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Mon, Apr 06
01:00PM
Mon, Apr 06
01:00PM

concert

Israeli Art & Song – from A to Z – Live on Zoom

Join Elad Kabilio of MusicTalks for a program of music and art. This livestream performance will pair works from Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition, From A(gam) to Z(aritsky): Highlights of Israeli Art from Yeshiva University Museum’s Collection with music ranging from Klezmer to classical, from piyyut and poetry to Israeli pop. Elad, on cello, will be joined by clarinetist and singer, Avigail Malachi, and singer, Inbar Goldman.

Ticket Info: Free; Link provided with reservation at atoz2020.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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concert

Mon, Apr 06
06:30PM
Mon, Apr 06
06:30PM

conversation

CANCELLED: Dis-Integration? Perspectives on a German Debate with Max Czollek & Rebecca Guber


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conversation

Tue, Apr 07
04:00PM
Tue, Apr 07
04:00PM

book launch

Please note: This is a Live Streamed Event via Zoom

In these uncertain times, with widespread myths pervading the media, government policy, and our homes, there is a deeper urge to not only discover what is true, but to be able to recognize falsehoods. This year our Passover will be different from all other Passovers – with more questions to share at real and virtual Seder tables.

That's why we're pleased to announce that the discussion between Magda Teter (Fordham University) and Sara Lipton (SUNY Stony Brook) about Dr. Teter’s new book, Blood Libel: On the Trail of Antisemitic Myth, will happen online via Zoom, right before Passover on April 7 at 4 pm EST.

The book explores the medieval myth that Jews murder Christian children to use their blood— and its surprising persistence over centuries, cultures, and continents. The invention and development of printed media contributed to widespread dissemination of the myth, turning it into a “persistent template of hate”: from mid-12th-century monastic manuscripts to the Facebook group “Jewish Ritual Murder,” shut down in 2014, and beyond.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at teterzoom.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 to receive a link to the Zoom event


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About the Speakers:

Magda Teter is Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies and Professor of History at Fordham University. Her work focuses on early modern religious and cultural history, with emphasis on Jewish-Christian relations, the politics of religion, and transmission of culture among Jews and Christians across Europe in the early modern period. She published numerous articles and books in English, Polish, Italian, and Hebrew. Magda Teter was recently appointed the 2020-2021 National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Fellow at the Center for Jewish History, and she will be working on her current research project, The Dissemination and Uses of the Jewish Past: The Role of The Present in The Production and Politics of History.

Sara Lipton is Professor of History at the State University of New York at  Stony Brook. Her work focuses on religious identity and experience, Jewish-Christian relations, and art and culture in the high and later Middle Ages (11th–15th centuries).  Her book,  Dark Mirror: The Medieval Origins of Anti-Semitic Iconography (Metropolitan Books, 2014) examines how changes in Christian devotion and politics affected the visual representation of the Jew. It explains the emergence of the iconographically identifiable Jew around the year 1080 and brings theoretical coherence to the dizzying proliferation of images of Jews in subsequent centuries. Sara Lipton’s current project, The Vulgate of Experience: Art and Preaching in the High Middle Ages (1180–1300), explores why and to what effect Christendom invested so much in worshiping the ineffable Word through the material thing.


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book launch

Sun, Apr 12
10:30AM
Sun, Apr 12
10:30AM

walking tour

CANCELLED: Soapbox Walks: Arts & Politics


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walking tour

Mon, Apr 13
03:00PM
Mon, Apr 13
03:00PM

lecture and discussion

German-Jewish Judaica for Passover - Live on Zoom

Join us for a brief online talk about a unique collection of Passover-themed Judaica live on Zoom. After the talk, discuss your own antique Judaica for an “Antique Judaica Roadshow”–style appraisal from the curator, Tsadik Kaplan. Snap and share a photo of your unique Judaica to share its story, learn more, and perhaps even discover its value.

Tsadik Kaplan is a collector and appraiser who writes the “Antique Judaica Roadshow” column in The Jewish Press and the author of Jewish Antiques: From Menorahs to Seltzer Bottles.

Invitations to the videoconference are limited to the first 30 participants, but anyone can watch live (or later!) online.

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at eventbrite.com/e/live-on-zoom-german-jewish-judaica-for-passover-tickets-101769441138 to receive a link to the Zoom event


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lecture and discussion

Mon, Apr 13
04:00PM
Mon, Apr 13
04:00PM

lecture

Please note: This is a Live Streamed Event via Zoom

Passover is often described as the quintessential domestic Jewish holiday, celebrated by more American Jews than other religious ritual. Since the mid-20th century, however, Seders have also been reinterpreted as auspicious sites for Jewish-Christian engagement. While early modern European Christian writing about Jews often depicted the Seder as a mysterious, secretive Jewish domestic ritual with sinister associations with murder and blood libel, contemporary American engagements with Passover have radically altered this depiction, reconceiving it as an opportunity for connection between Jews and Christians through the celebration of a ritual that an increasing number of Christians have come to regard as an important part of their own heritage.

In this talk, Jessica Cooperman examines some of the ways American Jews and Christians have reimagined their engagement with the Passover seder, both together and separately, and to consider the ways that the Passover seder has been redefined and reinterpreted as a Christian ritual. An exploration of these new approaches to the seder can perhaps offer us a window onto the multiple and shifting dynamics of Jewish-Christian relations in the post-World War II United States.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at coopermanzoom.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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About the Speaker:

Jessica Cooperman is an Associate Professor of Religion Studies and Director of Jewish Studies at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, PA. Her research focuses on 20th century American Judaism and on connections between American religion and state policy. Her book, Making Judaism Safe for America: World War I and the Origins of Religious Pluralism, was published by NYU Press in 2018 and received an honorable mention for the Saul Viener Prize in American Jewish History. Her current research explores projects for promoting Jewish-Christian dialogue and understanding after World War II.


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lecture

Mon, Apr 13
06:30PM
Mon, Apr 13
06:30PM

lecture

Joy & Halvah: A Family’s Story - Live on Zoom

Grab your Joyva jelly rings and join us for this virtual program just in time for Passover! When Nathan Radutzky immigrated from Kiev, he brought with him a recipe for halvah, a confection made from crushed sesame. In 1907 Nathan set up shop in Brooklyn New York selling his confections. Over the years Joyva Halvah expanded its sweet offerings and became ubiquitous in Jewish Americana and touched the lives of millions. Four generations later the manufacturer is still family-owned and Brooklyn based. Join us as we explore the history of this New York institution with award winning documentary filmmakers Sam Radtuzky and Josh Freund. They will be sharing footage from their upcoming documentary about the candy company and sharing how immigration, gentrification, and a drive to preserve cultural heritage have shaped the candy company’s past, present, and future.

Ticket Info: Free; Registration Link: bit.ly/3aJB74E


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lecture

Tue, Apr 14
06:30PM
Tue, Apr 14
06:30PM

poetry workshop

Poetry Salon - Live on Zoom

Emma Lazarus’s “New Colossus,” written in 1883, is perhaps America’s most enduring poem and has been inspiring people — and poets — for generations. Lazarus immersed herself in the debates, adding her own voice to the mix with her poetry and other writing. AJHS invites you to craft a poem that addresses the nation's debates: if you could write a poem for the Statue of Liberty, what would it say?

Led by celebrated teaching poets and contributors to the 92nd Street Y's #ANewColossus poetry festival, These 90-minute interactive virtual poetry workshops will delve into the construction and techniques used in writing “The New Colossus,” and place Lazarus' poem side by side with work by contemporary poets that is “descended” from, or inspired by, the original poem. Using what they have discovered as a springboard, salon participants will have two writing sessions per class based on prompts inspired by the poems they have discussed and share the work they have created.

Ticket Info: Free; Registration Link: bit.ly/2UuOLmE


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poetry workshop

Sun, Apr 19
11:00AM
Sun, Apr 19
11:00AM

family program

Meet Emma Lazarus - Live on Zoom

Step back in time and into the sitting room of Emma Lazarus, a fifth-generation American Jew caught in an important turning point in American history. In this live interactive program, children have the opportunity to engage with the famous poetess about her life and the issues of her time. Emma will encourage families to identify a cause that they care about and discover their own creative voice. Recommended for children age 7 – 12, but family of all ages are welcome to follow along.

Ticket Info: Free; Registration Link: bit.ly/2QWPbQr


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family program

Sun, Apr 19
02:00PM
Sun, Apr 19
02:00PM

lecture

CANCELLED: Scandals, Shandehs, and Lies: The Stories Families Don't Tell


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lecture

Mon, Apr 20
07:00PM
Mon, Apr 20
07:00PM

concert

CANCELLED: Beethoven in the Yiddish Imagination


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concert

Tue, Apr 21
06:00PM
Tue, Apr 21
06:00PM

exhibit opening

CANCELLED: An Unlikely Photojournalist: Emile Bocian in Chinatown


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exhibit opening

Wed, Apr 22
04:00PM
Wed, Apr 22
04:00PM

conversation

Epidemics, Disease, and Plagues in Jewish History & Memory - Live on Zoom

Epidemic diseases usually strike humans indiscriminately. Yet the social and cultural responses to them can often exacerbate the differences that set people apart. The plague first broke out in Europe in 1348, but it recurred every generation, and was a feature of daily, social, and cultural life. For Jews, outbreaks of disease carried a double threat: one biological, the other social. In this conversation we explore examples of disease in the Jewish past to examine the ways in which moments of epidemic challenged Jewish life and ritual, and to explore how governments, Jewish leaders, and Jewish and Christian neighbors responded to the pressures of plague. Joshua Teplitsky (SUNY Stony Brook) and Magda Teter (Fordham University) will discuss the role of memory and the constructions of myths and narratives about health, hygiene, immunity, and responsibility as they revolved around public health and the fear of contagion.

Ticket Info: Free; register at forever.fordham.edu/s/1362/18/interior.aspx?sid=1362&gid=1&pgid=8426&content_id=8426 to receive a link to the online program


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About the Speakers:

Joshua Teplitsky (Ph.D. NYU) teaches Jewish history at SUNY Stony Brook. He is the author of Prince of the Press: How One Collector Built History's Most Enduring and Remarkable Jewish Library (Yale University Press, 2019), which was a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award. He is also the author of dozens of articles in academic journals and popular venues. Joshua Teplitsky received many prestigious fellowships. He is currently a Harry Starr Fellow at Harvard University, working on a book about Jews and plagues in premodern Europe.

Magda Teter (Ph.D. Columbia University) is Professor of History and the Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies at Fordham University. She is the author of Blood Libel: On the Trail of an Antisemitic Myth (Harvard University Press, 2020), Sinners on Trial: Jews and Sacrilege after the Reformation (Harvard, 2011), and Jews and Heretics in Catholic Poland (Cambridge, 2006). She has published numerous articles in English, Hebrew, Italian, and Polish. Her research has been supported by  the John Simon Guggenheim and Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundations,the Yad Ha-Nadiv Foundation, Harvard University, and the NYPL's Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, among others.


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conversation

Thu, Apr 23
04:00PM
Thu, Apr 23
04:00PM

conversation

Strange New World: Time in David Bergelson’s Literary Work – Live on Zoom

Delays, inaction, repetition, the failure to take advantage of opportunities, missing the right moment—all sound bad.  We are constantly told to move on. Yet sometimes, not doing, daydreaming, and standing still can be positive, even, creative. David Bergelson lived in a time of enormous upheaval and violent change.  His characters, in contrast, do nothing. What can we learn from Bergelson in the Strange New World we live in?

Harriet Murav (University of Illinois) and Justin Cammy (Smith College) will discuss the texture of time, futurity, and activating the unrealized potentialities of the discarded past in Bergelson’s literary work, drawing on Murav’s recently published book, Strange New World: Untimeliness, Futurity. The conversation will begin with a general discussion about time and timing, using examples from The End of Everything, Bergelson’s 1913 masterpiece. We then turn to one of his most controversial novels, Judgment (1926) which, regardless of its sympathies for the Bolshevik cause, is not so interested in the new socialist future as much as the expansion of time and the exit from ongoing time found in holidays. The holiday, yontev, and the importance of holiday time (yontevdikayt) are key to Bergelson’s notion of creativity. To create literary work is to experience holiday time.

Ticket Info: Free; reservation required at yivo.org/Strange-New-World to receive a link to the Zoom event


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About the Speakers:

Harriet Murav is Professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Program in Comparative and World Literature at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In addition to studies of Dostoevsky, and Russian law and literature, her books include Identity Theft: The Jew in Imperial Russia and the Case of Avraam Uri Kovner (Stanford University Press, 2003), and Music from a Speeding Train: Jewish Literature in Post-Revolution Russia (Stanford University Press, 2011). Her most recent book is David Bergelson’s Strange New World. Untimeliness and Futurity, published in 2019. 

Justin Cammy is Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and of World Literatures at Smith College. He is a literary and cultural historian with research and teaching interests in Yiddish literature, Eastern European Jewish history, and Zionism and contemporary Israel. Justin Cammy's publications range from essays on Yiddish literary history to scholarly translations of Yiddish literature to introductions to new editions of works by Yiddish writers and memoirists. He is currently working on two projects: English translation and scholarly edition of the Abraham Sutzkever’ s memoir of the Vilna ghetto and testimony at Nuremberg, and a book,Young Vilna: Yiddish Culture of the Last Generation, to be published by Indiana University Press.


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conversation

Thu, Apr 23
07:00PM
Thu, Apr 23
07:00PM

book launch

Please note: This is a Live Streamed Event via Zoom

He created Spider-Man, Iron Man, the X-Men, and the Fantastic Four. The son of Jewish immigrants, he changed his name and transformed American pop culture. But Stan Lee’s Jewish roots ran deep. Join author Liel Liebovitz for the launch of his new book, Stan Lee: A Life in Comics and a discussion about the surprising connections between Lee’s celebrated comic book heroes and the ancient tales of the Bible, the Talmud, and Jewish mysticism. Was Spider-Man just a reincarnation of Cain? Is the Incredible Hulk simply Adam by another name? Liel speaks with Unorthodox Podcast co-host Stephanie Butnick about the deeply Jewish and surprisingly spiritual roots of Stan Lee and Marvel Comics.

Jewish Lives is Yale’s prize winning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at stanleezoom.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 to receive a link to the Zoom event


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About the Speakers:

Credit: Chia MessinaBorn in Israel to a rabbinic family, Liel Leibovitz pored over Marvel comic books with the same fiery intensity his ancestors had devoted to studying the Talmud. A senior writer for Tablet Magazine and the co-host of its popular podcast, Unorthodox, Liel received his PhD from Columbia University and is the author or co-author of several works of non-fiction including, most recently, A Broken Hallelujah: Rock and Roll, Redemption, and the Life of Leonard Cohen. He lives in New York with his family.

Stephanie Butnick is the deputy editor of Tablet and has written for the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. She has a Bachelor’s degree in religion from Duke and a Master’s in religious studies from NYU. She lives in New York with her husband and their cat, Cat Stevens.


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book launch

Sun, Apr 26
10:00AM
Sun, Apr 26
10:00AM

walking tour

CANCELLED: Walking Tour: The Unexpected Story of Jewish Williamsburg (2.5 hours)


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walking tour

Sun, Apr 26
10:30AM
Sun, Apr 26
10:30AM

walking tour

CANCELLED: Soapbox Walks: History’s Intersection


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walking tour

Sun, Apr 26
11:00AM
Sun, Apr 26
11:00AM

workshop

Soapbox Yoga - Live on Zoom

A key part of activism – is to take action and be active. This virtual series uniquely blends storytelling and physical movement and connects families in real time through Zoom! These 45-minute classes invite families to get up and participate in connecting past and present through poses inspired by the stories of Emma Lazarus and the soapbox speakers of Union Square. Recommended for children age 4 – 8, but family of all ages are welcome. (This program is made possible through the generous support of PJ Library.)

Ticket Info: Free; Registration Link: bit.ly/2QWPbQr


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workshop

Mon, Apr 27
12:30PM
Mon, Apr 27
12:30PM

book launch

Please note: This is a Live Streamed Event via Zoom

He was the greatest escape artist who ever lived. Famous for jumping handcuffed off bridges, dangling upside down in a straitjacket, and breaking out of jails all over America and Europe, Harry Houdini was a death-defying, self-liberating, American superhero. Born Erik Weisz, he was also the son of a rabbi and a Jewish immigrant who escaped his impoverished childhood thanks to talent and ferocious determination. But long after he achieved fame and fortune, Houdini continued to push the boundaries and flirt with death. In his new biography, Houdini: The Elusive American, acclaimed author Adam Begley tracks the restless magician’s wide-ranging exploits and questions not how Houdini did it, but why. Illuminating Houdini’s carefully constructed career - his advertising genius, his crusade against spiritualists, and his relationship with Arthur Conan Doyle - Begley speaks about his book’s central question: What kind of man was this?

Ticket Info: Registration information coming soon.


About the Speaker:

Credit: Zach GrossThe author of Updike and The Great Nadar: The Man Behind the Camera,Adam Begley was books editor of The New York Observer from 1997 to 2009. For many years he was an advisory editor with The Paris Reviewhe wrote for the London Review of Books and was a frequent contributor to a variety of magazines including Mirabella, where he wrote a monthly column. He has written hundreds of book reviews and other bits of literary journalism for many publications including The New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, The Spectator, The Guardian, andthe Financial Times. Begley grew up in New York and Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and now lives north of London.


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book launch

Mon, Apr 27
07:00PM
Mon, Apr 27
07:00PM

concert

CANCELLED: Where is Our Homeland? Songs from Testimonies in the Fortunoff Video Archive


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concert

Tue, Apr 28
06:30PM
Tue, Apr 28
06:30PM

book talk

People of the Book Club: The Flight Portfolio – Live on Zoom

Go behind the stories and peer inside the archives at our bi-monthly book discussion, led by Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History. This session will feature a discussion of The Flight Portfolio by Julie Orringer, a work of historical fiction about American journalist Varian Fry’s attempts to rescue artists and intellectuals during the Nazi occupation of France, followed by a show and tell of documents and artworks from the Center’s collections that are connected to the historical figures in the book.

Participants will need to obtain their own copy to read before the discussion.

Ticket Info: Free, registration required at bookclub2.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 to receive a link to the Zoom event


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book talk

Tue, Apr 28
07:00PM
Tue, Apr 28
07:00PM

conversation

CANCELLED: Erna Rosenstein: Once Upon a Time


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Presented by:

conversation

Wed, Apr 29
06:30PM
Wed, Apr 29
06:30PM

poetry workshop

Poetry Salon - Live on Zoom

Emma Lazarus’s “New Colossus,” written in 1883, is perhaps America’s most enduring poem and has been inspiring people — and poets — for generations. Lazarus immersed herself in the debates, adding her own voice to the mix with her poetry and other writing. AJHS invites you to craft a poem that addresses the nation's debates: if you could write a poem for the Statue of Liberty, what would it say?

Led by celebrated teaching poets and contributors to the 92nd Street Y's #ANewColossus poetry festival, These 90-minute interactive virtual poetry workshops will delve into the construction and techniques used in writing “The New Colossus,” and place Lazarus' poem side by side with work by contemporary poets that is “descended” from, or inspired by, the original poem. Using what they have discovered as a springboard, salon participants will have two writing sessions per class based on prompts inspired by the poems they have discussed and share the work they have created.

Ticket Info: Free; Registration Link: bit.ly/2UuOLmE


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Presented by:

poetry workshop

Thu, Apr 30
06:30PM
Thu, Apr 30
06:30PM

conversation

CANCELLED: Kabbalah and the Founding of America: Christian Uses of Jewish Thought in the Nascent Republic


Presented by:

conversation

Thu, Apr 30
06:30PM
Thu, Apr 30
06:30PM

lecture

Please note: This is a Live Streamed Event via Zoom

How did Jewish designers, architects, patrons, and merchants contribute to the history of modern architecture and design? What do their stories tell us about Jewish assimilation into American society?  And in the aftermath of World War II, how did creative communities like the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis, and Pond Farm in Guerneville, California welcome Jewish emigre architects and designers? Join the Art Deco Society of New York and author and curator Donald Albrecht for an illustrated talk about Jewish contributions to America’s 20th-century domestic landscape.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 CJH/Partner members at artdeco.org/cjh-jews-and-modernism;

Use password CJHDeco20 (case sensitive) for special CJH prices


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About the Speaker:

Donald Albrecht is an independent curator who has organized exhibitions for the Getty Center, Library of Congress, Museum of the City of New York, and the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, among others. He served as curator of the exhibition Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco in 2014.


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lecture