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Wed, Mar 03
12:00PM
Wed, Mar 03
12:00PM

book talk

New Works Wednesdays: The Jews of Iran and Rabbinic Literature: New Perspectives with Daniel Tsadik

Dr. Tsadik’s book addresses the question of Iranian Jewry’s familiarity with rabbinic literature from the 16th century to the beginning of the 20th century. Many of the book’s theses challenge and revise prevailing views that see this Jewry as largely isolated from world Jewry and its rabbinic legacy.

About the Author
A Fulbright scholar, Dr. Daniel Tsadik obtained his PhD in 2002 from the Yale University History Department. He authored several articles, a book entitled "Between Foreigners and Shi‘is: Nineteenth-Century Iran and its Jewish Minority" (Stanford University Press, 2007), another book entitled "The Jews of Iran and Rabbinic Literature: New Perspectives" (2019) which won the (Israel) Prime Minister Prize, and co-edited the book "Iran, Israel and the Jews: Symbiosis and Conflict from the Archaemenids to the Islamic Republic" (2019). From 2008 to 2020, Professor Tsadik taught at Yeshiva University, where he served as Associate Professor of Sephardic and Iranian Studies. His current research is on Shi‘ite-Jewish polemics.

For more about the book: mosadharavkook.com

Ticket Info: $5; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, Mar 03
04:00PM
Wed, Mar 03
04:00PM

book talk

Join author Eliyana R. Adler (Penn State University) in conversation with Debórah Dwork (The Graduate Center, CUNY) about her book, the forgotten story of 200,000 Polish Jews who escaped the Holocaust as refugees stranded in remote corners of the USSR.

Between 1940 and 1946, about 200,000 Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust.

Survival on the Margins is the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. The refugees fled Poland after the German invasion in 1939 and settled in the Soviet territories newly annexed under the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact. Facing hardship, and trusting little in Stalin, most spurned the offer of Soviet citizenship and were deported to labor camps in unoccupied areas of the east. They were on their own, in a forbidding wilderness thousands of miles from home. But they inadvertently escaped Hitler’s 1941 advance into the Soviet Union. While war raged and Europe’s Jews faced genocide, the refugees were permitted to leave their settlements after the Soviet government agreed to an amnesty. Most spent the remainder of the war coping with hunger and disease in Soviet Central Asia. When they were finally allowed to return to Poland in 1946, they encountered the devastation of the Holocaust, and many stopped talking about their own ordeals, their stories eventually subsumed within the central Holocaust narrative.

Drawing on untapped memoirs and testimonies of the survivors, Eliyana Adler rescues these important stories of determination and suffering on behalf of new generations.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/survival-on-margins-2021-03-03 to receive a Zoom link


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book talk

Mon, Mar 08
01:00PM
Mon, Mar 08
01:00PM

lecture

Leaving Behind the Froyen-vinkl, or How Women Functioned in the Male World of Yiddish Literature

For centuries, writing has been one of the few avenues available for women to make their voices heard in the public sphere. Joanna Lisek will present an overview of the strategies women used to break their way into the sphere of the printed Yiddish word: from annotations in the margins of books, to poems smuggled into the press in the guise of letters from readers, to the question of how relations with men were needed as leverage for getting published. Women writers and poets were not treated as equal partners in the male empire of Yiddish press and literature. Wedged into their froyen-vinkl, their “women’s corner,” women could expect condescension rather than actual recognition for their work. It is no coincidence that the seat of the Union of Jewish Writers and Journalists in Warsaw was described as a secular besmedresh, that is, a traditionally typical male institution. Finding a voice in the besmedresh of secular Yiddish literature was no easy task, and even more difficult was ensuring that this voice had a meaningful and important part in the discussion. Join us for this lecture to hear how they succeeded, oftentimes resorting to camouflage, at times openly manifesting their creative independence, all the while contending with unfavorable criticism.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Froyen-vinkl for a Zoom link


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About the Speaker:

Joanna Lisek is a literature scholar, translator, and faculty member at the Taube Department of Jewish Studies at the University of Wroclaw. Her main focus is on Jewish poetry and Yiddish culture, with a focus on women. She is the author of the monographs: Jung Wilne – ?ydowska grupa artystyczna [Yung Vilne, A Jewish Artistic Group, Wroclaw 2005] and Kol isze – g?os kobiet w poezji jidysz (od XVI w. do 1939 r.) [Kol ishe - The Voice of Women in Yiddish Poetry from the 16th Century to 1939, Sejny 2018], and the editor of the volumes: Nieme dusze? Kobiety w kulturze jidysz [Silent Souls? Women in Yiddish Culture, Wroclaw 2010] and Mykwa. Rytual i historia [Mikveh - Ritual and History, Wroclaw 2014]. She co-edited, with Karolina Szymaniak and Bella Szwarcman-Czarnota, Moja dzika koza. Antologia poetek jidysz [My Wild Goat. Anthology of Women Yiddish Poets, Kraków 2018]. In addition to the work of poets from Yiddish, she has translated into Polish works by, among others, Puah Rakovsky, Yente Serdatzky, and Chava Rosenfarb. Lisek is the editor of Zydzi. Polska. Autobiografia [Jews. Poland. Autobiography] series, which by 2023 will publish over 20 volumes of Jewish autobiographical literature, translated into Polish from Yiddish, Hebrew, German, Russian, as well as memoirs written originally in Polish.


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lecture

Wed, Mar 10
12:00PM
Wed, Mar 10
12:00PM

book talk

New Works Wednesdays: The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity: What Christianity Cost the Jews with Ross Shepard Kraemer

The Mediterranean Diaspora in Late Antiquity examines the fate of Jews living in the Mediterranean Jewish diaspora after the Roman emperor Constantine threw his patronage to the emerging orthodox (Nicene) Christian churches.

About the Author
Ross Shepard Kraemer is Professor Emerita of Religious Studies and Judaic Studies at Brown University, where she specialized in early Christianity and other religions of the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, including ancient Judaism. She holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Princeton University, and a B.A. from Smith College. Her many publications have focused particularly on gender and women's religions in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, and on aspects of Jews and Judaism in the late antique Mediterranean diaspora.

Ticket Info: $5; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Mon, Mar 15
04:00PM
Mon, Mar 15
04:00PM

book talk

Join author Ayala Fader (Fordham University) in conversation with Michal Kravel-Tovi (Tel Aviv University) about her book, a revealing look at Jewish men and women who secretly explore the outside world, in person and online, while remaining in their ultra-Orthodox religious communities.

What would you do if you questioned your religious faith, but revealing that would cause you to lose your family and the only way of life you had ever known? Hidden Heretics tells the fascinating, often heart-wrenching stories of married ultra-Orthodox Jewish men and women in 21st-century New York who lead “double lives” to protect those they love. While they no longer believe that God gave the Torah to Jews at Mount Sinai, these hidden heretics continue to live in their families and religious communities, even as they surreptitiously break Jewish commandments and explore forbidden secular worlds in person and online. Drawing on five years of fieldwork with those living double lives and the rabbis, life coaches, and religious therapists who minister to, advise, and sometimes excommunicate them, Ayala Fader investigates religious doubt and social change in the digital age.

In stories of conflicts between faith and self-fulfillment, Hidden Heretics explores the moral compromises and divided loyalties of individuals facing life-altering crossroads.

A 30% discount on the book is available to attendees and a special code will be included with your registration.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/hidden-heretics-2021-03-15 to receive a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, Mar 17
04:00PM
Wed, Mar 17
04:00PM

lecture

Answering the question "where do my ancestors come from?" is key to understanding their history and traditions. However, identifying and locating the places where they lived, particularly in Eastern Europe, is often a tricky task. In this lecture, Ed Mitukiewicz, map consultant for the documentary film Raise the Roof, will demonstrate how you can use historical map websites and geographic information databases to overcome these challenges.

This program is sponsored by the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute. It is funded, in part, by a Humanities New York CARES Grant, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/family-history-today-2021-03-17 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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lecture

Wed, Mar 17
07:00PM
Wed, Mar 17
07:00PM

panel discussion

The Tenor of Irish-Jewish Relations in 19th-20th Century New York

Join us as Miriam Nyhan Grey, Associate Director of NYU's Ireland House, hosts a discussion with Dr. Hasia Diner and Dr. Jeffrey Gurock as they question the long-accepted visions of Hibernians and Hebrews at constant loggerheads, and look to complicate the historical narrative with examples of common ground and cooperation. Dr. Diner will speak to the histories of American Jews and Irish American’s entwined with each other starting in 19th century. How they met informally on streets and in apartment buildings, but also how they connected in the labor movement, through politics, and schools.  In these encounters, Irish Americans, who had been in the United States longer and had established crucial power bases in the nation, served as mentors, models, and mediators for the Jews. Dr. Gurock will take us into the 20th century, describing the welcome Jews received at an Irish-Catholic University during the inter-war period, with a special emphasis on Jewish athletes becoming institutional standard bearers for St. John’s University. The relationship culminated in a tale of the unusual “get along” attitude obtained between the Irish and Jews in a post-war Bronx neighborhood. 

Ticket Info: Free; register at forms.office.com for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Thu, Mar 18
12:30PM
Thu, Mar 18
12:30PM

conversation

At Lunch with Susan Rosenberg Jones and Rebecca Naomi Jones

A new virtual interview series hosted by Julie Salamon

Author and journalist Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal and NY Times) sits down with influential cultural leaders in the Jewish American community; we'll hear their thoughts about working in this present moment, current projects, and what they have to say about their Jewish identity. Grab your lunch and tune in for our conversation with Photographer Susan Rosenberg Jones and her daughter Actor, Rebecca Naomi Jones

Our Guests This Week
Susan Rosenberg Jones is a portrait and documentary photographer focused on home, family, and community. Her work has been displayed at Camerawork Gallery, apexart Gallery in Tribeca, Griffin Museum, and Howland Cultural Arts Center among others.  Her series Second Time Around was selected for the Portfolio Showcase 9 exhibit at the Center for Fine Art Photography, Ft Collins, CO in 2016, received Honorable Mention in the 2017 Baxter Street at CCNY Annual Juried Competition, and was named a 2017 Critical Mass Top 50. Widowed, a portrait and text series, was named a 2019 Critical Mass Top 200 finalist. And in 2020, Susan was awarded a Critical Mass 200 finalist for her series, Safe Haven, an examination of her relationship with her husband during the Covid-19 lockdown in NYC.  Susan’s work has been published in Lenscratch, Fraction, Float Magazine, The American Scholar, and F-Stop Magazine. She has participated in numerous juried group exhibitions. www.susanrosenbergjones.com 

Rebecca Naomi Jones has performed on Broadway in Oklahoma!Significant Other, Hedwig and The Angry Inch, American Idiot and Passing Strange. Her off-Broadway performances include Big Love (Drama League nomination), Murder Ballad (Lilly award and Lucille Lortel nomination), Describe the Night (2018 Obie Award for Best Play), Marie and Rosetta, Fire In Dreamland, The Fortress of Solitude, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Wig Out! and As You Like It. Films: Someone Great (upcoming), The Outside Story (upcoming), French Fries, Most Likely To Murder, The Big Sick, Ratter, Ordinary World, Passing Strange and the documentary Broadway Idiot. Select Television: Strangers, High Maintenance, Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll, Inside Amy Schumer, Limitless and Difficult People. Solo concerts: Lincoln Center American Songbook, Apollo Cafe. Rebecca holds a BFA in Drama from the North Carolina School of the Arts.

Interviewed By
Julie Salamon is an American author, critic and storyteller. She worked at The Wall Street Journal for sixteen years first as a commodities and banking reporter before spending eleven years as the paper's film critic. Later she became a staff journalist at The New York Times where she was a TV critic and arts reporter. Later she gained fellowships at the MacDowell Colony and became a Kaiser Media Fellow. She has written both fiction and non-fiction books for adults and children-- and produced articles for magazines that include The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Vogue, Bazaar, and The New Republic. Her books have received wide critical and popular attention, she has just completed "Unlikely Friends," a memoir for Audible Original, scheduled for release in 2021.

Ticket Info: $5; available starting February 18 at ajhs.org/programs


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conversation

Thu, Mar 18
01:00PM
Thu, Mar 18
01:00PM

lecture

Sephardi Thought and Modernity: Sephardim in Israel and the Critique of Secularism

The intention of this series is to spark the interest in processes of Jewish modernization not exclusively mediated by Europeanization. The questions we will be dealing with are related to non-dichotomic identities, multiplicity and loss of language, colonization, social transformation, and intellectual responses to it. We will approach these questions by looking at Jewish-Arab influences, the Sephardi response to European modernization, the responses of the rabbinic leadership and the work of Sephardi intellectuals.

March 18th: Yaakov Yadgar (Oxford School of Global and Area Studies, University of Oxford): Sephardim in Israel and the critique of secularism

Ticket Info: Free; register at ucalgary.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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lecture

Tue, Mar 23
11:00AM
Tue, Mar 23
11:00AM

panel discussion

Nazi-Looted Art and Archives: Recovering and Preserving Jewish Culture

The ravages of the Holocaust and post-World War II led to the theft and disappearance of art, archives, and personal assets. Join Jonathan Brent and Howard Spiegler for a discussion on the quest to recover and preserve these cultural treasures.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Herrick for a Zoom link


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About the Speakers:

Jonathan Brent is the Executive Director of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York City. From 1991 to 2009 he was Editorial Director and Associate Director of Yale Press. He is the founder of the world acclaimed Annals of Communism series, which he established at Yale Press in 1991. Brent is the co-author of Stalin’s Last Crime: The Plot Against the Jewish Doctors, 1948-1953 (Harper-Collins, 2003) and Inside the Stalin Archives (Atlas Books, 2008). He is now working on a biography of the Soviet-Jewish writer Isaac Babel. Brent teaches history and literature at Bard College.

Howard Spiegler is co-chair of Herrick, Feinstein LLP’s Art Law Group, handling all aspects of commercial art matters. Working with other specialists in the firm, Howard advises clients on international trade issues, loans, museum and private exhibitions, organization and structuring of businesses, estate planning, insurance issues, art financing, tax, criminal law concerns, and other matters.

He has been integrally involved in some of the most important litigations brought on behalf of foreign governments and heirs of Holocaust victims and others to recover stolen artwork or other cultural property, including the precedent-setting “Portrait of Wally” case, in which he settled a litigation, with the assistance of the U.S. Government, brought on behalf of an estate to recover a painting confiscated by a Nazi agent in the late 1930s, the recovery on behalf of the family of the famous Soviet artist Kazimir Malevich of a number of extremely valuable and important Malevich paintings from the City of Amsterdam, and the recovery, on behalf of the Royal Library of Sweden, of a 415-year-old atlas, and other valuable books, which had been stolen from the library.

Howard is a frequent lecturer and panelist at educational, professional and industry organizations on a myriad of topics in art law. He is a regular writer and contributor to a variety of publications including the recently published first edition of The Art Law Review, of which Howard is the co-editor and for which he co-authored a chapter providing an overview of art law in the United States.


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panel discussion

Wed, Mar 24
04:00PM
Wed, Mar 24
04:00PM

book talk

Historian David Nasaw is the author of the award-winning, acclaimed biographies The Patriarch, Andrew Carnegie, and The Chief.  In his sweeping new masterwork, THE LAST MILLION: Europe’s Displaced Persons from World War to Cold War (Penguin Press), Nasaw turns his attention to the gripping yet little-known story of the million displaced persons left behind in Germany following the end of World War II: Jews, Poles, Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians, Ukrainians, and other Eastern Europeans who refused to go home or had no homes to return to. The Last Million would spend the next three to five years in displaced persons camps, temporary homelands in exile, divided by nationality, with their own police forces, churches and synagogues, schools, newspapers, theaters, and infirmaries. By 1952, the Last Million were scattered around the world. As they crossed from their broken past into an unknowable future, they carried with them their wounds, their fears, their hope, and their secrets.

Nasaw will share this history in a wide-ranging conversation with Atina Grossmann, author of Jews, Germans, and Allies: Close Encounters in Occupied Germany (Princeton University Press) and Professor of History in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Cooper Union, whose research relates to transnational Jewish refugee stories.

This program is funded, in part, by a Humanities New York CARES Grant, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/the-last-million-2021-03-24 to receive a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, Apr 07
04:00PM
Wed, Apr 07
04:00PM

book talk

In the fourth program of the series, Bernice Lerner, author of All the Horrors of War: A Jewish Girl, a British Doctor and the Liberation of Bergen-Belsen (Johns Hopkins, 2020) and Susan Jacobowitz, author of the manuscript Far from Childhood: A Holocaust Memoir, discuss with Natalia Aleksiun their parents' interrupted childhoods during the Holocaust in the Carpathian Mountains. The authors will reflect on their work uncovering the life trajectories of Rachel Genuth and Henryk Jakobowicz and the link between their own familiarity with and distance from the stories. They will share insights about the role of their own scholarship and writing about intimate tales of suffering, rupture, continuity, and courage.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/family-affairs-2021-04-07 to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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book talk

Thu, Apr 15
02:00PM
Thu, Apr 15
02:00PM

lecture

Family History Today: Researching your Family History in Israel from Home

Searching for records of your family in Israel can be daunting. Fortunately, much of your research can now be done online. In this lecture, Garri Regev, President of the Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA), will provide an overview of the types of records available online and where to focus your efforts. In addition, you will learn about alternatives to vital records and how you can create a vivid picture of how your ancestors lived in Israel.

This program is funded, in part, by a Humanities New York CARES Grant, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/family-history-today-2021-04-15 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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lecture

Tue, Apr 20
02:00PM
Tue, Apr 20
02:00PM

conversation

A Conversation on Charlotte Salomon

Griselda Pollock (University of Leeds, UK) will be in conversation with Kerry Wallach (Gettysburg College, PA) about the work and life of the Berlin-born Jewish artist, Charlotte Salomon (1917-1943).

Murdered with her unborn child on arrival at Auschwitz in 1943 at the age of 26, Charlotte Salomon left behind an artistic legacy that is as beguiling as it is perplexing. A single, composite artwork of images, text and music that she titled Leben? oder Theater? (Life? Or Theater?) comprises 784 paintings in a variety of modes produced in one year between 1941 and 1942 in the South of France. Salomon began the work after having spent several months in a French concentration camp at Gurs where many ‘German’ refugees in the France had been interned, including Hannah Arendt. In 1943, Salomon had been forced into hiding once Italy, hitherto controlling the Nice region where so many Jewish refugees had sought refuge, fell to German control after Hitler’s invasion of Italy. Pollock is the author of Charlotte Salomon and the Theatre of Memory (Yale U. Press, 2018. She has described Leben? oder Theater? as “an event in the history of modern art,” and has sought to present a searching analysis of Salomon’s paintings through the lenses of feminist art history and Jewish studies in order to draw out a more complex range of meanings in the work than are usually ascribed to it when it has treated as a visual autobiography.

Kerry Wallach, the author of Passing Illusions: Jewish Visibility in Weimar Germany (U. of Mich. Press, 2017), brings to the conversation insights that she has gained from her research on German-Jewish culture as well as new ones related to the preparation of the first book-length study of East European-born Jewish artist and illustrator Rahel Szalit-Marcus (1888–1942).

Ticket Info: Free; register at eventbrite.com/e/a-conversation-on-artist-charlotte-salomon-tickets-132447779875 for a Zoom link


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conversation

Thu, Apr 22
01:00PM
Thu, Apr 22
01:00PM

lecture

Sephardi Thought and Modernity: In Praise of the Orient: Elia Benamozegh’s Sephardic Modernities

The intention of this series is to spark the interest in processes of Jewish modernization not exclusively mediated by Europeanization. The questions we will be dealing with are related to non-dichotomic identities, multiplicity and loss of language, colonization, social transformation, and intellectual responses to it. We will approach these questions by looking at Jewish-Arab influences, the Sephardi response to European modernization, the responses of the rabbinic leadership and the work of Sephardi intellectuals.

April 22nd: Clemence Boulouque (Columbia University): In praise of the Orient: Elia Benamozegh’s Sephardic Modernities

Ticket Info: Free; register at ucalgary.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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lecture

Mon, Apr 26
04:00PM
Mon, Apr 26
04:00PM

book talk

In a brief life that led to a violent end, Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel (1906–1947) rose from desperate poverty to ill-gotten riches, from an early-twentieth-century family of Ukrainian Jewish immigrants on the Lower East Side to a kingdom of his own making in Las Vegas. In this captivating portrait, author Michael Shnayerson sets out not to absolve Bugsy Siegel but rather to understand him in all his complexity.

Through the 1920s, 1930s, and most of the 1940s, Bugsy Siegel and his longtime partner in crime Meyer Lansky engaged in innumerable acts of violence. As World War II came to an end, Siegel saw the potential for a huge, elegant casino resort in the sands of Las Vegas. Jewish gangsters built nearly all of the Vegas casinos that followed. Then, one by one, they disappeared. Siegel’s story laces through a larger, generational story of eastern European Jewish immigrants in the early- to mid-twentieth century.

Program registrants will receive a code for 30% off and free shipping on the book.

This program is funded, in part, by a Humanities New York CARES Grant, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/bugsy-siegel-2021-04-26 to receive a Zoom link


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book talk

Tue, Apr 27
04:00PM
Tue, Apr 27
04:00PM

lecture

Due to their unique mediation between the score, the stage, and their audiences, singers are one of the most indispensable elements of opera’s performance and reception. Although opera singers have often inspired scholarship about their geographical, social, and ethnic backgrounds, few studies have designed methods for comparing the experiences of large numbers of singers at the same time. What is more, beyond biographies of individual performers, Jews are rarely understood as significant contributors to the American opera scene. Yet examination of their presence in the Center for Jewish History’s archives confirms that there is merit in undertaking devoted study of their vocal careers.

In this talk, Samantha M. Cooper (CJH Dr. Sophie Bookhalter Graduate Fellow in Jewish Culture 2020-2021, NYU Ph.D. Candidate in Historical Musicology) presents the first extended investigation into the patterns that shaped the trajectories of numerous men and women of Jewish descent who pursued careers as opera singers in New York between 1880 and 1940. Drawing on a wealth of archival resources, she unearths over 50 European- and American-born singers from Jewish families who sang in the citadel of America’s opera scene: New York City. Specifically, she attends to how the outsized frequency of name-changing, connections with the synagogue cantorate, performances for Jewish organizations, recordings in Jewish languages, networking with other Jewish musicians, impact of the Holocaust, and dedication to the State of Israel shaped these singers’ professional lives in particularly Jewish ways. Ultimately, Cooper finds that the statistically significant presence of extraordinarily talented Jewish performers in the American opera industry constituted a much more ordinary reality than scholars of American Jewish history have previously realized.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/tradition-of-talent-2021-04-27 to receive a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, May 20
01:00PM
Thu, May 20
01:00PM

lecture

Sephardi Thought and Modernity: Rabbi Yosef Knafo’s Struggle for Democratization of Knowledge in Fin de Siècle Essaouira

The intention of this series is to spark the interest in processes of Jewish modernization not exclusively mediated by Europeanization. The questions we will be dealing with are related to non-dichotomic identities, multiplicity and loss of language, colonization, social transformation, and intellectual responses to it. We will approach these questions by looking at Jewish-Arab influences, the Sephardi response to European modernization, the responses of the rabbinic leadership and the work of Sephardi intellectuals.

May 20th: Gabriel Abensour (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): Rabbi Yosef Knafo’s Struggle for Democratization of Knowledge in Fin de Siècle Essaouira

Ticket Info: Free; register at ucalgary.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Jun 17
01:00PM
Thu, Jun 17
01:00PM

lecture

Sephardi Thought and Modernity: Foreign in a Familiar Land - Language and Belonging in the Work of Jacqueline Kahanoff, Albert Memmi and Jacques Derrida

The intention of this series is to spark the interest in processes of Jewish modernization not exclusively mediated by Europeanization. The questions we will be dealing with are related to non-dichotomic identities, multiplicity and loss of language, colonization, social transformation, and intellectual responses to it. We will approach these questions by looking at Jewish-Arab influences, the Sephardi response to European modernization, the responses of the rabbinic leadership and the work of Sephardi intellectuals.

June 17th: Yuval Evri (King’s College London) and Angy Cohen (University of Calgary): Foreign in a familiar land: language and belonging in the work of Jacqueline Kahanoff, Albert Memmi and Jacques Derrida

Ticket Info: Free; register at ucalgary.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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Presented by:

lecture