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Sun, Dec 05
12:00PM ET
Sun, Dec 05
12:00PM ET

celebration

Eid Al-Banat

The Institute of Jewish Experience and the Mizrahi Dance Archive invites you to a unique global celebration of Eid Al-Banat!

This year for the North African holiday of Eid Al-Banat (The Festival of Daughters, in Judeo-Arabic), or Hag HaBanot (Hebrew), we are bringing together female Mizrahi talents to virtually celebrate North African Jewish traditions, female leadership, music, dance, and so much more.

This festival honors the story of Jewish heroines like Judith and Queen Esther and the important role of women in Jewish life until today. It is customary to sing, dance, and light the night’s menorah candle and focus on bringing together generations of mothers, daughters, aunts, sisters and the extended community. Women would traditionally get together to bake sweet treats and give gifts to each other. They would sing piyyutim and pray for the health and wellbeing of the women in their lives. It is a celebration of women, past and present.

In this year’s celebration, we will be featuring musician Lala Tamar, a world-renowned Israeli singer, who will be streaming a concert from Morocco accompanied by local female musicians. Lala is known for her bold and feminine style where she incorporates her Moroccan roots and the ancient Judeo-Spanish language of Haketia.

Jackie Barzvi will be leading us in celebratory dance to Jewish Moroccan music, where anyone can follow along, without any previous dance experience. Jackie is a professional Raqs Sharqi (belly dance) instructor and performer and the creator of the Mizrahi Dance Archive.

Dr. Hélène Jawhara Piñer, author of Sephardi: Cooking the History. Recipes of the Jews of Spain and the Diaspora from the 13th Century to Today will be sharing a new recipe created uniquely for this program that incorporates the historical and modern significance of the day in the context of specific food items.

Ticket Info: Free; register at us02web.zoom.usfor a Zoom link


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celebration

Sun, Dec 05
03:00PM ET
Sun, Dec 05
03:00PM ET

concert

David's Harp Returns – Live in Concert for Hanukkah

Bask in some of the Middle East’s most exhilarating music, played by David’s Harp: a program of Sephardic folk songs in Ladino (Judeo-Spanish), Turkish, Greek, and Hebrew. “Canciones de Sefarad,” sung with flute, oud, keyboard, and percussion, brings David’s Harp’s virtuosity and dynamic energy to the rich musical legacy of the Sephardim with this exciting program! 

This year’s storyteller is Eleanor Reissa, Tony-award nominee, award-winning playwright, actress, and international concert artist.

To ensure compliance with local health and safety guidelines, proof of full COVID-19 vaccination (at least 14 days after your final vaccine dose) with matching ID is required for all visitors 12 and older. You can provide proof of vaccination by displaying it on your smartphone, by presenting a physical copy, or by using the New York State Excelsior Pass or NYC COVID Safe App (Android | iOS). Other acceptable forms of COVID-19 vaccination proof are the CDC Vaccination Card or NYC Vaccination RecordMask wearing is mandatory throughout the building.

Ticket Info: $18 general, $12 members, $9 seniors and students at eventbrite.com


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concert

Tue, Dec 07
11:00AM ET
Tue, Dec 07
11:00AM ET

panel discussion

Jewish Identity in Lithuania Today

Join YIVO for a conversation about the resurgence of interest in Jewish identity in Lithuania today. YIVO’s Executive Director Jonathan Brent will interview Migle AnušauskaiteAnna Avidan, and Kestas Pikunas about their work with and interest in Jewish culture today.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Tue, Dec 07
03:00PM ET
Tue, Dec 07
03:00PM ET

panel discussion

Ethical Dilemmas for Religious Leaders in Times of Crisis

LBI & Fellowships at Auschwitz for the Study of Professional Ethics

The rise of National Socialism, an ideology that sought to assimilate all social institutions toward its political ends, forced a reckoning for those in fields that once valued their independence from the state and political concerns. This played out not just in the professions, such as business, journalism, law, medicine but also in religion. Join us as our panelists Michael A. Meyer (Hebrew Union College) and Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth College) examine the excruciating choices faced by Jewish religious leaders, such as Rabbi Leo Baeck, as well as the response of Church leaders to National Socialism.

When he was elected to head the Reich Representation of German Jews in 1933, Leo Baeck had to continually weigh the value of principled opposition and almost certain martyrdom against the limited opportunities he had to reduce harm to his flock – all while maintaining the unity of a diverse Jewish community under threat. Famously, Baeck personally foreswore emigration even as he worked tirelessly to facilitate the escape of others.

Christian leaders did not face the same existential threat, but they grappled with how to respond to a regime that was at best indifferent and sometimes hostile to the church. For example, the "German Christian" movement within the Lutheran Church eagerly set about taking steps to harmonize its theology with a völkisch ideology, even revising scripture to remove Jewish influences. More theologically conservative elements resisted what they perceived as a threat to the autonomy of the Church, but only a small number of individuals ever overcame an ingrained attitude of Christian anti-Judaism to resist the Nazi's racial policies.

Our panel will discuss how the institutions, the theology, the training, and the personal moral vision of these religious leaders impacted their choices.

About the Panelists
Michael A. Meyer is the Adolph S. Ochs Professor of Jewish History Emeritus, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati. Meyer is the author of more than 200 articles and reviews as well as numerous books, including Response to Modernity: A History of the Reform Movement in Judaism and the biography, Leo Baeck: Living a Religious Imperative in Troubled Times (2020).

Susannah Heschel is the Eli Black Professor of Jewish Studies at Dartmouth College. Her scholarship focuses on Jewish-Christian relations in Germany during the 19th and 20th centuries, the history of biblical scholarship, and the history of antisemitism. Her numerous publications include Abraham Geiger and the Jewish Jesus (University of Chicago Press), which won a National Jewish Book Award, and The Aryan Jesus: Christian Theologians and the Bible in Nazi Germany (Princeton University Press). She is the editor, with Robert P. Ericksen of the volume Betrayal: German Churches and the Holocaust (1999).

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Wed, Dec 08
04:00PM ET
Wed, Dec 08
04:00PM ET

lecture

Putting on Cologne: An Exploration of a Medieval City

The medieval city of Cologne was a bustling metropolis and a hub of commerce. The city is better known for its economic prowess, with Jews and Christians working side by side. But it is less known for its contribution to theology and canon law, from the Jewish to the halakha and Jewish tradition. Nevertheless, due to the city’s central location between England, the Low Countries, Northern France and the German Rhineland, it serves as a gauge for assessing many religious, political and cultural processes in the high middle ages. Dr. Ephraim Shoham Steiner, the 2021-2022 visiting scholar and a Fordham-NYPL Fellow in Jewish Studies, and members of Fordham’s faculty in Medieval Studies will explore together how Cologne served in this fashion drawing on examples from both medieval Christian and Jewish sources.

Ephraim Shoham-Steiner is Professor of Medieval Jewish History at the Department of Jewish History at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and an expert on urban life in Europe in the late Middle Ages. For 2021-2022, he is the Fordham-NYPL Research Fellow in Jewish Studies and a Visiting Scholar at Fordham University. He is the author of On the Margins of a Minority: Leprosy, Madness, and Disability among the Jews of Medieval Europe (2014) and more recently, Jews and Crime in Medieval Europe (Wayne State, 2020).

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org for a Zoom link


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lecture

Wed, Dec 08
06:30PM ET
Wed, Dec 08
06:30PM ET

book talk

UNDERJERUSALEMTheBuriedHistoryoftheWorldrsquosMostContestedCity

In UNDER JERUSALEM: The Buried History of the World’s Most Contested City, acclaimed journalist and author Andrew Lawler delves into the tombs, tunnels, and trenches of the Holy City—a saga of biblical treasures, intrepid explorers, and political upheaval—and brings to life the indelible characters who have investigated this subterranean landscape. Sharing previously unpublished images by National Geographic photographers, Lawler will discuss how the 150-year quest to unearth the city’s biblical history has not only led to remarkable discoveries, but also contributed to riots and bloodshed. And yet while the colorful array of excavators has helped spawn Zionism, create the state of Israel, and ultimately define the conflict over modern Jerusalem, their struggles to control this contested place may also provide a map for two peoples and three faiths to peacefully coexist.

This program is funded, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/under-jerusalem-2021-12-08 for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Dec 09
12:00PM ET
Thu, Dec 09
12:00PM ET

panel discussion

Back to Berlin

We are pleased to announce a virtual panel discussion of the film “Back to Berlin.” We will be joined by the film’s director, Catherine Lurie, and historian Dr. Moshe Zimmermann, for a discussion examining the intersection of sports, antisemitism, and racism in German-Jewish history.

About the Film
The “Back to Berlin” cameras follow eleven modern-day Jewish bikers on an epic journey from Tel-Aviv to Berlin, crossing nine European countries in 24 days. Their mission: To deliver the Maccabi torch to Hitler’s infamous 1936 Olympiastadion for the Opening Ceremony of the 2015 European Maccabiah Games. These riders follow in the tracks of the early 1930s’ bikers who set out from Tel Aviv to all corners of Europe to seek out athletes to compete in the first Maccabiah Games.

Each country holds a chilling resonance for the bikers - each a Holocaust survivor or descendant of a survivor. The juxtaposition of the present and past is the underlying thread, mixing archival footage with the 2015 journey. This is the story of people overcoming the worst as they attempt to reaffirm belief in a common humanity.

View the trailer here: youtube.com/watch?v=-e-6LP0Bt_M

About the Speakers
Catherine Lurie is a film producer and journalist based in London. She conceived the idea of Back to Berlin after working as a correspondent covering the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel, where she found, produced and directed five human interest stories. She is on the Board of Trustees for Maccabi World Union. Her company, Luria Media, focuses on subjects relating to humanitarian causes.

“This has been a project of passion. When I heard that Germany would host the 2015 Maccabi Games at this infamous site - I decided to capture this ironic moment, when Germany now welcomed Jews. We would deliver the torch and fly the Israeli flag defiantly against injustice and intolerance through a Europe where Jews once thrived.”

Dr. Moshe Zimmermann, born 1943 in Jerusalem, is Professor emeritus for German History. From 1986-2012 he was Director of the Richard-Koebner-Center for German History at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. Dr. Zimmermann has been a visiting professor in Heidelberg, Mainz, Princeton (USA), Köln, Halle, München, Saarbrücken, Kassel, Göttingen and Krakow (Poland). His work has garnered numerous prizes, including the Humboldt-Forschungspreis 1993, Jacob- und Wilhelm-Grimm-Prize of the DAAD 1997; Dr. Lukas Prize of the Uni Tübingen 2002 and the Lessing-Prize of the Lessing Akademie Wolfenbüttel 2006. He is the author of many publications in German, English and Hebrew about nationalism, antisemitism, the history of sport, film-history and German-Jewish history, as well as about the Holocaust, collective memory in Germany and Israel, and German-Israeli relations.

Anton Klix, Consul for Political Affairs at the German Consulate General New York, will offer welcoming remarks.

This event is co-hosted by the Friends of Freiburg University, the Leo Baeck Institute New York, and the German Consulate General New York.

Participants are encouraged to watch the film in advance. The link will be provided to those who register for the program.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Sun, Dec 12
02:00PM ET
Sun, Dec 12
02:00PM ET

yiddish club

YIVO Yiddish Club: Yiddish and Hasidic Culture in Film, Tv, and Theater Today With Lili Rosen

Nu, vilst redn a bisele yidish? An event for Yiddish enthusiasts the world over, the YIVO Yiddish club is an informal monthly gathering to celebrate mame-loshn. Hosted by Shane Baker, sessions take place in English, and are liberally peppered with Yiddish. Each month Baker is joined by a different guest who discusses their work and a related Yiddish cultural theme. In the spirit of a club, sessions are held as interactive zoom meetings in which participants can see and hear one another. Each session includes ample time for audience questions, group discussion, and, time permitting, knock-down, drag-out arguments. Attendees need not know any Yiddish to attend, though some familiarity with the language is highly recommended.

This session features actor, writer, and producer Lili Rosen for a discussion of Yiddish and Hasidic culture in film, TV, and theater today. Born and raised in a Hasidic Jewish community in Brooklyn, Rosen featured as Reb Yosele in the hit Neftlix series Unorthodox and is the managing director of New Yiddish Rep.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/YiddishClub9 for a Zoom link


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yiddish club

Mon, Dec 13
05:00PM ET
Mon, Dec 13
05:00PM ET

lecture

FamilyHistoryTodayMid-18thCenturyAmericanJewishGenealogyResearch-ResourcesandConsiderations

Researching Jewish ancestors who immigrated to the United States in the mid-1800’s can be challenging, as common genealogical resources which exist in later periods may be unavailable or less informative in this period. In this lecture, Nancy Levin, a professional genealogist licensed by the Board for Certification of Genealogists since 1997, will highlight some of the lesser-known resources and special considerations necessary for successful research in mid-1800’s America. 

Live closed captions will be available. 

This program is sponsored by the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at the Center for Jewish History. It is funded, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Live closed captioning has been made possible by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/family-history-today-2021-12-13 for a Zoom link


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lecture

Tue, Dec 14
01:00PM ET
Tue, Dec 14
01:00PM ET

lecture

Emotional Geography of Revenge: Polish Jews and the Search for Postwar Justice in the Polish Countryside

While there is now a considerable amount of work showing the disintegration and extra-legal purges omnipresent in postwar Europe in the immediate aftermath of liberation, individual Jews were usually written out of this story. They were often considered physically and emotionally incapable of getting revenge. The notion of revenge as not only morally ambiguous, but also “irrational” and “uncivilized” as well as dangerous, potentially leading to communal unrest and a circle of violence, was also at that point reinforced by representatives of the Polish Jewish community. Katarzyna Person discusses how individual survivors, despite very few opportunities available to them, did attempt to get both physical revenge and retribution. Thus the Jewish search for justice can and should be discussed as part of the wider European postwar search for revenge and retribution, while at the same time can be clearly disentangled from the violence surrounding it.


About the Speaker:

Katarzyna Person received her PhD from the University of London and her habilitacja from the Polish Academy of Science. She works in the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw, where she leads the Ringelblum Archive publishing project. She has published on the Holocaust and its aftermath in occupied Poland. Her most recent book is Warsaw Ghetto Police. The Jewish Order Service during the Nazi Occupation (Cornell University Press 2021).

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Dec 16
07:30PM ET
Thu, Dec 16
07:30PM ET

concert

Celebrating Beethoven’s Birthday: Phoenix Chamber Ensemble Plays Trios by Beethoven, Mozart & Dvorak

On Beethoven’s 251st birthday, Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performs Mozart’s Piano Trio in B flat, K. 502, Beethoven’s Piano Trio in G major, Op. 1, No. 2, and Dvorak’s, Trio No. 4 in E minor, Op. 90 ("Dumky"). Pianists Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky are joined by Anna Elashvili on violin and Raman Ramakrishnan on cello.

Auditorium seating is available for 100. This concert will also be live streamed for those who cannot attend in person. 

To ensure compliance with local health and safety guidelines, proof of full COVID-19 vaccination (at least 14 days after your final vaccine dose) with matching ID is required for all visitors 12 and older. You can provide proof of vaccination by displaying it on your smartphone, by presenting a physical copy, or by using the New York State Excelsior Pass or NYC COVID Safe App (Android | iOS). Other acceptable forms of COVID-19 vaccination proof are the CDC Vaccination Card or NYC Vaccination RecordMask wearing is mandatory throughout the building.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info:
In person: $15 general; $10 members, seniors, students – ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY; NO SALES AT THE DOOR
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On YouTube: Pay what you wish
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concert

Wed, Dec 22
12:00PM ET
Wed, Dec 22
12:00PM ET

panel discussion

Perspectives on Jewish Life in Germany Today

In December 1945, when asked by the German-Jewish emigre journal Aufbau in New York whether he thought there was any future for Jews in Germany, Leo Baeck answered unequivocally: “No! The history of German-speaking Jewry is definitively at its end. There is no turning back the clock.”

There was no stopping the clock either. The 15,000 or so Jews who had survived in hiding or in “mixed” marriages were joined by approximately 250,000 Jewish “Displaced Persons” from Eastern Europe seeking the safety of the American Occupation Zone. The vast majority prepared for emigration to Palestine or other countries outside Europe, but some remained to build lives in Germany, and the history of Jewish life in Germany continued.

Throughout 2021, the Shared History Project has traced the intertwined histories of German-speaking Jews and their neighbors across nearly two millennia full of transformations, surprises, and ruptures – none greater than the cataclysm that led Leo Baeck to declare the end of his people’s history. The postwar period has also seen dramatic transformations in Jewish life, however, most notably the influx of at least 200,000 people with Jewish backgrounds from the former Soviet Union after 1990.

Since then, the presence of a significant and growing Jewish population, new synagogues and rabbinical seminaries, and a burgeoning Jewish cultural sphere seemed to suggest that the “new” Germany had finally overcome its past. But how are Jewish people defining their own place within German society, within a Jewish sphere that is much more diverse than the rest of Germany recognizes, and within German and Jewish history and memory? In recent years, a vital and sometimes contentious discussion within and around the Jewish community in Germany has addressed questions about Jewish identity and belonging, the relationship between Jews and other minorities in Germany – especially the significantly larger Muslim population – and the uses and abuses of Jewish history in Germany’s public sphere.

Our panelists, historians Atina Grossmann (Cooper Union) and Darja Klingenberg (Viadrina University Frankfurt an der Oder) and the poet, theater-maker, and essayist Max Czollek will discuss the terms of these debates and how they emerged from the complex and fractured history of Germany’s post-war Jewish community.

About the Panelists
Atina Grossmann is Professor of Modern European and German History, and Women’s and Gender Studies at The Cooper Union, New York. Her numerous publications include Jews, Germans, and Allies: Close Encounters in Occupied Germany (2007, German 2012), Wege in der Fremde: Deutsch-jüdische Begegnungsgeschichte zwischen New York, Berlin und Teheran (2012), and Reforming Sex: The German Movement for Birth Control and Abortion Reform 1920–1950. She is a member of the Academic Advisory Board of the Leo Baeck Institute – New York | Berlin and the co-author (with Tamar Lewinsky) of the section on the period 1945–1949 in A History of Jews in Germany since 1945 (Michael Brenner, ed.), a companion to the LBI’s four-volume German-Jewish History in Modern Times.

Max Czollek lives in Berlin, where he was born in 1987. After studying political science at the Technical University (TU) of Berlin, he earned a doctorate at the TU's Center for Research on Antisemitism. Since 2009 he has been a member of the poetry collective G13, which publishes books and organizes lectures. Together with Sasha Marianna Salzmann he was initiator of “Desintegration. Ein Kongress zeitgenössischer jüdischer Positionen” (2016) and “Radikale Jüdische Kulturtage” (2017) at Maxim Gorki Theater Berlin, Studio R. Since 2021 he has been curating the Coalition for a Pluralistic Public Discourse (CPPD) on memory culture in the pluralizing European societies. His lyric books Druckkammern (2012), Jubeljahre (2015) and Grenzwerte (2019) were published at Verlagshaus Berlin. In 2018 his non-fiction book Desintegriert Euch! was published at Carl Hanser, followed by Gegenwartsbewältigung in 2020.

Darja Klingenberg is a Research Associate at the Faculty of Social and Cultural Sciences at the European Viadrina University in Frankfurt an der Oder. Her research interests include migration and mobility, the Russian-speaking diaspora, feminist theory, and the sociologies of food and humor. She earned her PhD in social sciences at the Goethe University in Frankfurt with a dissertation on the sociology of middle-class Russian-speaking immigrants in Germany, which is also the topic of her forthcoming book Wohnen nach der Migration. Materialismus, Hoffnung und Melancholie migrantischer Mittelschichten.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Wed, Dec 22
07:00PM ET
Wed, Dec 22
07:00PM ET

lecture & performance

A Very Jewish Christmas: Toledot Yeshu, a Jewish Anti-gospel

While the “December Dilemma” is a familiar challenge to Jews today, it has its origins in antiquity. Jews in the early days of Christianity encountered Christian traditions and sought to distinguish themselves and their beliefs. One result of this interreligious encounter is the ancient book, Toledot Yeshu, a satirical, carnivalesque anti-gospel telling the story of a magical but not divine Jesus. It was, in some Jewish communities, a tradition to read this story dramatically on Christmas Eve similar to the way that the Megiles-Ester is read on Purim. The text, shrouded in mystery, is extant in a variety of versions, and is believed to contain narrative traditions that are over 1500 years old. Renditions exist in Hebrew, Aramaic, Judeo Arabic, Judeo Persian, Ladino, and, of course, Yiddish. Rare versions were saved by the Paper Brigade from Nazi destruction and recently digitized as a part of the Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Online Collections Project.

Join YIVO for a very Jewish Christmas celebration featuring a talk on the history and receptions of Toledot Yeshu by Azzan Yadin-Israel. Following Yadin-Israel’s presentation, Shane Baker and Eleanor Reissa will perform a bilingual reading, in Yiddish and English, of a version of the story.

This event will take place in person with a kosher Chinese food feast following the presentation.

Proof of full COVID-19 vaccination with matching ID is required in order to enter the Center for Jewish History. Click here to see our Visitor Safety Requirements.

About the Participants
Azzan Yadin-Israel is a professor in the departments of Jewish Studies and Classics are Rutgers University, having earned a BA from the Hebrew University and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. His primary area of scholarship is early rabbinic literature, and he has published two books on midrash with the University of Pennsylvania Press. His monograph, "How the Forbidden Fruit Became and Apple" is forthcoming with the University of Chicago Press.

Shane Baker is executive director of the Congress for Jewish Culture, a Yiddish cultural organization based in New York. He is best known for playing Vladimir in his own Yiddish translation of Waiting for Godot, both Off Broadway and internationally. Pre-pandemic, he was appearing as his alter ego, Mitzi Manna in Her First-Ever Final Farewell Tour, with plans to continue in 2022. In 2020, he received Adrienne Cooper Dreaming in Yiddish Award.

Eleanor Reissa is a Tony nominated director, international concert artist, award winning playwright and Broadway actor. Fluent in two languages, English and Yiddish, she has lived a life in the theatre for over thirty years, in nearly every entertainment medium and in many parts of the world.  Her work is unique, honest, authentic, and reflects who she is. She appeals to a wide audience and has received critical recognition by the press as well as her peers.

Ticket Info: Live - $25 general; $20 YIVO members, students
Livestream – Free
Register for both at  yivo.org for a Zoom link


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lecture & performance

Wed, Jan 05
01:00PM ET
Wed, Jan 05
01:00PM ET

lecture

How Should We Think about Freedom?

Freedom is the main idea of American political life, but no one knows what it means. The right treats it as the highest value, but defines it very narrowly, as the absence of hindrances. The left supports policies that are liberating, but concedes the idea of freedom to the right. Intellectuals propose that freedom will be brought by larger forces, such as economics or technology, which perverts the very idea of individual agency. Americans associate freedom with abstractions and phantoms, such as the "free market," which means granting their own rights to entities that do not actually exist. Meanwhile, the digital world remodels thought and behavior towards conformism and polarization. What would it take to have a country of free speakers and free people?

In this lecture, Timothy Snyder defines freedom as the capacity to choose among values, envision futures, and realize some of them. He makes the case that freedom takes five forms: sovereignty, unpredictability, mobility, solidarity, and factuality. Finally, he presents a vision of a future where Americans are far freer than we are today, and in which their freedom leaves them more secure and more capable of addressing the ecological and other existential threats we face as a species.

About the Speaker
Timothy Snyder is the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna. He speaks five and reads ten European languages. His eight chief books are Nationalism, Marxism, and Modern Central Europe: A Biography of Kazimierz Kelles-Krauz (1998); The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, 1569-1999 (2003); Sketches from a Secret War: A Polish Artist’s Mission to Liberate Soviet Ukraine (2005); The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of a Habsburg Archduke (2008); Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin (2010), Thinking the Twentieth Century (with Tony Judt, 2012); Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning (2015); On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century (2017); The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America (2018); and Our Malady: Lessons in Liberty from a Hospital Diary (2020). He has also co-edited three further books: The Wall Around the West: State Borders and Immigration Controls in Europe and North America (2001); Stalin and Europe: Terror, War, Domination (2013); and The Balkans as Europe (2018). His essays are collected in Ukrainian History, Russian Politics, European Futures (2014), and The Politics of Life and Death (2015).

Snyder's work has appeared in forty languages and has received a number of prizes, including the Emerson Prize in the Humanities, the Literature Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Václav Havel Foundation prize, the Foundation for Polish Science prize in the social sciences, the Leipzig Award for European Understanding, the Dutch Auschwitz Committee award, and the Hannah Arendt Prize in Political Thought. Snyder was a Marshall Scholar at Oxford, has received the Carnegie and Guggenheim fellowships, and holds state orders from Estonia, Lithuania, and Poland. He has appeared in documentaries, on network television, and in major films. His books have inspired poster campaigns and exhibitions, films, sculpture, a punk rock song, a rap song, a play, and an opera. His words are quoted in political demonstrations around the world, most recently in Hong Kong. He is researching a family history of nationalism and finishing a philosophical book about freedom.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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lecture

Mon, Jan 10
12:00PM ET
Mon, Jan 10
12:00PM ET

virtual tour

Museum Mondays: Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center

Tour the Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center in Or Yehuda from the comfort of your own home with Nachliel Selavan, the Museum Guy.

About Your Tour Guide
Nachliel Selavan created and delivered an integrated learning and museum tour program for both school and adult educational settings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and has hosted similar pilot visits to a dozen museums in North America, and a few museums in Europe and in Jerusalem. He also teaches and engages audiences through virtual tours and social media. He has recently completed a year-long Tanach Study podcast called Parasha Study Plus, delivering a weekly episode of Archaeology on the Parasha, and is now on his second podcast and a new video series reviewing every book in Tanach, called Archaeology Snapshot.

Ticket Info: $10; register at us02web.zoom.usfor a Zoom link


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virtual tour

Wed, Jan 12
01:00PM ET
Wed, Jan 12
01:00PM ET

lecture

The Other Side: Law, Education, Ideology & Normalizing the Criminal

A school board in Texas was recently asked by its executive director to contemplate “opposing views” of the Holocaust. Can such views ever accord with reason, social, political and religious values? Hitler explicitly wished to create an “antisemitism of reason” and employed all the institutions of German society — education, law, religion, medicine, science, philosophy and history — to create the logic whereby segregation, expulsion and ultimately genocide was made reasonable, acceptable, normal to the majority of Germans. This lecture by YIVO's executive director Jonathan Brent will explore the other side of “normal.”

About the Speaker
Jonathan Brent is the Executive Director of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York City. From 1991 to 2009 he was Editorial Director and Associate Director of Yale Press. He is the founder of the world acclaimed Annals of Communism series, which he established at Yale Press in 1991. Brent is the co-author of Stalin’s Last Crime: The Plot Against the Jewish Doctors, 1948-1953 (Harper-Collins, 2003) and Inside the Stalin Archives (Atlas Books, 2008). He is now working on a biography of the Soviet-Jewish writer Isaac Babel. Brent teaches history and literature at Bard College.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Jan 27
01:00PM ET
Thu, Jan 27
01:00PM ET

book talk

From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg: Memoir and Testimony

After escaping the Vilna Ghetto and surviving winter in the forest among partisan fighters, Avrom Sutzkever was airlifted to Moscow in 1944. The renowned Yiddish poet turned to memoir to detail his two years in the Vilna Ghetto. In his sobering account, Sutzkever details the Nazi occupation and establishment of the ghetto, daily life in the ghetto, and mass killings at Ponar. He also details armed Jewish resistance, how Jews organized collectively to retain their dignity, and demand for historical justice.

The memoir, From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg: Memoir and Testimony, was originally published in Yiddish in 1946, and has been translated into English for the first time by professor of Jewish studies and world literatures Justin Cammy. Join Justin Cammy and YIVO's Executive Director and CEO Jonathan Brent for a discussion of the great poet’s account of the Holocaust.

About the Participants
Jonathan Brent is the Executive Director of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York City. From 1991 to 2009 he was Editorial Director and Associate Director of Yale Press. He is the founder of the world acclaimed Annals of Communism series, which he established at Yale Press in 1991. Brent is the co-author of Stalin’s Last Crime: The Plot Against the Jewish Doctors, 1948-1953 (Harper-Collins, 2003) and Inside the Stalin Archives (Atlas Books, 2008). He is now working on a biography of the Soviet-Jewish writer Isaac Babel. Brent teaches history and literature at Bard College.

Justin Cammy is professor of Jewish Studies and World Literatures at Smith College. An alum of YIVO's Uriel Weinreich Summer Program in Yiddish and a past recipient of YIVO's Dina Abramowicz Emerging Scholar fellowship, he is a leading expert on the interwar Yiddish literary group Young Vilna. In 2020 he was a faculty fellow of the Yiddish Matters research project at the Frankel Institute for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan, and in 2018 he was the recipient of a Yiddish Book Center translation fellowship. Cammy is the translator from the Yiddish of Sholem Aleichem's Judgment of Shomer, Hinde Bergner's On Long Winter Nights: Memoirs of a Jewish Family in a Galician Township, and most recently Abraham Sutzkever's From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2021).

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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