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Thu, Aug 25
02:00PM ET
Thu, Aug 25
02:00PM ET

book club

LBI Book Club: Exile Music

About the Book
As a young girl growing up in Vienna in the 1930s, Orly has an idyllic childhood filled with music. Her father plays the viola in the Philharmonic, her mother is a well-regarded opera singer, her beloved and charismatic older brother holds the neighborhood in his thrall, and most of her eccentric and wonderful extended family live nearby. Only vaguely aware of Hitler's rise or how her Jewish heritage will define her family's identity, Orly spends her days immersed in play with her best friend and upstairs neighbor, Anneliese. Together they dream up vivid and elaborate worlds, where they can escape the growing tensions around them.

But in 1938, Orly's peaceful life is shattered when the Germans arrive. Her older brother flees Vienna first, and soon Orly, her father, and her mother procure refugee visas for La Paz, a city high up in the Bolivian Andes. Even as the number of Jewish refugees in the small community grows, her family is haunted by the music that can no longer be their livelihood, and by the family and friends they left behind. While Orly and her father find their footing in the mountains, Orly's mother grows even more distant, harboring a secret that could put their family at risk again. Years pass, the war ends, and Orly must decide: Is the love and adventure she has found in La Paz what defines home, or is the pull of her past in Europe – and the piece of her heart she left with Anneliese – too strong to ignore? (description taken from Amazon)

About the Author
Jennifer Steil is an award-winning novelist and memoirist who lives in many countries. She left the United States in 2006 to take a job as editor of a newspaper in Sana’a, Yemen, where she lived for four years. Her first book, The Woman Who Fell From the Sky, was inspired by her experience in Yemen. She began writing her first novel, The Ambassador’s Wife, after she was kidnapped when pregnant with her daughter, an experience that became the first scene of the novel. She and her infant daughter were evacuated from Yemen after her husband Tim Torlot, a British diplomat, was attacked by a suicide bomber. They lived in Amman, Jordan, until his posting ended and he could join them in London. In 2012, they moved to La Paz, Bolivia. Early in her time there, Steil met Jewish Bolivians whose families had fled the Nazis in Europe during World War II. Their stories sparked her third book, the novel Exile Music.

The Ambassador’s Wife won the William Faulkner-William Wisdom Creative Writing Competition Best Novel Award and the 2016 Phillip McMath Post Publication Book Award. Steil’s stories and articles have appeared in the New Orleans ReviewSaranac ReviewWorld Policy JournalThe WeekTimeLifePeauxdunque ReviewThe Washington TimesVogue UKDie WeltNew York PostThe Rumpus, and France 24.

Getting the Book
Exile Music can be found at most larger libraries. Purchase options for the book are available here.

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://www.lbi.org/events/book-club-exile-music/ for a Zoom link


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book club

Thu, Sep 01
01:00PM ET
Thu, Sep 01
01:00PM ET

lecture

Orthodox, Female, Poet: the Litvish Life of Hadasah Hirshovitz Levin, 1912-1946

Hadasah Hirshovitz Levin was a rare example of an Orthodox Jewish poet who came of age during the interwar period, a culturally turbulent time in Lithuanian Jewish history. The political and social turmoil wrought by the First World War resulted in the geographic relocation of the storied Lithuanian yeshivas, the central cultural and theological institutions of Lithuanian and Eastern European Orthodox Jewry. Some students exited the physical and ideological parameters of the Talmudical academies while others reinforced their commitment to the institution of the yeshiva. Traditionally observant women of Jewish Lithuania also underwent a transformation during this period. These women attempted to define themselves amidst the ruptures and sought avenues of creativity and religious expression that reflected the sociocultural milieu of the yeshiva world as well as the larger Eastern European cultural landscape.

Levin exemplified this struggle, bridging the gap between the yeshiva and the modern world of Orthodox education for women. Levin’s life reflected a breadth of experience immortalized in the poetry and prose she published in the interwar period. Levin’s wartime memoir offers a powerfully lyrical account of her experiences written in situ and point to a reality in which some Orthodox women achieved proficiency in both secular and religious texts.

In this lecture, Tzipora Weinberg will examine Levin’s written legacy in the context of lesser-known efforts and publications of her colleagues, to provide a lens into the experiences of an unknown group of traditionalist women in greater Jewish Lithuania.

About the Speaker
Tzipora Weinberg is a doctoral candidate in the Skirball Center for Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University. Her research focuses on Eastern European Jewish history in the 20th century and centers around the intellectual and religious experiences of Orthodox Jewish women within the communities of Poland, Galicia, and Lithuania. She has presented her findings at Columbia University, Dartmouth College, Jewish Historical Institute, and the American Musicological Society, among other academic institutions. Her next article, “Shifting Paradigms, Pandemic Realities: the Reception of Ishay Ribo’s Music in the American Hasidic Community” is forthcoming in the Yale Journal of Music and Religion. As the 2021-2022 Max Weinreich Fellow in Baltic Jewish studies at YIVO and the 2022-2023 Dr. Sophie Bookhalter Fellow at the Center for Jewish History, she explores the educational and theological development of Orthodox women in Jewish Lithuania.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Hadasah-Hirshovitz-Levin for a Zoom link


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lecture

Wed, Sep 07
06:30PM ET
Wed, Sep 07
06:30PM ET

book talk

JewishNoirIITalesofCrimeandOtherDarkDeeds

Jewish Noir II: Tales of Crime and Other Dark Deeds is a new collection of short stories by Jewish and non-Jewish writers, including numerous award-winning authors, exploring the light and dark sides of religion and culture, examining such issues as the enduring legacy of negative stereotypes amid rising anti-Semitism, prejudice, assimilation, and questions of regional, national, and ethnic identity.

Co-editors Chantelle Aimée Osman and Kenneth Wishnia as well as contributors Dr. Maria Bivens-Smith, Robin Hemley, Rabbi Ilene Schneider, and Xu Xi will be in conversation with Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History.

Program registrants will receive a code for 20% off the cost of the book.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/jewish-noir-2-2022-09-07 for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Sep 08
01:00PM ET
Thu, Sep 08
01:00PM ET

book talk

Serenade: A Balanchine Story

At age seventeen, Toni Bentley was chosen by Balanchine, then in his final years, to join the New York City Ballet. From both backstage and onstage, Bentley's new book Serenade: A Balanchine Story carries us through the serendipitous history and physical intricacies and demands of Serenade: its dazzling opening, with seventeen women in a double-diamond pattern; its radical, even jazzy, use of the highly refined language that is ballet; its place in the choreographer’s own dramatic story of his immigration to the United States from Soviet Russia; its mystical—and literal—embodiment of the tradition of classical ballet in just thirty-three minutes. Join YIVO for a discussion of this new book featuring Bentley in conversation with YIVO's Executive Director Jonathan Brent, including a discussion of how researching this book brought Bentley to YIVO, even though Balanchine was not Jewish.

Buy the book.

About the Author
Toni Bentley danced with George Balanchine’s New York City Ballet for ten years. She is the author of five New York Times Notable Books, including Winter Season: A Dancer’s JournalHolding On to the Air (coauthored with Suzanne Farrell), and The Surrender: An Erotic Memoir. Bentley is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and her work has appeared in The Best American Essays as well as in many periodicals, including The New York Times Book ReviewThe New YorkerThe Wall Street JournalThe New York Review of BooksThe Daily BeastVogue, and Vanity Fair.

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://yivo.org/Balanchine for a Zoom link


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book talk

Sun, Sep 11
01:00PM ET
Sun, Sep 11
01:00PM ET

commemoration

Nusakh Vilne Memorial - Live and Livestreamed on Zoom

Join us in commemorating the Jewish community of Vilna through poetry, music, and presentation. This year, Justin Cammy will discuss the poetic legacy of Yung-vilne and Avrom Sutzkever using an archival document as his launching point. A mini concert featuring musical settings of poetry of Avrom Sutzkever will follow Cammy's presentation.

Proof of full COVID-19 vaccination with matching ID is required in order to enter the Center for Jewish History. Click here to see our Visitor Safety Requirements.

About the Speaker
Justin Cammy is professor of Jewish Studies and World Literatures at Smith College. An alum of YIVO's Uriel Weinreich Yiddish Summer Program and a past recipient of YIVO's Dina Abramowicz Emerging Scholar fellowship, he also serves as on-site summer director of the Naomi Prawer Kadar International Yiddish Summer Program at Tel Aviv University. Cammy is a leading expert on the interwar Yiddish literary group Young Vilna. His translation of Abraham Sutzkever's From the Vilna Ghetto to Nuremberg (McGill-Queen's) was a finalist for the 2021 National Jewish Book Award.

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://yivo.org/NusakhVilne2022 for tickets or a Zoom link


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commemoration

Tue, Sep 13
01:00PM ET
Tue, Sep 13
01:00PM ET

panel discussion

The YIVO Sound Archive at 40: a Celebration

Join us for a fascinating insider discussion of the history of the YIVO Sound Archive, important areas of its collections, projects it has facilitated, and other stories of the past 40 years. Moderated by Hankus Netsky, this event will, for the very first time, bring together the founder of YIVO's Sound Archive, Henry Sapoznik, current YIVO Sound Archivists Lorin Sklamberg and Eléonore Biezunski, and former YIVO Sound Archivist Jenny Romaine.

The YIVO Sound Archive houses over 20,000 recordings (including 78, 45, and 33rpm discs, open-reel and cassette tapes, piano rolls, and compact discs and other digital formats) as well as various artifacts related to sound recordings. It is is one of the most extensive and frequently consulted Jewish music collections in the world, embracing Yiddish and Hebrew folk, pop and theater music, Holocaust songs, liturgical, choral and instrumental compositions and, of course, klezmer music, as well as spoken word, oral histories, interviews, and radio programs. In addition to serving researchers, the Sound Archive maintains a special link to the Yiddish cultural world, and has close relationships with many musicians who utilize its resources in creating their art. It serves anyone seeking to include Yiddish music in their life or work, including teachers, journalists, camp counselors, and radio producers, among others.

About the Speakers
Henry H. Sapoznik is an award winning producer, musicologist and performer and writer in the fields of traditional and popular Yiddish and American music and culture. Sapoznik, a native Yiddish speaker and child of Holocaust survivors, is one of the founders of the klezmer revival, the founder of the YIVO sound archives and a five time Grammy nominated producer and winner of the 2002 Peabody award for his 10 part NPR series “The Yiddish Radio Project.” The collection upon which it was based contains over 10,000 unique items and is housed at the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress in Washington DC.

Sapoznik’s new book, A Tourist’s Guide to Lost Yiddish New York, is scheduled for a 2023 release by Excelsior Press.

Jenny Romaine is a director, designer, puppeteer, and co-founder/artistic director of the OBIE winning Great Small Works visual theater collective. She is music director of Jennifer Miller’s CIRCUS AMOK. Romaine/ Great Small Works performs, teaches, and directs in theaters, schools, parks, libraries, museums, prisons, street corners, and other public spaces, producing work on many scales, from gigantic outdoor spectacles with scores of participants, to miniature shows in living rooms. Jenny was a sound archivist at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research for 13 years and for several decades has drawn on Yiddish/Pan Jewish primary source materials to create art that has contemporary meaning. Her Great Small Works projects include Muntergang and Other Cheerful Downfalls about Yiddish puppeteers Zuni Maud and Yosl Cutler, The Sukkos Mob (featured in the film Punk Jews), community Purim Shpiln with the Aftselakhis Spectacle Committee in cahoots with JFREJ, and Vu bistu geven? / Where Have You Been? a Quebec-based adventure parable that asks questions about diasporic Jewish relationships to land.

Lorin Sklamberg is a founding member of the Grammy Award-winning Klezmatics, and teaches Yiddish song from São Paulo to Stockholm. His recent projects include a forthcoming recording of newly-discovered Yiddish cabaret songs from Helsinki and 150 Voices, a collaboration with Yiddish-Russian singer/pianist/composer Polina Shepherd and the members of five choirs in the UK and the United States. As YIVO’s longtime Sound Archivist, he co-curates the Ruth Rubin Legacy website and currently presents materials from the newly-digitized YIVO Yiddish Folksong Project worldwide. “One of the premier American singers in any genre.” – Robert Christgau, NPR.

Eléonore Biezunski is an award-winning Parisian singer/violinist/songwriter and scholar now living in NYC. An avid collector of Yiddish music, she has led several projects and has collaborated with a large number of well-known Jewish performers in the US and abroad. Her recordings include Yerushe (IEMJ, 2016) and Zol zayn (2014). Her composition “Tshemodan” was voted Best New Yiddish Song by São Paulo’s 2021 Bubbe Awards. As YIVO’s Sound Archivist since 2016, Eléonore has coordinated the Ruth Rubin Legacy website (ruthrubin.yivo.org). She has a PhD from the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris and has published several book chapters and articles on the history of Yiddish music and culture, and co-edited a reissue of the complete recordings of the French Elesdisc label, 1948-1953 (2015, IEMJ). She is also a team member of the Klezmer Institute and is a recipient of an NYSCA Folk Arts Apprenticeship. www.eleonorebiezunski.com

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/SoundArchive40 for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Wed, Sep 14
01:00PM ET
Wed, Sep 14
01:00PM ET

book talk

The Dancer and the Holocaust: a Biography of Pola Nirenska

In her book Tancerka i Zaglada (The Dancer and the Holocaust), Weronika Kostyrko uncovers the story of dancer Pola Nirenska (1910-1992) whose career was repeatedly interrupted by antisemitism and fascism. Born Pola Nirensztajn in Warsaw, Nirenska lived and worked in Poland, Germany, Austria, Italy and Great Britain before leaving for America. Kostyrko’s biography intertwines the story of an outstanding Jewish dancer, the history of the avant-garde in Europe and the United States, and the story of the Holocaust in Poland. Kostyrko’s book also sheds light on an unknown chapter in the biography of Jan Karski, a member of the Polish prewar establishment and wartime underground, with new revelations on Karski's attitude towards Jews.

Kostyrko retraced Nirenska’s life and legacy on the basis of interviews with the last witnesses living in the USA, with Nirenska’s relatives in Israel, as well as correspondence and archives scattered on three continents. Nirenska herself did not leave diaries, private letters, nor do we have a film record of her dance. Her name survives in The Jan Karski and Pola Nirenska Award, awarded annually by YIVO.

Join YIVO for a discussion of this important new biography featuring Kostyrko in conversation with YIVO’s Executive Director Jonathan Brent.

About the Author
Weronika Kostyrko worked for 20 years for the Polish liberal daily "Gazeta Wyborcza” as parliament reporter and correspondent in Germany, among other duties. As editor-in-chief of the newspaper’s women’s supplement, "Wysokie Obcasy,” she published many life stories of outstanding Jewish female figures. From 2011 Kostyrko served for five years at the Adam Mickiewicz Institute as editor-in-chief of the Culture.pl website that included many articles on Yiddish culture, bios of Jewish artists and descriptions of their selected works. She is currently working on a biography of Rosa Luxemburg.

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://yivo.org/Nirenska for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Sep 15
06:30PM ET
Thu, Sep 15
06:30PM ET

lecture

Revenge: History and Fantasy - Live Program

From God to Quentin Tarantino: for the first time, an extraordinary exhibition at the Jewish Museum of Frankfurt, accompanied by a book and podcast, takes a look at the subject of revenge in Jewish cultural history. The show offers new perspectives ranging from biblical stories, rabbinical writings, and Jewish legends, to anti-Jewish myths and Jewish bandits. Pop cultural stories form the start of the exhibition, while its vanishing point can be found in the final testimonies of those murdered and the question of justice after the Shoah. Curator Max Czollek will present the exhibition. More about Revenge: History and Fantasy can be found here.

About the Speaker
Max Czollek lives in Berlin, where he was born in 1987. After studies of political science at the Technical University (TU) of Berlin, he earned a doctorate at the TU's Center for Research on Antisemitism. Since 2009 he is member of the poetry collective G13, which published books and organized lectures. 2013–2018 he was curator of the international project “Babelsprech.International” for the connection of the young German-speaking and European poetry scene. Together with Sasha Marianna Salzmann he was initiator of “Desintegration. Ein Kongress zeitgenössischer jüdischer Positionen” (2016) and “Radikale Jüdische Kulturtage” (2017) at Maxim Gorki Theater Berlin, Studio R. His lyric books Druckkammern (2012), Jubeljahre (2015) and Grenzwerte (2019) were published at Verlagshaus Berlin. 2018 his non-fiction book Desintegriert Euch! was published at Carl Hanser.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/revenge-history-and-fantasy/.


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lecture

Wed, Sep 21
06:30PM ET
Wed, Sep 21
06:30PM ET

book talk

The Rise and Fall of Protestant Brooklyn – Live Event

The American Jewish Historical Society presents The Rise and Fall of Protestant Brooklyn, book talk with authors, Stuart M. Blumin and Glenn C. Altschuler.

The Rise and Fall of Protestant Brooklyn, tells the story of nineteenth-century Brooklyn’s domination by upper- and middle-class Protestants with roots in Puritan New England. This lively history describes the unraveling of the control they wielded as more ethnically diverse groups moved into the “City of Churches” during the twentieth century.

Before it became a prime American example of urban ethnic diversity, Brooklyn was a lovely and salubrious “town across the river” from Manhattan, celebrated for its churches and upright suburban living. But challenges to this way of life issued from the sheer growth of the city, from new secular institutions—department stores, theaters, professional baseball—and from the licit and illicit attractions of Coney Island, all of which were at odds with post-Puritan piety and behavior.

Despite these developments, the Yankee-Protestant hegemony largely held until the massive influx of Southern and Eastern European immigrants in the twentieth century. As The Rise and Fall of Protestant Brooklyn demonstrates, in their churches, synagogues, and other communal institutions, and on their neighborhood streets, the new Brooklynites established the ethnic mosaic that laid the groundwork for the theory of cultural pluralism, giving it a central place within the American Creed.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $32 including copy of book; register at ajhs.org/events/book-talk-the-rise-and-fall-of-protestant-brooklyn/


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book talk

Thu, Sep 22
12:30PM ET
Thu, Sep 22
12:30PM ET

conversation

At Lunch with Ruth Messinger

Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal and NY Times) sits down with political leader and social justice advocate Ruth W. Messinger. Ruth is the Global Ambassador for American Jewish World Service, an international human rights organization she ran from 1998-2016. Additionally, she does social justice and organizing work at the Jewish Theological Seminary and at the Meyerson JCC, and teaches Jewish women social justice entrepreneurs.  Ruth is a trained social worker, and previously had a 20-year career in elected office in New York City. She serves on several boards, has 3 children, 8 grand-children and 3.5 thankgreat grandchildren.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs.org/events/at-lunch-with-ruth-messinger/for a Zoom link


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conversation

Thu, Sep 22
01:00PM ET
Thu, Sep 22
01:00PM ET

book talk

Hidden Heretics: Jewish Doubt in the Digital Age

In her recent publication, Hidden Heretics: Jewish Doubt in the Digital Age, scholar Ayala Fader tells the fascinating, often heart-wrenching stories of married ultra-Orthodox Jewish men and women in twenty-first-century New York who lead “double lives” in order to protect those they love. Drawing on five years of fieldwork with those living double lives and the rabbis, life coaches, and religious therapists who minister to, advise, and sometimes excommunicate them, Fader investigates religious doubt and social change in the digital age. In following those living double lives, who range from the religiously observant but open-minded on one end to atheists on the other, Fader delves into universal quandaries of faith and skepticism, the ways digital media can change us, and family frictions that arise when a person radically transforms who they are and what they believe.

Join YIVO for a discussion of this recent publication featuring Fader in conversation with Josh Lambert, professor and director of the Jewish Studies Program at Wellesley College.

About the Speakers
Ayala Fader is Professor of Anthropology at Fordham University. She is the author of the award-winning books, Mitzvah Girls: Bringing Up the Next Generation of Hasidic Jews in Brooklyn (2009) and Hidden Heretics: Jewish Doubt in the Digital Age (2020). Fader’s research, supported by fellowships including the NSF and the NEH, appears in academic journals and more public venues. Fader is the co-founder of the Seminar on Jewish Orthodoxies at Fordham’s Jewish Studies Program, on the steering committee of the Haredi Research Group, and is a fellow at the American Academy for Jewish Research. As the director of Fordham’s Center for Public Anthropology, Fader is currently collaborating on the Demystifying Language Project, which works to make linguistic anthropology a social justice resource for public high schools.

Josh Lambert is the Sophia Moses Robison Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and English, and director of the Jewish Studies Program, at Wellesley College. He's the author of The Literary Mafia: Jews, Publishing, and Postwar American Literature (2022) and Unclean Lips: Obscenity, Jews, and American Culture (2014), and coeditor of How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish (2020).

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://yivo.org/Hidden-Heretics for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Sep 29
01:00PM ET
Thu, Sep 29
01:00PM ET

lecture

How to Do Research at YIVO: What is an Archive?

The Archives and Library at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research represent the single largest and most comprehensive collection of materials on Eastern European Jewish civilization in the world. With some 23 million items in the YIVO Archives and nearly 400,000 volumes in all European languages in YIVO's Library, the possibilities for research are endless.

Join YIVO archivist Hallel Yadin for an overview on how to do research at YIVO. The program will cover crucial and fundamental questions including: What is an archive? How is an archive different from a library? How are archives and libraries used, and by whom? What key terminologies associated with archives and libraries are useful to know?

Yadin will also cover the basics of how to search for material at YIVO. This event is open to anyone interested in doing research (online or in-person) at YIVO or learning more about YIVO’s vast collections.

Other programs in this series:

How To Do Research at YIVO: A Practical Introduction
How To Do Research at YIVO: Accessing Digitized Materials

About the Speaker
Hallel Yadin is an Archivist at YIVO. Before coming to YIVO full-time, she interned in the YIVO Archives and worked as a research assistant at Rutgers University Special Collections/University Archives. She is completing an M.L.I.S. with an emphasis in archival studies at the University of Missouri, and holds a B.A. in history from Rutgers University. She has reading knowledge of Yiddish and French.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Research-Intro2 for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Sep 29
02:00PM ET
Thu, Sep 29
02:00PM ET

book club

LBI Book Club: When Time Stopped

About the Book
In this astonishing story that “reads like a thriller and is so, so timely,” (BuzzFeed) Ariana Neumann dives into the secrets of her father’s past. “Like Anne Frank’s diary, it offers a story that needs to be told and heard” (Booklist, starred review).

In 1941, the first Neumann family member was taken by the Nazis, arrested in German-occupied Czechoslovakia for bathing in a stretch of river forbidden to Jews. He was transported to Auschwitz. Eighteen days later his prisoner number was entered into the morgue book.

Of thirty-four Neumann family members, twenty-five were murdered by the Nazis. One of the survivors was Hans Neumann, who, to escape the German death net, traveled to Berlin and hid in plain sight under the Gestapo’s eyes. What Hans experienced was so unspeakable that, when he built an industrial empire in Venezuela, he couldn’t bring himself to talk about it. All his daughter Ariana knew was that something terrible had happened.

When Hans died, he left Ariana a small box filled with letters, diary entries, and other memorabilia. Ten years later Ariana finally summoned the courage to have the letters translated, and she began reading. What she discovered launched her on a worldwide search that would deliver indelible portraits of a family loving, finding meaning, and trying to survive amid the worst that can be imagined.

A “beautifully told story of personal discovery,” (John le Carré) When Time Stopped is an unputdownable detective story and an epic family memoir, spanning nearly ninety years and crossing oceans. Neumann brings each relative to vivid life, and this “gripping, expertly researched narrative will inspire those looking to uncover their own family histories” (Publishers Weekly). (description taken from Amazon)

About the Author
Ariana Neumann was born and grew up in Venezuela. She has a BA in History and French Literature from Tufts University, an MA in Spanish and Latin American Literature from New York University and a PgDIP in Psychology of Religion from University of London. She previously was involved in publishing, worked as a foreign correspondent for Venezuela’s The Daily Journal and her writing has appeared in a variety of publications including The European, the Jewish Book Council, and The New York Times.

Learn more about When Time Stopped here, and read a review in The New York Times.

Getting the Book
When Time Stopped can be found in most library systems and is in stock in numerous bookstores. You can also purchase it here.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/book-club-when-time-stopped/ for a Zoom link


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book club

Sun, Oct 02
10:00AM ET
Sun, Oct 02
10:00AM ET

symposium

Jews in the Gilded Age: The Leonard L. Milberg Symposium in honor of Harold T. Shapiro – Live Event

The American Jewish Historical Society is delighted to serve as host of the book launch event for Yearning to Breathe Free. This comprehensive volume, featuring contributions from twenty of American Jewish history’s most preeminent scholars, details Jewish life in Gilded Age America, and provides a much-needed glimpse into the political, economic, and social histories of Jewish Americans. Confirmed presenters include co-editors Jonathan Sarna and Adam Mendelsohn, contributors Melissa Klapper, Zev Eleff, and Daniel Soyer, Pamela NadellNY Times writer Mike Hale, and AJHS Trustee and best-selling author Julie Salamon.

Ticket Info: $50 including a kosher lunch and a copy of the book; register at ajhs.org/events/the-leonard-l-milberg-symposium-in-honor-of-harold-t-shapiro-jews-in-the-gilded-age/


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symposium

Sun, Oct 09
04:00PM ET
Sun, Oct 09
04:00PM ET

panel discussion

Poet Laureate of Southern Jews: Personal Remembrances of Eli Evans

Please join our panel of Eli Evans’ colleagues, friends and family remembering the man whose passion for southern Jewish history provided a legacy that has thrived for five decades. The panelists will bring their own perspective to the discussion about their colleague, their friend, their father.

The Panelists
Robert Rosen, moderator: When not involved in his Charleston law practice, Robert likely will be found studying and writing history. He has authored several books about the history of Charleston and southern Jewish history and has been a frequent participant with SJHSSC programs. Mr. Rosen also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Historic Charleston Foundation and is Chairman of the Arts and History Commission of the City of Charleston. He is past president of the JHSSC.

Marcie Cohen-Ferris: Marcie is a professor in the Department of American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Ferris’s research and teaching interests include southern history and culture–particularly the foodways and material culture of the American South, the history of the Jewish South, and American Jewish identity and culture.

Josh Evans: Josh, a SAG-AFTRA actor with multiple television and film credits to his name, is the only son of Eli and Judith Evans. His work can be seen on joshlevans.com

Macy B. Hart: Macy is the founder and President Emeritus of the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life (ISJL). Before establishing the ISJL, Macy was Director of the Henry S. Jacobs Camp in Utica, Mississippi, for 30 years. He also founded the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience (MSJE) in 1986; the new MSJE is now open in New Orleans.

Len Rogoff: Len, former president of the SJHS, has written and lectured on the Jewish history of North Carolina.  He is now historian for Jewish Heritage North Carolina.

Steve Whitfield: Steve is the Max Richter Professor of American Civilization, Emeritus, at Brandeis University. He has written extensively about American political and cultural history, and southern Jewish history.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs.org/events/poet-laureate-of-southern-jews-personal-remembrances-of-eli-evans/ for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Thu, Oct 13
06:30PM ET
Thu, Oct 13
06:30PM ET

lecture and theatrical reading

Lew Nussimbaum aka Essad Bey: Wanderer between Words – Live Event

Born to a Jewish family in Kiev, raised in Baku, and converted to Islam in Berlin, Essad Bey’s (né Lew Nussimbaum) (1905–1942) orientalist writings reached a huge audience in the Weimar Republic. Although his novels and essays depicting life in locales such as Azerbaijan and the Caucasus helped shape notions of a mysterious and romantic East in the German public imagination, his own incredible life may have been the most fantastical story he left us. Michael Lahr will give a lecture on Essad Bey’s life and times, followed by a dramatic reading of selected works (in German with English subtitles) by the actor Gregorij H. von Leitis.

About the Presenters
Michael Lahr is is the Executive Director of the Lahr von Leïtis Academy & Archive, Vice Chairman of the Erwin Piscator Award Society, co-director of the Elysium Festival in Bernried, and member of the advisory board of the Nietzsche Forum Munich and the Leon Askin Forum Vienna. He is also the Program Director and Associate Artistic Director of Elysium - Between Two Continents.

Lahr is a co-author of the volume of essays Bilder des Menschen (Images of Man), to which he contributed an article entitled Der Jüdische Humanismus und das Konzept der Veranwortung (Jewish Humanism and the Concept of Responsibility). His essay about Nietzsches Einfluss auf die französische Gegenwartsphilosophie: Spurensuche im Werk Michel Foucaults (Nietzsche's Influence on French contemporary Philosophy: Looking for Traces in the Work of Michel Foucault) was published in the yearbook of the Nietzsche Forum Munich e.V. A specialist on Erwin Piscator, founder of the Political and Epic Theater, he curated the exhibition Erwin Piscator: Political Theater in Exile, which has been shown in Bernried, New York, Catania, Salzburg, and Munich.

Gregorij H. von Leitis has been working as a director at various theaters in Europe and the USA for more than 50 years. He is also the Artistic Director of Elysium - Between Two Continents. In 1985 he was the first non-American to receive the New York Theatre Club Prize for his direction of Bertolt Brecht's The Jewish Wife. In 2003, he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany by German President Johannes Rau for his merits in promoting international understanding by means of art. In April 2016, the Austrian Federal President Dr. Heinz Fischer bestowed on him the Austrian Cross of Honor for Science and Art. In recent years, Gregorij von Leïtis has been increasingly active as a speaker; through reading programs and literary-musical collages, he has been active in Germany and abroad against hate (Hate is a Failure of Imagination), for the preservation of democracy (Defending Democracy), and for environmental protection (After Us, the Deluge?), among other things.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/lew-nussimbaum-aka-essad-bey/


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lecture and theatrical reading

Fri, Oct 14
11:00AM ET
Fri, Oct 14
11:00AM ET

walking tour

WalkingTourTheUnexpectedStoryofJewishWilliamsburg

It would be fair to call Williamsburg the Lower East Side’s lesser-known sibling. Opening in 1903, the Williamsburg bridge, which connects the Lower East Side to Williamsburg, soon came to be known as “The Jewish Highway.” Jewish immigrants, seeking to escape the crowded tenements of the Lower East Side, resettled in Williamsburg in large numbers. They brought with them all the character of similar enclaves – Yiddish, kosher butchers, and synagogues – as well as the familiar ambition of upward mobility. However, unlike the Lower East Side, Williamsburg was not soon past its heyday. 

After the Holocaust, Hungarian survivors, many of whom were Hasidic, became the next wave of immigrants to make their American starter homes in Williamsburg. But this second wave did not want to move on and assimilate. They stayed in Williamsburg, despite the polluted East River, high crime, and crumbling infrastructure, and maintained their traditions. Even as North Williamsburg has been reborn as a trendy hipster enclave in recent decades, the fourth generation of Hasidim continue to thrive in South Williamsburg. Our tour will take us through this story by way of the buildings, streets, and synagogues, with a nosh of the famous Hungarian kosher baking. And, since we’ll be visiting during the week of Sukkos, the community’s lively atmosphere will enrich your experience of contemporary Jewish Williamsburg. 

About the Tour Guide

Frieda Vizel  is a New York City tour guide who specializes in Jewish Williamsburg. She grew up in the Satmar Hasidic community and her four holocaust survivor grandparents lived in Williamsburg. She has since left the fold but remains drawn to the area‘s rich legacy.

Location and Other Details
This two-hour tour will begin at the Williamsburg Bridge Plaza Bus Terminal, a glass building at the corner of Broadway and Havermeyer Streets. Please plan to arrive at 10:45 AM to check in. We will not wait more than a few minutes for late arrivals. This tour will take place rain or shine. Note: Some tour stops are not wheelchair accessible. Additional logistical information will be emailed to all registrants one week before the tour, and again the day before the tour.

Ticket Info: $30 general admission; $25 Center or Partner members. Limited spots available. Register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/walking-tour-2022-10-14.


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walking tour

Thu, Oct 20
01:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 20
01:00PM ET

book talk

Hugo Kauder: Composer, Musical Philosopher, Music Theorist

Hugo Kauder was a mid-century Viennese Jewish composer, pedagogue, and émigré to America, who defied the atonal trend of his generation with his uniquely harmonic, contrapuntal style. His legacy of over 300 works, many yet to be published, is receiving renewed interest today. YIVO's Director of Public Programs Alex Weiser joins Kauder's biographer, scholar and pianist Karin Wagner, for a conversation about Kauder, his work, and his legacy.

About the Speakers
Karin Wagner teaches piano and piano pedagogy at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. Wagner has published widely on the subject of composers in exile.

Alex Weiser is the Director of Public Programs of YIVO and a composer of contemporary classical music. Weiser's debut album and all the days were purple, was named a 2020 Pulitzer Prize Finalist for Music.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Kauder-Book-Talk for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Oct 20
06:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 20
06:00PM ET

book talk

TheSassoonsTheGreatGlobalMerchantsandtheMakingofanEmpire

The gilded Baghdadi Sassoons, one of the richest families in the world for over two centuries, built a vast empire through global finance and trade-cotton, opium, shipping-that reached across three continents. Against the monumental canvas of the Ottoman Empire and the changing face of the Far East, across Europe and Great Britain during the time of its farthest reach, Joseph Sassoon gives us a spectacular generational saga of the making (and undoing) of this family dynasty in his new book, The Sassoons: The Great Global Merchants and the Making of an Empire.

Dr. Joseph Sassoon, Professor of History and Political Economy and Director of the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University, will be in conversation with Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/the-sassoons-2022-10-20 for a Zoom link


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book talk

Sun, Oct 23
02:00PM ET
Sun, Oct 23
02:00PM ET

yiddish club

YIVO Yiddish Club: Contemporary Yiddish Creativity in Israel With Mendy Cahan

Nu, vilst redn a bisele yidish? An event for Yiddish enthusiasts the world over, the YIVO Yiddish club is an informal monthly gathering to celebrate mame-loshn. Hosted by Shane Baker, sessions take place in English, and are liberally peppered with Yiddish. Each month Baker is joined by a different guest who discusses their work and a related Yiddish cultural theme. In the spirit of a club, sessions are held as interactive zoom meetings in which participants can see and hear one another. Each session includes ample time for audience questions, group discussion, and, time permitting, knock-down, drag-out arguments. Attendees need not know any Yiddish to attend, though some familiarity with the language is highly recommended.

This session features Mendy Cahan, Yiddish singer, actor, badkhn, teacher, and founder of the YUNG YiDiSH Library and Cultural center in Tel Aviv which hosts a variety of activities to strengthen Yiddish culture in Israel. Cahan performs on Yiddish stages worldwide and at the Gesher Theatre in Tel Aviv. He has appeared in award-winning films including Murer: Anatomie eines Prozesses and the Oscar-awarded Son of Saul, for which he was also the Yiddish coach. Cahan will soon be seen in the upcoming Netflix series Diamonds. He currently lectures about Yiddish Literature at Alma College and is active as a volunteer for YUNG YiDiSH.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/YiddishClub13 for a Zoom link


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yiddish club

Tue, Oct 25
06:30PM ET
Tue, Oct 25
06:30PM ET

film

Dear Fredy: Sexuality and Politics in the Theresienstadt Ghetto – Live Event

Combining interviews, archival material, and animation, this documentary tells the story of Fredy Hirsch, a gay, Zionist athlete who became the head of the youth department of the Theresienstadt Ghetto. Hirsch faced discrimination and persecution both for his sexuality and as a Jew, but he was also a widely admired figure in Theresienstadt. Following the screening, LBI’s Head of Public Outreach, Michael Simonson, will discuss Hirsch’s life, as well as the topic of sexuality in concentration camps.

About the Speaker
Michael Simonson has been part of the Leo Baeck Institute since 2002. Since his beginnings as a new archivist, he has taken on many roles, including the position of Director of the Dr. Robert Ira Lewy Reference Services and as Director of Public Outreach. Simonson works closely with researchers and their needs, be it academic or personal genealogy. He has coordinated a number of programs online, as well as the monthly meetings of the Leo Baeck Institute book club. You are always welcome to write him with any questions you have related to your research.

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://www.lbi.org/events/dear-fredy/


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film

Wed, Oct 26
06:30PM ET
Wed, Oct 26
06:30PM ET

panel discussion

Village Preservation: Recognizing and Protecting Jewish History – Live Event

Join us for a night of landmark discussion on the history of Union Square, and historic preservation! Special guest Village Preservation will join AJHS to discuss Union Square’s path to landmark status designation. Beginning with a historical overview of the Square, we’ll continue through to the landmarking campaign, and finish with an audience Q&A. Come learn how Union Square became a landmark! 

Ticket Info: Free with registration; register at ajhs.org/events/village-preservation-recognizing-and-protecting-jewish-history-event/


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panel discussion

Thu, Oct 27
12:30PM ET
Thu, Oct 27
12:30PM ET

conversation

At Lunch with Lynn Novick

Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal, NY Times) sits down with award-winning documentary filmmaker Lynn Novick.  Lynn, co-director and producer of The U.S. and the Holocaust, has been making landmark documentary films about American life and culture for more than 30 years. She has created nearly 100 hours of acclaimed programming for PBS in collaboration with Ken Burns, including Ernest Hemingway, The Vietnam War, Baseball, Jazz, Frank Lloyd Wright, The War, and Prohibition — these landmark series have garnered 19 Emmy nominations. One of the most respected documentary filmmakers and storytellers in America, Novick herself has received Emmy, Peabody and Alfred I. duPont Columbia Awards.

College Behind Bars, Novick’s debut as solo director, premiered at the New York Film Festival and aired on PBS in 2019. Novick’s next project as solo director and writer is a multi-part PBS series on the history of crime and punishment in America, slated for release in 2026.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs.org/events/at-lunch-with-lynn-novick/ for a Zoom link


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conversation

Thu, Oct 27
07:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 27
07:00PM ET

concert

Music of Hugo Kauder – Live Event

Hugo Kauder was a mid-century Viennese Jewish composer, pedagogue, and émigré to America, who defied the atonal trend of his generation with his uniquely harmonic, contrapuntal style. His legacy of over 300 works, many yet to be published, is receiving renewed interest today. A collaboration with the Leo Baeck Institute, American Society for Jewish Music, Hugo Kauder Society, and YIVO, this concert explores a selection of Kauder's vocal music, piano music, and chamber music including Kauder's newly available Violin Sonata in A minor.

A free online streaming option is also available. Learn more here.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 LBI/CJH/Partner Members, Students, Seniors at lbi.org/events/hugo-kauder-concert/


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concert

Mon, Oct 31
01:00PM ET
Mon, Oct 31
01:00PM ET

workshop

How to Do Research at YIVO: Accessing Digitized Materials

The Archives and Library at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research represent the single largest and most comprehensive collection of materials on Eastern European Jewish civilization in the world. With some 23 million items in the YIVO Archives and nearly 400,000 volumes in all European languages in YIVO's Library, the possibilities for research are endless.

Join YIVO archivist Hallel Yadin for an overview of how to access YIVO’s digitized holdings. This program will go over the portals that contain digitized archival and library materials, as well as tips for navigating each portal effectively.

This event is open to anyone interested in doing online research at YIVO or learning more about YIVO’s vast digitized collections.

About the Speaker
Hallel Yadin is an Archivist at YIVO. Before coming to YIVO full-time, she interned in the YIVO Archives and worked as a research assistant at Rutgers University Special Collections/University Archives. She is completing an M.L.I.S. with an emphasis in archival studies at the University of Missouri, and holds a B.A. in history from Rutgers University. She has reading knowledge of Yiddish and French.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Research-Intro3 for a Zoom link


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workshop