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Sun, Oct 09
04:00PM ET
Sun, Oct 09
04:00PM ET

panel discussion

Poet Laureate of Southern Jews: Personal Remembrances of Eli Evans

Please join our panel of Eli Evans’ colleagues, friends and family remembering the man whose passion for southern Jewish history provided a legacy that has thrived for five decades. The panelists will bring their own perspective to the discussion about their colleague, their friend, their father.

The Panelists
Robert Rosen, moderator: When not involved in his Charleston law practice, Robert likely will be found studying and writing history. He has authored several books about the history of Charleston and southern Jewish history and has been a frequent participant with SJHSSC programs. Mr. Rosen also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Historic Charleston Foundation and is Chairman of the Arts and History Commission of the City of Charleston. He is past president of the JHSSC.

Marcie Cohen-Ferris: Marcie is a professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ferris’s research and teaching interests include southern history and culture–particularly the foodways and material culture of the American South, the history of the Jewish South, and American Jewish identity and culture.

Josh Evans: Josh, a SAG-AFTRA actor with multiple television and film credits to his name, is the only son of Eli and Judith Evans. His work can be seen on joshlevans.com

Macy B. Hart: Macy is the founder and President Emeritus of the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life (ISJL). Before establishing the ISJL, Macy was Director of the Henry S. Jacobs Camp in Utica, Mississippi, for 30 years. He also founded the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience (MSJE) in 1986; the new MSJE is now open in New Orleans.

Len Rogoff: Len, former president of the SJHS, has written and lectured on the Jewish history of North Carolina.  He is now historian for Jewish Heritage North Carolina.

Steve Whitfield: Steve is the Max Richter Professor of American Civilization, Emeritus, at Brandeis University. He has written extensively about American political and cultural history, and southern Jewish history.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs.org/events/poet-laureate-of-southern-jews-personal-remembrances-of-eli-evans/ for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Thu, Oct 13
06:30PM ET
Thu, Oct 13
06:30PM ET

lecture and theatrical reading

Lew Nussimbaum aka Essad Bey: Wanderer between Words – Live Event

Born to a Jewish family in Kiev, raised in Baku, and converted to Islam in Berlin, Essad Bey’s (né Lew Nussimbaum) (1905–1942) orientalist writings reached a huge audience in the Weimar Republic. Although his novels and essays depicting life in locales such as Azerbaijan and the Caucasus helped shape notions of a mysterious and romantic East in the German public imagination, his own incredible life may have been the most fantastical story he left us. Michael Lahr will give a lecture on Essad Bey’s life and times, followed by a dramatic reading of selected works (in German with English subtitles) by the actor Gregorij H. von Leitis.

About the Presenters
Michael Lahr is is the Executive Director of the Lahr von Leïtis Academy & Archive, Vice Chairman of the Erwin Piscator Award Society, co-director of the Elysium Festival in Bernried, and member of the advisory board of the Nietzsche Forum Munich and the Leon Askin Forum Vienna. He is also the Program Director and Associate Artistic Director of Elysium - Between Two Continents.

Lahr is a co-author of the volume of essays Bilder des Menschen (Images of Man), to which he contributed an article entitled Der Jüdische Humanismus und das Konzept der Veranwortung (Jewish Humanism and the Concept of Responsibility). His essay about Nietzsches Einfluss auf die französische Gegenwartsphilosophie: Spurensuche im Werk Michel Foucaults (Nietzsche's Influence on French contemporary Philosophy: Looking for Traces in the Work of Michel Foucault) was published in the yearbook of the Nietzsche Forum Munich e.V. A specialist on Erwin Piscator, founder of the Political and Epic Theater, he curated the exhibition Erwin Piscator: Political Theater in Exile, which has been shown in Bernried, New York, Catania, Salzburg, and Munich.

Gregorij H. von Leitis has been working as a director at various theaters in Europe and the USA for more than 50 years. He is also the Artistic Director of Elysium - Between Two Continents. In 1985 he was the first non-American to receive the New York Theatre Club Prize for his direction of Bertolt Brecht's The Jewish Wife. In 2003, he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany by German President Johannes Rau for his merits in promoting international understanding by means of art. In April 2016, the Austrian Federal President Dr. Heinz Fischer bestowed on him the Austrian Cross of Honor for Science and Art. In recent years, Gregorij von Leïtis has been increasingly active as a speaker; through reading programs and literary-musical collages, he has been active in Germany and abroad against hate (Hate is a Failure of Imagination), for the preservation of democracy (Defending Democracy), and for environmental protection (After Us, the Deluge?), among other things.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/lew-nussimbaum-aka-essad-bey/


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lecture and theatrical reading

Thu, Oct 13
07:30PM ET
Thu, Oct 13
07:30PM ET

concert

19thCenturyPianoTriosOntheCuspofRomanticism

The Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performs Piano Trios by Schubert (No. 1 in B flat major, Op. 99) and Brahms (No. 2 in C major, Op. 87). Pianists/founders Vassa Sheveland Inessa Zaretsky will be joined by ensemble regulars Anna Elashvili on violin and Raman Ramakrishnan on cello.

This program will be livestreamed for those who cannot attend in person.

Made possible by the Stravinsky Institute Foundation through the generous support of the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Ticket Info:
In person: $15 general; $10 members, seniors, students – ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY; NO SALES AT THE DOOR
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On YouTube: Pay what you wish
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concert

Fri, Oct 14
11:00AM ET
Fri, Oct 14
11:00AM ET

walking tour

WalkingTourTheUnexpectedStoryofJewishWilliamsburg

This event is sold out.

It would be fair to call Williamsburg the Lower East Side’s lesser-known sibling. Opening in 1903, the Williamsburg bridge, which connects the Lower East Side to Williamsburg, soon came to be known as “The Jewish Highway.” Jewish immigrants, seeking to escape the crowded tenements of the Lower East Side, resettled in Williamsburg in large numbers. They brought with them all the character of similar enclaves – Yiddish, kosher butchers, and synagogues – as well as the familiar ambition of upward mobility. However, unlike the Lower East Side, Williamsburg was not soon past its heyday. 

After the Holocaust, Hungarian survivors, many of whom were Hasidic, became the next wave of immigrants to make their American starter homes in Williamsburg. But this second wave did not want to move on and assimilate. They stayed in Williamsburg, despite the polluted East River, high crime, and crumbling infrastructure, and maintained their traditions. Even as North Williamsburg has been reborn as a trendy hipster enclave in recent decades, the fourth generation of Hasidim continue to thrive in South Williamsburg. Our tour will take us through this story by way of the buildings, streets, and synagogues, with a nosh of the famous Hungarian kosher baking. And, since we’ll be visiting during the week of Sukkos, the community’s lively atmosphere will enrich your experience of contemporary Jewish Williamsburg. 

About the Tour Guide

Frieda Vizel  is a New York City tour guide who specializes in Jewish Williamsburg. She grew up in the Satmar Hasidic community and her four holocaust survivor grandparents lived in Williamsburg. She has since left the fold but remains drawn to the area‘s rich legacy.

Location and Other Details
This two-hour tour will begin at the Williamsburg Bridge Plaza Bus Terminal, a glass building at the corner of Broadway and Havermeyer Streets. Please plan to arrive at 10:45 AM to check in. We will not wait more than a few minutes for late arrivals. This tour will take place rain or shine. Note: Some tour stops are not wheelchair accessible. Additional logistical information will be emailed to all registrants one week before the tour, and again the day before the tour.


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walking tour

Thu, Oct 20
01:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 20
01:00PM ET

book talk

Hugo Kauder: Composer, Musical Philosopher, Music Theorist

Hugo Kauder was a mid-century Viennese Jewish composer, pedagogue, and émigré to America, who defied the atonal trend of his generation with his uniquely harmonic, contrapuntal style. His legacy of over 300 works, many yet to be published, is receiving renewed interest today. YIVO's Director of Public Programs Alex Weiser joins Kauder's biographer, scholar and pianist Karin Wagner, for a conversation about Kauder, his work, and his legacy.

About the Speakers
Karin Wagner teaches piano and piano pedagogy at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. Wagner has published widely on the subject of composers in exile.

Alex Weiser is the Director of Public Programs of YIVO and a composer of contemporary classical music. Weiser's debut album and all the days were purple, was named a 2020 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for Music.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Kauder-Book-Talk for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Oct 20
06:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 20
06:00PM ET

book talk

TheSassoonsTheGreatGlobalMerchantsandtheMakingofanEmpire

The gilded Baghdadi Sassoons, one of the richest families in the world for over two centuries, built a vast empire through global finance and trade—cotton, opium, shipping—that reached across three continents. Against the monumental canvas of the Ottoman Empire and the changing face of the Far East, across Europe and Great Britain during the time of its farthest reach, Joseph Sassoon gives us a spectacular generational saga of the making (and undoing) of this family dynasty in his new book, The Sassoons: The Great Global Merchants and the Making of an Empire.

Dr. Joseph Sassoon, Professor of History and Political Economy and Director of the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University, will be in conversation with Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/the-sassoons-2022-10-20 for a Zoom link


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book talk

Sun, Oct 23
02:00PM ET
Sun, Oct 23
02:00PM ET

yiddish club

YIVO Yiddish Club: Contemporary Yiddish Creativity in Israel With Mendy Cahan

Nu, vilst redn a bisele yidish? An event for Yiddish enthusiasts the world over, the YIVO Yiddish club is an informal monthly gathering to celebrate mame-loshn. Hosted by Shane Baker, sessions take place in English, and are liberally peppered with Yiddish. Each month Baker is joined by a different guest who discusses their work and a related Yiddish cultural theme. In the spirit of a club, sessions are held as interactive zoom meetings in which participants can see and hear one another. Each session includes ample time for audience questions, group discussion, and, time permitting, knock-down, drag-out arguments. Attendees need not know any Yiddish to attend, though some familiarity with the language is highly recommended.

This session features Mendy Cahan, Yiddish singer, actor, badkhn, teacher, and founder of the YUNG YiDiSH Library and Cultural center in Tel Aviv which hosts a variety of activities to strengthen Yiddish culture in Israel. Cahan performs on Yiddish stages worldwide and at the Gesher Theatre in Tel Aviv. He has appeared in award-winning films including Murer: Anatomie eines Prozesses and the Oscar-awarded Son of Saul, for which he was also the Yiddish coach. Cahan will soon be seen in the upcoming Netflix series Diamonds. He currently lectures about Yiddish Literature at Alma College and is active as a volunteer for YUNG YiDiSH.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/YiddishClub13 for a Zoom link


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yiddish club

Tue, Oct 25
12:00PM ET
Tue, Oct 25
12:00PM ET

book talk

Exclusive Authors Series with Judith Roumani

Join us for this episode of our Exclusive Authors Series with Judith Roumani discussing her new book Francophone Sephardic Fiction: Writing Migration, Diaspora, and Modernity.

Francophone Sephardic Fiction approaches modern Sephardic literature in a comparative way to draw out similarities and differences among selected francophone novelists from various countries, with a focus on North Africa. The definition of Sepharad here is broader than just Spain: it embraces Jews whose ancestors had lived in North Africa for centuries, even before the arrival of Islam, and who still today trace their allegiance to ways of being Jewish that go back to Babylon, as do those whose ancestors spent a few hundred years in Iberia. The author traces the strong influence of oral storytelling on modern novelists of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries and explores the idea of the portable homeland, as exile and migration engulfed the long-rooted Sephardic communities.

About the Author
Judith Roumani is founder and director of the Jewish Institute of Pitigliano, and founder and editor of the online journal Sephardic Horizons, which appears three times a year (sephardichorizons.org). She received a BA Honors in Spanish and French from the University of Nottingham, an MA in Latin American Studies from the University of London, and a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Rutgers. She has taught Spanish and Sephardic studies at the University of Maryland, College Park, and other colleges in the Washington DC area. She has also been a director of publications, professional translator, an associate editor or author of five books and a monograph, and her work has been translated into Hebrew, Italian, and French.

Click here for more about the book.

Ticket Info: Free; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Tue, Oct 25
01:00PM ET
Tue, Oct 25
01:00PM ET

lecture

The Origins of National Culture: Self Translation, Originals and Split Authors

Is there a difference between originals and translations, artistically? Intuitively the answer seems to be: yes, especially in our cultural and historical context of modern Yiddish and Hebrew literatures, that share a vested interest in originality. But when matters come to self-translation, work written and rewritten by the same author, issues of origins and originality become murky.

This lecture will look at work by self-translating writers such as Sholem Yankev Abramovitsh, Hersch Dovid Nomberg, and Zalman Shneour to explore the ways authors and critics thought about self-translation, how they pondered and practiced writing the same work time and again. In thinking about this practice the validity of concepts such as “original” and “translation” will be scrutinized, as well as the idea that people have different capacities and even personalities in different languages. Looking at modes of self-presentation and literary composition will allow us to ask what, if at all, sets the self-translating author apart from other writers and translators.

About the Speakers
Yaakov Herskovitz is the inaugural Goldrich postdoctoral fellow in the Yiddish studies program at Tel Aviv University and teaches in the Yiddish studies program at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Prior to this appointment he served as a postdoctoral fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem as part of a German-Israeli research group studying Jewish-German literary exchanges in the interwar period. In 2019-2020 he was a fellow at the Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan, in a year devoted to Yiddish.

Currently he is concluding work on a book that deals with the role literary self-translation played in the formation of Jewish national cultures. Another book, forthcoming in Hebrew with Hakkibutz Hameuchad, is devoted to the translational poetics of Israeli poet Avot Yeshurun and the Yiddish origins of his Hebrew. Yaakov’s research interests include Modern Hebrew & Yiddish literature, translation studies, gender and the making of national cultures. His work has appeared in journals such as ShofarJewish Social Studies and most recently Prooftexts. He serves on the board of In geveb, a journal of Yiddish studies.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/National-Culture for a Zoom link


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lecture

Wed, Oct 26
06:30PM ET
Wed, Oct 26
06:30PM ET

panel discussion

Village Preservation: Recognizing and Protecting Jewish History – Live Event

Join us for a night of landmark discussion on the history of Union Square, and historic preservation! Special guest Village Preservation will join AJHS to discuss Union Square’s path to landmark status designation. Beginning with a historical overview of the Square, we’ll continue through to the landmarking campaign, and finish with an audience Q&A. Come learn how Union Square became a landmark! 

Ticket Info: Free with registration; register at ajhs.org/events/village-preservation-recognizing-and-protecting-jewish-history-event/


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panel discussion

Thu, Oct 27
12:30PM ET
Thu, Oct 27
12:30PM ET

conversation

At Lunch with Lynn Novick

Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal, NY Times) sits down with award-winning documentary filmmaker Lynn Novick.  Lynn, co-director and producer of The U.S. and the Holocaust, has been making landmark documentary films about American life and culture for more than 30 years. She has created nearly 100 hours of acclaimed programming for PBS in collaboration with Ken Burns, including Ernest Hemingway, The Vietnam War, Baseball, Jazz, Frank Lloyd Wright, The War, and Prohibition — these landmark series have garnered 19 Emmy nominations. One of the most respected documentary filmmakers and storytellers in America, Novick herself has received Emmy, Peabody and Alfred I. duPont Columbia Awards.

College Behind Bars, Novick’s debut as solo director, premiered at the New York Film Festival and aired on PBS in 2019. Novick’s next project as solo director and writer is a multi-part PBS series on the history of crime and punishment in America, slated for release in 2026.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs.org/events/at-lunch-with-lynn-novick/ for a Zoom link


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conversation

Thu, Oct 27
02:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 27
02:00PM ET

book club

LBI Book Club: Good Neighbors, Bad Times Revisited

Mimi Schwartz’s father was born Jewish in a tiny German village thirty years before the advent of Hitler when, as he’d tell her, “We all got along.” In her original memoir, Good Neighbors, Bad Times, Schwartz explored how human decency fared among Christian and Jewish neighbors before, during, and after Nazi times. Ten years after its publication, a letter arrived from a man named Max Sayer in South Australia. Sayer, it turns out, grew up Catholic in the village during the Third Reich, and in 1937 moved into an abandoned Jewish home five houses away from where the family of Schwartz’s father had lived for generations before fleeing to America a few months earlier. The two families had never met.

Sayer wrote an unpublished memoir about his childhood memories and in Schwartz's new edition, Good Neighbors, Bad Times Revisited, the two memoirs talk to each other. Weaving excerpts from Sayer's memoir and from a yearlong correspondence with him into her book, Schwartz revisits village history from a new perspective, deepening our understanding of decency and demonization. Given the rise of xenophobia, white supremacy, and antisemitism in the world today, this exploration seems more urgent than ever. (description taken from Thrift Books)

Learn more about the book in this video, and read a review in the Boston Globe.

About the Author
Mimi Schwartz is the author of seven books, most recently, Good Neighbors, Bad Times Revisited: Echoes of My Father’s German Village (2021); When History Is PersonalThoughts from a Queen-Sized Bed and Writing True, the Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction (with co-author Sondra Perl). Her short work has appeared in PloughsharesTikkunThe New York TimesThe Missouri ReviewFourth GenreCreative Nonfiction, and The Boston Globe, among others. Ten essays have been Notables in Best American Essays and she is recipient of a McDowell Fellowship, Geraldine R. Dodge Fellowship, and Editor’s Prize of The Florida Review, New Hampshire’s Best Literary Nonfiction Award and a Foreword Magazine Award for Best Memoir in 2008. She is Professor Emerita in Writing at Stockton University and lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

Buying the Book
Good Neighbors, Bad Times Revisited is available in both print and digital forms from the University of Nebraska Press here.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/book-club-good-neighbors-bad-times-revisited/ for a Zoom link


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book club

Thu, Oct 27
07:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 27
07:00PM ET

concert

Music of Hugo Kauder – Live Event

Hugo Kauder was a mid-century Viennese Jewish composer, pedagogue, and émigré to America, who defied the atonal trend of his generation with his uniquely harmonic, contrapuntal style. His legacy of over 300 works, many yet to be published, is receiving renewed interest today. A collaboration with the Leo Baeck Institute, American Society for Jewish Music, Hugo Kauder Society, and YIVO, this concert explores a selection of Kauder's vocal music, piano music, and chamber music including Kauder's newly available Violin Sonata in A minor.

A free online streaming option is also available. Learn more here.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 LBI/CJH/Partner Members, Students, Seniors at lbi.org/events/hugo-kauder-concert/


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concert

Sun, Oct 30
03:00PM ET
Sun, Oct 30
03:00PM ET

theater

Arrivals: A Sephardi-Ashkenazi Love Story – Live Event

A Jewish Romeo & Juliet love story based on historical events. A hit in Seattle, coming to New York.

When the first Sephardic Jew arrived in Seattle in 1902, not everything went as planned. Marco Cordova, a young Sephardic Jew from Turkey, came to America to make his fortune. Bayla Keigelman, a fragile Ashkenazi girl from Russia, arrived fleeing a pogrom. Their meeting seemed written in the stars until tradition declared their love forbidden.

Ticket Info: $36 early bird discount (if purchased before October 9th); $50 general admission (if purchased after October 9th) at eventbrite.com


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theater

Mon, Oct 31
01:00PM ET
Mon, Oct 31
01:00PM ET

workshop

How to Do Research at YIVO: Accessing Digitized Materials

The Archives and Library at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research represent the single largest and most comprehensive collection of materials on Eastern European Jewish civilization in the world. With some 23 million items in the YIVO Archives and nearly 400,000 volumes in all European languages in YIVO's Library, the possibilities for research are endless.

Join YIVO archivist Hallel Yadin for an overview of how to access YIVO’s digitized holdings. This program will go over the portals that contain digitized archival and library materials, as well as tips for navigating each portal effectively.

This event is open to anyone interested in doing online research at YIVO or learning more about YIVO’s vast digitized collections.

About the Speaker
Hallel Yadin is an Archivist at YIVO. Before coming to YIVO full-time, she interned in the YIVO Archives and worked as a research assistant at Rutgers University Special Collections/University Archives. She is completing an M.L.I.S. with an emphasis in archival studies at the University of Missouri, and holds a B.A. in history from Rutgers University. She has reading knowledge of Yiddish and French.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Research-Intro3 for a Zoom link


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workshop

Mon, Oct 31
08:00PM ET
Mon, Oct 31
08:00PM ET

theater

Arrivals: A Sephardi-Ashkenazi Love Story – Live Event

A Jewish Romeo & Juliet love story based on historical events. A hit in Seattle, coming to New York.

When the first Sephardic Jew arrived in Seattle in 1902, not everything went as planned. Marco Cordova, a young Sephardic Jew from Turkey, came to America to make his fortune. Bayla Keigelman, a fragile Ashkenazi girl from Russia, arrived fleeing a pogrom. Their meeting seemed written in the stars until tradition declared their love forbidden.

Ticket Info: $36 early bird discount (if purchased before October 9th); $50 general admission (if purchased after October 9th) at eventbrite.com


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theater

Tue, Nov 01
12:00PM ET
Tue, Nov 01
12:00PM ET

book talk

Exclusive Authors Series with Andrée Aelion Brooks and Ruth K. Abrahams

Join us for an episode of our Exclusive Authors Series with Andrée Aelion Brooks and Ruth K. Abrahams discussing their book The Remarkable Life of Luis Moses Gomez.

During the early days of colonial America, a number of Sephardic Jews and conversos came from the Caribbean islands to the eastern seaboard for economic opportunity. They have largely been overlooked as the stories of the later German and Ashkenazi Jewish immigrants, took over in terms of numbers and achievements. Here is the story of one of those early Sephardic settlers who came from Jamaica to the New York area in search of such opportunities.

About the Authors
Andrée Aelion Brooks is a journalist, author and lecturer specializing in Jewish history. Formerly a contributing columnist for the New York Times, she is an Associate Fellow, Yale University, and founder of the Women’s (political) Campaign School at Yale. Her award-winning books include a comprehensive biography of Dona Gracia Nasi, a Jewish leader who was the richest woman in Renaissance Europe; Russian Dance, about a Jewish Bolshevik spy; Out of Spain, a children’s program in Sephardic history. She was honored in 2013 by the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame.

Executive Director of the Gomez Mill House Foundation (ret.) from 1999-2017, Dr. Ruth Abrahams also served as Executive Director of the Lehman College Foundation and Vice President for Advancement at Pratt Institute. Artistically, Dr. Abrahams sang professionally in New York from 1967-1980. She received an M.A. in Humanities (Japanese Studies), and a Ph.D. in Dance History from New York University, where she taught as adjunct associate professor from 1982-1996. She was a founding member and first president of World Dance Alliance-Americas, an international advocacy organization for dance.

Click here for more about the book.

Ticket Info: Free; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Tue, Nov 01
04:30PM ET
Tue, Nov 01
04:30PM ET

class

AllintheMishpochehIntrotoJewishGenealogyatCJH-LiveonZoom

10-session classes run from November 2022 through January 2023
Section 1: Tuesdays at 4:30 - 5:45 p.m. ET beginning November 1, Instructor: Moriah Amit, or:
Section 2: Fridays at 10 - 11:15 a.m. ET beginning November 4, Instructor: J.D. Arden

Ready to take a deep dive into your family history?

Join the staff of the Center for Jewish History for this 10-week online genealogy course, suitable for beginner and intermediate researchers. You will benefit from the unique experience of one-on-one mentoring from our expert genealogy librarians and enjoy access to digitized archival material found in the collections of our onsite partner organizations, which include the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute, and American Sephardi Federation. This course will be relevant and applicable to all areas of the Jewish diaspora—Sephardi, Mizrahi, and Ashkenazi—and will touch on numerous topics, including family tree building, DNA and endogamy, search strategies, common genealogy myths, Holocaust records,Landsmanshaftn, Jewish orphanages, and much more, with a particular focus on collections housed at the Center. By the end of the 10 weeks, you will have compiled a basic family history portfolio and will be equipped with a strong foundation for further explorations.

Students are encouraged to participate live but are welcome to watch or review class recordings as needed.

Read what some of the participants of last spring's session had to say about the class:

"The instructor is very knowledgeable, organized, and engaging in the virtual format."

"Clear instructions, questions answered immediately, open class participation."

"The information and guidance provided helped me to launch my genealogy research in an effective way."

"The course gave me terrific resources to use in the future and demonstrated how to use the resources. It was terrific to listen to the progress of others and how they reached their goals."

Registration Info: $300 general, $275 CJH members (members are those who have donated $50 or more to the Center in the past year)
Register for Tuesday 4:30 p.m. here
Register for Friday 10 a.m. here


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class

Tue, Nov 01
06:30PM ET
Tue, Nov 01
06:30PM ET

exhibition opening

Leopold Zunz: Scholarship and Revolution – Live Event

Leopold Zunz (1794–1886) founded the discipline of Jewish Studies (Wissenschaft des Judentums) and produced its first great body of scholarly work, but his scholarship was never an end in itself. Rather, he forged it as a weapon in the fight for emancipation, with unambiguous political implications. Ismar Schorsch (Jewish Theological Seminary) discusses Zunz’s scholarly and political legacy at the opening of a new exhibition focused on Zunz in the Smart Gallery at the Center for Jewish History.

Leopold Zunz: Creativity in Adversity will be available for purchase at this event.

About the Speaker
Ismar Schorsch is chancellor emeritus of The Jewish Theological Seminary and Rabbi Herman Abramovitz Distinguished Service Professor of Jewish History. He received the Leo Baeck Medal in 2015. Since retiring as chancellor in 2006, Dr. Schorsch has returned to his first love: the life of the mind and serious scholarship. His most recent book Leopold Zunz: Creativity in Adversity was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2017.

Previously he had authored Canon Without Closure (March 2007, Aviv Press), a wide-ranging collection of Torah commentaries written during his tenure as chancellor. In 2004, he published a two-volume collection of the articles and essays written while chancellor titled Polarities in Balance; and in 1995, he published The Sacred Cluster: The Core Values of Conservative Judaism, a highly acclaimed monograph outlining the seven fundamental tenets of the Movement. In Feburary 2018, Professor Schorsch was awarded the Moses Mendelsohn Prize by the city of Dessau, Germany.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/leopold-zunz-scholarship-and-revolution/


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exhibition opening

Tue, Nov 01
08:00PM ET
Tue, Nov 01
08:00PM ET

theater

Arrivals: A Sephardi-Ashkenazi Love Story – Live Event

A Jewish Romeo & Juliet love story based on historical events. A hit in Seattle, coming to New York.

When the first Sephardic Jew arrived in Seattle in 1902, not everything went as planned. Marco Cordova, a young Sephardic Jew from Turkey, came to America to make his fortune. Bayla Keigelman, a fragile Ashkenazi girl from Russia, arrived fleeing a pogrom. Their meeting seemed written in the stars until tradition declared their love forbidden.

Ticket Info: $36 early bird discount (if purchased before October 9th); $50 general admission (if purchased after October 9th) at eventbrite.com


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theater

Thu, Nov 03
01:00PM ET
Thu, Nov 03
01:00PM ET

book talk

The Golden Peacock: The Voice of the Yiddish Writer

Many may be familiar with the poetry and prose of Celia Dropkin, Yankev Glatshteyn, Rokhl Korn, Aron Glanz-Leyeles, H. Leivick, Kadya Molodowsky, Itzik Manger, Avrom Sutzkever, Sholem-Aleichem, Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman, Yekhiel Shraibman and Elie Wiesel. But it can be rare to hear audio recordings of these writers reading their own works.

The Golden Peacock: The Voice of the Yiddish Writer (in Yiddish: Di Goldene Pave: Dos Kol fun dem Yidishn Shrayber) is a unique collection of Yiddish literature. In addition to the audio recordings, the project includes the texts in Yiddish and in English translation, biographies of the writers, and notes in English about each selection.

Join YIVO for a discussion of this publication featuring Sheva Zucker in conversation with Anna Fishman Gonshor. This event will be conducted in English, with selections of Yiddish poetry featured alongside English translations.

Buy the book.

About the Speakers
Sheva Zucker has taught YIVO’s Uriel Weinreich Summer Program in Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture for over two decades. She is the author of the textbooks Yiddish: An Introduction to the Language, Literature & Culture, Vols. I and II, which are used widely in university and adult classes around the world. She has taught and lectured on Yiddish and Yiddish literature on five continents and at major universities, including Columbia, New York University, Duke, Bar-Ilan, and Russian State Humanities University. From 2005 to 2020 she served as the executive director of the League for Yiddish and the editor of its all-Yiddish publication Afn Shvel. Her research and translation work focus mainly on women in Yiddish literature.

Anna Fishman Gonshor is Faculty Lecturer of Yiddish Studies in the Department of Jewish Studies at McGill University (retired). She has been guest lecturer for several university Yiddish programs and various institutions across North America. As a translator her work includes film, articles for academic publications and archival materials. In addition, she is a longstanding faculty member of the YIVO Uriel Weinreich Summer Program in Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/The-Golden-Peacock for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Nov 03
08:00PM ET
Thu, Nov 03
08:00PM ET

theater

Arrivals: A Sephardi-Ashkenazi Love Story – Live Event

A Jewish Romeo & Juliet love story based on historical events. A hit in Seattle, coming to New York.

When the first Sephardic Jew arrived in Seattle in 1902, not everything went as planned. Marco Cordova, a young Sephardic Jew from Turkey, came to America to make his fortune. Bayla Keigelman, a fragile Ashkenazi girl from Russia, arrived fleeing a pogrom. Their meeting seemed written in the stars until tradition declared their love forbidden.

Ticket Info: $36 early bird discount (if purchased before October 9th); $50 general admission (if purchased after October 9th) at eventbrite.com


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theater

Fri, Nov 04
10:00AM ET
Fri, Nov 04
10:00AM ET

class

AllintheMishpochehIntrotoJewishGenealogyatCJH-LiveonZoom

10-session classes run from November 2022 through January 2023
Section 1: Tuesdays at 4:30 - 5:45 p.m. ET beginning November 1, Instructor: Moriah Amit, or:
Section 2: Fridays at 10 - 11:15 a.m. ET beginning November 4, Instructor: J.D. Arden

Ready to take a deep dive into your family history?

Join the staff of the Center for Jewish History for this 10-week online genealogy course, suitable for beginner and intermediate researchers. You will benefit from the unique experience of one-on-one mentoring from our expert genealogy librarians and enjoy access to digitized archival material found in the collections of our onsite partner organizations, which include the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute, and American Sephardi Federation. This course will be relevant and applicable to all areas of the Jewish diaspora—Sephardi, Mizrahi, and Ashkenazi—and will touch on numerous topics, including family tree building, DNA and endogamy, search strategies, common genealogy myths, Holocaust records,Landsmanshaftn, Jewish orphanages, and much more, with a particular focus on collections housed at the Center. By the end of the 10 weeks, you will have compiled a basic family history portfolio and will be equipped with a strong foundation for further explorations.

Students are encouraged to participate live but are welcome to watch or review class recordings as needed.

Read what some of the participants of last spring's session had to say about the class:

"The instructor is very knowledgeable, organized, and engaging in the virtual format."

"Clear instructions, questions answered immediately, open class participation."

"The information and guidance provided helped me to launch my genealogy research in an effective way."

"The course gave me terrific resources to use in the future and demonstrated how to use the resources. It was terrific to listen to the progress of others and how they reached their goals."

Registration Info: $300 general, $275 CJH members (members are those who have donated $50 or more to the Center in the past year)
Register for Tuesday 4:30 p.m. here
Register for Friday 10 a.m. here


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class

Sun, Nov 06
03:00PM ET
Sun, Nov 06
03:00PM ET

theater

Arrivals: A Sephardi-Ashkenazi Love Story – Live Event

A Jewish Romeo & Juliet love story based on historical events. A hit in Seattle, coming to New York.

When the first Sephardic Jew arrived in Seattle in 1902, not everything went as planned. Marco Cordova, a young Sephardic Jew from Turkey, came to America to make his fortune. Bayla Keigelman, a fragile Ashkenazi girl from Russia, arrived fleeing a pogrom. Their meeting seemed written in the stars until tradition declared their love forbidden.

Ticket Info: $36 early bird discount (if purchased before October 9th); $50 general admission (if purchased after October 9th) at eventbrite.com


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theater

Wed, Nov 09
07:30PM ET
Wed, Nov 09
07:30PM ET

concert

Kristallnacht and Its Aftermath – Live Event

A fitting tribute to those whose lives forever changed by the events leading up to Kristallnacht, November 9, 1938, “The Night of Broken Glass,” and others who were deported by the Nazis, or lost in the Holocaust. This annual program presented by the American Society for Jewish Music, YIVO, the Leo Baeck Institute, and the Center for Jewish History, will feature the Trio SerenadeSong of Authum, and Rapsodia Notturna by Karol Rathaus, a Piano Trio by Hans Gál, and the Suite Polonaise by Simon Laks, three composers who were forced to restart their promising young careers in as immigrants in new countries.

Ticket Info: $18 general; $12 LBI/CJH/Partner Members, Students, Seniors at lbi.org/events/kristallnacht-and-its-aftermath-2022/


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concert

Thu, Nov 10
03:30PM ET
Thu, Nov 10
03:30PM ET

book talk

Dineh: An Autobiographical Novel

Ida Maze's autobiographical novel Dineh is a haunting portrait of her rural, village, and small-town life in White Russia (now Belarus) at the turn of the 20th century. Dineh's story is interwoven with portraits of other people, chiefly women and girls, in her community. The novel examines the lives of women, including class stratification, thwarted romance, violence (domestic, state-instigated, and otherwise), and the perils of childbirth. In addition to exploring relations between Jews and non-Jews, Maze's novel touches on Tsarist anti-Semitism, restrictions on Jewish economic survival, and the rising tide of revolutionary movements.

Originally published in Yiddish, Dineh has been translated for the first time into English by Yermiyahu Ahron Taub. Join YIVO for a discussion of this publication featuring Taub in conversation with Professor Alice Nakhimovsky.

Buy the book.

About the Speakers
Yermiyahu Ahron Taub is a poet, writer, and Yiddish literary translator. He is the author of two books of fiction, Beloved Comrades: a Novel in Stories (2020) and Prodigal Children in the House of G-d: Stories (2018), and six volumes of poetry, including A Mouse Among Tottering Skyscrapers: Selected Yiddish Poems (2017). Yermiyahu's most recent translation from the Yiddish is Dineh: an Autobiographical Novel by Ida Maze (2022). Learn more on his website.

Alice Nakhimovsky is Distinguished Professor of Jewish Studies and Professor of Russian and Eurasian Studies at Colgate University. She has written widely about Russian Jews. Her 2014 book, Dear Mendl, Dear Reyzl: Yiddish Letter Manuals in Russia and America, written with Roberta Newman, won a National Jewish Book Award. Her next book is called "Bad Moral Luck: Eight Jewish Lives under Stalin."

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Dineh for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Nov 10
05:00PM ET
Thu, Nov 10
05:00PM ET

lecture

Family History Today: Clued In - Case Studies from Sherlock Cohn, The Photo Genealogist

At its core, genealogy research is detective work. In this fun and informative talk, Sherlock Cohn, the photo genealogy sleuth, will explore how and why it is important to find the clues our ancestors left for us in our family photos. Participants will learn what clues an expert looks for in photos, how to organize your approach to dating and interpreting photos, and how to match photo information with vital records. Additionally, Sherlock will present how she solved “The Case of the Mistaken Date,” demonstrating how accurate dating, photo identification, knowledge of fashion, and records matching can illuminate our ancestors’ lives and help us solve some of our vexing genealogy mysteries.  At the conclusion, she will help attendees begin the process of analyzing their own family photos.

Do you have a family photo that you would like Sherlock Cohn to analyze? Once you register for this program, you will receive a confirmation email with detailed guidelines on how to submit your family photo for the chance to have it analyzed by Sherlock Cohn. Note:Sherlock will only analyze a selection of the photos she receives. At the live program on November 10, if Sherlock selected your photo, she will present a few of her discoveries and her recommendations on how to continue your photo research. All photos must be submitted by October 7.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/family-history-today-2022-11-10 for a Zoom link


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lecture

Tue, Nov 15
12:00PM ET
Tue, Nov 15
12:00PM ET

book talk

Exclusive Authors Series with Sarina Roffé

Join us for an episode of Exclusive Authors Series with Sarina Roffé as she discusses her book Branching Out from Sepharad.

In Branching Out from Sepharad, readers will follow the history of Jewish life in Hispania, Spain, the Middle East and the Americas as Sarina Roffé links three rabbinic dynasties from the 11th Century to the present day, all with an Irish Converso Twist.

About the Author
Sarina Roffé is a professional genealogist, editor of the journal DOROT, and founder of the Sephardic Heritage Project. She is the author of Branching Out From Sepharad (Sephardic Heritage Project, 2017), which outlines the history of Jews in Spain, the 1492 expulsion, their history in Syria, and their immigration to the Americas. She is Co-Chair of the Brooklyn Jewish Historical Initiative, and Chair of the JewishGen Sephardic Research Division.

Sarina is also the author of Backyard Kitchen: Mediterranean Salads, and Backyard Kitchen: the Main Course and a cooking app called Sarina’s Sephardic Cuisine, available in the Apple Store, as well as hundreds of articles. Sarina presents often at IAJGS Conferences and has completed over a dozen genealogies, through her genealogy consulting business, Sephardic Genealogical Journeys.

Click here for more about the book.

Ticket Info: Free; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Tue, Nov 15
06:30PM ET
Tue, Nov 15
06:30PM ET

film

Dear Fredy: Sexuality and Politics in the Theresienstadt Ghetto – Live Event

Combining interviews, archival material, and animation, this documentary tells the story of Fredy Hirsch, a gay, Zionist athlete who became the head of the youth department of the Theresienstadt Ghetto. Hirsch faced discrimination and persecution both for his sexuality and as a Jew, but he was also a widely admired figure in Theresienstadt. Following the screening, LBI’s Head of Public Outreach, Michael Simonson, will discuss Hirsch’s life, as well as the topic of sexuality in concentration camps.

About the Speaker
Michael Simonson has been part of the Leo Baeck Institute since 2002. Since his beginnings as a new archivist, he has taken on many roles, including the position of Director of the Dr. Robert Ira Lewy Reference Services and as Director of Public Outreach. Simonson works closely with researchers and their needs, be it academic or personal genealogy. He has coordinated a number of programs online, as well as the monthly meetings of the Leo Baeck Institute book club. You are always welcome to write him with any questions you have related to your research.

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://www.lbi.org/events/dear-fredy/


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film

Wed, Nov 16
07:00PM ET
Wed, Nov 16
07:00PM ET

film and discussion

"Ver vet blaybn?"" (Who Will Remain?) — A Documentary About Avrom Sutzkever – Live Event

Join YIVO and the Yiddish Book Center for the New York premiere screening of Ver Vet Blaybn? (Who Will Remain?), a film about Yiddish poet Avrom Sutzkever. The award-winning documentary, a production of the Yiddish Book Center’s Wexler Oral History Project, features Sutzkever's grandaughter, Israeli actress Hadas Kalderon, traveling to Lithuania and using Sutzkever's diary to trace his early life in Vilna and his survival of the Holocaust.

Sutzkever (1913–2010) was an acclaimed Yiddish poet—described by the New York Times as the “greatest poet of the Holocaust”—whose verse drew on his youth in Siberia and Vilna, his spiritual and material resistance during World War II, and his post-war life in the State of Israel. Kalderon, whose native language is Hebrew, relies on translations of her grandfather’s work, but is nevertheless determined to connect with what remains of the poet’s bygone world and confront the personal responsibility of preserving her grandfather’s literary legacy.

Woven into the documentary are family home videos, newly recorded interviews, and archival recordings including Sutzkever’s testimony at the Nuremberg Trial. Recitation of Sutzkever's poetry and personal reflections on resisting Nazi forces as a partisan fighter reveal how Sutzkever tried to make sense of the Holocaust and its aftermath. As Kalderon strives to reconstruct the stories told by her grandfather, the film examines the limits of language, geography, and time. A Q&A with filmmakers Emily Felder and Christa Whitney will follow the screening.

This film is in Yiddish, Hebrew, Russian, and English with English subtitles. Running Time: 57 minutes.

About the Filmmakers
Christa P. WhitneyProducer and Co-Director
Originally from Northern California, Christa discovered Yiddish while studying comparative literature at Smith College. She has studied Yiddish language at the Vilnius Yiddish Institute, the Workmen’s Circle, and the Yiddish Book Center. For the past ten years, she has directed the Yiddish Book Center’s Wexler Oral History Project, traveling near and far recording oral history interviews, managing a video archive, and producing documentary films and web features about all aspects of Yiddish language and culture.

Emily FelderEditor and Co-Director
Emily Felder is a documentary film editor whose work has been screened in museums, libraries, and schools across the country. She studied anthropology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she became invested in archaeology, visual ethnography, and non-fiction storytelling. She worked as the premiere technical assistant for the Yiddish Book Center’s Wexler Oral History Project, and as an assistant editor at Florentine Films/Hott Productions on feature-length documentaries broadcast on PBS. She is now an editor and videographer based in Los Angeles where she continues to make films.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 YIVO members, Yiddish Book Center members & students at yivo.org/Who-Will-Remain


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film and discussion

Thu, Nov 17
12:30PM ET
Thu, Nov 17
12:30PM ET

conversation

At Lunch with Karen Hartman

Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal & NY Times) sits down with playwright Karen Hartman. Karen Hartman’s work launches VOLT at 59e59 Theaters, an unprecedented festival of three off-Broadway premieres by a single author simultaneously: New Golden Age (Primary Stages); Goldie, Max & Milk (MBL Productions); and The Lucky Star (The Directors Company). Also in 2022, Denver Theater Center presented the world premiere musical Rattlesnake Kate, book by Hartman, score by Neyla Pekarek. 

Good Faith: Four Chats about Race and the New Haven Fire Department premiered at Yale Repertory Theater in 2019. Roz and Ray (McKnight Fellowship, Edgerton New Play Prize), premiered at Seattle Rep and Victory Gardens. The Lucky Star (as The Book of Joseph) premiered at Chicago Shakespeare Theater and broke box office records at Everyman Theater in Baltimore. Hartman is developing Project Dawn (People’s Light, NEA Art Works Grant, NNPN Rolling World Premiere) for Population Media Center as a television series, and another project for 20th Television. She wrote the book for Alice Bliss (music: Jenny Giering, lyrics: Adam Gwon, based on Laura Harrington’s novel) which won the 2019 Weston-Ghostlight New Musical Award. Her prose has appeared in the New York Times and the Washington Post. A recent Guggenheim Fellow and former Fulbright Scholar, Hodder Fellow, and New Dramatist, Hartman served as Senior Artist-in-Residence at University of Washington School for five years, and lives in Brooklyn with her family.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs.org/events/at-lunch-with-karen-hartman/ for a Zoom link


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conversation

Thu, Nov 17
07:00PM ET
Thu, Nov 17
07:00PM ET

panel discussion

JewishPathstoEmancipationStrugglesforCitizenshipAcrossRevolutionaryEuropeLiveEventampLivestreamedonZoom

Join us in celebrating our new exhibit, How Jews Became Citizens: Highlights from the Sid Lapidus Collection, with three contributing scholars, Dr. David Sorkin (Yale University), Dr. Marsha Rozenblit (University of Maryland), and Dr. Daniel Schwartz (George Washington University), in conversation with moderator and exhibit curator Ivy Weingram, as they discuss the exciting new collection on which the exhibit is based as well as overarching issues of Jewish emancipation in Europe and citizenship the world over. The exhibit will be open for viewing in advance of the panel.

The exhibit has been made possible by the generous support of Sid and Ruth Lapidus, a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info:
In person: Pay what you wish; register here
Zoom livestream: Pay what you wish; register here


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panel discussion

Sun, Nov 20
02:00PM ET
Sun, Nov 20
02:00PM ET

yiddish club

YIVO Yiddish Club: Yiddish Songwriting Today With Adah Hetko

Nu, vilst redn a bisele yidish? An event for Yiddish enthusiasts the world over, the YIVO Yiddish club is an informal monthly gathering to celebrate mame-loshn. Hosted by Shane Baker, sessions take place in English, and are liberally peppered with Yiddish. Each month Baker is joined by a different guest who discusses their work and a related Yiddish cultural theme. In the spirit of a club, sessions are held as interactive zoom meetings in which participants can see and hear one another. Each session includes ample time for audience questions, group discussion, and, time permitting, knock-down, drag-out arguments. Attendees need not know any Yiddish to attend, though some familiarity with the language is highly recommended.

This session features Adah Hetko, a Yiddish singer, songwriter, and educator living in Somerville, Massachusetts. Hetko graduated with a master’s degree in Jewish Studies from Indiana University in 2018 and worked as a Graduate Fellow at the Yiddish Book Center from 2018-2019. She has been a fellow and staff member for Yiddish New York and has coordinated multidisciplinary programs for KlezKanada’s 2020 and 2021 retreats. Hetko is lead vocalist and dance leader for klezmer band Burikes and performs with the Yiddish song trio Levyosn. In addition to performing traditional songs, she composes new Yiddish songs and poetry settings, and English-language adaptations and translations.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/YiddishClub14 for a Zoom link


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yiddish club

Tue, Nov 29
07:00PM ET
Tue, Nov 29
07:00PM ET

film and discussion

I Am Free...But Who is Left? – Live Event

A mother, a father, four brothers, and a sister live in Hrubieszow, Poland, a small town with a majority Jewish population. They thrive economically and academically despite antisemitism. "I Am Free … But Who Is Left?” is a new documentary created by Joanne Weiner Rudof and Lawrence Langer with Yale's Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies that tells their story. Survivors of the family and the town describe the Nazi invasion, brutality, destruction, and murder. Personal photographs and documents enhance reflective first-person accounts. Join YIVO for the New York premiere screening of this film.

About the Filmmakers
Joanne Weiner Rudof retired as the archivist at the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies, Yale University in September 2017 after thirty-three years. She has written numerous articles, book chapters, and conference papers on Holocaust testimonies. She has edited and produced documentaries including Voices from the Yugoslav HolocaustRemembering CzestochowaParallel Paths, and the award winning national PBS broadcast, Witness: Voices from the Holocaust for which she was co-editor of the book with the same title. She has coordinated over twenty Holocaust testimony projects in North and South America, Europe, and Israel and advised video testimony projects documenting genocide, oppression, and human rights violations. She was a 2019 recipient of an award from Lessons & Legacies and the Holocaust Education Foundation in recognition of her “Distinguished Contribution to Holocaust Education.”

Lawrence L. Langer is Alumnae Chair Professor of English emeritus from Simmons College (now Simmons University) in Boston, from which he retired in 1992. He is the author of numerous books and articles on Holocaust literature, memoirs, testimony and art, including The Holocaust and the Literary Imagination (1976), which was one of three finalists for the National Book Award. His Holocaust Testimonies: The Ruins of Memory (1991) won the National Book Critics Circle Award for criticism and was named one of the ten best books of the year by the Sunday New York Times Book Review. His most recent work is The Afterdeath of the Holocaust (2021). He has also provided extended critical commentary for twelve volumes representing the artistic achievement of child Holocaust survivor Samuel Bak, whose titles include Landscapes of Jewish Experience (1997), Return to Vilna (2007), and From Generation to Generation (2016). In 2016 he received the Holocaust Educational Foundation Distinguished Achievement Award for Holocaust Studies and Research.

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at yivo.org/I-Am-Free


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film and discussion

Wed, Nov 30
12:00PM ET
Wed, Nov 30
12:00PM ET

book talk

Yiddish Paris: Staging Nation and Community in Interwar France

Nick Underwood explores how left-wing Yiddish-speaking emigrants from Eastern Europe created a Yiddish diaspora nation in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s in his new publication, Yiddish Paris: Staging Nation and Community in Interwar France.

In this first full-length study of interwar Yiddish culture in France, Underwood argues that the emergence of a Yiddish Paris depended on "culture makers," mostly Jews from Socialist and Communist backgrounds who created cultural and scholarly organizations and institutions, including the French branch of YIVO, theater troupes, choruses, and a pavilion at the Paris World's Fair of 1937.

Yiddish Paris examines how these left-wing Yiddish-speaking Jews insisted that even in France, a country known for demanding the assimilation of immigrant and minority groups, they could remain a distinct group, part of a transnational Yiddish-speaking Jewish nation. Yet, in the process, they in fact created a French-inflected version of Jewish diaspora nationalism, finding allies among French intellectuals, largely on the left.

Join YIVO for a discussion of this publication with Underwood in conversation with Professor Laura Hobson Faure.

Buy the book.

About the Speaker
Nick Underwood is an assistant professor of history and the Berger-Neilsen Chair of Judaic Studies at The College of Idaho. He earned his PhD from the University of Colorado Boulder and, prior to his current appointment, held postdocs at the University of Michigan and the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a member of the Digital Yiddish Theatre Project.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Yiddish-Paris for a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, Nov 30
02:00PM ET
Wed, Nov 30
02:00PM ET

book talk

German Jews and the University – Live Event

For centuries Jews in Germany were denied full rights and excluded from gentile society. At the same time, Jewish law restricted scholarship to exegesis of the Talmud. But from the late seventeenth century onward, as German universities progressively opened their doors to them, many Jews turned toward university studies. Now available in English translation for the first time, Monika Richarz’s classic study addresses the far-reaching transformation of German Jewry under the impact of university education. With translator Joydeep Bagchee (Hindu University of America), historian Shmuel Feiner (Bar-Ilan University), Rabbi Edward Reichman (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University), and moderator Marion Kaplan (New York University).

After registering for this event, you will receive a code for 40% off the book from Camden House/Boydell & Brewer, valid through December 31st, 2022.

About the Speakers
Joydeep Bagchee is a core doctoral faculty member at the Hindu University of America and a visiting lecturer based in Berlin, Germany. He holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from New School for Social Research, New York. His areas of expertise are twentieth-century Continental philosophy, German Romanticism, Nietzsche, philology, and the Western reception of Indian thought. Along with Dr. Vishwa Adluri, he is the author of The Nay Science: A History of German Indology (Oxford University Press, 2014) and Philology and Criticism: A Guide to Mahabharata Textual Criticism (Anthem, 2018). He co-edited the volume Argument and Design: The Unity of the Mahabharata (Brill, 2016). Dr. Bagchee has taught at Technische Universität Dresden, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich and has been a fellow at Free University, Berlin. 

Shmuel Feiner is a professor of Modern Jewish History at Bar Ilan University and Chairman of the Historical Society of Israel, as well as the Samuel Braun Chair for the History of the Jews in Germany. Among his publications: The Jewish Enlightenment; Moses Mendelssohn; The Origins of Jewish Secularization in Eighteenth Century Europe; The Jewish Eighteenth Century, A European Biography, Volume 1, 1700-1750; The Jewish Eighteenth Century, A European Biography, Volume 2, 1750-1800. He was visiting Professor at Yale University (2011) and Frankfurt University (2012). Recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award, 2012, and the former Chairman of the Jerusalem Leo Baeck Institute.

Marion Kaplan is the Skirball Professor of Modern Jewish History at New York University. She is a three-time winner of the National Jewish Book Award for her books: The Making of the Jewish Middle Class: Women, Family and Identity in Imperial Germany (New York, Oxford University Press, 1991); Between Dignity and Despair: Jewish Life in Nazi Germany (Oxford University Press, 1998); and Gender and Jewish History, co-edited with Deborah Dash Moore (Indiana, 2011). Her most recent book is Hitler's Jewish Refugees: Hope and Anxiety in Portugal (Yale, 2020). All of her monographs have been translated into German.

Rabbi Edward Reichman received his B.A. from Yeshiva University; M.D. from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine; and Rabbinic Ordination from the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary. In addition to his full-time clinical practice in emergency medicine at Montefiore Medical Center, Rabbi Reichman lectures internationally on Jewish medical ethics. He has edited books and penned many book chapters and journal articles on Jewish medical ethics and Jewish medical history. He is the recipient of a Kornfeld Foundation Study Fellowship and the Michael A. and Jonathan S. Rubinstein Medical Ethics Prize. He was elected to the Davidoff Society for excellence in medical teaching at Einstein and was awarded the Outstanding Mentor Award for two years at Yeshiva University. He has served on the advisory boards of the New York Organ Donor Network, Center for Genetics and Public Policy, the Program for Jewish Genetic Health at Einstein and the Rabbinical Council of America.

Monika Richarz is the former director of the Institute for the History of German Jews and professor of history at the University of Hamburg. She received her Ph.D. from the Free University of Berlin, was a research fellow at the Leo Baeck Institute in New York, and has published widely on Jewish social and cultural history. In addition to German Jews and the University, she is the author of Jewish Life in Germany: Memoirs from Three Centuries and co-author of German-Jewish History in Modern Times, vol. III. She edited Die Hamburger Kauffrau Glikl, Juedische Existenz in der Frühen Neuzeit.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/german-jews-and-the-university/


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book talk