Tue, Feb 27
01:00PM
Tue, Feb 27
01:00PM

gallery tour

Museum Director's Tour of <em>The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries</em> - In-person Event

Museum Director's Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries - In-person Event

Join YU Museum Director Gabriel Goldstein for a guided tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries, illuminating the life and impact of the multifaceted luminary and great Jewish sage across continents and cultures through rare manuscripts and books. Exhibition highlights include manuscripts in Maimonides’s own handwriting, a carved 11th century door to the Torah ark from Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, and beautifully illuminated medieval manuscripts.


Presented by:

gallery tour

Mon, Feb 26
01:00PM
Mon, Feb 26
01:00PM

discussion

Hamas and the Origins of Islamic Antisemitism - Live on Zoom

During and after World War II and the Holocaust, the collaboration of leading Palestinian nationalists with the Nazi regime was a major issue in the press and politics, especially liberal politics, in New York and Washington. In the past several decades, historians in Israel, Germany and the United States have examined the details and nature of this collaboration and of the ideas of Islamists that led them to lend support to Hitler. The ideology of Hamas, famously expressed in its Charter of 1988, echoes themes of Jew-hatred in the key Islamist texts written eighty years earlier. In this conversation historians Matthias Küntzel and Jeffrey Herf will discuss the origins of Hamas, the history of Islamic antisemitism, and its causal significance in the war of 1947-1948.

Buy the books from this series.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.


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Presented by:

discussion

Sun, Feb 25
11:00AM
Sun, Feb 25
11:00AM

gallery tour

Exhibition Tour of <em>The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries</em> with Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education - In-person Event

Exhibition Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries with Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education - In-person Event

Join Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education, for a guided tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries, illuminating the life and impact of the multifaceted luminary and great Jewish sage across continents and cultures through rare manuscripts and books. Exhibition highlights include manuscripts in Maimonides’s own handwriting, a carved 11th century door to the Torah ark from Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, and beautifully illuminated medieval manuscripts.


Presented by:

gallery tour

Sun, Feb 25
11:00AM
Sun, Feb 25
11:00AM

discussion

2024 Summer Program Information Session - Advanced Levels - Live on Zoom

Are you thinking of returning to the Summer Program to continue your advanced studies? Join Summer Program faculty and staff for a brief information session about YIVO’s advanced levels. Open to graduates of YIVO’s level Daled and Hey (levels four and five) and those with comparable proficiency, this session will cover the structure of YIVO’s advanced levels, the online and in-person formats, admissions process, and more, with time for questions from prospective Summer Program participants.

The session will be conducted in Yiddish and is entirely optional (prospective participants are not required to attend).

Learn more about the Uriel Weinreich Summer Program in Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture.


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discussion

Wed, Feb 21
01:00PM
Wed, Feb 21
01:00PM

lecture

The Reality of Myth for Yiddish Writers in Weimar Germany - Live on Zoom

Berlin in the Weimar Republic (1918-1933) — though peripheral to the centers of Yiddish culture in the United States, Poland, and the Soviet Union — offered financial windfalls and business opportunities for migrants with foreign currency, particularly for writers with contact to the American Yiddish press. Moreover, Germany, unlike Poland, maintained diplomatic and economic relations with the Soviet Union, which allowed writers sympathetic to the Bolshevik Revolution a safe haven.

The heyday of Yiddish culture in Berlin was relatively short-lived, dating from about 1921 until about 1926, after which the Soviet Union had achieved political stability and began to invest, at least for the next decade, in a wide series of Yiddish-language cultural institutions. Nevertheless, Berlin was an important way-station in the development of modern Yiddish culture and particularly a Yiddish avant-garde.

In historical terms, it is always necessary to distinguish between "myth" and "reality"; for Yiddish writers in interwar Berlin, however, what is fascinating is the degree to which myth and reality informed and interpenetrated one another. In this lecture, Marc Caplan will examine the historical significance and legendary allure of Weimar culture by considering three of its most significant Yiddish writers: Moyshe Kulbak, Dovid Bergelson, and Der Nister ("the hidden one," Pinkhes Kahanovitch).

Buy the book.

About the Speaker
Marc Caplan is a native of Louisiana and a graduate of Yale University. In 2003 he earned his Ph.D. in comparative literature from New York University. Since then he has held professorial appointments at Indiana University, Johns Hopkins University, Yale, the University of Wroclaw (Poland), and Dartmouth College, as well as research fellowships at the University of Pennsylvania, Harvard University, the Universität Konstanz (Germany), the Center for Jewish History (New York), and the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor). In 2011 he published How Strange the Change: Language, Temporality, and Narrative Form in Peripheral Modernisms—a comparison of Yiddish and African literatures—with Stanford University Press. His second book, Yiddish Writers in Weimar Berlin: A Fugitive Modernism, was published by Indiana University Press in 2021. Currently he is a senior lecturer in Yiddish literature for the Heinrich-Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany.


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lecture

Wed, Feb 21
06:30PM
Wed, Feb 21
06:30PM

lecture

Maimonides and Medicine - In-person Event

Lectures by:
Dr. Jeremy Brown:
The Surprising Influence of Maimonides's Treatise on Poisons

Dr. Edward Reichman:
If the Rambam Were Alive Today: Contemporary Jewish Medical Ethics
Through the Eyes of Maimonides

Moderated by Dr. Erica Brown, Vice Provost for Values and Leadership, Director, Sacks-Herenstein Center, Yeshiva University

Co-sponsored by Yeshiva University Museum and Yeshiva University Medical Ethics Society

Guided tours of the exhibition The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries will be offered at 5:30 pm and 8:00 pm


Presented by:

lecture

Thu, Feb 15
07:30PM
Thu, Feb 15
07:30PM

concert

All About the Piano: Phoenix Chamber Ensemble and Guest Ellen Braslavsky Present a Concert for Two Pianos with Music by Bach, Shostakovich, Rossini & More – In-Person Event & Live on YouTube

All About the Piano: Phoenix Chamber Ensemble and Guest Ellen Braslavsky Present a Concert for Two Pianos with Music by Bach, Shostakovich, Rossini & More – In-Person Event & Live on YouTube

Join Phoenix Chamber Ensemble pianists Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky and guest pianist Ellen Braslavsky. The program will include pieces by Bach, Guastavino, Shostakovich, Arensky, Franck, Poulenc, and Rossini.

Made possible by the Stravinsky Institute Foundation through the generous support of the Blavatnik Family Foundation.


Presented by:

concert

Thu, Feb 15
07:30PM
Thu, Feb 15
07:30PM

lecture

A Scrolls-Based Reading of Jewish Text, Voice and Exile - Live on Zoom

Sephardic Jewish history is shaped by cases of population transfer across and around the Mediterranean. When Jewish populations migrated, they carried with them traditions and customs, and objects that embodied those traditions, like the Torah scroll. Venerated and anthropomorphized, the Torah scroll commemorates the past as a remnant of communal life in one place and points to a future in which it transforms a new space into a synagogue. The scroll is referred to as the “tree of life,” a life-giving force that affirms a future for Jewish communities even as its text is rooted in the past. The text that is embodied and vocalized gives life to the community, just as voicing the text brings the scroll to life. This presentation considers the different ways that a Torah scroll gives voice to the experience of exile for communities on the move, considering the ways that Jewish communities use the scroll as a life-giving force in their chanting and veneration practices.

In this lecture, Ilana Webster-Kogen will consider ethnographic material from across North African ritual, particularly the ways that congregations in France adjust the customs of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia as they navigate their communal voice. Considering Jewish migration from the perspective of the Torah scrolls that move with populations, Webster-Kogen proposes a reading of exile that centers mystical and postcolonial thought, Jewish-Muslim intimacies, and the power of giving voice to text.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 


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lecture

Wed, Feb 14
12:30PM
Wed, Feb 14
12:30PM

conversation

At Lunch with Annette Insdorf – Live on Zoom

At Lunch with Annette Insdorf – Live on Zoom

Julie Salamon (author and journalist) sits down with film historian and author Annette Insdorf. Annette is Professor of Film at Columbia University’s School of the Arts, and Moderator of the popular “Reel Pieces” series at Manhattan’s 92Y, where she has interviewed 300 film celebrities. She is the author of the landmark study, Indelible Shadows: Film and the Holocaust (with a foreword by Elie Wiesel); Double Lives, Second Chances: The Cinema of Krzysztof Kieslowski; Francois Truffaut, a study of the French director’s work; Philip Kaufman, and Intimations: The Cinema of Wojciech Has. Her latest book is Cinematic Overtures: How to Read Opening Scenes, currently in its fourth printing.


Presented by:

conversation

Wed, Feb 14
06:00PM
Wed, Feb 14
06:00PM

gallery tour

Museum Director's Tour of <em>The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries</em> - In-person Event

Museum Director's Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries - In-person Event

Join YU Museum Director Gabriel Goldstein for a guided tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries, illuminating the life and impact of the multifaceted luminary and great Jewish sage across continents and cultures through rare manuscripts and books. Exhibition highlights include manuscripts in Maimonides’s own handwriting, a carved 11th century door to the Torah ark from Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, and beautifully illuminated medieval manuscripts.


Presented by:

gallery tour

Mon, Feb 12
12:00PM
Mon, Feb 12
12:00PM

book talk

Horizons Blossom, Borders Vanish: Anarchism and Yiddish Literature - Live on Zoom

Spanning the last two centuries, Horizons Blossom, Borders Vanish: Anarchism and Yiddish Literature by Anna Elena Torres combines archival research on the radical press and close readings of Yiddish poetry to offer an original literary study of the Jewish anarchist movement.

Torres examines Yiddish anarchist aesthetics from the nineteenth-century Russian proletarian immigrant poets through the modernist avant-gardes of Warsaw, Chicago, and London to contemporary antifascist composers. The book also traces Jewish anarchist strategies for negotiating surveillance, censorship, detention, and deportation, revealing the connection between Yiddish modernism and struggles for free speech, women’s bodily autonomy, and the transnational circulation of avant-garde literature.

Rather than focusing on narratives of assimilation, Torres intervenes in earlier models of Jewish literature by centering refugee critique of the border. Jewish deportees, immigrants, and refugees opposed citizenship as the primary guarantor of human rights. Instead, they cultivated stateless imaginations, elaborated through literature.

Join YIVO for a discussion with Torres about this new book, led by scholar Amelia Glaser.

Buy the book.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 


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Presented by:

book talk

Sun, Feb 11
12:00PM
Sun, Feb 11
12:00PM

workshop

Community Read: "Ven ikh bin Roytshild" - Live on Zoom

Join YIVO and the International Association of Yiddish Clubs (IAYC) for a beshutfesdike leyenung, or a “Community Read.” Led by esteemed Yiddishist, Dr. Raphael (Refoyl) Finkel, attendees will read Sholem Aleichem's short story, “Ven ikh bin Roytshild,” (“If I Were Rothschild”). While Dr. Finkel reads the Yiddish text aloud, participants will see the story in yidishe oysyes, in YIVO transliteration, and in English translation. The online Yiddish text will have a feature that enables readers to see the English translation of any given word in red colored font. With another click, the word will return to the original Yiddish spelling. During the program, Dr. Finkel will explain the linguistic and cultural characteristics of certain words and phrases that appear in the Yiddish text. A discussion of the short story will follow the reading.

Read Ven ikh bin Roytshild in Yiddish, transliteration, and English translation.

Read the glossary for this text.

Read more about the New York production of Ven ikh bin Roytshild from 1939.

All registrants will receive links to the three texts and a glossary via email in advance of the program. For questions, please write to the IAYC at IAYCbriv@gmail.com.

IAYC is dedicating this program to the memory of the beloved Troim Katz Bliacher Handler z"l, who was a staunch Yiddishist and a Yiddish poet. For many years, she served on the IAYC executive board of directors. During her tenure, she selected teaching materials and performance materials for the benefit of IAYC Clubs and their leaders. Those materials were mailed to the clubs several times a year. In 2014, Troim received the IAYC Lifetime Achievement Award.


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Presented by:

workshop

Wed, Feb 07
07:30PM
Wed, Feb 07
07:30PM

concert

Liederabend: Wolfgang Holzmair sings the songs of Max Kowalski - In-person Event

Liederabend: Wolfgang Holzmair sings the songs of Max Kowalski - In-person Event

The Leo Baeck Institute and the American Society for Jewish Music invite you for a night of live music with Wolfgang Holzmair and Thérèse Lindquist on February 7th, 7:30PM EST at the Center for Jewish History.

Max Kowalski (1882–1956) was born in Poland but raised and educated in Frankfurt am Main, where he studied composition with Bernhard Sekles. He also obtained a law degree from the Univerisity of Marburg and represented musicians and composers including Arnold Schoenberg. A specialist in lieder whose setting of Guiraud’s Pierrot Lunaire (1912) earned him early accolades, he had a productive career as both an attorney and a widely published composer until the Nazi rise to power. Following his wife's suicide and his own arrest and internment in the Buchenwald concentration camp, Kowalski emigrated to London in 1939. He struggled to regain his earlier success as a composer and made a living as a teacher, cantor, and piano tuner.

Reflecting on his own work as an artist Kowalski once observed,“I am not concerned with any kind of ‘principles.’ I am an arch-romantic and rely wholly on feeling.” And then in a turn to Goethe’s Faust, “Feeling is all!”


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Presented by:

concert

Mon, Feb 05
05:00PM
Mon, Feb 05
05:00PM

lecture

Family History Today: The Future of Genealogy – Live on Zoom

Family History Today: The Future of Genealogy – Live on Zoom

While all family history researchers seek to uncover stories from the past, trendsetters in the field are employing up-to-the-minute technological tools and techniques in ways that will have a huge impact on the future of genealogy. Jarrett Ross, creator and host of the YouTube series GeneaVlogger and Professional Genealogist Reacts, will provide a preview of what lies ahead, covering emerging trends in artificial intelligence, facial recognition software, OCR software, and genetic genealogy.


Presented by:

lecture

Fri, Feb 02
10:00AM
Fri, Feb 02
10:00AM

discussion

2024 Summer Program Information Session - Live on Zoom

Have you always wanted to study Yiddish at YIVO’s Summer Program? Are you wondering what it would be like to take the program online or in person? Join faculty and staff of YIVO's Summer Program for a brief information session. This 30-minute session will cover the program’s structure, online and in-person formats, admissions process, and more, with time for questions from prospective Summer Program participants. The session will be conducted in English and is entirely optional (prospective participants are not required to attend).

Learn more about the Uriel Weinreich Summer Program in Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture.


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Presented by:

discussion

Wed, Jan 31
01:00PM
Wed, Jan 31
01:00PM

discussion

2024 Summer Program Information Session - Live on Zoom

Have you always wanted to study Yiddish at YIVO’s Summer Program? Are you wondering what it would be like to take the program online or in person? Join faculty and staff of YIVO's Summer Program for a brief information session. This 30-minute session will cover the program’s structure, online and in-person formats, admissions process, and more, with time for questions from prospective Summer Program participants. The session will be conducted in English and is entirely optional (prospective participants are not required to attend).

Learn more about the Uriel Weinreich Summer Program in Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture.


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Presented by:

discussion

Wed, Jan 31
06:00PM
Wed, Jan 31
06:00PM

exhibit opening

Leave to Land - In-person Event & Live on Zoom

Leave to Land - In-person Event & Live on Zoom

The Kitchener Camp has been largely forgotten today, but in 1939, this derelict army base on the Kent coast in southeastern England became the scene of an extraordinary rescue in which 4,000 men were saved from the Holocaust.

The Leave to Land traveling exhibition was authored by Clare Weissenberg and was based on materials collected through The Kitchener Camp Project, a unique online resource that brings together archival records and family treasures to build a moving and compelling picture of this unlikely sanctuary.

The exhibition premiered at London's Jewish Museum on September 1, 2019, and LBI New York is bringing a version of the exhibition to the Center for Jewish History in Manhattan on January 16, 2024.

Beginning at 6:00 PM EST on January 31, we invite you to visit this exhibit in the Katherine and Clifford H. Goldsmith Gallery. At 6:30 PM EST, we will be joined for a live panel discussion with Barbara Birch (President and CEO at ORT America), Emary Aronson (LBI Board Member and Chief Knowledge Officer and Senior Advisor to the CEO at Robin Hood), and Ronnie Wolf (Senior Adviser of the Leave to Land Exhibition) and moderated by Frank Mecklenburg (Mark M. and Lottie Salton Senior Historian at the Leo Baeck Institute).

Panelists will then take questions from the live audience.

Cosponsored by ORT America.


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Presented by:

exhibit opening

Tue, Jan 30
01:00PM
Tue, Jan 30
01:00PM

gallery tour

Museum Director's Tour of <em>The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries</em> - In-person Event

Museum Director's Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries - In-person Event

Join YU Museum Director Gabriel Goldstein for a guided tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries, illuminating the life and impact of the multifaceted luminary and great Jewish sage across continents and cultures through rare manuscripts and books. Exhibition highlights include manuscripts in Maimonides’s own handwriting, a carved 11th century door to the Torah ark from Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, and beautifully illuminated medieval manuscripts.


Presented by:

gallery tour

Tue, Jan 30
02:00PM
Tue, Jan 30
02:00PM

book club

LBI Book Club: The Morning Gift - Live on Zoom

LBI Book Club: The Morning Gift - Live on Zoom

Drama and romance abound in this charming epic romance, ideal for fans of The English Patient.

Twenty-year-old Ruth Berger is desperate. The daughter of a Jewish-Austrian professor, she was supposed to have escaped Vienna before the Nazis marched into the city. Yet the plan went completely wrong, and while her family and fiancé are waiting for her in safety, Ruth is stuck in Vienna with no way to escape. Then she encounters her father’s younger college professor, the dashing British paleontologist Quin Sommerville. Together, they strike a bargain: a marriage of convenience, to be annulled as soon as they return to safety. But dissolving the marriage proves to be more difficult than either of them thought—not the least because of the undeniable attraction Quin and Ruth share. To make matters worse, Ruth is enrolled in Quin’s university, in his very classes. Can their secret survive, or will circumstances destroy their love?

About the Author
Eva Ibbotson, born Maria Charlotte Michelle Wiesner (21 January 1925 20 October 2010), was an Austrian-born British novelist, known for her children's books. Some of her novels for adults have been successfully reissued for the young adult market in recent years. For the historical novel Journey to the River Sea (Macmillan, 2001), she won the Smarties Prize in category 9 11 years, garnered unusual commendation as runner up for the Guardian Prize, and made the Carnegie, Whitbread, and Blue Peter shortlists. She was a finalist for the 2010 Guardian Prize at the time of her death. Her last book, The Abominables, was one of eight books on the longlist for the same award in 2012. (Bio from Amazon).


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Presented by:

book club

Tue, Jan 30
06:30PM
Tue, Jan 30
06:30PM

concert

The Blues and Resilience: A Concert in Honor of International Holocaust Remembrance Day - In-person Event

The Blues and Resilience: A Concert in Honor of International Holocaust Remembrance Day - In-person Event

This cultural-educational experience with live music featuring acclaimed Israeli Jazz musician (and ASF Pomegranate Award recipient) Itamar Borochov.


Presented by:

concert

Mon, Jan 29
09:00AM
Mon, Jan 29
09:00AM

conversation

Virtual Professional Development Workshop: Theresienstadt - Live on Zoom

Virtual Professional Development Workshop: Theresienstadt - Live on Zoom

In this virtual half-day professional development workshop, we will launch a series of brand-new lesson plans designed and created by a group of veteran teachers and using primary sources from The Leo Baeck Institute archive. After an introduction to both organizations and their teaching resources, the LBI will present a virtual walk through of their online exhibition, The Last Stop Before the Last Stop: Theresienstadt 1942-45. Then, teachers will have the option to join small discussion groups to learn more about two of the four lesson plans. 

The four lessons that teachers will be able to choose from are as follows: 

  1. “An Image Is Not Always Worth a 1000 Words”: Propaganda
  2. “Last Stop Before the Last Stop”: Transit 
  3. Children in Terezín 
  4. Intellectual Resistance 

At the end of the workshop, teachers will have gained in-depth understanding of two new lesson plans (and will be provided all four lessons) to teach about the Holocaust in social studies, English language arts, music or art classes.

LBI and DRF will provide a certificate stating that participants have earned 3 hours of professional development training. Participants will also receive a free book, In Echtzeit: Posts from the Past. 1938 from a Jewish PerspectiveIn Echtzeit signifies a watershed moment in the history of German-speaking Jewry, through personal documents that detail the experiences and hardships they suffered in the shadow of Nazi persecution and the cataclysmic events of 1938.


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conversation

Sun, Jan 28
10:00AM
Sun, Jan 28
10:00AM

symposium

Addressing Antisemitism: Contemporary Challenges – In-person & live on YouTube

Addressing Antisemitism: Contemporary Challenges – In-person & live on YouTube

Addressing Antisemitism: Contemporary Challenges seeks to explain the recent upsurge of Jew hatred in the contemporary world. Timed to coincide with International Holocaust Remembrance Day and co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism (ISCA) at Indiana University, the symposium brings together prominent scholars to discuss the challenge of defining antisemitism, explaining its explosion in Europe and the United States, understanding its dissemination through digital media, and determining how scholars and activists should best combat it in an era of intensifying global turmoil.

Click here for a list of panels and speakers.

Tickets include lunch and a wine and cheese reception after the program. Speakers will be selling and signing books throughout the day.

Museum Director’s Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries 
Please join Yeshiva University Museum Director Gabriel Goldstein for a 30-minute exhibition highlights tour. Meet in front of the Popper Gallery at 1 pm. The exhibition will also be open for viewing during the wine and cheese reception from 5:30 to 6:00 pm.

This symposium is presented in partnership with Indiana University’s Institute for the Study of Contemporary Antisemitism (ISCA) and has received generous support from the Achelis & Bodman Foundation, the David Berg Foundation, the Combat Antisemitism Movement (CAM), the American Jewish Committee’s Edward M. Chase Educational Fund, Robert S. Rifkind, the Moise Y Safra Foundation, and the Office of the President, Fairfield University. The symposium is the fourth installment in a larger series of public symposia sponsored by the Center for Jewish History’s Jewish Public History Forum.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.


Presented by:

symposium

Wed, Jan 24
01:00PM
Wed, Jan 24
01:00PM

gallery tour

Exhibition Tour of <em>The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries</em> with Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education - In-person Event

Exhibition Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries with Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education - In-person Event

Join Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education, for a guided tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries, illuminating the life and impact of the multifaceted luminary and great Jewish sage across continents and cultures through rare manuscripts and books. Exhibition highlights include manuscripts in Maimonides’s own handwriting, a carved 11th century door to the Torah ark from Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, and beautifully illuminated medieval manuscripts.


Presented by:

gallery tour

Wed, Jan 24
03:00PM
Wed, Jan 24
03:00PM

book talk

Between Two Worlds - Jewish War Brides After the Holocaust – Live on Zoom

Between Two Worlds - Jewish War Brides After the Holocaust – Live on Zoom

Between Two Worlds author Robin Judd joins us in discussion with historian Hasia Diner.

Facing the harrowing task of rebuilding a life in the wake of the Holocaust, many Jewish survivors, community and religious leaders, and Allied soldiers viewed marriage between Jewish women and military personnel as a way to move forward after unspeakable loss. Proponents believed that these unions were more than just a ticket out of war-torn Europe: they would help the Jewish people repopulate after the attempted annihilation of European Jewry.

Historian Robin Judd, whose grandmother survived the Holocaust and married an American soldier after liberation, introduces us to the Jewish women who lived through genocide and went on to wed American, Canadian, and British military personnel after the war. She offers an intimate portrait of how these unions emerged and developed—from meeting and courtship to marriage and immigration to life in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom—and shows how they helped shape the postwar world by touching thousands of lives, including those of the chaplains who officiated their weddings, the Allied authorities whose policy decisions structured the couples’ fates, and the bureaucrats involved in immigration and acculturation. The stories Judd tells are at once heartbreaking and restorative, and she vividly captures how the exhilaration of the brides’ early romances coexisted with survivor’s guilt, grief, and apprehension at the challenges of starting a new life in a new land.


Presented by:

book talk

Wed, Jan 24
06:00PM
Wed, Jan 24
06:00PM

gallery tour

Museum Director's Tour of <em>The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries</em> - In-person Event

Museum Director's Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries - In-person Event

Join YU Museum Director Gabriel Goldstein for a guided tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries, illuminating the life and impact of the multifaceted luminary and great Jewish sage across continents and cultures through rare manuscripts and books. Exhibition highlights include manuscripts in Maimonides’s own handwriting, a carved 11th century door to the Torah ark from Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, and beautifully illuminated medieval manuscripts.


Presented by:

gallery tour

Wed, Jan 24
07:00PM
Wed, Jan 24
07:00PM

concert

Shotns/Shadows: A New Album from the Fortunoff Archive - In-person Event & Live on Zoom

Join YIVO for a performance of the Yale Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies' newest album, Shotns/Shadows. Part of the "Songs From Testimonies" project, this album is based on poems and songs from interviews with Holocaust survivors recorded by the Fortunoff Archive. Compiled and researched by composer, multi-instrumentalist, ethnomusicologist, and Yiddish educator Zisl Slepovitch and arranged and recorded by singer Sasha Lurje and his ensemble, this album draws upon the more than 100 testimonies in the Fortunoff Archive's collection in which survivors recount poetry or sing musical compositions from the prewar, wartime and postwar periods. The songs and poems included on Shotns/Shadows were sung or recounted in a number of testimonies and reflect the richness of Holocaust video testimonies as a unique form of documentation.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.


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Presented by:

concert

Tue, Jan 23
06:30PM
Tue, Jan 23
06:30PM

leo baeck memorial lecture

64th Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture by Atina Grossmann - In-person Event & Live on Zoom

64th Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture by Atina Grossmann - In-person Event & Live on Zoom

Trauma, Privilege, and Adventure: Jewish Refugees Between ‘Orient’ and European Catastrophe

In the 64th Annual Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture, historian Atina Grossmann (Cooper Union) will examine the ambivalent, paradoxical, and diverse experiences, emotions, and memories of Jews who found refuge from National Socialism and the Holocaust in India and Iran after 1933.  Always shadowed by the emerging European catastrophe, uprooted Jews were also precariously privileged as white Europeans in non-western, colonial or semi-colonial societies. An extensive collection of family correspondence and memorabilia extending from wartime Nazi Berlin throughout the global diaspora of German Jewry as well as archival, literary, visual, and oral history sources illuminates refugees’ everyday lives in the changing context of interwar fascination and contact with the “Orient,” global war against fascism, anti-colonial independence movements, and gradual revelations about the destruction of the European world they had escaped.


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Presented by:

leo baeck memorial lecture

Sun, Jan 21
11:00AM
Sun, Jan 21
11:00AM

gallery tour

Exhibition Tour of <em>The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries</em> with Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education - In-person Event

Exhibition Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries with Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education - In-person Event

Join Ilana Benson, YU Museum Director of Museum Education, for a guided tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries, illuminating the life and impact of the multifaceted luminary and great Jewish sage across continents and cultures through rare manuscripts and books. Exhibition highlights include manuscripts in Maimonides’s own handwriting, a carved 11th century door to the Torah ark from Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, and beautifully illuminated medieval manuscripts.


Presented by:

gallery tour

Sun, Jan 21
02:00PM
Sun, Jan 21
02:00PM

panel discussion

Bendichas Manos: The 7th Annual New York Ladino Day - In-person Event

Bendichas Manos: The 7th Annual New York Ladino Day - In-person Event

Curated by Jane Mushabac and Bryan Kirschen

Featuring: Rabbi Marc Angel, author and editor of 38 books, and a 2023 International Sephardic Gala Honoree for his decades of remarkable community leadership.
Rachel Amado Bortnick, teacher and founder of the renowned online group, Ladinokomunita, now in its 25thyear with 1500 Ladino-speaking members worldwide.
Elizabeth Graver, author of the groundbreaking 2023 Sephardic novel Kantika, and long celebrated for her prize-winning fiction.
Sarah Aroeste, singer/songwriter, and Susan Barocas, foodwriter/story-teller, a duo whose “Savor” program of songs and talk about Sephardic cuisine is garnering raves here and abroad.

Ladino is a bridge to many cultures. A variety of Spanish, it has absorbed words from Hebrew, Turkish, Arabic, French, Greek, and Portuguese. The mother tongue of Jews in the Ottoman Empire for 500 years, Ladino became the home language of Sephardim worldwide. While the number of Ladino speakers has sharply declined, distinguished Ladino Day programs like ours celebrate and preserve a vibrant language and heritage. These programs are, as Aviya Kushner has written in the Forward, “Why Ladino Will Rise Again.”

Since 2013, Ladino Day programs have been held around the world to honor Ladino, also known as Judeo-Spanish. January 21st marks New York’s 7th Annual Ladino Day hosted by the American Sephardi Federation.

>© Rhodes, mid-19th century Sephardi & Romaniot Jewish Costumes in Greece & Turkey. 16 watercolours by Nicholas Stavroulakis published by the Association of the Friends of the Jewish Museum of Greece, Athens, 1986.


Presented by:

panel discussion

Thu, Jan 18
12:30PM
Thu, Jan 18
12:30PM

conversation

At Lunch with Emily Bowen Cohen – Live on Zoom

At Lunch with Emily Bowen Cohen – Live on Zoom

Julie Salamon (Author and Journalist) sits down with Emily Bowen Cohen author of the graphic novel Two Tribes. Emily Bowen Cohen creates comics that explore intersectional identity. She is Jewish and a member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. She uses personal experience to tell stories that examine contemporary American and Jewish culture. Emily grew up in rural Oklahoma. Her father was the Chief of Staff at their tribal hospital and her mother is a nice Jewish girl from New Jersey. When Emily was nine years-old, her father passed away and she was separated from her Native family. A decade later, she returned to Oklahoma for a bittersweet homecoming.  Emily graduated from Harvard University. She currently lives in Los Angeles, CA, with her husband and their three Native American Jewish children.


Presented by:

conversation

Thu, Jan 18
07:30PM
Thu, Jan 18
07:30PM

lecture and concert

"Thousands of Stories to Tell": Broadway Musicals, New York City, and the Making of Jewish Americans – In-Person Event

Featuring songs from Funny Girl (1964), The Education of H*Y*M*A*N K*A*P*L*A*N (1968), Rags (1986), and Ragtime(1998), this cabaret blends scholarship and artistry, history and storytelling. Beginning in the 1960s, for the first time, the Jewishness featured in Broadway musicals was neither represented through racialized comedic representations nor hidden underneath crypto-Jewish characters. Interestingly, many of the musicals of the latter half of the twentieth century that feature Jewish characters, culture, and history are set in the early part of the twentieth century, and most of those are set in the Progressive Era in New York City. These musicals, featuring representations of Jewish Americans, are steeped in a retrospective point of view, both romanticizing and problematizing narratives of immigration and Americanization. The selected musicals are among the many stories created to reaffirm how Jewish immigrants became Jewish Americans in the United States. Incorporating showtunes, lesser-known songs, storytelling, and scholarship, this cabaret invites audience members to consider the historical narratives of musicals in addition to enjoying the pleasure they provide.

This cabaret is based on Dr. Barrie Gelles’s scholarship that examines the themes and tropes in musicals that recreate, reframe, and reclaim narratives of Jewish American cultural history.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.


Presented by:

lecture and concert

Sun, Jan 14
10:00AM
Sun, Jan 14
10:00AM

symposium

A Medium for the Masses: The Yiddish Press and the Shaping of American Jewish Culture - In-person Event and Live on Zoom

This symposium will look back on more than 150 years of the Yiddish press in the United States, examining its role as a vehicle of acculturation, a forum for political and ideological debates, and a seedbed for the growth of a mass culture among Jews worldwide. The day’s events will culminate in an evening program celebrating the launch of Ayelet Brinn’s new book, A Revolution in Type: Gender and the Making of the American Yiddish Press (NYU Press, 2023), which offers a fascinating glimpse into the complex and often unexpected ways that women and ideas about women shaped widely read Yiddish newspapers.

Buy A Revolution in Type: Gender and the Making of the American Yiddish Press.

This program is part of the Center for Jewish History's Jewish Public History Forum.


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Presented by:

symposium

Sun, Jan 14
05:00PM
Sun, Jan 14
05:00PM

book launch

A Revolution in Type: Gender and the Making of the American Yiddish Press – In-Person Event & Live on Zoom

A Revolution in Type: Gender and the Making of the American Yiddish Press – In-Person Event & Live on Zoom

Author Ayelet Brinn will be in conversation with Anita Norich (Professor Emerita, University of Michigan) about her new book, A Revolution in Type: Gender and the Making of the American Yiddish Press, a fascinating glimpse into the complex and often unexpected ways that women and ideas about women shaped widely read Jewish newspapers.

Between the 1880s and 1920s, Yiddish-language newspapers rose from obscurity to become successful institutions integral to American Jewish life. During this period, Yiddish-speaking immigrants came to view newspapers as indispensable parts of their daily lives. For many Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe, acclimating to America became inextricably intertwined with becoming a devoted reader of the Yiddish periodical press, as the newspapers and their staffs became a fusion of friends, religious and political authorities, tour guides, matchmakers, and social welfare agencies.

In A Revolution in Type, Ayelet Brinn argues that questions related to women were central to the emergence of the Yiddish press as a powerful, influential force in American Jewish culture. Through rhetorical debates about women readers and writers, the producers of the Yiddish press explored how to transform their newspapers to reach a large, diverse audience. The seemingly peripheral status of women’s columns and other newspaper features supposedly aimed at a female audience—but in reality, read with great interest by male and female readers alike—meant that editors and publishers often used these articles as testing grounds for the types of content their newspapers should encompass. The book explores the discovery of previously unknown work by female writers in the Yiddish press, whose contributions most often appeared without attribution; it also examines the work of men who wrote under women’s names to break into the press. Brinn shows that instead of framing issues of gender as marginal, we must view them as central to understanding how the American Yiddish press developed into the influential, complex, and diverse publication field it eventually became.

A wine and cheese reception and book signing will follow the program.

About the Author
Ayelet Brinn is the Philip D. Feltman Assistant Professor of Modern Jewish History in the Departments of Judaic Studies and History at the University of Hartford.


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Presented by:

book launch

Fri, Jan 12
01:00PM
Fri, Jan 12
01:00PM

class

All in the Mishpocheh: Intro to Jewish Genealogy at the CJH - Online Course

All in the Mishpocheh: Intro to Jewish Genealogy at the CJH - Online Course

10-session online course (via Zoom)
Fridays, 1:00-2:15 PM ET
January 12 – March 15, 2024

Join the staff of the Center for Jewish History’s Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute for this 10-week online genealogy course, suitable for beginners and anyone interested in reviewing the basics. Topics include family trees, online search strategies, immigration, DNA, Holocaust records, finding your ancestral towns, name changes, obtaining records from other countries, and much more. By the end of this course, you will have a portfolio of new documents and information on your ancestors' lives ready to share with your family. 

Students are encouraged to participate live but are welcome to watch or review class recordings as needed.

FAQ

Can I contact the instructor outside of class time?
Absolutely! One unique aspect of this course is that our librarian instructors not only permit, but encourage, their students to reach out to them beyond the class time – via email, video chat, or in-person visits. Former students say this one-on-one availability was instrumental in their personal research progress, providing the tailored guidance they needed to chart their research path.

Will I get personal feedback?
Yes. Your instructor will give you feedback on your assignments and your personal research questions either during or between classes. Your fellow students may also offer their advice during class.

 How many people will be in the class?
Class sizes have ranged from about 20-30 students, with an average of 10-15 students regularly participating in the live Zoom classes.


Presented by:

class

Thu, Jan 11
07:00PM
Thu, Jan 11
07:00PM

discussion

Family History Today: The Krakovsky Documents – Live on Zoom

Family History Today: The Krakovsky Documents – Live on Zoom

For several years, Alex Krakovsky, a Ukrainian Jew, has been scanning Jewish metrical and census records found in long-closed Ukrainian archives and placing these documents, predominantly in Cyrillic (Russian), on a website where they can easily be accessed. Gary Pokrassa and Joel Spector, Director of Data Acquisition and Metric Record Projects, respectively, at the JewishGen Ukraine Research Division, will discuss the origin and method of Alex’s data acquisition and provide an overview of the contents of his site. Additionally, they will explain how to navigate the files in English, offer tips on working with the indexes and documents, and describe the Ukraine Research Division’s ongoing role in this project.


Presented by:

discussion

Wed, Jan 10
06:00PM
Wed, Jan 10
06:00PM

gallery tour

<strong>Cancelled</strong>: Museum Director's Tour of <em>The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries</em>

Cancelled: Museum Director's Tour of The Golden Path: Maimonides Across Eight Centuries

Please note: This event has been cancelled.


Presented by:

gallery tour

Mon, Jan 08
01:00PM
Mon, Jan 08
01:00PM

lecture

Holocaust Distortion in Poland and Beyond - Live on Zoom

Since the beginning of this century, the commemoration and the history of the Holocaust were at the heart of political struggles in Poland. In order to defend the “good name of the nation,” Polish authorities created institutions and legislated laws intended to enforce the official, state-approved version of history. This new narrative shifts the focus away from the Jewish victims of the Shoah and places it on righteous gentiles, real or imagined. It is within this context that old antisemitic tropes came alive and acquire new currency. This unprecedented, and state-sponsored, assault on the memory of the Shoah is known today as Holocaust distortion, a particularly insidious brand of Holocaust denial.  

In this lecture, Jan Grabowski will shed light on the origins of the current situation as well as its impact on Holocaust memory and Holocaust education in Poland, Europe, and beyond.

Buy a book on this topicNight Without End: The Fate of Jews in German-Occupied Poland.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 


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Presented by:

lecture

Thu, Jan 04
07:00PM
Thu, Jan 04
07:00PM

concert

Challenging the Theater of Memory: Yiddish Song beyond Kitsch and Stereotype - In-person Event and Live on Zoom

Performing Yiddish music in post-war Germany and Austria comes with a set of expectations and assumptions about Jewish culture. In this lecture-concert, Yiddish musicians and researchers Isabel Frey and Benjy Fox-Rosen confront these expectations, challenging the so-called “Theater of Memory” where Jewish roles are limited and often instrumentalized to fit into the broader dominant cultural narrative.

The evening’s musical journey begins with nostalgic Yiddish songs before moving to unaccompanied folk songs collected through ethnographic fieldwork. It continues with partisan and resistance songs from the Holocaust and concludes with new Yiddish music by the artists themselves. Through musical performance, dialogue, and short essayistic fragments, Frey and Fox-Rosen reflect on the myth of the shtetl, the ruptures and continuities of oral transmission, the weight of Holocaust memory culture and their own attempts to creatively deal with the expectations inherent to performing Jewish music in the German-speaking world.

Join YIVO for this performance followed by a Q&A with performers Isabel Frey and Benjy Fox-Rosen moderated by Samantha Cooper and Gordon Dale.


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Presented by:

concert