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Sun, Aug 09
01:30PM
Sun, Aug 09
01:30PM

concert

BEYLE100: Celebrating a Century of the Yiddish Songs, Poetry & Artistic Vision of Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman – Live on Zoom

Join us for a special online concert celebrating the 100th Birthday of Yiddish songwriter/poet/singer Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman (1920-2013). The program, conceived by Binyumen Schaechter, and organized by Schaechter with the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, will feature a number of the Yiddish world’s leading contemporary performers including Michael AlpertSharon BernsteinDovid BraunPatrick FarrellItzik GottesmanSvetlana KundishJanet LeuchterSasha LurjeSarah MyersonBinyumen SchaechterReyna SchaechterTemma SchaechterGitl Schaechter-ViswanathAsya Vaisman SchulmanAlicia SvigalsPerl TeitelbaumTheresa TovaLucette van den BergJosh Waletzky, and Hy Wolfe. Yiddish actor Shane Baker will serve as emcee.

Born in Vienna and raised in Chernovitz (then Romania, now Ukraine), Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman came to New York in 1951, and created an oeuvre of vivid songs and poetry covering a wide range of subjects from subway musicians, to personal reminiscences, to descriptions of street life near her home in the Bronx. Writing in Yiddish, Schaechter-Gottesman’s work uniquely captures universal themes from intimate snapshots, while humanizing the bustle of modern life. Schaechter-Gottesman was named a National Heritage Fellow by the National Endowment for the Arts in 2005, and her songs continue to be performed and enjoyed across the globe.

Planning Committee:
Shane Baker, Dovid Braun, Itzik Gottesman, Ethel Raim, Pete Rushefsky, Binyumen Schaechter, Josh Waletzky, Alex Weiser

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at yivo.org/Beyle100 to receive a link to the Zoom program

Made possible by: The Center for Traditional Music and Dance’s An-sky Institute for Yiddish Culture, Congress for Jewish Culture, CYCO, Hebrew Actors Foundation (Union), Jewish People’s Philharmonic Chorus, KlezKanada, League for Yiddish, Museum of Jewish Heritage, Sholem Aleichem Cultural Center, Workers Circle, Yiddish New York, YIVO Institute, Yugntruf Youth for Yiddish


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concert

Mon, Aug 10
08:00PM
Mon, Aug 10
08:00PM

concert

Cantata Profana Performs Gustav Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde – on Facebook Live and YouTube

YIVO joins forces with the young, “intrepid” (New Yorker) instrumental and vocal chamber ensemble Cantata Profana to present Gustav Mahler’s epic song symphony, Das Lied von der Erde (The Song of the Earth) in Arnold Schoenberg and Rainer Riehn’s chamber orchestra arrangement.

Ticket Info: Free; registration not required. Premiering on YIVO's Facebook page and Cantana Profana's YouTube.


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concert

Tue, Aug 11
04:00PM
Tue, Aug 11
04:00PM

talk

A story from the Archives of the Leo Baeck Institute

With a keen photographic eye and sharp sense of humor, Emil Carl Grossmann documented his life as he encountered the quotidian joys and historic upheavals characterizing a life that spanned the 20th century. Diverse materials including autographed playbills, photographs of zoo animals, and personal ads, along with reminders of his family’s tragic history, come together to give a fuller picture of Grossmann and his time. By exploring his archival collection, Sarah Glover, Archivist at the Center for Jewish History, shows how much we can learn from just one box.  With Michael Simonson, head of the Reference Department and Director of Public Outreach for the Leo Baeck Institute.

About the Series
At the Center for Jewish History, there are tens of thousands of boxes in our partners’ archival collections. Boxes filled with photographs, journals, letters, and documents. We take these treasures Out of the Box in our new series. Join us!

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at grossmann.bpt.me to receive a link to the program on Zoom


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About the Speakers:

Sarah Glover is an Archivist and Digitization Projects Liaison at the Center for Jewish History, where she has worked since 2015. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she studied English, History, and Jewish Studies and her Master of Science in Information from the University of Michigan. Sarah uses her knowledge of German, Hebrew, and Yiddish in her archival work.

Michael Simonson serves as the head of the Ira S. Lewy Reference Department and as the Director of Public Outreach for the Leo Baeck Institute. Originally from Minnesota, Michael studied German history and German language before attending Pratt Institute for archival studies. A former President of the Archivist Roundtable of Metropolitan New York, Michael has worked as an archivist at LBI for the last 17 years.


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talk

Wed, Aug 12
04:00PM
Wed, Aug 12
04:00PM

book talk

Sue Eisenfeld is a Yankee by birth and a Virginian by choice, an urbanite who came to appreciate the rural South while understanding the need to interrogate its complexities. In Wandering Dixie: Dispatches from the Lost Jewish South, she travels to nine states, uncovering how the history of Jewish southerners converges with the region’s complex, conflicted present. Learning how southern Jews benefited from slavery and escaped some discrimination by not being on the lowest rung of society’s ladder, she finds herself on an African-American history journey as well, investigating the unexpected ways that race, religion, and hidden histories intertwine.

If you would like more information about the National Museum of American Jewish History please visit nmajh.org

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; reservation required at eisenfeld.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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book talk

Tue, Aug 18
02:00PM
Tue, Aug 18
02:00PM

book talk

LBI Book Club, Volume IV: The German Bride by Joanna Hershon – Live on Zoom

The German Bride, by Joanna Hershon, begins in Berlin in 1861. Eva Frank, a 16-year-old Jewess, has her portrait painted, which leads to an indiscretion that has devastating consequences. Desperate to escape a painful situation, Eva marries Abraham Shein, an ambitious merchant who has returned home to Germany for the first time in a decade since establishing himself in the American West. The young bride leaves Berlin and its ghosts for an unfamiliar life halfway across the world, traversing the icy waters of the Atlantic and the rugged, sweeping terrain of the Santa Fe Trail.

Though Eva’s existence in the rough and burgeoning community of Sante Fe, New Mexico, is a far cry from her life as a daughter of privilege, she soon begins to settle into the mystifying town. But this new setting cannot keep at bay the overwhelming memories of her former life, nor can it protect her from an increasing threat to her own safety that will force Eva to make a fateful decision.

Join LBI and author Joanna Hershon on August 18th at 2:00 PM EDT in discussing this fascinating novel, which was also shaped in part by Hershon's research at the Leo Baeck Institute. The Zoom information will be sent via email before the event.

Author

Joanna Hershon is the author of five novels: St. Ivo (Farrar, Straus & Giroux April 2020), SwimmingThe Outside of AugustThe German Bride and A Dual Inheritance (Ballantine Books). Her writing has appeared in Granta, The New York Times, One Story, The Virginia Quarterly Review, the literary anthologies Brooklyn Was Mine and Freud’s Blind Spot, and was shortlisted for the 2007 O. Henry Prize Stories. Her two most recent novels are A Dual Inheritance and St. Ivo, a contemporary suspense novel set in New York City. She teaches in the Creative Writing department at Columbia University and lives in Brooklyn with her husband, painter Derek Buckner, their twin sons and daughter. Learn more about Hershon and her work on her website.

Ticket Info: Free; register at eventbrite.com/e/lbi-book-club-vol-iv-the-german-bride-by-joanna-hershon-featuring-author-tickets-113666258840 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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book talk

Thu, Aug 20
06:00PM
Thu, Aug 20
06:00PM

lecture

Jennifer Mendelsohn is the founder of #resistancegenealogy, a social media movement that’s garnered international attention by using genealogical and historical records to fight disinformation and honor America’s immigrant past. In this session she’ll talk about her path to becoming an “accidental activist.” She’ll also detail how her genealogical adventures have helped reunite long lost family members, debunked decades-old family fairy tales (Did you know no names were changed at Ellis Island?) and led to shocking, poignant and sometimes hilarious revelations.  

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at mendelsohn.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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lecture

Thu, Sep 10
04:00PM
Thu, Sep 10
04:00PM

panel discussion

Join Deborah Dash Moore, Elisheva Carlebach, Dara Horn, and Itamar Borochov, in a discussion of Confronting Modernity, 1750–1880, vol. 6 of The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, edited by Elisheva Carlebach.

Hear voices rarely included in Jewish culture, such as that of Roza, a multilingual Jewish midwife or that of a Jewish soldier during the American Civil War. Learn about the powerful religious music inspiring artists of today as well as Jewish debates on all sides of religious and political issues. Some defended and others repudiated the notion of private property. Some defended and others repudiated the institution of slavery.

What happens to our understanding of Jewish civilization when those who are often marginalized move to the center of the story? Discover the unexpected breadth of Jewish culture.

Confronting Modernity, 1750–1880, vol. 6 of The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, is a landmark project to collect and translate primary sources from a period "in which every aspect of Jewish life underwent the most profound changes to have occurred since antiquity,” as the editor Elisheva Carlebach describes it. This wide-ranging collection includes a diverse selection of literature, music, art, theater, and more created by Jews around the world, translated from more than a dozen languages.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; reservation required at posen.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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panel discussion

Wed, Sep 16
06:30PM
Wed, Sep 16
06:30PM

book talk

People of the Book Club: The World That We Knew – Live on Zoom

Go behind the stories and peer inside the archives at our book discussion, led by Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History. This session will feature a discussion of The World That We Knew by Alice Hoffman, a work of historical fiction and magical realism set in 1941, that follows three young women as they flee from Berlin into France to escape the Nazi regime. The discussion will be followed by a show and tell with archivist Michael Simonson, sharing documents and artworks from LBI’s collections that are connected to the setting and themes of the book.

“[A] hymn to the power of resistance, perseverance, and enduring love in dark times…gravely beautiful…Hoffman the storyteller continues to dazzle.” —THE NEW YORK TIMES

Participants will need to obtain their own copy to read before the discussion.

Ticket Info: Free, registration required at hoffman.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom program


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book talk

Thu, Sep 17
03:00PM
Thu, Sep 17
03:00PM

panel discussion

Omer Bartov, Attina Grossman and Daniel Mendelsohn in conversation with Natalia Aleksiun in our Opening Panel

In a series of discussions with leading scholars of modern Jewish history and the Holocaust, our new "Family Affairs" series explores researching and writing about Jewish experience from a distinctively personal perspective.

We will also discuss projects in the making, with scholars who are currently working on their books that either trace their family history or take this connection as a point of departure for their research. Despite their different disciplinary approaches and geographic scope, what these scholars share is the challenge of life-writing about close relatives. How does this experience change their thinking about Jewish history and their experience of writing it? What do these family affairs reveal to them in different ways?

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at familyaffairs.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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panel discussion

Tue, Sep 22
04:00PM
Tue, Sep 22
04:00PM

conversation

Natalia Aleksiun in conversation with Samuel Kassow

Natalia Aleksiun and Samuel Kassow discuss the legacies of Jewish historians before the Holocaust who wrote both academic and popular history for their community and engaged in creating a sense of Polish-Jewish belonging, while also fighting for their rights as an ethnic minority. What shaped their sense of both scholarly and communal mission? How relevant is their work to writing Jewish history today and to our understanding of the modern Jewish experience in East Central Europe?

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at conscioushistory.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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conversation

Wed, Oct 14
04:00PM
Wed, Oct 14
04:00PM

book talk

Derek Penslar will discuss his book Theodor Herzl: The Charismatic Leader with Jonathan Gribetz

About the book: The life of Theodor Herzl (1860–1904) was as puzzling as it was brief. How did this cosmopolitan and assimilated European Jew become the leader of the Zionist movement? How could he be both an artist and a statesman, a rationalist and an aesthete, a stern moralist yet possessed of deep, and at times dark, passions? And why did thousands of Jews, many of them from traditional, observant backgrounds, embrace Herzl as their leader?

Drawing on a vast body of Herzl's personal, literary, and political writings, historian Derek Penslar shows that Herzl's path to Zionism had as much to do with personal crises as it did with antisemitism. Once Herzl devoted himself to Zionism, Penslar shows, he distinguished himself as a consummate leader—possessed of indefatigable energy, organizational ability, and electrifying charisma. Herzl became a screen onto which Jews of his era could project their deepest needs and longings.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at herzl.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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book talk

Thu, Oct 22
07:30PM
Thu, Oct 22
07:30PM

lecture

Speaker: Sara Halpern

Facing an escalating demand for entry into the United States by German-speaking Jews in Shanghai in early 1941, the United States Consulate called the JDC for help. No one forewarned Laura Margolis, a translator for immigration interviews, about the Jewish refugees’ living conditions: over 16,000 Jewish refugees from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Poland desperate for food and housing. She set up a new JDC office. Under four directorships, four different regimes, and two wars, the JDC Shanghai office stood as a rock for Jewish refugees for a decade.

Drawing from the JDC Archives, testimonies, and memoirs, this lecture offers a tale of how the JDC Shanghai office, as both a transnational American and an international Jewish relief organization, and its ingenious directors navigated the regimes of the treaty port controlled by multiple powers, the Japanese puppet government, Chiang Kai-Shek, and Mao Zedong. Hailed by the senior administration in New York, the “Shanghai job” was one of the most difficult in the world. In contrast to Europe during the same period, the small, isolated JDC Shanghai office had to rely on the goodwill of the various consulates and local authorities to assist with the Jewish refugees’ survival and emigration to other destinations.

Closed captioning will be available during this program.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at halpern.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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lecture

Wed, Nov 11
04:00PM
Wed, Nov 11
04:00PM

discussion

In a series of discussions with leading scholars of modern Jewish history and the Holocaust, our new "Family Affairs" series explores researching and writing about Jewish experience from a distinctively personal perspective.

We will also discuss projects in the making, with scholars who are currently working on their books that either trace their family history or take this connection as a point of departure for their research. Despite their different disciplinary approaches and geographic scope, what these scholars share is the challenge of life-writing about close relatives. How does this experience change their thinking about Jewish history and their experience of writing it? What do these family affairs reveal to them in different ways?

Meri-Jane Rochelson and Devin E. Naar will discuss their projects and personal histories in Ashkenazi and Sephardi contexts, in conversation with Natalia Aleksiun.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at familyaffairs2.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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discussion