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Sun, Feb 05
02:00PM ET
Sun, Feb 05
02:00PM ET

curator's tour

How Jews Became Citizens  Highlights from the Sid Lapidus Collection     Live Event

What does citizenship mean to you? What are the rights and responsibilities that come with citizenship?

Join curator Ivy Weingram for a one-hour in-person tour in which she addresses these meaningful questions in the special exhibition, How Jews Became Citizens: Highlights from the Sid Lapidus Collection. The Lapidus collection tells the complex, ongoing story of the Jewish people’s path to emancipation—the process through which Jews obtained rights—in Europe, across centuries. Read more about the exhibition  here.

This tour will also be offered on February 16 at 6 pm.

Please note that this tour is not available on Zoom.

The exhibit and program have been made possible by the generous support of Sid and Ruth Lapidus, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at nxt.blackbaud.com


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curator's tour

Sun, Feb 05
02:00PM ET
Sun, Feb 05
02:00PM ET

yiddish club

YIVO Yiddish Club: Theater and Storytelling With Eleanor Reissa – Live on Zoom

Nu, vilst redn a bisele yidish? An event for Yiddish enthusiasts the world over, the YIVO Yiddish club is an informal monthly gathering to celebrate Mame-loshn. Hosted by Shane Baker, sessions take place in English, and are liberally peppered with Yiddish. Each month Baker is joined by a different guest who discusses their work and a related Yiddish cultural theme. In the spirit of a club, sessions are held as interactive zoom meetings in which participants can see and hear one another. Each session includes ample time for audience questions, group discussion, and, time permitting, knock-down, drag-out arguments. Attendees need not know any Yiddish to attend, though some familiarity with the language is highly recommended.

This session features Eleanor Reissa, a Tony-nominated director; Broadway, film, and television actress; a prize-winning playwright, and an international singing artist. Former artistic director of the Folksbiene Yiddish Theater, a storyteller in English and Yiddish, she has sung in every major musical venue in New York and in festivals around the world. Current film/tv includes THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA, DEAD CITY (a sequel to THE WALKING DEAD), and THE ZWEIFLERS (a new German television series). She hosts Yale University’s podcast: “Those Who Were There: Voices from the Holocaust” and is the audio guide narrator of “What Hate Can Do”, the latest exhibit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage. Her book, The Letters Project: A Daughter’s Journey was recently published by Post Hill Press.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/YiddishClub16 for a Zoom link


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yiddish club

Thu, Feb 09
02:00PM ET
Thu, Feb 09
02:00PM ET

lecture

Spinoza, Hegel, and Martin Luther King Jr.: On Political Change – In-Person Lecture & Livestreamed on Zoom

In this lecture inspired by realist insights of the scholar and philosopher David Baumgardt, Jason Maurice Yonover explores – and offers a new historical narrative of – the idea that political progress only comes through struggle. Yonover argues that Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s predecessors, Baruch Spinoza and even Salomon Maimon, help to shed light on the realist view Hegel takes here. For Hegel then, someone who institutes a new and better social order does so rightfully, despite even violence. Yonover also argues, with unpublished writings by Martin Luther King Jr. on Hegel in hand, that both Hegel and King agree friction is essential to progress, but disagree on what such friction should look like, as for King nonviolence is an especially suitable engine of social improvement. In short: on King’s view, one must indeed crack eggs in order to make an omelet, and yet some techniques for cracking should be disvalued.

If you would like to attend this program virtually, please select the "Virtual Admission" option when reserving tickets on Eventbrite.

About the Speaker
Jason Maurice Yonover is a historian of political thought, and of philosophy more broadly, whose work bridges several contexts – in this case the Jewish, German, and Black radical traditions. He is currently the Desai Family Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Philosophy at Princeton University, and has presented his research at institutions across the US and Europe. He is also the most recent winner of the American Philosophical Association’s triennial Baumgart Memorial Fellowship, which is the occasion for this event.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 members, seniors, students. Advance registration required at lbi.org/events/spinoza-hegel-king/


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lecture

Thu, Feb 09
07:00PM ET
Thu, Feb 09
07:00PM ET

lecture

Elusive Emancipation  Jews in the Russian Empire  the Soviet Union  and Beyond     In-person Event

In-person Event

The majority of the world’s Jews entered the twentieth century unemancipated. Most of that majority lived in what is today Ukraine, Belarus, and Lithuania, at the time part of the Russian Empire.  Join Benjamin Nathans (University of Pennsylvania) as he explores why emancipation came so late to the empire of the tsars, what role Jews played in its arrival, and how the Bolshevik Revolution recast the meaning of emancipation itself, with consequences that are still with us today.

About the Speaker
Benjamin Nathans is the Alan Charles Kors Associate Professor of History at Penn, specializing in modern Russia, the Soviet Union, modern Jewish history, and the history of human rights. He is author of the prizewinning Beyond the Pale: The Jewish Encounter with Late Imperial Russia, which has been translated into Hebrew and Russian, and co-editor, most recently, of the collective volume From Europe’s East to the Middle East: Israel’s Russian and Polish Lineages.  His book To the Success of Our Hopeless Cause: The Many Lives of the Soviet Dissident Movement is forthcoming with Princeton University Press. He chaired the international committee of scholars hired by Ralph Appelbaum Associates, the New York-based museum design firm, to help create the Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center in Moscow, which opened in 2012.  His essays have appeared in The EconomistThe Washington PostThe New York Review of BooksThe Times Literary Supplement, and other venues.

This lecture is part of the Sid Lapidus Lecture Series, programs created in partnership with the exhibition How Jews Became Citizens: Highlights from the Sid Lapidus Collection. Click here for information about the exhibit.

The exhibit and program have been made possible by the generous support of Sid and Ruth Lapidus, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: $8 general; $5 members, seniors, students; advance registration required at nxt.blackbaud.com


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lecture

Tue, Feb 14
02:00PM ET
Tue, Feb 14
02:00PM ET

curator's tour

Final Curator’s Tour of From A(gam) to Z(aritsky) – In-Person Event

Collections Curator Bonni-Dara Michaels will explore the character of Israeli art and the personal relationships between artists, collectors, and donors on this special tour of the exhibition, From A(gam) to Z(aritsky): Highlights of Israeli Art from Yeshiva University Museum’s Collection. (Exhibition closes on February 28, 2023.)

Masks are required for this tour.

Ticket Info: Free; advance reservation required at rsvp@yum.cjh.org


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curator's tour

Wed, Feb 15
01:00PM ET
Wed, Feb 15
01:00PM ET

book talk

Knowledge Under Siege | Breaking the Frame: New School of Polish-jewish Studies – Live on Zoom

This event is a part of YIVO's series Knowledge Under Siege, which presents recent scholarship from Poland about the Holocaust and antisemitism. Each event features scholars discussing a recent book they worked on.

Breaking the Frame. New School of Polish-Jewish Studies, edited by Irena Grudzinska Gross, Konrad Matyjaszek, introduced by Jan T. Gross (Berlin: Peter Lang Verlag, 2022).

“Breaking the Frame: New School in Polish-Jewish Studies” edited by Irena Grudzinska Gross and Konrad Matyjaszek is a collection of the most incisive texts of the New School of Polish-Jewish Studies, a direction of critical thinking in Polish-Jewish history and in Holocaust studies. In facing the Holocaust, the New School opposes two intellectual frames. One of them is the framework of Polish nationalism, built around the myth of Polish innocence that either conceals or justifies centuries-old antisemitism. The other is the post-Cold War conviction that the history of Polish Christians’ anti-Jewish violence is an obstacle to Poland’s Western future and that the history of that structural violence should be told as the country’s harmonious and tolerant past. The authors of the volume reformulate the terms and conditions of discourses in history, cultural and literary studies, and other fields of research. Addressing the anti-Jewish violence perpetrated through Polish history, the book is founded on a thought that past violence can be overcome and prevented in the future if it is documented and worked through – intellectually as well as emotionally – together with its cultural context.

About the Speakers
Irena Grudzinska Gross is Professor in the Institute of Slavic Studies of the Polish Academy of Science in Warsaw. Previously, she taught at Emory, New York, Boston and Princeton Universities. She is a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow. She researches issues of war and violence in modern and contemporary European literature. Among other books, she has published “The Scar of Revolution: Custine, Tocqueville and the Romantic Imagination” (1995); “Czeslaw Milosz and Joseph Brodsky: Fellowship of Poets” (2009); and, with Jan T. Gross, “Golden Harvest: Reflections on Events at the Periphery of the Holocaust” (2012).

Konrad Matyjaszek is an architect and cultural studies scholar working at the Institute of Slavic Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw. His work focuses on architecture and urban spaces, Polish discourses of antisemitism and narratives of urban modernization. He published “Produkcja przestrzeni zydowskiej w dawnej i wspolczesnej Polsce” [The production of Jewish space in premodern and contemporary Poland] (2019), a history of Poland’s urban Jewish spaces and of cultural and spatial repression that defined their shape throughout centuries.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/KnowledgeUnderSiege1 for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Feb 16
01:30PM ET
Thu, Feb 16
01:30PM ET

conversation

At Lunch with Brian Lehrer – Live on Zoom

Julie Salamon (NY Times & Wall Street Journal) sits down with WNYC and podcast host Brian Lehrer.  Lehrer is host of The Brian Lehrer Show, WNYC Radio’s daily call-in program, covering politics and life, locally and globally. The live show airs weekdays from 10am-noon on WNYC 93.9 FM, AM 820 and wnyc.org. He also hosts Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast. The New York Times has called Lehrer a “master interviewer.” David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker, says Lehrer is “the equivalent of Lebron James or Steph Curry in the interviewing game.” New York Magazine put him on its “dream dinner party guest list.” The Brian Lehrer Show was recognized with a 2007 George Foster Peabody Award for “Radio That Builds Community Rather Than Divides.”  Political guests have ranged from Barack Obama and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to Mitch McConnell and Boris Johnson, and beyond. Lehrer has been a questioner in televised New York City Mayoral Debates for every election since 1997. Lehrer is also a commentator on local and national issues on television and in print. He has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, NY1, and The Colbert Report on Comedy Central. He has written op-ed pieces for publications including The New York Times, The Daily News, Newsday, and Slate. In addition to the Peabody, Lehrer has won numerous awards, including seven Associated Press New York Broadcasters “Best Interview” Awards since 2000 and two “Best Talk Show” awards from The Garden State Journalists Association. Lehrer holds master’s degrees in public health from Columbia University and journalism from The Ohio State University and a bachelor’s in music and mass communications from the State University of New York at Albany.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs.org/events/at-lunch-with-brian-lehrer/ for a Zoom link


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conversation

Thu, Feb 16
06:00PM ET
Thu, Feb 16
06:00PM ET

curator's tour

How Jews Became Citizens  Highlights from the Sid Lapidus Collection     Live Event

What does citizenship mean to you? What are the rights and responsibilities that come with citizenship?

Join curator Ivy Weingram for a one-hour in-person tour in which she addresses these meaningful questions in the special exhibition, How Jews Became Citizens: Highlights from the Sid Lapidus Collection. The Lapidus collection tells the complex, ongoing story of the Jewish people’s path to emancipation—the process through which Jews obtained rights—in Europe, across centuries. Read more about the exhibition  here.

Please note that this tour is not available on Zoom.

The exhibit and program have been made possible by the generous support of Sid and Ruth Lapidus, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at nxt.blackbaud.com


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curator's tour

Thu, Feb 16
07:00PM ET
Thu, Feb 16
07:00PM ET

book talk

Irena Klepfisz: Her Birth and Later Years: New and Collected Poems, 1971-2021 – Live on Zoom

For fifty years, Irena Klepfisz has written powerful, searching poems about relatives murdered during the war, recent immigrants, a lost Yiddish writer, a Palestinian boy in Gaza, and various people in her life. A trailblazing lesbian poet, child Holocaust survivor, and political activist whose work is deeply informed by socialist values, Klepfisz is a vital and individual American voice. Klepfisz's new book, Her Birth and Later Years: New and Collected Poems, 1971-2021, is the first and only complete collection of her work.

Join The Workers Circle and YIVO for an online conversation with Irena Klepfisz and Julie Enszer celebrating this new book.

Buy the book.

About the Speakers
Irena Klepfisz (Brooklyn, NY) recently retired after 22 years of teaching Jewish Women's Studies at Barnard College. She is the author of four books of poetry including Periods of StressKeeper of AccountsDifferent EnclosuresA Few Words in the Mother Tongue, and Dreams of an Insomniac (prose). She is one of the foremost advocates of the Yiddish language. A co-editor of The Tribe of Dina: A Jewish Women's Anthology, her work has appeared in In GevebSinister WisdomJewish CurrentsConditionsThe Manhattan ReviewThe Village VoiceThe Georgia ReviewPrairie SchoonerChicago Review, and more.

Julie R. Enszer, PhD, is a scholar and a poet. Her scholarship is at the intersection of U.S. history and literature with particular attention to twentieth century U.S. feminist and lesbian histories, literatures, and cultures. She edits and publishes Sinister Wisdom, a multicultural lesbian literary and art journal, and a regular book reviewer for the The Rumpus and Calyx. In 2022, she published two books; OutWrite: The Speeches that Shaped LGBTQ Literary Culture with Rutgers University Press and Fire-Rimmed Eden: Selected Poems by Lynn Lonidier with Nightboat Books. Her scholarly book manuscript, A Fine Bind, is a history of lesbian-feminist presses from 1969 until 2009. Her scholarly work has appeared or is forthcoming in Southern CulturesJournal of Lesbian StudiesAmerican PeriodicalsWSQ, and Frontiers.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Irena-Klepfisz-2023 for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Feb 16
07:30PM ET
Thu, Feb 16
07:30PM ET

concert

Three Trios from Three Centuries  Phoenix Chamber Ensemble Performs Piano Trios by Beethoven  Turina and Inessa Zaretsky

Join Phoenix Chamber Ensemble pianists Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky and regular guest artists Raman Ramakrishnan on cello and Anna Elashvilion violin for Beethoven’s “Archduke” Piano Trio, Op.97; Joaquin Turina’s Piano Trio, Op.76; and Inessa Zaretsky’s “Traveling Light” Piano Trio.

Made possible by the Stravinsky Institute Foundation through the generous support of the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Ticket Info:
In-person: $15 general; $10 members, seniors; advance purchase required
On YouTube: Pay what you wish


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concert

Tue, Feb 21
07:00PM ET
Tue, Feb 21
07:00PM ET

lecture

 ldquo It Is Hard to Find a Loophole for Admitting the Hebrew rdquo   A Twentieth-Century History of Jewish Emancipation in the United States     In-person Event

In-person Event

Historians have long assumed that Jews in the United States were simply emancipated upon arrival. Yet this claim has occluded ongoing struggles for emancipation that endured throughout the twentieth century and that placed American Jews in contingent relationships with other groups seeking the full rights of citizenship. Bereft of the history of American Jewish emancipation, a whole field of study has been perilously isolated from modern Jewish history and from US history. In this talk, Lila Corwin Berman (Temple University) examines history and the consequences of its neglect.

About the Speaker
Lila Corwin Berman holds the Murray Friedman Chair of American Jewish History at Temple University, where she directs the Feinstein Center for American Jewish History. Her most recent book, The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex: The History of a Multibillion-Dollar Institution, has been awarded the 2021 Ellis W. Hawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians and the Saul Viener Book Prize from the American Jewish Historical Society. Her articles have appeared in several scholarly publications, including the American Historical Review, Journal of American History, and AJS Review, and she has written guest columns for the Washington Post, the Forward, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Chronicle of Philanthropy. She is currently working on a new book called “America’s Jewish Question” about the inclusions and exclusions of American liberalism. 

This lecture is part of the Sid Lapidus Lecture Series, programs created in partnership with the exhibition How Jews Became Citizens: Highlights from the Sid Lapidus Collection. Click here for information about the exhibit.

The exhibit and program have been made possible by the generous support of Sid and Ruth Lapidus, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: $8 general; $5 members, seniors, students; advance registration required at nxt.blackbaud.com


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lecture

Thu, Feb 23
11:00AM ET
Thu, Feb 23
11:00AM ET

lecture

Family History Today  Polish Jews in the USSR During WWII - Live on Zoom

Family History Today: Polish Jews in the USSR During WWII - Live on Zoom

When the “Ribbentrop – Molotov pact” divided Poland between the Soviet Union and Germany in 1939, the Polish territories annexed to the Soviet Union had a Jewish population of approximately 2 million. About 400,000 residents of these territories, many of them Jews, were deported to “special settlements,” mostly in Siberia. Additionally, about 250,000 to 300,000 Jewish refugees from German-occupied western Poland fled to the Soviet Union after the war broke out. In this lecture, Serafima Velkovich, Head of the Family Roots Research Section at the Yad Vashem Archives, will provide an overview of the route and the fate of Jewish refugees from Poland who spent the war years in the USSR, and their post-war search for a new home. She will also explain how you can research the experiences and fates of family members who were among these refugees.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register here for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Feb 23
07:30PM ET
Thu, Feb 23
07:30PM ET

concert

More Forbidden Music: Jewish Composers Banned by the Nazis – In-Person Event

The Exilarte Center in Vienna works to rediscover musical treasures of the 20th Century that were suppressed by the Third Reich. This concert features a selection of music whose composers were branded as 'degenerate' and is being rediscovered thanks to Exilarte's work. Composers featured include Julius Bürger, Hals Gál, Andre Singer, Gustav Lewi, Walter Arlen, Vally Weigl and Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Performances will be by the musicians of Exilarte in collaboration with students from the Mannes College of Music.

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at yivo.org/More-Forbidden-Music


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concert

Mon, Feb 27
01:00PM ET
Mon, Feb 27
01:00PM ET

book talk

Summer Camp and Jewish Culture in Postwar America – Live on Zoom

In the decades directly following the Holocaust, American Jewish leaders debated how to preserve and produce Jewish culture, fearful that growing affluence and suburbanization threatened the future of Jewish life. Many communal educators and rabbis pinned their hopes on residential summer camps for Jewish youth: institutions that sprang up across the U.S. as places for children and teenagers to socialize, recreate, and experience Jewish culture. Camp life was shaped both by adults’ fears, hopes, and dreams about the Jewish future as well as children and teenagers own desires and interests.

Focusing on the lived experience of campers and camp counselors, Sandra Fox’s new book, The Jews of Summer: Summer Camp and Jewish Culture in Postwar America, explores how a cultural crisis birthed a rite of passage that remains a significant influence in American Jewish life. Join YIVO for a discussion with Fox about this new book led by Philissa Cramer (Jewish Telegraphic Agency).

Buy the book.

About the Speakers
Sandra Fox is visiting assistant professor of Hebrew Judaic Studies and Director of the Archive of the Jewish Left Project at New York University, and founder and executive producer of the Yiddish-language podcast Vaybertaytsh: A Feminist Podcast in Yiddish.

Philissa Cramer is the Jewish Telegraphic Agency's editor in chief. Prior to joining JTA in 2020, she was a founder and editor at Chalkbeat, the nonprofit news organization covering education. She is a graduate of Brown University.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Summer-Camp for a Zoom link


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book talk

Tue, Feb 28
06:30PM ET
Tue, Feb 28
06:30PM ET

book talk

The Confidante  The Untold Story of the Woman Who Helped Win WWII and Shape Modern America     Live on Zoom

A Hungarian Jewish immigrant with only a high school education, Anna Marie Rosenberg was FDR’s special envoy to Europe in World War II, was among the first Allied women to enter a liberated concentration camp, and stood in the Eagle’s Nest, Hitler’s mountain retreat, days after its capture. She was a key figure behind national policies critical to America winning the war and prospering afterwards, guiding the direction of the Manhattan Project and the G.I. Bill of Rights.  In this first-ever biography of Rosenberg, who was dubbed by Life Magazine “the most important woman in the American government,” Christopher C. Gorham affords her the recognition she so richly deserves. 

The author will be in conversation with Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register here for a Zoom link


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book talk