21 | Oct
01:00PM
21 | Oct
01:00PM

walking tour

Sanctuary in the Heights: Migration and Memory in Washington Heights

Rob Snyder, author of the book Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York City, leads a walking tour and panel discussion in the northern Manhattan neighborhood once known as “Frankfurt on the Hudson” for its large population of German-Jewish refugees. Eight decades later, the neighborhood is still a vibrant home for new immigrant communities. Tickets to the walking tour include admission to a panel discussion at Hebrew Tabernacle Congregation at 3:30 pm. Visit lbi.org/in-the-heights for meeting location.

Ticket Info: $20 general; $15 CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at 800-838-3006


Presented by:

walking tour

21 | Oct
02:00PM
21 | Oct
02:00PM

lecture

Branching Out from Sepharad: Solving a Converso Mystery, with Sarina Roffe

Sarina Roffé, professional genealogist and founder of the Sephardic Heritage Project and author of Branching Out from Sepharad, outlines the history and expulsion of Jews in Spain, their history in Syria and immigration to the Americas. She discusses the Kassin rabbinic dynasty from the 12th century to the 50-year leadership of Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin in Brooklyn and solves a Converso mystery. 

Ticket Info: $5 at the door; free for JGS, ASF, NYG&B members


Presented by:

lecture

22 | Oct
06:30PM
22 | Oct
06:30PM

lecture

Bill Moyers on History, Memory and Democracy

The Inaugural Diamonstein-Spielvogel Forum on History and the Public Good
In Honor of Rabbi Dr. Ronald B. Sobel, President, Leo Baeck Institute-New York | Berlin

While filming a documentary in Israel, Bill Moyers was struck by the words attributed to the Baal Shem Tov and inscribed at the entrance to the Yad Vashem Holocaust Museum—“Remembrance is the secret to redemption.” As democratic institutions around the world reel from the eroding forces of inequality and intolerance, prize-winning journalist Moyers will reflect on the role of history and memory in preserving democracy and democratic institutions.

The lecture will be the first of a series of distinguished speakers reflecting on history and the public good initiated and sponsored by Dr. Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel and Ambassador Carl Spielvogel.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 LBI/CJH members at moyers.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

lecture

22 | Oct
07:00PM
22 | Oct
07:00PM

lecture

Synagogues of Iran: Design and Development in Urban Context

Professor Mohammad Gharipour will discuss his research and recently published book, Synagogues of the Islamic World: Architecture, Design, and Identity (Edinburgh University Press, 2017), which explores how the architecture of synagogues in Central Asia, the Middle East, North Africa, and Spain responded to contextual issues and traditions, as well as how these contexts influenced the design and evolution of synagogues. The book considers patterns of the development of synagogues in urban contexts in connection with urban elements and monuments, while revealing how synagogues reflect the culture of the Jewish minority at macro and micro scales.

This presentation is being made possible by the generous support of The Cahnman Foundation.

Ticket Info: $15 at bpt.me/3567682 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


About the Speaker:

Mohammad Gharipour is Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning at Morgan State University at Baltimore, Maryland. He obtained his Masters in Architecture from the University of Tehran and a Ph.D. in Architecture and Landscape History from Georgia Institute of Technology. He has received several awards, including the Hamad Bin Khalifa Fellowship in Islamic Art, the Spiro Kostof Fellowship Award from the Society of Architectural Historians, the National Endowment in Humanities Faculty Award, and was recognized as "one of the twelve minority scholars in the US who are making their mark in academia" in 2016 by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education Magazine. Professor Gharipour's books include Bazaar in the Islamic City (American University of Cairo Press, 2012), Persian Gardens and Pavilions: Reflections in Poetry, Arts, and History (I.B. Tauris, 2013), Calligraphy and Architecture in the Muslim World (co-edited with Irvin Schick, Edinburgh University Press, 2013), The City in the Muslim Word: Depictions by Western Travelers (co-edited with Nilay Ozlu, Routledge, 2014), and Sacred Precincts: The Religious Architecture of Non-Muslim Communities across the Islamic World (Brill, 2014). He is the director and founding editor of the International Journal of Islamic Architecture (www.intellectbooks.com/ijia).


Presented by:

lecture

23 | Oct
07:00PM
23 | Oct
07:00PM

panel discussion

The Man Who Made the Movies

Join us for a panel discussion with author Vanda Kreftt , David Kehr (curator, MoMA) and Frederick Wasser (Brooklyn College, CUNY) to celebrate the publication of The Man who Made the Movies: The Meteoric Rise and Tragic Fall of William Fox. A riveting story of ambition, greed, and genius unfolding at the dawn of modern America, this landmark biography brings into focus a fascinating brilliant entrepreneur—like Steve Jobs or Walt Disney, a true American visionary—who risked everything to realize his bold dream of a Hollywood empire.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 AJHS members, seniors, students at bpt.me/3582684 or 800-838-3006; $12 at the door


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

panel discussion

23 | Oct
07:00PM
23 | Oct
07:00PM

lecture

Exhibiting Difficult Histories: The 'Anti-Zionist' Campaign in Poland, 1967–1968, and Its Echoes Today

In March 1968, in reaction to a student rebellion, the communist government of Poland launched a noisy propaganda campaign against the alleged Zionists, who were accused of a conspiracy to undermine socialist Poland. The campaign of slander, harassment, and persecution forced half of Poland’s Jews into exile and deeply affected the life of those who remained.

For the fiftieth anniversary of the events this year, POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw prepared an exhibition and a rich program of educational and cultural events. This coincided with a stormy debate on the recent “Holocaust defamation law,” bringing mass attention to the program and opening a controversy on the nature of and responsibility for the campaign of 1968. Despite heavy criticism from the media of the right, the museum’s relevant temporary exhibition, lectures, debates and cultural events have already attracted an audience of 100,000 people.

Dariusz Stola, the director of POLIN, will discuss how this history is presented in their current temporary exhibition and the controversies surrounding it.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 YIVO members, students at yivo.org/Exhibiting-Difficult-Histories


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

lecture

25 | Oct
07:00PM
25 | Oct
07:00PM

history matters

Jews, Politics, and the 2018 Midterm Elections

When Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected president, his popularity with American Jews inspired this Yiddish quip from a Jewish Republican judge: The Jews now had three velten (worlds), he said. Di velt (this world), yene velt (the world to come), and Roosevelt. Historically, the majority of American Jews have continued to align themselves with the Democratic party. But like all voters, the critical issues that motivate Jewish voters reflect both a range of priorities and the current political terrain. Today, as the country grows increasingly polarized, are Jewish voters becoming more starkly divided as well? Are ideological schisms, generational divisions, and a shifting political landscape shaking up the “Jewish vote?” How do historical voting trends help us understand where we are today? As we approach the much anticipated 2018 midterm elections, veteran journalist Clyde Haberman sits down with an all-star panel for a candid conversation and more than one opinion. Rabbi Jill Jacobs, columnist Jeff Jacoby, political historian Julian Zelizer, and Democratic strategist Halie Soifer join Mr. Haberman for a spirited discussion about Jewish political involvement past and present, and how this year’s vote could shape the future.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 CJH/partner members, seniors, students at zelizor.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


About the Speakers:

Clyde Haberman first worked at The New York Times as a copy boy in 1964, then as a campus correspondent at City College of New York. After reporting for The New York Post, he returned to the Times in 1977and went on to become a Metro reporter, City Hall Bureau Chief and, from 1982 to 1995, a foreign correspondent based successively in Tokyo, Rome and Jerusalem. From 1995-2011, Mr. Haberman wrote the highly acclaimed column, NYC, and in 2011, started a new online column, The Day, and a series of interviews called Breaking Bread. Since 2014 Mr. Haberman has written a regular Times column accompanying Retro Report, a series of video documentaries exploring major news stories of the past and their continuing resonance. He is the writer and editor of The Times of the Seventies: The Culture, Politics, and Personalities That Shaped the Decade (Black Dog & Leventhal, 2013). In 2009, Mr. Haberman was part of a Times team that won the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News, awarded for coverage of the prostitution scandal that led to Gov. Eliot Spitzer's resignation, and he was inducted into the New York Press Club's Hall of Fame in 2015.


Rabbi Jill Jacobs is the Executive Director of T’ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rights, which mobilizes more than 2,000 rabbis and cantors and tens of thousands of American Jews to protect human rights in North America and Israel. Widely regarded as a leading voice on Jewish social justice, she has written about Jewish perspectives on social justice and human rights for more than two dozen publications. Rabbi Jacobs has been named three times to the Forward’s list of 50 influential American Jews, to Newsweek’s list of the 50 Most Influential Rabbis in America every year since 2009, and to the Jerusalem Post’s 2013 list of “Women to Watch.” She holds rabbinic ordination and an MA in Talmud from the Jewish Theological Seminary and is the author of Where Justice Dwells: A Hands-On Guide to Doing Social Justice in Your Jewish Community (Jewish Lights, 2011) and There Shall Be No Needy: Pursuing Social Justice through Jewish Law and Tradition (Jewish Lights, 2009).


Jeff Jacoby is an award-winning Op-Ed columnist for The Boston Globe, and a nationally recognized conservative voice. In 1994, the Globe recruited him from the Boston Herald, where he had been chief editorial writer since 1987. A native of Cleveland, Mr. Jacoby is the son of a Holocaust survivor and the product of a Jewish day-school education. Graduating from Boston University Law School in 1983, he briefly practiced law at the national firm of Baker & Hostetler, and was later an assistant to Dr. John Silber, the president of Boston University. In 1999, Jeff Jacoby became the first recipient of the Breindel Prize, a major award for excellence in opinion journalism. He has been recognized by the Institute for Justice with the Thomas Paine Award, which honors journalists “who dedicate their work to the preservation and championing of individual liberty.” In 2009, he was presented with the Ben Hecht Award for Outstanding Journalism on the Middle East and was included in the “Forward 50,” a list of the 50 most influential American Jews, in 2014.


A seasoned congressional aide, Obama administration alum and foreign policy expert, Halie Soifer is the first executive director of the Jewish Democratic Council of America and oversees the Jewish Electorate Institute, founded to examine Jewish voting patterns through a nonpartisan lense. Soifer has a long record working on issues of importance to the Jewish community and of concern to Jewish voters. For the past 16 years, she has served in various national security roles supporting Democrats in the U.S. Senate, House, and Executive Branch. Most recently, she served as national security advisor to Senator Kamala Harris (CA), where she advised the senator on matters related to foreign policy, defense, veterans and cybersecurity. In her positions on Capitol Hill and at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, Soifer served as a liaison to the Jewish community and organizations, and worked extensively on national security issues, including those related to Israel. A native of East Lansing Michigan, Ms. Soifer received her master’s degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Middle East Studies and international economics, and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan Honors College.


Julian E. Zelizer is the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes, Class of 1941 Professor of History and Public Affairs at Princeton University and a CNN Political Analyst. This year, Professor Zelizer is the Distinguished Senior Fellow at the New York Historical Society where he is working on a biography of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel for the Jewish Lives series at Yale University. He is the author and editor of 19 books on American politics and he has published over 800 op-eds. This January Norton will publish his new book, Fault Lines: The History of Divided America Since 1974, co-authored with Kevin Kruse. He is also working on as Pirate Politics: Newt Gingrich, the Speaker Wright Scandal and the Origins of Our Polarized Times to be published by Penguin Press. Zelizer authors a popular weekly column for CNN.Com and is a regular contributor to The Atlantic. His last book, The Fierce Urgency of Now: Lyndon Johnson, Congress, and the Battle for the Great Society was just awarded the D.B. Hardeman Prize for Best Book on Congress.


Presented by:

history matters

28 | Oct
02:00PM
28 | Oct
02:00PM

book talk

First Person: Jamie Bernstein

Leonard Bernstein’s eldest daughter, Jamie Bernstein, shares a rare and intimate look at her father on the centennial of his birth in her new memoir, Famous Father Girl: A Memoir of Growing Up Bernstein. Join Jamie and Broadway performer Alexandra Silber (Fiddler on the Roof) for conversation and a selection of the Maestro's most famous songs. A book signing and reception will follow the program.

Co-presented by the American Friends of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at jbernstein.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


About the Speakers:

Jamie Bernstein is a writer, broadcaster, filmmaker and concert narrator. In addition to writing her many articles and concert narrations, Jamie travels extensively, speaking about music as well as about her father, Leonard Bernstein. Jamie’s film documentary, Crescendo: The Power of Music has won numerous prizes and is now available on Netflix. Jamie’s memoir, Famous Father Girl, was published by HarperCollins in June of 2018.


Grammy nominated artist, Alexandra Silber recently completed a run on Broadway as Tzeitel in the Tony-nominated revival of Fiddler on the Roof. She made her professional acting debut in London’s West End at age 21, and her Broadway debut in 2011, playing opposite Tony-Award winner Tyne Daly in Terrence McNally’s Master Class. Alexandra has performed in Carnegie Hall, across the country and around the globe and is the author of the novel, After Anatevka, and her memoir, White Hot Grief Parade.


Accompanist Ben Moss is a pianist and performer who is currently appearing in and music directing Prospect Theater Company's The Hello Girls at 59E59 Theaters. His theater credits include Head over Heels,  Amelie, Brooklynite, Spring Awakening, and Arlington (with Alexandra Silber, available on Broadway Records). Ben can also be heard on the Audible recording of Alexandra Silber's After Anatevka, and he appears monthly at The Bongo Hour, hosted by Peter Smith and Sandy Honig at The Slipper Room.


Presented by:

book talk

01 | Nov
07:00PM
01 | Nov
07:00PM

book talk

Lake Success: A Novel

A book talk celebrating the publication of Gary Shteyngart’s new novel. Lake Success is a poignant tale of familial longing and an unsentimental ode to what really makes America great. Gary Shteyngart will be in conversation with Suketu Mehta.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 AJHS members, seniors, students at bpt.me/3618498 or 800-838-3006; $12 at the door


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

book talk

04 | Nov
03:00PM
04 | Nov
03:00PM

book talk

A Rich Brew: How Cafés Created Modern Jewish Culture

Shachar Pinsker (University of Michigan) provides a fascinating glimpse into the world of the coffeehouse and its role in shaping modern Jewish culture. He uncovers a network of interconnected cafés that were central to the modern Jewish experience in a time of migration and urbanization. Pinsker follows coffeehouses in Odessa, Warsaw, Vienna, Berlin, New York City, and Tel Aviv, from the mid-19th to mid-20th centuries. These cafés fostered a modern Jewish cultural ferment, an exchange of philosophical ideas and political ideologies, as well as a new Jewish literary culture. The mix of the national and transnational characteristics of the coffeehouse, and their "otherness" explain why many of these cafés were owned by Jews, why Jews became their most devoted habitués, and how cafés acquired associations with Jewishness. Drawing on stories, novels, poems, newspaper articles, memoirs, archival documents, photographs, caricatures, and artwork, Pinsker shows how Jewish modernity was born in the café, nourished, and sent out into the world by way of politics, literature, art, and theater. What was experienced and created in the space of the coffeehouse touched thousands who read, saw, and imbibed a modern culture that redefined what it meant to be a Jew in the world.  Pinsker will be joined for a lively discussion with author Ruby Namdar and Anita Norich (2018-19 NEH Senior Scholar at CJH, University of Michigan).

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at pinsker.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

book talk

08 | Nov
06:30PM
08 | Nov
06:30PM

commemoration

Kristallnacht: 80th Anniversary Commemoration

Featuring remarks by historian Marion Kaplan (NYU), the premiere of a short documentary featuring individuals sharing their memories of 1938, reflections by radio personality and author Martin Goldsmith, and a musical performance by the Phoenix Chamber Ensemble. Additional funding by the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 LBI/ASJM members, seniors, students at bpt.me/3620875 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

commemoration

08 | Nov
06:30PM
08 | Nov
06:30PM

lecture

What's New in Jewish Genetics?

Reading DNA continues to sharpen our view of Jewish history, health, and identity. Join computational geneticist Itsik Pe’er (Columbia University) and moderator Nathan Pearson (rootdeep.com) to explore what our genomes say today...and may reveal in the future.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at genetics.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


About the Speakers:

Itsik Pe’er is an associate professor in Columbia University’s Department of Computer Science and the principal investigator at Columbia’s Lab of Computational Genetics. His laboratory develops and applies computational methods for the analysis of human genetics, particularly in isolated populations, such as Pacific Islanders and Ashkenazi Jews.

Genomicist Nathan Pearson has long explored what DNA reveals about health and history. Teaming with fellow scientists and genome-curious layfolk -- from historian Henry Louis Gates, Jr. to rocker Ozzy Osbourne and journalist Carl Zimmer -- he works to make inner data personally and scientifically useful. Trained at Stanford and the University of Chicago, Nathan has led science at the whole-genome interpretation company Knome, served as Senior Director of Scientific Engagement and Public Outreach at the New York Genome Center, and, most recently, founded Root to reward blood and marrow donor volunteers with wise, personal, and free insight from their own most vital genes, in memory of his mom (who died at 34 of blood cancer with no marrow donor). He writes at genomena.com and tweets as @GenomeNathan.


Presented by:

lecture

11 | Nov
02:00PM
11 | Nov
02:00PM

book talk

World War I and the Jews

On the centennial of the armistice ending The Great War, this program explores key findings of the new book, World War I and the Jews: Conflict and Transformation in Europe, the Middle East, and America (Berghahn), the first to deal with the war's monumental impact on world Jewry. The First World War utterly transformed the lives of Jews, unleashing massive suffering in many locales but also affording Jews a unique opportunity to display their patriotism and military prowess. Most profoundly, the war destroyed much of the political framework in which the majority of world Jewry had long existed, replacing it with a new order of nation-states that made their lives more uncertain and precarious.

This program features discussion between scholars of the war – the editors Marsha L. Rozenblit (University of Maryland) and Jonathan Karp (Binghamton University, SUNY) and several contributors, alongside historians Allan Arkush (Binghamton University, SUNY), Rebecca Kobrin (Columbia University) and Volker Berghahn (Columbia University) – about the conflict’s impact on Jewish communities in Europe, the Middle East and North America. A reception sponsored by Berghahn Books will follow, including sales of the new paperback edition.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at WWIandJews.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

book talk

12 | Nov
06:30PM
12 | Nov
06:30PM

curator's talk

Lost & Found – A Family Photo Album

Join curator Jacob Wisse on a tour of Lost & Found, exploring the remarkable story of a pre-war family photo album that was owned a woman who was deported from the Kovno Ghetto in 1943. Prior to her deportation, she smuggled the album to a non-Jewish Lithuanian family for safekeeping. After the album’s fortuitous discovery in 2013, it was reunited with the original owner’s descendants.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 seniors, students; free for YUM members, YU students, faculty, staff at bpt.me/3661204


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

curator's talk

15 | Nov
07:30PM
15 | Nov
07:30PM

film screening & conversation

Seltzertopia: Neither Egg, Nor Cream

Join us for a NY premier screening of the short Egg Cream and a celebration of the publication of Seltzertopia: The Extraordinary Story of an Ordinary Drink. Featuring Peter Miller and Barry Joseph and followed by tastings of various egg creams.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $7 AJHS members, seniors, students at bpt.me/3618545 or 800-838-3006; $12 at the door


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

film screening & conversation

18 | Nov
01:00PM
18 | Nov
01:00PM

lecture

The Afterlives of Shabbatai Zvi: A Lecture on the Memory of Heresy

This lecture by David Biale will examine the way 19th- and 20th-century authors remembered the Sabbatian movement, the great heretical explosion in the Jewish world of the 17th and 18th centuries.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at yivo.org/Shabbatai-Zvi


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

lecture

18 | Nov
01:00PM
18 | Nov
01:00PM

curator's talk

Art and Augmented Reality with artist Yona Verwer

Learn the creative potential of augmented reality.  Bring copies of personal photographs, videos, or texts, and your smartphone or tablet. Create a work using paints, pastels, or markers and learn the technology of embedding images that are visible only when focusing on an area with your smartphone or tablet.  If you choose, you may also incorporate photographic images from the Museum’s newest exhibition, Lost & Found – A Family Photo Album.

Ticket Info: $12 general; $8 YUM members, YU students, faculty, staff at bpt.me/3659277 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

curator's talk

18 | Nov
07:00PM
18 | Nov
07:00PM

concert

Soundscapes of Modernity: Jews and Music in Polish Cities

This concert presents music of Polish Jews that is little known to American audiences—choral pieces from 19th-century progressive congregations, compositions associated with Jewish music societies, and avant-garde works by Jewish composers.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations at JewishMusicForum.org or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

concert

21 | Nov
21 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm on Wednesday, November 21. It will remain closed Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 for Thanksgiving.


Presented by:

holidays and closures

22 | Nov
22 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 for Thanksgiving.


Presented by:

holidays and closures

23 | Nov
23 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, November 23 for Thanksgiving.


Presented by:

holidays and closures

26 | Nov
06:00PM
26 | Nov
06:00PM

exhibit opening

Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War

Just weeks after Kristallnacht, the first group of Jewish refugee children arrived in the United Kingdom. LBI and YUM launch an exhibition exploring this remarkable effort that saved some 10,000 children, many of whom never saw their parents again.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at kindertransport.bpt.me/3620932 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

exhibit opening

27 | Nov
07:00PM
27 | Nov
07:00PM

not just funny girl: jewish american women in comedy

From Jean Carroll to Mrs. Maisel: Jewish Women Comedians as Inspiration

A talk with Noah Gardenswartz, writer for The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, and Grace Overbeke, Dramaturg and Professor at Northwestern University. Join us for an evening of conversation, film clips, and good laughs as we discuss the life and work of comedian Jean Carroll, and how the character of “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” was inspired by Carroll, Joan Rivers, and other Jewish women comedians.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $7 AJHS members, seniors, students at  bpt.me/3660982 or 800-838-3006; $12 at the door


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

not just funny girl: jewish american women in comedy

27 | Nov
07:00PM
27 | Nov
07:00PM

lecture

What Did the Ten Commandments Look Like? Depictions in Text and in Art from the Bible to Rembrandt

Professor Jordan S. Penkower (Zalman Shamir Bible Department at Bar-Ilan University) will review the history of the Tablets of the Covenant and the Ten Commandments inscribed thereon, from the Bible through the Middle Ages, in both Jewish and Christian Art. Included is a study of two of Rembrandt’s paintings, in which the last five Commandments can be read clearly.

Ticket Info: Free; RSVP to yu.edu/rembrandt


Purchase Tickets


About the Speaker:

Professor Penkower is an expert on the transmission of the Hebrew Bible and masorah both in manuscripts and printed editions. His research extends to broad aspects of the Bible in rabbinic interpretation, as well as Jewish medieval biblical exegesis, especially that of Rashi. His publications focus on Textual Transmission of the Bible and the Masorah, The Bible in Rabbinic Exegesis and Medieval Jewish Biblical Exegesis.


Presented by:

lecture

28 | Nov
06:30PM
28 | Nov
06:30PM

curator's tour

Hey, Wow! The Art of Oded Halahmy

Join curator Audra Lambert on a tour of the exhibition Hey, Wow! The Art of Oded Halahmy, featuring lyrical sculptures and painted reliefs that reflect the rich, complex history of Jewish heritage in Babylonia. Celebrating the notion of homeland, Hey, Wow! explores themes originating in the eponymous popular Hebrew song originating from Iraq.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 seniors, students; free for YUM members, YU students, faculty, staff at bpt.me/3671118 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

curator's tour

29 | Nov
06:30PM
29 | Nov
06:30PM

leo baeck memorial lecture

Otto Frank & His Daughter’s Diary: The Making of a Universal Icon

Raphael Gross (German Historical Museum) will discuss Otto Frank’s role in helping to establish his daughter’s diary as the “emotional anchor” of West Germany’s first empathic confrontation with what would later be known as the Holocaust.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at bpt.me/3621119 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

leo baeck memorial lecture

03 | Dec
06:30PM
03 | Dec
06:30PM

musical theater

Monish: A Musical Tale of Talmud and Temptation

I.L. Peretz’s “Monish” is a tale in verse, a story about the seductive allure of alien cultures and the power of music. The Big Galute(e) Jewish Music Ensemble brings the tale to life in a dramatic, sexy, and moving translation.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 CJH/Partner members, Cornell alumni, seniors, students at monish.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

musical theater

03 | Dec
06:30PM
03 | Dec
06:30PM

curator's tour

Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War

Join us on a tour of Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War, illuminating the organized rescue efforts that brought thousands of children from Nazi Europe to Great Britain in the late 1930s. Explore the children’s difficult and often heartbreaking journeys through personal stories, artifacts and engaging media.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at kindertransport.bpt.me/33671412 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

curator's tour

06 | Dec
07:00PM
06 | Dec
07:00PM

concert

Sweet is Thy Voice: The Song of Songs in Concert

Shir hashirim, “The Song of Songs,” has inspired generations of Hebrew love poems, and musical settings in many languages, from Jewish and non-Jewish perspectives. This concert features a variety of music which engages with the ancient poem including new works commissioned for the occasion.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 YIVO members, students at yivo.org/Song-of-Songs


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

concert

09 | Dec
12:00PM
09 | Dec
12:00PM

musictalks

Hanukkah Concert for Families

Bring your children, bring your grandchildren and join cellist Elad Kabilio and the musicians from MusicTalks for a family-friendly send-off to Hanukkah. Hear stories and songs inspired by the Festival of Lights, across different cultures and musical styles; from Klezmer and Ladino to classical opera and jazz. Children will be treated to a special “musical instrument petting zoo”, where they can meet the musicians and experience their instruments close up. Come early to enjoy other family activities at the Center for Jewish History!

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 CJH/Partner members, seniors, children, YU students/faculty/staff; free children 5 and under at bpt.me/3671902 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

musictalks

09 | Dec
03:00PM
09 | Dec
03:00PM

concert

The Annual Hanukkah Concert

Ever a joyous experience, with music, song, plus a special story for the holiday, the Annual Hanukkah Concert always plays to a packed house. Come join us for a fun-filled afternoon that will thrill you with surprises and delight.

Ticket Info: $18 general; $12 AJHS/ASJM/CJH members; $9 seniors, students at bpt.me/3671934 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

concert

10 | Dec
09:00AM
10 | Dec
09:00AM

conference

The Displacement of Jewish Communal Life in Islamic Lands and Cultural Reconstruction in Israel

Scholars from Israel, the U.S., and Canada will explore the history and culture of the Jews from Islamic lands, their displacement and resettlement in Israel. Topics include: Jewish communal life, rabbis and religious life, cultural institutions and the responses of international institutions.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at bpt.me/3687694 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

conference

10 | Dec
06:30PM
10 | Dec
06:30PM

book talk

Reclaiming Citizenship: Stories of a New Jewish Return to Germany

Donna Swarthout, editor of a volume of essays by authors who reclaimed German citizenship as the descendants of persecuted Jews, discusses her story with historian David Sorkin (Yale), whose research on Jewish Emancipation illuminates the meanings of citizenship in Jewish history.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 LBI members, seniors, students at bpt.me/3621130 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

book talk

13 | Dec
06:30PM
13 | Dec
06:30PM

lecture

If not now, when? Turning to Gender in Jewish Studies

Prof. Anita Norich (2018-19 NEH Senior Scholar at CJH, University of Michigan) will deliver this keynote lecture as a part of the colloquium “The Gender Turn in Jewish Studies”. It concludes the work of the Scholars Working Group on Women and Gender which met for two years at the Center for Jewish History.

PLEASE NOTE: This event will take place at The New School.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at norich.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

lecture

13 | Dec
07:30PM
13 | Dec
07:30PM

concert

Unique Voices: Songs and Piano Trios

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble featuring countertenor Nicolas Tamanga in songs by Purcell/Britten, Chabrier, Hahn and Poulenc; and Piano Trios by Beethoven Op.1, No.2, and Op.1, No.3 with violinist Rebecca Fisher, cellist Raman Ramakrishnan and pianists Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky.

Made possible by Stravinsky Institute Foundation through the generous support of Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 CJH/partner members, seniors, students at phoenix.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

concert

16 | Dec
02:00PM
16 | Dec
02:00PM

lecture

The Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Collections Project

Jonathan Brent, Executive Director and CEO of YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, will speak about the Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Collections Project, begun in 2015, to conserve and digitize YIVO's entire prewar library and archival collections located in NYC and Vilnius, Lithuania, reuniting them through a dedicated web portal.

Ticket Info: $5 at the door; free for JGS/YIVO members.


Presented by:

lecture

16 | Dec
02:00PM
16 | Dec
02:00PM

concert

Ruth Rubin’s Legacy of Yiddish Song

An evening of singing, stories, and reminiscences by renowned vocalist and scholar Ruth Rubin's family, friends, colleagues, and students who continue to be inspired by her work, and a celebration of YIVO’s Ruth Rubin Legacy online exhibition.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 YIVO members, students at yivo.org/Ruth-Rubin-Concert


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

concert

24 | Dec
24 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm on Monday, December 24, and is closed Tuesday, December 25 for Christmas.


Presented by:

holidays and closures

25 | Dec
25 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, December 25 for Christmas.


Presented by:

holidays and closures

31 | Dec
31 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm on Monday, December 31 for New Year's Eve.


Presented by:

holidays and closures