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Thu, Jul 18
02:00PM ET
Thu, Jul 18
02:00PM ET

lecture

Libes briv (18th C.): Isaac Wetzlar’s Call for Reform of Jewish Society and Education (in Yiddish) - Live on Zoom

Marion Aptroot | Delivered in Yiddish. 

Isaac Wetzlar, a Jewish merchant in Germany, writes a Yiddish letter of brotherly love to his brothers and sisters in the mid-18th century. He criticizes the fabric of Jewish society in the German lands and lays out plans for a reform of Jewish education in Ashkenaz in which both Hebrew and Yiddish play a part – for both sexes. Wetzlar calls for a return to basics within Jewish tradition, but he is also inspired by the contemporary Pietist Christian revival movement.

Further reading:

  •  The Libes Briv of Isaac Wetzlar. Edited and translated by Morris M. Faierstein. Atlanta, Ga.: Scholars Press, 1996.
  • Aptroot, Marion, and Rebekka Voß, eds. Libes Briv (1748/49) Isaak Wetzlars pietistisches Erneuerungsprogramm des Judentums: Textedition, Übersetzung, Kommentar und historische Beiträge. Hamburg: Buske, 2021.

About the Speaker
Marion Aptroot received an MA in Romance Languages from Leiden University and a DPhil in Yiddish Studies from the University of Oxford. After teaching as Preceptor in Yiddish at Harvard from 1993–1996, she was appointed professor of Yiddish Culture, Language and Literature at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf. Her research focuses on older Yiddish literature and the history of the Yiddish language in their broader contexts. She has written, co-edited or co-authored several books, including Araynfir in der yidisher shprakh un kultur (2002, 2016), Storm in the Community: Yiddish Polemical Pamphlets of Amsterdam Jewry, 1797–1798 (2002), Isaak Euchel, Reb Henoch, oder: woß tut me damit? Eine jüdische Komödie der Aufklärungszeit (2004), Jiddisch: Geschichte und Kultur einer Weltsprache (2010, 2023), Leket: Yiddish Studies Today (2012), Yiddish Language Structures (2014), Yiddish Knights (2020).

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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lecture

Sun, Jul 21
07:00PM ET
Sun, Jul 21
07:00PM ET

theatrical performance

The Trial of Adolf Eichmann - In-person Event

The Trial of Adolf Eichmann - In-person Event

Adapted on stage by David Serero

Inspired by actual events, this powerful drama takes audiences on a haunting journey through one of the most infamous trials in history, examining the depths of human evil and the quest for justice. 

Don’t miss this compelling and thought-provoking theatrical experience as the world premiere of “The Trial of Adolf Eichmann” opens in July 2024 at the Center for Jewish History, inviting audiences to reflect on the lessons of history and the enduring struggle for justice and reconciliation.

July 21 at 7:00PM EST
July 22 at 8:00PM EST (Premiere)
July 23 at 3:00PM EST
July 25 at 8:00PM EST

Ticket Info: $26-$36
For questions and more details please call 855.688.7277 (ext.1)


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theatrical performance

Mon, Jul 22
08:00PM ET
Mon, Jul 22
08:00PM ET

theatrical performance

The Trial of Adolf Eichmann - In-person Event

The Trial of Adolf Eichmann - In-person Event

Adapted on stage by David Serero

Inspired by actual events, this powerful drama takes audiences on a haunting journey through one of the most infamous trials in history, examining the depths of human evil and the quest for justice. 

Don’t miss this compelling and thought-provoking theatrical experience as the world premiere of “The Trial of Adolf Eichmann” opens in July 2024 at the Center for Jewish History, inviting audiences to reflect on the lessons of history and the enduring struggle for justice and reconciliation.

July 21 at 7:00PM EST
July 22 at 8:00PM EST (Premiere)
July 23 at 3:00PM EST
July 25 at 8:00PM EST

Ticket Info: $26-$36
For questions and more details please call 855.688.7277 (ext.1)


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theatrical performance

Tue, Jul 23
02:00PM ET
Tue, Jul 23
02:00PM ET

lecture

Musical Pripetshik: Lyrics and Melodies of Traditional Yiddish Folksongs - Live on Zoom

Michael Lukin | Delivered in English. 

Most of the Yiddish songs we know today were created in the first half of the 20th century and distributed through commercial channels such as sheet music, concerts, radio broadcasts, records and CDs, theater stages, and more recently through songbooks produced in educational settings around the world. Our discussion focuses on lesser-known songs – Eastern Yiddish musical folklore, which emerged over a period of approximately four hundred years preceding the formation of the “popular” repertoire. Although we lack transcriptions of melodies or lyrics from before the end of the 19th century, a comparative study of documentation collected from then until the middle of the 20th century reveals that older layers of this musical-poetic creativity had been preserved over long periods of time. I refer to this older repertoire as the "musical pripetshik." Similar to the traditional combined home-heat-generating cooking oven known as the pripetshik, this old song repertoire was an integral part of Jewish culture, evolving in meaning and function over time. While for many, the image of the pripetshik corresponds to the nostalgic song by Mark Varshavski of 1901, this lecture will explore the earlier history of this and other poetic and musical images to offer an appreciation of their significance.

About the Speaker
Dr. Michael Lukin of the Jewish Music Research Centre (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) researches the traditional culture of Yiddish speakers from various perspectives: the ethnomusicological, the folkloristic, and the historical. His recent publications in Polin, Shofar, Oxford Handbook of Slavic and East European Folklore, and Music Traditions illuminate the music and poetics of Yiddish folksongs and the history of their scholarship. Over the past four years, as a Polonsky Fellow in Oxford and a Mandel-Scholion Postdoctoral Fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, he has engaged in extensive exploration of additional aspects of Jewish Eastern European music and folklore, including semiotics of various genres, their historical development, as well as their encounters with non-Jewish traditions. Lukin teaches courses on music and folklore in the Yiddish-speaking cultural realm, Hasidic musical thought, and music by Jews – at the Hebrew University and Bar-Ilan University. This year he has been a fellow at the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, working on his new project about Hasidic nigunim.

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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lecture

Tue, Jul 23
03:00PM ET
Tue, Jul 23
03:00PM ET

theatrical performance

The Trial of Adolf Eichmann - In-person Event

The Trial of Adolf Eichmann - In-person Event

Adapted on stage by David Serero

Inspired by actual events, this powerful drama takes audiences on a haunting journey through one of the most infamous trials in history, examining the depths of human evil and the quest for justice. 

Don’t miss this compelling and thought-provoking theatrical experience as the world premiere of “The Trial of Adolf Eichmann” opens in July 2024 at the Center for Jewish History, inviting audiences to reflect on the lessons of history and the enduring struggle for justice and reconciliation.

July 21 at 7:00PM EST
July 22 at 8:00PM EST (Premiere)
July 23 at 3:00PM EST
July 25 at 8:00PM EST

Ticket Info: $26-$36
For questions and more details please call 855.688.7277 (ext.1)


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theatrical performance

Tue, Jul 23
06:00PM ET
Tue, Jul 23
06:00PM ET

lecture

Family History Today  It s Hard to Say Goodbye - Challenges Faced by Eastern European Jewish Emigrants     Live on Zoom

Family History Today: It's Hard to Say Goodbye - Challenges Faced by Eastern European Jewish Emigrants – Live on Zoom

Emily Garber, professional genealogist/Jewish genealogy blogger, will focus on a rarely if ever discussed but nonetheless crucial part of the Jewish emigration experience, the journey of Eastern European Jews from their homes to the ships between 1880-1914. Ms. Garber will answer questions including: What were the emigration requirements? Where, how, and from whom did they purchase passage? How did the emigrants know how to get from their shtetls to the ports? Did they receive any help along the way?

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register here


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lecture

Thu, Jul 25
02:00PM ET
Thu, Jul 25
02:00PM ET

lecture

Ethnographers between Yiddish and Polish: a Study in Intellectual History (in Yiddish) - Live on Zoom

Karolina Szymaniak | Delivered in Yiddish. 

Chaim Chajes, secretary of YIVO's Ethnographic Commission and a figure central to establishing its early research program, is barely mentioned in publications devoted to Jewish ethnography. Daniel Fajnsztejn, the first Doctor of Ethnology at Stefan Batory University in Vilna, appears in the pages of Jewish history only as a member of the "Paper Brigade" in the Vilna Ghetto. Their near complete invisibility in Polish and Jewish intellectual history is, in part, a result of their simultaneous membership in two different cultural spheres and intellectual worlds – as figures of the Polish-Jewish "cultural borderland." This lecture will present fuller profiles of both researchers and their role in shaping modern ethnography and what could have become a new field of study, the development of which was interrupted by the outbreak of World War II and the Holocaust.

This work is based on research conducted together with Prof. Anna Engelking.

About the Speaker
Karolina Szymaniak is Assistant Professor in the Jewish Studies Department of the University of Wroclaw and Research Fellow at the Jewish Historical Institute (Warsaw). Her research interests range across modern Yiddish literature, Polish-Jewish cultural relations, and translation studies. In addition to having taught Yiddish language and culture throughout Poland and Europe, she has also served as a consultant for the POLIN Museum and as a curator for the Museum of Modern Art in Lodz. Her recent publications include Montages: Debora Vogel and the New Legend of the City and My wild goat: Anthology of Women Yiddish Poets (in Polish). She is also the editor of Rachel Auerbach's Ghetto Writings (in Polish), which received the 2016 Polityka History Award, as well as the memoirs of Malke Lee and Hinde Bergner.

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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lecture

Thu, Jul 25
08:00PM ET
Thu, Jul 25
08:00PM ET

theatrical performance

The Trial of Adolf Eichmann - In-person Event

The Trial of Adolf Eichmann - In-person Event

Adapted on stage by David Serero

Inspired by actual events, this powerful drama takes audiences on a haunting journey through one of the most infamous trials in history, examining the depths of human evil and the quest for justice. 

Don’t miss this compelling and thought-provoking theatrical experience as the world premiere of “The Trial of Adolf Eichmann” opens in July 2024 at the Center for Jewish History, inviting audiences to reflect on the lessons of history and the enduring struggle for justice and reconciliation.

July 21 at 7:00PM EST
July 22 at 8:00PM EST (Premiere)
July 23 at 3:00PM EST
July 25 at 8:00PM EST

Ticket Info: $26-$36
For questions and more details please call 855.688.7277 (ext.1)


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theatrical performance

Thu, Aug 08
05:00PM ET
Thu, Aug 08
05:00PM ET

lecture

Family History Today: Researching your Jewish Ancestors in Greater Hungary – Live on Zoom

Jordan Auslander, forensic genealogist and author of the Genealogical Gazetteer for the Kingdom of Hungary, will provide an overview of resources available online and in European archives for tracing your family history in Hungary and former Hungarian territories over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. He will also discuss Jewish demographics, record keeping, the Holocaust, and the diasporas before and after World War II, concluding with an examination of the contemporary resurgence of Jews in Hungary in the face of Viktor Orbán’s regime. 

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register here


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lecture

Wed, Nov 13
07:00PM ET
Wed, Nov 13
07:00PM ET

film screening and discussion

Joseph Brodsky: Epitaph for a Centaur, Six Years Later - In-person Event

Join YIVO and Poetry in America for a panel discussion and screening of a short film examining the life of Joseph Brodsky, the celebrated Russian-Jewish American writer and Nobel Laureate.

Through analyses of two of Brodsky's evocative poems, “Epitaph for a Centaur” and “Six Years Later,” this 25-minute film encapsulates Brodsky's exploration of identity, belonging, and the passage of time. The film examines the paradoxical relationship between the U.S. and Russia during the Cold War, intricately portrayed through the symbolic figure of the centaur—a representation of Brodsky’s own multi-faceted existence as Russian, American, and Jewish. By delving into the intricate language of Brodsky’s poetry, this short film explores Brodsky’s Jewish identity, his legacy, and the political undertones of his writing.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required


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Presented by:

film screening and discussion