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Thu, Jan 21
01:00PM
Thu, Jan 21
01:00PM

book talk

New Works Wednesdays – “Concealed” with Esther Amini

In our extended New Works Wednesdays series, we explore new fiction and nonfiction works. In this part of the series, Esther Amini discusses her new work Concealed.

Esther Amini grew up in Queens, New York, during the freewheeling 1960s. She also grew up in a Persian-Jewish household, the American-born daughter of parents who had fled Mashhad, Iran. In Concealed, she tells the story of being caught between these two worlds: the dutiful daughter of tradition-bound parents who hungers for more self-determination than tradition allows.

Exploring the roots of her father's deep silences and explosive temper, her mother's flamboyance and flights from home, and her own sense of indebtedness to her Iranian-born brothers, Amini uncovers the story of her parents' early years in Mashhad, Iran's holiest Muslim city; the little-known history of Mashhad's underground Jews; the incident that steeled her mother's resolve to leave; and her parents' arduous journey to the U.S., where they faced a new threat to their traditions: the threat of freedom. Determined to protect his daughter from corruption, Amini's father prohibits talk, books, education, and pushes an early Persian marriage instead. Can she resist? Should she? Focused intently on what she stands to gain, Amini comes to see what she also stands to lose: a family and community bound by food, celebrations, sibling escapades, and unexpected acts of devotion by parents to whom she feels invisible.

Esther Amini is a writer, painter, and psychoanalytic psychotherapist in private practice. Her short stories have appeared in Elle, Lilith, Tablet, The Jewish Week, Barnard Magazine, Inscape Literary, and Proximity. She was named one of Aspen Words’ two best emerging memoirists and awarded its Emerging Writer Fellowship in 2016 based on her memoir entitled: “Concealed.” Her pieces have been performed by Jewish Women’s Theatre in Los Angeles and in Manhattan, and was chosen by JWT as their Artist-in-Residence in 2019.

Ticket Info: $5; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Jan 21
02:00PM
Thu, Jan 21
02:00PM

lecture

Family History Today: Researching your Family History in Israel from Home

Searching for records of your family in Israel can be daunting. Fortunately, much of your research can now be done online. In this lecture, Garri Regev, President of the Israel Genealogy Research Association (IGRA), will provide an overview of the types of records available online and where to focus your efforts. In addition, you will learn about alternatives to vital records and how you can create a vivid picture of how your ancestors lived in Israel.

This program is funded, in part, by a Humanities New York CARES Grant, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/family-history-today-2021-01-21 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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lecture

Wed, Jan 27
12:00PM
Wed, Jan 27
12:00PM

book talk

New Works Wednesdays – “White Zion” with Gila Green

In our extended New Works Wednesdays series, we explore new fictions works. In this part of the series, Gila Green discusses her new work White Zion.

The novel takes readers into the worlds of 19th century Yemen, pre-State Israel, modern Israel and modern Canada. You will hear the voices of a young boy marveling at Israel's first air force on his own roof, the cry of a newly married woman helpless to defend herself against her new husband's desires, the anger of the heroine's uncle as he reveals startling secrets about his marriage and the fall-out after generations of war.

Gila Green's novels feature characters of Sephardi, Yemenite, and mixed Middle Eastern heritage because she couldn't find any Jewish stories that reflected her experience growing up and decided to write them herself. Her novel-in-stories White Zion explores one Yemenite family's journey from Sanaa to Jerusalem to Canada. In Passport Control, heroine Miriam Gil struggles to understand her Yemenite father's past against a trove of family secrets. Gila is an author, a creative writing teacher, an EFL college lecturer, an editor, and a mother of five. When she's not exploring the Middle East in her novels, she migrates to South Africa in her continuing environmental young adult series that takes place in Kruger National Park. In addition to her four published novels, her short works have been featured in dozens of publications including: Sephardic Horizons, Jewish Fiction, Jewish Literary Journal, Fiction Magazine, Akashic Books, The Fiddlehead, and others.

For more about the book and the author: https://www.gilagreenwrites.com/

Ticket Info: $5; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, Jan 27
02:00PM
Wed, Jan 27
02:00PM

book club

LBI Book Club, Vol. VII: The War of the Jews

This month, we will be reading and discussing The War of the Jews: A Historical Novel of Josephus, Imperial Rome, and the Fall of Judea and the Second Temple (also known as Josephus: A Historical Romance) by Lion Feuchtwanger, published in 1932. We are pleased to be joined for the discussion by Professor Johnathan Skolnik.

About the Book
Joseph ben Matthias, Judaen aristocrat and Jerusalem Temple priest of the first rank, steps out into the boundless, magnificent city of Rome. He's clever, handsome, fêted by his Jewish hosts, and on a righteous mission to free three venerable old Jews wrongfully imprisoned as rebels. Joseph secures an audience with Nero's beautiful young Empress, Poppæa. Charmed by Joseph's zeal, she asks the Minister of Oriental Affairs to release the prisoners. The Minister seizes the opportunity to trade his assent for an edict guaranteed to outrage and mobilize the Jews of Judaen; Rome needs an excuse to comprehensively crush ongoing Jewish resistance. His scheme bears fruit. In the year 66 Judaen revolts. Led by canny old commander Vespasian, Roman forces prevail until only the fortified city of Jerusalem remains in the hands of Jewish rebels. Vespasian is acclaimed Emperor and returns to Rome, leaving the siege to his son Titus. Weeks drag by. Jerusalem, with its lofty, magnificent Temple, becomes to the besieging Romans a symbol of obdurate Jewish arrogance to be overthrown. Rebel commander, Roman captive and Flavian protégé, Josephus, long reviled as a traitor and Roman toady, is portrayed by Feuchtwanger with clear-eyed empathy as a complex, brilliant man whose desire to become a "citizen of the world" conflicts with his Jewish identity. It was Joseph’s destiny, however, to become a fierce defender in Rome of the unique importance of Jewish contribution to humanity, and to become known as the first-century historian Flavius Josephus and the author of The Jewish War (Description adapted from a review by Annis, HistoricalNovels.info).

About the Author
Lion Feuchtwanger (1884–1958) was a German-Jewish novelist and playwright. A prominent figure in the literary world of Weimar Germany, he influenced numerous contemporaries as a leading cultural figure, including Bertolt Brecht. Feuchtwanger's Judaism and fierce criticism of the Nazi movement, years before it assumed power, ensured that he would be a target of government-sponsored persecution after Adolf Hitler's appointment as chancellor of Germany in January 1933. Following a brief period of internment in France and a harrowing escape from Europe, he found asylum in the United States, where he died in California. Until his death, he was an important figure in German literature and the middle of a circle of cultural figures who had fled Europe in the Nazi period.

About our Guest
Jonathan Skolnik is Associate Professor of German at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he is also on the faculty in Judaic and Near Eastern Studies and in History. His books include Jewish Pasts, German Fictions: History, Memory, and Minority Culture in Germany, 1824-1955. You can learn more about him here.

Ticket Info: Free; register at eventbrite.com/e/lbi-book-club-vol-vii-the-war-of-the-jews-by-lion-feuchtwanger-tickets-134219256409 for a Zoom link


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book club

Thu, Jan 28
04:00PM
Thu, Jan 28
04:00PM

exhibit opening

Behind the Scenes of an Exhibition: Emile Bocian in Chinatown

In partnership with the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA), the Center has launched a new online exhibition, An Unlikely Photojournalist: Emile Bocian in Chinatown, a never-before-seen collection of images of Manhattan’s Chinatown in the 1970s and 80s. Co-curators Kevin Chu, Assistant Director of Collections at MOCA, and Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager of Public Services at the Center for Jewish History, will share a behind-the-scenes look into Bocian's life, his collection, and the genesis of the exhibition. Bocian’s grandniece and nephew will also be in attendance to share their memories.

Emile Bocian (1912-1990) was the child of Jewish immigrants who spent the last two decades of his life living and working in Chinatown as a photojournalist for The China Post, a Chinese-language daily. He photographed protests, celebrations, and scenes of daily life, as well as storefronts and streetscapes that provide a glimpse into a vanishing New York.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/emile-bocian-2021-01-28 to receive a Zoom link


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exhibit opening

Thu, Jan 28
07:00PM
Thu, Jan 28
07:00PM

book talk

The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex: A Conversation between Lila Corwin Berman and Dahlia Lithwick

Join Lila Corwin Berman, author of The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex: The History of a Multibillion-Dollar Institution, and Dahlia Lithwick, senior editor at Slate, for a discussion about the history of American Jewish philanthropy and what that history might tell us about money, politics, and the public good in American and American Jewish life today.

Berman is professor of history at Temple University, where she directs the Feinstein Center for American Jewish History. Lithwick writes about law and politics and is a contributing editor at Newsweek and senior editor at Slate.

Ticket Info: Free; register at  for a Zoom link


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book talk

Sun, Jan 31
10:00AM
Sun, Jan 31
10:00AM

cooking show

Sephardic Culinary History with Chef Hélène Jawhara-Piñer

Episode Six: Meatballs ‘cursed by the Jews’ & Muhallabiyye

A special show focusing on Sepharadim in the Middle East.

Sephardi Culinary History is a new show that combines chef and scholar Hélène Jawhara-Piñer’s fascination with food studies and flair for creating delicious cuisine. Join along as she cooks Sephardic history! ASF Broome & Allen Fellow Piñer earned her Ph.D in History, Medieval History, and the History of Food from the University of Tours, France.

Ticket Info: Free; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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cooking show

Wed, Feb 03
12:00PM
Wed, Feb 03
12:00PM

book talk

New Works Wednesdays: Views of Jewish Morocco: Forms, Places, Narratives with Nadia Sabri

In this interactive session Nadia Sabri will have a discussion with book contributors Abdou Filaly Ansary, Vanessa Paloma Elbaz and Brahim El Guabli.

The book is a multidisciplinary collective work that focuses on the memory of Moroccan Judaism through autobiographical accounts, testimonies, artistic experiences and critical writings that shed light on them. These contributions weave an unprecedented set of texts and works of art, combining temporalities around memories of a world lost forever, of a Morocco that the young ignore, and that this book proposes to revisit in a pluralistic manner. The collection encompasses a contemporary reflection on the scope of maintaining the memory of Moroccan Judaism.

Ticket Info: $5; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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About the Speaker:

Academic and independent curator, Dr. Nadia Sabri is president of the Moroccan section of AICA (International Association of Art Critics). Nadia Sabri has built projects around Art and societal issues over the course of the last fifteen years. She conceives artistic projects as a driving force combining research, demonstrative processes, and experiences. Nadia Sabri has written and directed several research projects and publications on contemporary art and its relationship to sociopolitical issues such as cities, exile or even artist commitment. In 2015, she founded Exiles, paradigm fertile, a multidisciplinary platform for reflection and creation around the issue of exile as a creative and evolutionary paradigm. She lives in Rabat (Morocco) where she is associated professor at Mohammed V University and also works as a curator and researcher in several countries. For more about the book: https://lefennec.com/livre/exils-vues-du-maroc-juif-formes-lieux-recits/


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book talk

Wed, Feb 03
05:00PM
Wed, Feb 03
05:00PM

discussion

In the third program of the series, Sharon Musher, author of Promised Lands: Hadassah Kaplan, Zionism, and the Making of American Jewish Women and David Slucki, author of Sing This at My Funeral: A Memoir of Fathers and Sons, will discuss with Natalia Aleksiun their grandparents’ and parents’ turbulent life trajectories before, during, and after the war in New York, Europe, British Palestine, and Australia. Rather than an examination of modern Jewish politics, this conversation will reflect on family ties, hopes and disappointments, loss and belonging in an intimate perspective through studying personal documents of loved ones.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/family-affairs-2021-02-03 to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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discussion

Sun, Feb 07
12:00PM
Sun, Feb 07
12:00PM

workshop

Writing Between Tongues: An Exploration of Hebrew and Arabic Calligraphy - Part 2

Following the success of December’s talk “Writing Between Tongues: An Exploration of Hebrew and Arabic Calligraphy”, we are excited to bring back educator and artist Ruben Shimonov for a follow-up interactive artist talk, virtual gallery tour, and workshop. In this 90-minute session, we will take a deeper dive into the rich visual worlds of Arabic and Hebrew calligraphy. Educator, community organizer, and artist Ruben Shimonov will take us on an exploratory journey of his multilingual calligraphy and the ways he has used his art to enrich Muslim-Jewish interfaith communities. We will have a talk-back with the artist, as well as a live calligraphy demonstration during which you can try your hand at the calligraphy!

Ticket Info: $15; register at us02web.zoom.us to receive a Zoom link


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workshop

Thu, Feb 11
03:00PM
Thu, Feb 11
03:00PM

lecture

Family History Today: Finding Your Eastern European Jewish Family on JRI-Poland.org

For 25 years, JRI-Poland.org has served as the preferred database for the historical Jewish records that survive in the archives of Poland. This vast collection of 6.2 million documents includes information about towns and families from Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, Lithuania, Germany, and the former territories of Galicia and Prussia. In this lecture, Robinn Magid, Assistant Director of JRI-Poland.org, will recount some truly memorable stories of genealogical breakthroughs achieved by researchers, and will demonstrate how you can take advantage of this vast resource.

This program is sponsored by the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute. It is funded, in part, by a Humanities New York CARES Grant, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/family-history-today-2021-02-11 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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lecture

Wed, Feb 17
01:00PM
Wed, Feb 17
01:00PM

book talk

Yiddish: Biography of a Language – Live on Zoom

Jeffrey Shandler's new book, Yiddish: Biography of a Language, presents the story of Yiddish, the defining vernacular of Ashkenazi Jews, from its origins to the present. Shandler relates the multifaceted history of Yiddish in the form of a biographical profile. Through a series of thematic chapters—from “Name” and “Date and Place of Birth” to “Religion” and “Life Expectancy”—he offers surprising insights into the dynamic interrelation of the language, its speakers, and their culture and explores the varied symbolic investments that Yiddish speakers and others have made in the language. Join us for a conversation celebrating this new book with Jeffrey Shandler, Anita Norich, and Ayala Fader, moderated by YIVO's Academic Advisor and Director of Exhibitions Eddy Portnoy.

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://www.yivo.org/Biography-of-a-Language to receive a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Feb 18
12:30PM
Thu, Feb 18
12:30PM

conversation

At Lunch with Ann Temkin

A new virtual interview series hosted by Julie Salamon

Author and journalist Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal and NY Times) sits down with influential cultural leaders in the Jewish American Community; we'll hear their thoughts about working in this present moment, current projects, and what they have to say about their Jewish identity. Grab your lunch and tune in for our first conversation with Ann TemkinChief Curator at MoMA in New York City.

Ticket Info: $5; register at ajhs.org/programs for a link to the Zoom program


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About the Speakers:

Julie Salamon is an American author, critic and storyteller. She worked at The Wall Street Journal for 16 years first as a commodities and banking reporter before spending 11 years as the paper's film critic. Later she became a staff journalist at The New York Times where she was a TV critic and arts reporter. Later she gained fellowships at the MacDowell Colony and became a Kaiser Media Fellow. She has written both fiction and non-fiction books for adults and children-- and produced articles for magazines that include The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Vogue, Bazaar, and The New Republic. Her books have received wide critical and popular attention, she has just completed "Unlikely Friends," a memoir for Audible Original, scheduled for release in 2021.

Ann Temkin is an American art curator, and currently the Marie-Josee and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.  Previously she was the Muriel and Philip Berman Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Ms. Temkin is an ex-officio Trustee at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University and a member of the Claifornia Institute of the Arts Board of Overseers. She was born in Connecticut and received her BA magna cum laude from Harvard University and her PhD in the history of art from Yale University.


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conversation

Thu, Feb 18
04:00PM
Thu, Feb 18
04:00PM

lecture

AJS Dissertation Completion Fellow 2020/21 Miriam Schulz looks at Soviet Yiddish cultural agents who operated within the rather destructive post-Stalinist memory regime in which they found themselves and created their own vernacular Holocaust memory in Soviet situ. She will showcase this vernacular Holocaust memory by means of several distinct examples, looking primarily at the interplay of literature and Holocaust monuments, and the role of Yiddish within them.

Since antiquity, Sophocles’ Antigone epitomizes both the enormous political significance of top-down orchestration and controlling of public mourning in the wake of war for specific groups and the enduring fascination with heroic acts that deliberately go against the sovereign regulations of this exclusive privilege (Butler, 2009, 38–39). In a way, the historiography of Holocaust memory in the Soviet Union has followed Sophocles’ script in that an alleged complete top-down silencing was juxtaposed to Antigonean acts of resistance by Soviet Jewish subjects whose understandable desire to mourn for Holocaust victims was paired with the urge to leave the Soviet Union for the sake of grieving in “freedom.”

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/not-antigone-2021-02-18 to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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lecture

Wed, Feb 24
03:00PM
Wed, Feb 24
03:00PM

lecture

Color on My Mind: The History of the First Black Mental Health Clinic in America

The Lafargue Clinic was founded in 1946 by a group of black intellectuals and German-Jewish doctors. These activists joined together to answer a pressing need in New York - the need for psychiatric care for Black people. Blacks were historically denied access to clinics and hospitals that provided for the mental needs of the city. Further, black intellectuals argued that their communities suffered two-fold: having the psychological needs all people had, but also further needs fueled by the racism they experienced around them.

Led by American cultural figures like writers Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and photographer Gordon Parks, as well as the German-Jewish doctors Frederic Wertham and Hilde Mosse (who had fled Berlin after Hitler took power in 1933), the Lafargue Clinic was in the basement of a church. Using partitions, small rooms were formed for visitors seeking psychiatric care. The care was free, even though it had to be privately supported, as no New York City government agencies agreed to fund it. The Lafargue Clinic became the first clinic for psychiatric care for Black people in America. Its legacy continues today as The Northside Center for Child Development.

Register to join this presentation by Gabriel Mendes, author of Under the Strain of Color: Harlem's Lafargue Clinic and the Promise of an Antiracist Psychiatry, (Cornell University Press, 2015). He will discuss the history of the Lafargue clinic, its importance in the history of public health, and its important role in the battles against school segregation.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/color-on-my-mind/ for a Zoom link


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About the Speaker:

Gabriel N. Mendes is Director of Public Health Programs at the Bard Prison Initiative. He has held academic positions at Emmanuel College, UC San Diego, and, most recently, Vanderbilt University, where he was Senior Lecturer at the Center for Medicine, Health, and Society. He was also Associate Director of the Higher Education Opportunity Program at Bard College and Director of the Men2B Program at the Rhode Island Department of Corrections. Mendes is the author of Under the Strain of Color: Harlem’s Lafargue Clinic and the Promise of an Antiracist Psychiatry (Cornell University Press, 2015), and he is currently writing his second book Through a Glass Darkly: Race and Madness in Modern America. Mendes holds a Ph.D. in American Civilization from Brown University, an M.T.S. from Harvard Divinity School, and a B.A. from Hobart College.


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lecture

Wed, Feb 24
04:00PM
Wed, Feb 24
04:00PM

book club

People of the Book Club: The Lost Shtetl with Author Max Gross

Go behind the stories and peer inside the archives at the CJH book discussion, led by Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History. This session will feature a discussion of The Lost Shtetl by Max Gross, a work of speculative fiction and magical realism involving a previously undiscovered remote Polish shtetl that is suddenly and unceremoniously dragged into the present. The book discussion will be followed by a look at some archival photos in YIVO's collections that are connected to the setting of the book. We will also be joined by the author for a Q&A after the discussion.

Participants will need to obtain their own copy to read before the discussion.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/people-book-club-2021-02-24 for a Zoom link


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book club

Tue, Mar 02
01:00PM
Tue, Mar 02
01:00PM

panel discussion

Beba Epstein: The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary Girl

The YIVO Bruce and Francesca Cernia Slovin Online Museum's inaugural exhibition, Beba Epstein: The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary Girl, uses the true story of Beba Epstein, a girl born in Vilna in 1922 who survived the Holocaust, to explore East European Jewish life in the 20th century. The museum's innovative, interactive storytelling contextualizes over two hundred artifacts from the YIVO Archives.

Join us for a discussion celebrating this exhibition featuring Beba Epstein's son, Michael Leventhal, scholar Antony Polonsky, museum chief curator Karolina Ziulkoski, and YIVO's Executive Director and CEO Jonathan Brent. The discussion will be moderated by Gal Beckerman (The New York Times Book Review).

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Beba-2021 for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Wed, Mar 03
04:00PM
Wed, Mar 03
04:00PM

book talk

Join author Eliyana R. Adler (Penn State University) in conversation with Debórah Dwork (Clark University) about her book, the forgotten story of 200,000 Polish Jews who escaped the Holocaust as refugees stranded in remote corners of the USSR.

Between 1940 and 1946, about 200,000 Jewish refugees from Poland lived and toiled in the harsh Soviet interior. They endured hard labor, bitter cold, and extreme deprivation. But out of reach of the Nazis, they escaped the fate of millions of their coreligionists in the Holocaust.

Survival on the Margins is the first comprehensive account in English of their experiences. The refugees fled Poland after the German invasion in 1939 and settled in the Soviet territories newly annexed under the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact. Facing hardship, and trusting little in Stalin, most spurned the offer of Soviet citizenship and were deported to labor camps in unoccupied areas of the east. They were on their own, in a forbidding wilderness thousands of miles from home. But they inadvertently escaped Hitler’s 1941 advance into the Soviet Union. While war raged and Europe’s Jews faced genocide, the refugees were permitted to leave their settlements after the Soviet government agreed to an amnesty. Most spent the remainder of the war coping with hunger and disease in Soviet Central Asia. When they were finally allowed to return to Poland in 1946, they encountered the devastation of the Holocaust, and many stopped talking about their own ordeals, their stories eventually subsumed within the central Holocaust narrative.

Drawing on untapped memoirs and testimonies of the survivors, Eliyana Adler rescues these important stories of determination and suffering on behalf of new generations.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/survival-on-margins-2021-03-03 to receive a Zoom link


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book talk

Mon, Mar 08
01:00PM
Mon, Mar 08
01:00PM

lecture

Leaving Behind the Froyen-vinkl, or How Women Functioned in the Male World of Yiddish Literature

For centuries, writing has been one of the few avenues available for women to make their voices heard in the public sphere. Joanna Lisek will present an overview of the strategies women used to break their way into the sphere of the printed Yiddish word: from annotations in the margins of books, to poems smuggled into the press in the guise of letters from readers, to the question of how relations with men were needed as leverage for getting published. Women writers and poets were not treated as equal partners in the male empire of Yiddish press and literature. Wedged into their froyen-vinkl, their “women’s corner,” women could expect condescension rather than actual recognition for their work. It is no coincidence that the seat of the Union of Jewish Writers and Journalists in Warsaw was described as a secular besmedresh, that is, a traditionally typical male institution. Finding a voice in the besmedresh of secular Yiddish literature was no easy task, and even more difficult was ensuring that this voice had a meaningful and important part in the discussion. Join us for this lecture to hear how they succeeded, oftentimes resorting to camouflage, at times openly manifesting their creative independence, all the while contending with unfavorable criticism.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Froyen-vinkl for a Zoom link


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About the Speaker:

Joanna Lisek is a literature scholar, translator, and faculty member at the Taube Department of Jewish Studies at the University of Wroclaw. Her main focus is on Jewish poetry and Yiddish culture, with a focus on women. She is the author of the monographs: Jung Wilne – ?ydowska grupa artystyczna [Yung Vilne, A Jewish Artistic Group, Wroclaw 2005] and Kol isze – g?os kobiet w poezji jidysz (od XVI w. do 1939 r.) [Kol ishe - The Voice of Women in Yiddish Poetry from the 16th Century to 1939, Sejny 2018], and the editor of the volumes: Nieme dusze? Kobiety w kulturze jidysz [Silent Souls? Women in Yiddish Culture, Wroclaw 2010] and Mykwa. Rytual i historia [Mikveh - Ritual and History, Wroclaw 2014]. She co-edited, with Karolina Szymaniak and Bella Szwarcman-Czarnota, Moja dzika koza. Antologia poetek jidysz [My Wild Goat. Anthology of Women Yiddish Poets, Kraków 2018]. In addition to the work of poets from Yiddish, she has translated into Polish works by, among others, Puah Rakovsky, Yente Serdatzky, and Chava Rosenfarb. Lisek is the editor of Zydzi. Polska. Autobiografia [Jews. Poland. Autobiography] series, which by 2023 will publish over 20 volumes of Jewish autobiographical literature, translated into Polish from Yiddish, Hebrew, German, Russian, as well as memoirs written originally in Polish.


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lecture

Mon, Mar 15
04:00PM
Mon, Mar 15
04:00PM

book talk

Join author Ayala Fader (Fordham University) in conversation with Michal Kravel-Tovi (Tel Aviv University) about her book, a revealing look at Jewish men and women who secretly explore the outside world, in person and online, while remaining in their ultra-Orthodox religious communities.

What would you do if you questioned your religious faith, but revealing that would cause you to lose your family and the only way of life you had ever known? Hidden Heretics tells the fascinating, often heart-wrenching stories of married ultra-Orthodox Jewish men and women in 21st-century New York who lead “double lives” to protect those they love. While they no longer believe that God gave the Torah to Jews at Mount Sinai, these hidden heretics continue to live in their families and religious communities, even as they surreptitiously break Jewish commandments and explore forbidden secular worlds in person and online. Drawing on five years of fieldwork with those living double lives and the rabbis, life coaches, and religious therapists who minister to, advise, and sometimes excommunicate them, Ayala Fader investigates religious doubt and social change in the digital age.

In stories of conflicts between faith and self-fulfillment, Hidden Heretics explores the moral compromises and divided loyalties of individuals facing life-altering crossroads.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/hidden-heretics-2021-03-15 to receive a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, Mar 17
12:00PM
Wed, Mar 17
12:00PM

conversation

A Conversation on Charlotte Salomon

Griselda Pollock (University of Leeds, UK) will be in conversation with Kerry Wallach (Gettysburg College, PA) about the work and life of the Berlin-born Jewish artist, Charlotte Salomon (1917-1943).

Murdered with her unborn child on arrival at Auschwitz in 1943 at the age of 26, Charlotte Salomon left behind an artistic legacy that is as beguiling as it is perplexing. A single, composite artwork of images, text and music that she titled Leben? oder Theater? (Life? Or Theater?) comprises 784 paintings in a variety of modes produced in one year between 1941 and 1942 in the South of France. Salomon began the work after having spent several months in a French concentration camp at Gurs where many ‘German’ refugees in the France had been interned, including Hannah Arendt. In 1943, Salomon had been forced into hiding once Italy, hitherto controlling the Nice region where so many Jewish refugees had sought refuge, fell to German control after Hitler’s invasion of Italy. Pollock is the author of Charlotte Salomon and the Theatre of Memory (Yale U. Press, 2018. She has described Leben? oder Theater? as “an event in the history of modern art,” and has sought to present a searching analysis of Salomon’s paintings through the lenses of feminist art history and Jewish studies in order to draw out a more complex range of meanings in the work than are usually ascribed to it when it has treated as a visual autobiography.

Kerry Wallach, the author of Passing Illusions: Jewish Visibility in Weimar Germany (U. of Mich. Press, 2017), brings to the conversation insights that she has gained from her research on German-Jewish culture as well as new ones related to the preparation of the first book-length study of East European-born Jewish artist and illustrator Rahel Szalit-Marcus (1888–1942).

Ticket Info: Free; register at eventbrite.com/e/a-conversation-on-artist-charlotte-salomon-tickets-132447779875 for a Zoom link


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