19 | May
10:00AM
19 | May
10:00AM

conference

Legacies of Violence: The Pogroms of the Russian Civil War at 100

Join a group of distinguished scholars to commemorate the centennial of the 1919 wave of anti-Jewish violence unleashed by the Russian Civil War.They will discuss the pogroms through the lenses of the specific geopolitical context where the violence erupted, as well as in a comparative framework in relation to anti-Black violence. The presenters will also explore the power of literary responses to anti-Jewish violence and reassess the role that pogroms play in Jewish memory and history. 

10:00 am– 11:30 am:
On Literature and Pogroms
Chair: Anita Norich, University of Michigan
Presenter: Amelia Glaser, UC San Diego
Presenter: Harriet Murav, University of Illinois
Discussant: Val Vinokur, The new School

11:30 am – 11:45 am: Coffee break

11:45 am – 1:15 pm:
Toward a Comparative Approach
Chair: Eugene Avrutin, University of Illinois
Presenter: Michele Mitchell, New York University
Presenter: Benjamin Gampel, Jewish Theological Seminary
Discussant: Bob Weinberg, Swarthmore College

1:15 pm – 2:30 pm: Lunch (on your own)

2:30 pm – 4:30 pm:
Pogroms in Context: Russia and Poland
Chair: Faith Hillis, University of Chicago
Presenter: Glenn Dynner, Sarah Lawrence College
Presenter: Polly Zavadivker, University of Delaware
Presenter: Anna Cichopek-Gajraj, Arizona State University
Presenter: Bob Weinberg, Swarthmore College

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm: Coffee break

5:00 pm – 6:30 pm:
Pogroms in History and Memory: A Conversation
Elissa Bemporad, Queens College and the Graduate Center, CUNY
Jeffrey Veidlinger, University of Michigan
Steve Zipperstein, Stanford University

The conference is organized thanks to the generous support of the Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jews, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and The Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

conference

19 | May
10:30AM
19 | May
10:30AM

walking tour

Union Square Walking Tour with Annie Polland

Union Square is where two major roads intersected and where labor unions gathered energy, and it is also the place where Jewish history and American history intertwined in fascinating and diverse ways. Come analyze the buildings, Macy's, Tammany Hall, Margaret Sangers Planned Parenthood townhouse and come hear what Emma Goldman, Emma Lazarus and others had to say about immigration, suffrage and free love. This special walking tour ends with a behind-the-scenes look at the objects and primary sources including Emma Lazarus' handwritten manuscript of the New Colossus that inspired the tour.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

walking tour

19 | May
11:00AM
19 | May
11:00AM

walking tour

Washington Heights Walking Tour

Rob Snyder, author of the book Crossing Broadway, Washington Heights and the Promise of New York City, and Professor of Journalism and American Studies at Rutgers University-Newark, leads a walking tour and panel discussion in the northern Manhattan neighborhood once known as “Frankfurt on the Hudson” for its large population of German-Jewish refugees. Eight decades later, the neighborhood is still a vibrant home for new immigrant communities. Purchase tickets for location information.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

walking tour

19 | May
02:00PM
19 | May
02:00PM

lecture

WHAT'S IN A NAME? A case study of (Re)Discovering Jewish Identity on (and off) an Unlikely African Archipelago

From Poland to Brazil to New Mexico, individuals, families and communities around the world are discovering that they have Jewish ancestors who renounced and/or suppressed their religious identity. What happens when Christians today learn that some of their long-ago relatives were Jewish? The West African nation of Cabo Verde offers an especially compelling place from which to explore this intriguing process because of the unexpected convergence of Jews and Africans on a remote archipelago in the North Atlantic.

Professor Alma Gottlieb, an award-winning cultural anthropologist , will discuss her research with the Cabo Verdeans who are reconnecting with their Jewish heritage.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the American Sephardi Federation

lecture

19 | May
07:00PM
19 | May
07:00PM

concert

Rothko’s Chapel, Little Match Girl Passion, and an Adam Roberts Premiere: Secular Sacred Music

p>A performance of two choral masterworks, Morton Feldman’s Rothko’s Chapel and David Lang’s Little March Girl Passion, featuring the young artists of the OS Ensemble, led by Raquel Acevedo-Klein, including the performance of a new secular sacred work by composer Adam Roberts, commissioned for the occasion.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

17 | May
03:00PM
17 | May
03:00PM

opera

Nabucco

An opera by Giuseppe Verdi, adapted by and starring David Serero as Nabucco. Building on the Biblical accounts of the Babylonian Exile found in Jeremiah and Daniel, Verdi's Nabucco (Nebuchadnezzar) combines political and love intrigues with some of the greatest songs ever written (including “Va, pensiero, The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves”).

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

opera

16 | May
07:00PM
16 | May
07:00PM

lecture

Saving Monticello: The Little-Known Story of the Levy Family’s Stewardship of Thomas Jefferson’s ‘Essay in Architecture.’

Marc Leepson will present a lively talk on U.S. Navy Commodore Uriah Phillips Levy and Representative Jefferson Monroe Levy, the Sephardic saviors of Jefferson’s iconic house at Charlottesville, Virginia, including the history of one of the most accomplished Jewish-American families (Levy-Phillips-Nunez).

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

lecture

15 | May
06:30PM
15 | May
06:30PM

lecture

Urban Genealogy - Researching New York City’s Buildings

Who built my building? When? Who designed it? Has it changed? What did it used to look like? Who’s lived there over the decades? Has it been written about or photographed?  New York City enjoys unrivalled resources for hunting down answers to those questions. In the past, such research meant visiting archives, city offices, libraries and historical societies, but in recent decades vast amounts of material have migrated to the cloud. For more than 30 years, Anthony Robins has taught New Yorkers the secrets of uncovering the city’s history in an annual seminar at the Municipal Art Society. This one-hour introduction synthesizes the highlights of that seminar, focusing on some of the most useful on-line resources — from New York City property records to newspaper databases to public library collections to photo research — and demonstrates their use.

About the Speaker: Architectural historian and author Anthony W. Robins (AnthonyWRobins.com) spent 20 years on staff at the New York Landmarks Commission, supervising the work of historians researching the city's landmarks and historic districts. Now in private practice, he continues to research the history of the city's buildings, while writing, teaching and leading walking tours. His books include Grand Central Terminal: 100 Years of a New York Landmark; Classics of American Architecture: The World Trade Center; Subway Style: 100 Years of Architecture & Design in the New York City Subway; and New York Art Deco: A Guide to Gotham’s Jazz Age Architecture, winner of a 2017-2018 New York City Book Award from the New York Society Library.

An ASL interpreter may be made available if requested in advance.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Presented by: the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

lecture

15 | May
08:00PM
15 | May
08:00PM

opera

Nabucco

An opera by Giuseppe Verdi, adapted by and starring David Serero as Nabucco. Building on the Biblical accounts of the Babylonian Exile found in Jeremiah and Daniel, Verdi's Nabucco (Nebuchadnezzar) combines political and love intrigues with some of the greatest songs ever written (including “Va, pensiero, The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves”).

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

opera

13 | May
06:30PM
13 | May
06:30PM

curator's tour

Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War

Join curator Ilona Moradof on a tour of Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War, illuminating the organized rescue efforts that brought thousands of children from Nazi Europe to Great Britain in the late 1930s. Explore the children’s difficult and often heartbreaking journeys through personal stories, artifacts and engaging media.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

10 | May
03:00PM
10 | May
03:00PM

opera

Nabucco

An opera by Giuseppe Verdi, adapted by and starring David Serero as Nabucco. Building on the Biblical accounts of the Babylonian Exile found in Jeremiah and Daniel, Verdi's Nabucco (Nebuchadnezzar) combines political and love intrigues with some of the greatest songs ever written (including “Va, pensiero, The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves”).

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

opera

09 | May
03:00PM
09 | May
03:00PM

lecture

Leaving Mother Russia

Between 1881 and 1914, about two million Jews left the Tsarist Empire and departed westward, primarily for the United States. What were the logistics of this often-difficult process? This presentation will highlight the complex decision-making and border-crossing processes that individual Jews went through on their journeys to America.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

09 | May
07:00PM
09 | May
07:00PM

staged reading

Three Suitcases—An Encounter with Ernst Toller & William S. Burroughs

True story: In 1937, future Beat Generation icon William Burroughs was 23 years old. He married a German Jewish woman named Ilse Herzfeld Klapper to help her obtain a visa to avoid repatriation to Germany. She was 37 years old at the time.

Ilse Burroughs arrived in New York in 1939. She was hired as a secretary by exiled anti-fascist German writer and activist Ernst Toller.

A poet and war veteran, Toller came to prominence in 1919 as a leader of the short-lived Worker’s Republic (Räterepublik) in Munich. This revolutionary government in Bavaria was brutally suppressed in two months. Toller was sentenced to five years in prison.

The plays and poems Toller wrote in jail—including a play that prophesied the rise of Hitler—made him an international luminary. He was an immediate target of the Nazi regime when it took power in 1933. His apartment in Berlin was raided in the first waves of arrests after the Reichstag fire, but Toller was in Switzerland. He never returned to Germany.

Toller’s books were burned on Berlin's Opernplatz in May 1933. He quickly became one of the leading figures in anti-fascist resistance. He gave speeches, wrote articles, raised money for the hungry in Spain. He even wrote film scripts in Hollywood.

Richard Byrne’s new play Three Suitcases imagines two meetings between these three characters in the Mayflower Hotel in 1939. It's a landscape of refugees and exiles, growing fascism, and attempts to erase and rewrite history.
Three Suitcases also asks hard questions about the artist and politics. Can writers change the world with words? Or should authors stand apart from power?

With a post-reading discussion featuring playwright Richard Byrne and Lisa Marie Anderson, professor of German at Hunter College.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute & Deutsches Haus at NYU

staged reading

08 | May
07:30PM
08 | May
07:30PM

concert

Army Bands – A Tribute

In celebration of Yom Ha’atzmaut, former army band singers Ariella Edvy and Omer Shaish, along with the MusicTalks ensemble, pay musical tribute to the Israeli army band phenomenon of the 60’s and 70’s. Through vivid stories and background, host Elad Kabilio contextualizes the music that helped inspire the young nation of Israel during and after times of war.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & Yeshiva University’s Center for Israel Studies

concert

07 | May
03:00PM
07 | May
03:00PM

lecture

Reimagining the History of the Kovno Ghetto

For decades, scholarship on the Holocaust in Kovno has been dominated by the writings of ghetto elites, relegating the testimonies of Jews who did not occupy positions of authority during the war to the margins. This talk will highlight Yiddish and Hebrew accounts of the Kovno ghetto whose evidentiary value has been minimized or ignored.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

07 | May
07:00PM
07 | May
07:00PM

panel discussion

Antisemitism, Identity Politics and American Identity: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

Considering current events, historians and the public are motivated to re-examine the history of antisemitism in the U.S. Join us for a panel discussion on antisemitism, and how it is woven into our national conversations around identity politics, intercultural relations, and national identity. Featuring Christina Greer, Tony Michels and Eric Ward.

Part of the Jack Coleman and Lawrence Kanter, MD Lecture Series.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

panel discussion

07 | May
07:30PM
07 | May
07:30PM

lecture

Jewish Religious Music in 19th-Century America

Drawing on material in his new book Jewish Religious Music in Nineteenth-Century America: Restoring the Synagogue Soundtrack, Judah M. Cohen (Indiana University) presents a new side to the story of American Jewish music, including important sonic innovations of the 19thcentury.

Presented by: Jewish Music Forum, A Project of the American Society for Jewish Music

lecture

06 | May
07:00PM
06 | May
07:00PM

lecture

Memory of the Past and the Battle for a Promising Future

Join us for a talk by founder and president of Yahad-In Unum, Catholic priest Father Patrick Desbois. Yahad-In Unum identifies mass Jewish killing sites and collects forensic evidence of the executions and conducts international workshops and graduate-level seminars to contribute to Holocaust scholarship and the study of genocide.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

05 | May
09:00AM
05 | May
09:00AM

conference

In Dialogue: Polish Jewish Relations

The 2018-19 “In Dialogue” series culminates in this daylong conference discussing Polish Jewish relations in the post-war era, including contemporary issues such as Poland’s controversial Holocaust law.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies at Columbia University & Fordham University

conference

02 | May
06:30PM
02 | May
06:30PM

book launch

A Jewish Refugee in New York

Join Anita Norich in conversation with Joseph Berger about Jewish refugees in America, female authors, Yiddish novels, translation and more to celebrate the launch of Professor Norich’s translation of Kadya Molodovsky’s novel.

Rivke Zilberg, a 20-year-old Jewish woman, arrives in New York shortly after the Nazi invasion of Poland, her home country. In this fictionalized journal originally published in Yiddish, author Kadya Molodovsky provides keen insight into the day-to-day activities of the large immigrant Jewish community of New York. By depicting one woman's struggles as a Jewish refugee in the US during WWII, Molodovsky points readers to the social, political, and cultural tensions of that time and place. A reception and book signing will follow the program.

A limited number of seats are available for this event; reservations are required.

This event is generously supported by the Covenant Foundation.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society & YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book launch

02 | May
07:30PM
02 | May
07:30PM

concert

Love Letters to Clara: Phoenix Chamber Ensemble and Tesla Quartet Perform Schumann and Brahms

Brahms and Schumann shared their love for Clara Schumann. Both pieces at this concert, Brahms Piano Quartet in G minor, Op.25 and Schumann Piano Quintet in E-Flat Major, Op.44, were composed for her. She performed at the premiere of the Brahms Quartet, and was to perform at the premiere of the Schumann Quintet as well, but fell ill, so Felix Mendelssohn stepped in her place, sight-reading the piano part.

Made possible by Stravinsky Institute Foundation through the generous support of Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

01 | May
07:00PM
01 | May
07:00PM

music and discussion

Dear Erich: A Jazz Opera by Ted Rosenthal

Dear Erich is inspired by 200 newly discovered letters written in Germany between 1938 and 1941 by Herta Rosenthal to her son Erich, the composer's father.  Dear Erich tells a refugee story for our times.  How can a family cope as the walls of their nation's hatred close in around them? For those who escape, what lies ahead?  Even in the land of the free, are they ever really free?  What if they never learn the fate of loved ones left behind and the communications just stopped? What does closure mean, why does remembrance matter, where does hope come from?

Erich, a Jewish academic, escaped Nazi Germany to the U.S. shortly before Kristallnacht. The opera tells the story of a family's dual fates. Erich's journey to a new life in the new world - his studies, jazz and love -  while the situation deteriorates in Germany and his family ultimately meets their cruel demise at the hands of the Nazis. Frustrated and powerless to help them emigrate, Erich must live with deep survivor guilt which affects him in his relationships with his wife and children.

Dear Erich addresses these themes – walls and wars, refugees and immigrants, survivors and victims, the promise of a new world. Dear Erich asks what is found when a survivor forms a new family, and what gets lost when the next generation is untethered to the past?  The opera's scenes of immigration and refugees in crisis raise moral dilemmas that resound to this day.  Finally, Dear Erich stands for the power of remembrance, not just to honor the past but also to root us in the present and chart our future.

Presented by: American Society for Jewish Music, American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History & All Partners

music and discussion

28 | Apr
10:30AM
28 | Apr
10:30AM

walking tour

Union Square Walking Tour with Annie Polland

Union Square is where two major roads intersected and where labor unions gathered energy, and it is also the place where Jewish history and American history intertwined in fascinating and diverse ways. Come analyze the buildings, Macy's, Tammany Hall, Margaret Sangers Planned Parenthood townhouse and come hear what Emma Goldman, Emma Lazarus and others had to say about immigration, suffrage and free love. This special walking tour ends with a behind-the-scenes look at the objects and primary sources including Emma Lazarus' handwritten manuscript of the New Colossus that inspired the tour.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

walking tour

28 | Apr
02:00PM
28 | Apr
02:00PM

lecture

Using FamilySearch.org for Jewish Research

We live in a time when the availability of genealogical records appears to be almost endless. Every day, a new database becomes available or new records are added to an existing database. This growth has enabled people worldwide to make large strides in searching for their ancestors from the comfort of their own homes. FamilySearch.org is one of the leading online providers of free international genealogical records, but its vast website can be difficult to navigate. In this presentation, W. Todd Knowles will provide an overview of the most effective methods for using FamilySearch.org to locate records of Jewish ancestors.

Before the lecture, join us for a tour of the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute, a FamilySearch affiliate library, beginning at 12:30 PM.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

lecture

26 | Apr
26 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, April 26 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Apr
25 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm Thursday, April 25 for Erev Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | Apr
11:00AM
24 | Apr
11:00AM

workshop

Passover Objects Up Close and Personal

Join Collections Curator Bonni-Dara Michaels as she handles and sheds light on unique Passover objects from the Museum’s collection, which are currently not on view to the public. See an array of historic holiday artifacts up close – and while they are not behind glass – including traditional and modern Seder plates, Miriam cups, beautiful fabric items, and whimsical artworks.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

24 | Apr
12:30PM
24 | Apr
12:30PM

art workshop

Emboss a Metal Plaque

Create a Mizrach, a family name plate, or a decorative plaque of your choice. Choose from a selection of Hebrew fonts and design motifs to create a personally meaningful work of art for the Passover holiday.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

art workshop

24 | Apr
02:00PM
24 | Apr
02:00PM

workshop

Passover Objects Up Close and Personal

Join Collections Curator Bonni-Dara Michaels as she handles and sheds light on unique Passover objects from the Museum’s collection, which are currently not on view to the public. See an array of historic holiday artifacts up close – and while they are not behind glass – including traditional and modern Seder plates, Miriam cups, beautiful fabric items, and whimsical artworks.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

23 | Apr
11:00AM
23 | Apr
11:00AM

workshop

Passover Objects Up Close and Personal

Join Collections Curator Bonni-Dara Michaels as she handles and sheds light on unique Passover objects from the Museum’s collection, which are currently not on view to the public. See an array of historic holiday artifacts up close – and while they are not behind glass – including traditional and modern Seder plates, Miriam cups, beautiful fabric items, and whimsical artworks.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

23 | Apr
12:30PM
23 | Apr
12:30PM

art workshop

Emboss a Metal Plaque

Create a Mizrach, a family name plate, or a decorative plaque of your choice. Choose from a selection of Hebrew fonts and design motifs to create a personally meaningful work of art for the Passover holiday.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

art workshop

23 | Apr
02:00PM
23 | Apr
02:00PM

workshop

Passover Objects Up Close and Personal

Join Collections Curator Bonni-Dara Michaels as she handles and sheds light on unique Passover objects from the Museum’s collection, which are currently not on view to the public. See an array of historic holiday artifacts up close – and while they are not behind glass – including traditional and modern Seder plates, Miriam cups, beautiful fabric items, and whimsical artworks.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

22 | Apr
07:00PM
22 | Apr
07:00PM

concert reading

The Soap Myth

Award winning actors Ed Asner and Tovah Feldshuh star in a concert reading of The Soap Myth, a powerful play about survival, memory, and truth. Set more than fifty years after WWII, a young Jewish reporter grapples with different versions of the same story - did the Nazis make soap from the corpses of murdered Jews?  Ed Asner portrays Milton Saltzman, a Holocaust survivor committed to proving that this atrocity happened while Tovah Feldshuh plays dual roles of a Holocaust scholar and a Holocaust denier - both of whom reject Saltzman’s memory. Performed in tribute to Yom HaShoah, The Soap Myth dramatizes the painful confrontation between survivors, scholars, and Holocaust deniers, and questions who has the right to write history. Written by Jeff Cohen and directed by Pam Berlin, the production features Ned Eisenberg in multiple roles including Holocaust scholar Daniel Silver and Liba Vaynberg as journalist Annie Blumberg. The concert reading at the Center for Jewish History is part of the production’s National Tour.

This performance will be filmed by ALL ARTS, a new broadcast channel and streaming platform produced and distributed by WLIW, a member of the WNET family of public media organizations. Visit allarts.org for information on how to watch.

The evening also includes a post-performance discussion with the cast, creative team, and Stefanie Halpern, Acting Director of the YIVO archives.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, ALL ARTS, Burke Cohen Entertainment

concert reading

21 | Apr
21 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, April 21 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

19 | Apr
19 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm Friday, April 19 for Erev Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

17 | Apr
07:00PM
17 | Apr
07:00PM

film and discussion

From Swastika to Jim Crow

The recent uptick in antisemitic, anti-immigrant, and racist rhetoric have created a burst of new interest in the acclaimed documentary, From Swastika to Jim Crow.  Based on the book by Gabrielle Simon Edgcomb, the film tells the little-known story of two very different cultures, sharing a common burden of oppression. In the 1930s, German universities were some of the first targets of Nazi activity.  Jewish professors and intellectuals who were able to immigrate to the United States faced an uncertain future.  Confronted with antisemitism at American universities and a public distrust of foreigners, a surprising number sought refuge in a most unlikely place – the traditionally black colleges in the then- segregated South.  Securing teaching positions, these scholars came to form lasting relationships with their students, and went on to significantly impact the communities in which they lived and worked.

Nineteen years after the film was originally released, the filmmakers, Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher, feel its message –that more binds us together than separates us - must be heard.  They passionately believe that as long as racism and inequality exist in our society, there will be a compelling need to bring From Swastika to Jim Crow to a wider audience. One-hour screening followed by a panel discussion with the filmmakers, historian Charles L. Chavis, Jr., and moderated by the Schomburg Center’s Brian Jones.

Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society and Leo Baeck Institute are grateful to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture for its support as a promotional partner for this program..

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute and American Jewish Historical Society

film and discussion

16 | Apr
06:30PM
16 | Apr
06:30PM

lecture

Georgian Jews

At the Crossroads of Sephardic, Mizrahi, and Russian-Speaking Worlds: A Three-Part Learning and Cultural Series on the Greater Sephardic Communities of the Former Soviet Union

Back by popular demand, the American Sephardi Federation’s Young Sephardi Scholars Series is excited to once again host a 3-part learning and cultural series about the Russian-speaking Jewish (RSJ) communities of the Greater Sephardic world. The cultures and histories of Bukharian, Georgian, and Kavkazi (Mountain) Jews are situated at the fascinating, yet lesser known, intersection of RSJ, Sephardic and Mizrahi life. Led by Ruben Shimonov, this multimedia learning series will provide a unique opportunity to explore the multilayered and rich stories of the three communities.

Co-sponsored by JDC Entwine. This project was created as part of the COJECO BluePrint Fellowship, supported by COJECO and Genesis Philanthropy Group.

Light dinner reflecting the cuisine of Georgian Jews will be served

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation Young Sephardi Scholars Series

lecture

16 | Apr
07:00PM
16 | Apr
07:00PM

panel discussion

Iranian Jews Between Iran, Zion, and America

This talk with Leah Mirakhor (Yale University), Lior Sternfeld (Penn State University) and moderator Atina Grossman (Cooper Union) celebrates the new groundbreaking work of two social historians on Iranian Jewish life and community in the 20th century between immigrations and diasporas in Iran, Israel, and the U.S.  The speakers will pay tribute to the work of HIAS in helping Jews immigrate and resettle in the U.S. in the years post the 1979 revolution in Iran.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

15 | Apr
06:30PM
15 | Apr
06:30PM

lecture

From Macy's to the Titanic – The Straus Family Legacy

Department store historian Michael Lisicky discusses how the Straus family rose from German-Jewish peddlers to merchant princes and major philanthropists before Isidor Straus's untimely death on the RMS Titanic.

Pop-up exhibition of Titanic memorabilia from the collections of the Straus Historical Society open from 5 pm.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, American Jewish Historical Society & Straus Historical Society

lecture

14 | Apr
01:30PM
14 | Apr
01:30PM

art workshop

Transforming Haggadah Text into Textile

Create a fabric wall hanging or functional piece (such as a matza cover!) inspired by a favorite prayer, verse, quote – or words of your own. Class will be taught by fiber artist Heather Stoltz, whose quilted wall hangings and fabric sculptures are inspired by social justice issues and Hebrew texts.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

art workshop

10 | Apr
07:00PM
10 | Apr
07:00PM

lecture

Carnegie Hall’s Migrations Festival Comes to YIVO: The Musical Legacy of Eastern European Jews

Mark Slobin, acclaimed scholar of East European and American Jewish music, will discuss Carnegie Hall’s April 15th musical program, From Shtetl to Stage. He will use images and recordings and cover a range of Yiddish theater songs, novelty numbers, concert music and songs of social movements.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

09 | Apr
04:00PM
09 | Apr
04:00PM

open house

Educators Open House at the Center

Learn about educational programs for K-12 and for undergraduate students and participate in the interactive Teacher Professional Development workshops presenting method- and content-based approaches to teaching with primary sources. Get exclusive behind-the-scenes tours of our collection areas and timely exhibitions led by our expert staff.

Take home “Ready-to-Use” lesson plans and free access to online lessons and lectures. Learn how the CCSS and SSSS standards connect to the rich collections of our five partner organizations: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and American Sephardi Federation.

Participation in the all activities of the Open House will be awarded with 2 CTLE credits.

Light refreshments will be served.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

open house

09 | Apr
07:00PM
09 | Apr
07:00PM

concert

And All the Days Were Purple

Join us for the launch of and all the days were purple, a new album by composer Alex Weiser which features songs that set Yiddish and English poems to music which search for the divine while reflecting on the longing, beauty, and tumult of life. 

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

08 | Apr
06:30PM
08 | Apr
06:30PM

tour in yiddish

Lost & Found – A Family Photo Album

Join Yiddish literature scholar Ruth Wisse on a Yiddish-language tour of Lost & Found, exploring the remarkable story of a pre-war family photo album that was owned by a woman (Wisse’s aunt) who was deported from the Kovno Ghetto in 1943. Prior to her deportation, she smuggled the album to a non-Jewish Lithuanian family for safekeeping.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and The Yiddish Forward

tour in yiddish

08 | Apr
07:00PM
08 | Apr
07:00PM

book talk

Translating the Bible: A Conversation with Robert Alter

Award-winning biblical translator and acclaimed literary critic Robert Alter is the author of more than two dozen books including, most recently, The Hebrew Bible: A Translation with Commentary. A masterpiece of deep learning and fine sensibility, Robert Alter’s translation of the Hebrew Bible, now complete, reanimates one of the formative works of our culture. Capturing its brilliantly compact poetry and finely wrought, purposeful prose, Alter renews the Old Testament as a source of literary power and spiritual inspiration.

In his brief new book The Art of Bible Translation, Alter offers a personal and passionate account of what he learned about the art of Bible translation over the two decades he spent completing his own English version of the Hebrew Bible. Alter provides an illuminating and accessible introduction to biblical style that also offers insights about the art of translation far beyond the Bible. Adam Gopnik of The New Yorker called the book “hugely entertaining and irreverent.”

Alter will appear in conversation with Dr. Adriane Leveen, senior lecturer in Hebrew Bible at the Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion. Dr. Leveen received her Ph.D. in Hebrew Bible from the University of California at Berkeley under the supervision of Robert Alter. Dr. Leveen is a trained psychotherapist and practiced for 17 years in both Israel and the United States before getting her doctorate in biblical studies.

A reception, book sale, and signing will follow the program.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book talk

07 | Apr
11:00AM
07 | Apr
11:00AM

walking tour

Ladies Mile Walking Tour with Ephemeral New York’s Esther Crain

It sold out last fall, so our popular walking tour is back! Enjoy a storied stroll along Ladies Mile, a nine- block stretch once known for posh department stores and architectural grandeur. Join Esther Crain, writer of the award-winning Ephemeral New York blog, and author of The Gilded Age in New York, 1870-1910, as she weaves in Jewish stories and Gilded Age tales about the people and places that once populated these historic blocks.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

walking tour

07 | Apr
11:00AM
07 | Apr
11:00AM

workshop

Family Genealogy Day: Exploring Family Photos

Session 1: 11:00am-12:30pm
Session 2: 1:30pm-3:00pm
(morning and afternoon sessions are identical)

Through a variety of hands-on activities for the whole family, find out how family photos can help you discover and document your family’s history. Search for informative clues within our family photo exhibitions, create a portrait collage of your family, color historical fashions that your ancestors may have worn, learn simple tips for preserving your family photos and scrapbooks, and more.  We welcome explorers of all ages and abilities.

This program is presented in conjunction with the following exhibitions: Lost & Found – A Family Photo Album and All in the Family: Photographs from Across the Jewish World. On April 7, all Center for Jewish History exhibitions will be open from 11 AM – 5 PM. To learn more about our current exhibitions, please visit cjh.org/culture/exhibitions. Light refreshments will be served in the Great Hall. Please note that food and drinks are prohibited in all exhibition galleries.

>The Center for Jewish History and the American Jewish Historical Society are proud to partner with PJ Library for this and other upcoming family programs. PJ Library provides free books that celebrate Jewish values and culture to families with children 6 months through 8 years old. Sign up for PJ Library to receive the gift of Jewish books each month – at no cost to your family!

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Presented by: Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute & Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

04 | Apr
06:30PM
04 | Apr
06:30PM

film

The City without Jews

Jews are hounded by mobs and driven from Vienna in this 1924 expressionist film based on the satirical novel by Hugo Bettauer. The sensational film that anticipated the Holocaust and cost Bettauer his life was rediscovered in 2015. With commentary by film scholar Noah Isenberg (UT Austin) and a live score.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

film

04 | Apr
07:00PM
04 | Apr
07:00PM

book talk

A Rosenberg by Any Other Name: A History of Jewish Name Changing in America

Join author Kirsten Fermaglich in conversation with Jennifer Mendelsohn (Resistance Genealogy) to celebrate the publication of A Rosenberg by Any Other Name. A groundbreaking history of the practice of Jewish name changing in the 20th century, this book showcases just how much is in a name.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society & Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute

book talk

03 | Apr
07:30PM
03 | Apr
07:30PM

concert

Israel and Eurovision 1973-2019

Featuring Israeli singers Ariella Edvy and Omer Shaish along with the MusicTalks Ensemble, this high-energy concert celebrates Israel’s participation in Europe’s iconic song competition. Host Elad Kabilio highlights Israel’s entries from past competitions, including winning songs such as “Abanibi,” “Hallelujah” and “Toy” by Netta Barzilai, last year’s winner.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & Yeshiva University’s Center for Israel Studies

concert

01 | Apr
06:30PM
01 | Apr
06:30PM

curator's tour

Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War

Join curator Ilona Moradof on a tour of Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War, illuminating the organized rescue efforts that brought thousands of children from Nazi Europe to Great Britain in the late 1930s. Explore the children’s difficult and often heartbreaking journeys through personal stories, artifacts and engaging media.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

01 | Apr
07:00PM
01 | Apr
07:00PM

book talk

First Person: Jason Stanley in Conversation with Peter Beinart

As a professor of philosophy at Yale, a scholar of propaganda, and the child of World War II Jewish Refugees, Jason Stanley understands how democratic societies can be vulnerable to fascism. Alarmed by the pervasive rise of fascist tactics both at home and around the globe, Stanley set out to analyze the language and beliefs that separate people into an “us” and a “them.” In his new book, How Fascism Works, The Politics of Us and Them, Stanley knits together reflections on history, philosophy, sociology, and critical race theory with stories from contemporary Hungary, Poland, India, Myanmar, and the United States, among other nations. In a fascinating First Person conversation, Stanley speaks with journalist Peter Beinart about the ten pillars of fascist politics, the recurring patterns he sees, and how his own family history influences his world view today.

A reception, book sale and signing follow the program.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, the Leo Baeck Institute and the American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

31 | Mar
11:00AM
31 | Mar
11:00AM

conference

Immigration Matters: Jews, Other Immigrants and America

Immigration made America and its Jews. Historians will explore the Jewish stake in immigration as a historical matter and ask about the contemporary moment. Speakers include Maddalena Mariani, Joel Perlman, Randy Storch, Libby Garland, Hasia Diner and Carl Bon Tempo.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

conference

28 | Mar
07:30PM
28 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Stern College for Women New Music Ensemble-in-Residence

The Ensemble-in-Residence of Stern College for Women, Yeshiva University, performs the work of 20th-century and contemporary Jewish composers, including the premiere of Concertino No. 2 for clarinet.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & The Beatrice Diener Fund for Music at Stern College for Women

concert

27 | Mar
06:30PM
27 | Mar
06:30PM

curator's talk

Lost & Found – A Family Photo Album

Join curator Jacob Wisse on a tour of Lost & Found, exploring the remarkable story of a pre-war family photo album that was owned by a woman who was deported from the Kovno Ghetto in 1943. Prior to her deportation, she smuggled the album to a non-Jewish Lithuanian family for safekeeping. After the album’s fortuitous discovery in 2013, it was reunited with the original owner’s descendants.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's talk

27 | Mar
07:00PM
27 | Mar
07:00PM

book launch

Avrom Goldfaden and the Rise of the Modern Yiddish Theater

The Rise of the Modern Yiddish Theater examines its origins, from roughly 1876 to 1883, through the works of one of its best-known and most colorful figures, Avrom Goldfaden. Join us for the launch of this book with a discussion of this rich theatrical tradition as well as the broader social life that its study sheds light on.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book launch

26 | Mar
06:30PM
26 | Mar
06:30PM

lecture

Bukharian Jews

At the Crossroads of Sephardic, Mizrahi, and Russian-Speaking Worlds: A Three-Part Learning and Cultural Series on the Greater Sephardic Communities of the Former Soviet Union

Back by popular demand, the American Sephardi Federation’s Young Sephardi Scholars Series is excited to once again host a 3-part learning and cultural series about the Russian-speaking Jewish (RSJ) communities of the Greater Sephardic world. The cultures and histories of Bukharian, Georgian, and Kavkazi (Mountain) Jews are situated at the fascinating, yet lesser known, intersection of RSJ, Sephardic and Mizrahi life. Led by Ruben Shimonov, this multimedia learning series will provide a unique opportunity to explore the multilayered and rich stories of the three communities.

Co-sponsored by JDC Entwine. This project was created as part of the COJECO BluePrint Fellowship, supported by COJECO and Genesis Philanthropy Group.

Light dinner reflecting the cuisine of Bukharian Jews will be served.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation Young Sephardi Scholars Series

lecture

25 | Mar
06:30PM
25 | Mar
06:30PM

film screening and discussion

RBG

Born in 1933, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg developed a lengthy legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. But her unique, personal journey to a seat on the nation’s highest court was largely unknown, even to some of her biggest fans – until now. The Oscar nominated film, RBG explores Ginsberg’s fascinating life and brilliant career – from the young legal scholar who was shunned by law firms because of her gender, to the masterful appellate litigator who successfully argued before the Supreme Court for women’s rights, to the U.S. Supreme Court Justice.

Join MALA and the Center for Jewish History for a special screening and panel discussion of this critically acclaimed, award-winning documentary. Following the film, RBG Director/Producer Julie Cohen and Associate Producer Nadine Natour discuss their own fascinating journeys chronicling the life and career of Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Muslim American Leadership Alliance, and the American Jewish Historical Society

film screening and discussion

24 | Mar
11:00AM
24 | Mar
11:00AM

workshop

History Unfolded

The Center for Jewish History is proud to host two History Unfolded Workshop Events on February 24th and March 24th, 2019 in collaboration with History Unfolded: US Newspapers and the Holocaust, a program of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in support of their upcoming exhibition on American reactions to the Holocaust. More on History Unfolded: https://www.ushmm.org/learn/history-unfolded

Citizen historians are invited to register for a research account on the History Unfolded website prior to visiting the Center for Jewish History to conduct research in newspaper collections and investigate US press coverage for specific Holocaust events.

Participants will gain hands-on instruction for using online tools to search for newspaper articles as well as physically handling collections. These workshops help the Holocaust Memorial Museum to discover what Americans knew and how they responded to news of Nazi persecution. Users can submit their findings to the USHMM’s online database which will be available to anyone, anywhere—from historians to curators to students.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

workshop

24 | Mar
02:00PM
24 | Mar
02:00PM

lecture

Life Under the Tsars: Registration, Residence, and Exit Routes

To help trace our families before their departure from the Russian Empire, genealogist Alan Shuchat will discuss the system of registration and residence permits under the Tsars, the different social estates, and the process of obtaining steamship tickets and travel from the shtetls to the ports.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society of NY & Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute

lecture

24 | Mar
06:00PM
24 | Mar
06:00PM

book talk

Sarah Schenirer and Bais Yaakov: A Revolution in the Name of Tradition

This program will explore the emergence of the Bais Yaakov schools in interwar Poland, when it grew from a one-room school in Sarah Schenirer's living quarters to a school system with over 200 schools, 36,000 students, and an international reach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

21 | Mar
07:30PM
21 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Bach Turns 333! Phoenix Chamber Ensemble Celebrates Bach's Birthday

The program includes two Bach keyboard concerti, in D minor (BWV 1052) and G minor (BWV 1058) with a string quartet; and the F-minor concerto (BWV 1056) - 1 piano 4-hand version; Martinu’s three Madrigals for violin and viola; and Handel’s Halvorsen Passacaglia for violin and cello.

Made possible by Stravinsky Institute Foundation through the generous support of Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

19 | Mar
02:00PM
19 | Mar
02:00PM

lecture

Searching for Survivors: the Fate of the St. Louis Passengers

On the occasion of the 80th Anniversary of the St. Louis’ fateful voyage from Hamburg, Germany, the JDC Archives and the American Jewish Historical Society invite you to a special public program:

Eighty years ago, in early June of 1939, the St. Louis, a passenger ship carrying 937 people – almost all of them Jews fleeing Nazi Germany – was denied entry into both Cuba and the United States. With no refuge in sight, the St. Louis was forced to sail back to Europe. The fates of its passengers, however, remained an unsolved mystery for over sixty years.

Scott Miller, former Director of Curatorial Affairs at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, will discuss his decades-long search to uncover the fate of every passenger from this tragic journey and JDC’s historic role in striving to rescue them.

Scott Miller was a founding staff member of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, where he worked for 30 years and now serves as a consultant on special acquisitions for the Holocaust Museum’s National Institute for Holocaust Documentation. He is the co-author with Sarah Ogilvie of Refuge Denied – The St. Louis Passengers and the Holocaust, the story of their search for the St. Louis passenger

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society &American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC)

lecture

19 | Mar
07:00PM
19 | Mar
07:00PM

film and discussion

Black Honey: The Life and Poetry of Avraham Sutzkever

Black Honey: The Life and Poetry of Avraham Sutzkever (2018) recounts the story of one of the greatest Yiddish poets who became a symbol of national resistance and creative survival. The film, which complements YUM’s exhibition Lost & Found – A Family Photo Album, will be followed by a discussion with Yiddish literature scholar Ruth Wisse about the poet’s writing and legacy.

film and discussion

17 | Mar
11:00AM
17 | Mar
11:00AM

family program

Children’s Day

Join us for our annual Children’s Day, where visitors of all ages will enjoy a wonderful selection of Purim-themed activities and performances. This year’s program will have something for everybody – sing-alongs of Yiddish folk staples, a magic show, and delicious treats, among other activities – to enjoy.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

family program

13 | Mar
06:30PM
13 | Mar
06:30PM

film

My Knees Were Jumping—Remembering the Kindertransports

Join director Melissa Hacker and NPR journalist Uri Berliner to watch and discuss the first documentary film to tell the heart-wrenching story of the Kindertransports. After the screening, Hacker and Berliner will talk about how the Kindertransport affected their own family histories.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Yeshiva University Museum

film

12 | Mar
07:00PM
12 | Mar
07:00PM

book talk

First Person: Matti Friedman in Conversation with Lucette Lagnado

Matti Friedman’s new book, Spies of No Country: Secret Lives at the Birth of Israel tells the unknown story of four of Israel’s first spies. Recruited by a rag-tag outfit called the Arab Section before the 1948 War of Independence, they assumed Arab identities to gather intelligence and carry out sabotage and assassinations. At the height of the war the spies posed as refugees fleeing the fighting, reached Beirut, and set up what became Israel’s first foreign intelligence station. Spies not only tells a breathtaking and true espionage story, it also explores a different story about how the state was founded and raises many questions that are relevant today.

In a wide-ranging First Person conversation, Matti Friedman speaks with author Lucette Lagnado (The Man in the White Sharkskin Suit) about his journalism career, researching and writing his new book, and what Spies of No Country reveals about Israel in the 20th and 21st centuries.

A reception, book sale and signing follow the program.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, & Jewish Book Council

book talk

10 | Mar
01:30PM
10 | Mar
01:30PM

art workshop

Assemblage Portraiture in the Spirit of Purim

Multi-media artist Deborah Yasinsky will lead participants in a portraiture workshop, using recycled, non-traditional materials to create a richly textured image with hidden elements! Learn new techniques and explore the idea of hiddenness (hester panim) in the holiday of Purim.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

art workshop

10 | Mar
04:00PM
10 | Mar
04:00PM

concert

Al Naharot Bavel (By the Waters of Babylon): Jewish Musicians at the Courts of England and Italy

NYC ensembles ARTEK and PARTHENIA offer a concert of music by Jewish composers of the Renaissance and early baroque, in Italy and England.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

concert

07 | Mar
06:30PM
07 | Mar
06:30PM

curator's tour

Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War

Join curator Ilona Moradof on a tour of Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War, illuminating the organized rescue efforts that brought thousands of children from Nazi Europe to Great Britain in the late 1930s. Explore the children’s difficult and often heartbreaking journeys through personal stories, artifacts and engaging media.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

05 | Mar
07:00PM
05 | Mar
07:00PM

book launch and panel discussion

America's Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today

On the day of publication, join us in launching Pamela Nadell’s America's Jewish Women. A groundbreaking history of how Jewish women have maintained their identity and influenced social activism as they wrote themselves into American history. Panelists include author Pamela Nadell, Barbara Dobkin (Ma’yan) and Jane Eisner.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

book launch and panel discussion

04 | Mar
07:30PM
04 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

PLEASE NOTE: Cancelled due to pending extreme weather
The Land of Israel – in Song

Israeli singer Ariella Edvy and the MusicTalks Ensemble embark on a musical journey through Israel’s diverse sites and environments – from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea, from bustling cities to agricultural kibbutzim. Through an array of vivid site-specific songs, host Elad Kabilio offers up a fresh auditory experience of the landscape of Israel.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & Yeshiva University’s Center for Israel Studies

concert

03 | Mar
04:00PM
03 | Mar
04:00PM

not just funny girl: jewish american women in comedy

Happy Birthday, Molly! Celebrate East and West and Other Migrating Identities

Live score and film screening of the silent classic East and West (1923) featuring the composer of the original score for the 1991 remastered film, Pete Sokolow, and musician Michael Winograd (Sandaraa), celebrating the 121st birthday of Molly Picon.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, Carnegie Hall, YIVO Institute, Goldstein-Goren Center for American Jewish History & Center for Jewish History

not just funny girl: jewish american women in comedy

27 | Feb
07:00PM
27 | Feb
07:00PM

panel discussion

Is America Different? Anti-Semitism in the United States

Panel Discussion with Lila Corwin Berman (Temple University), Tony Michels (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and Jonathan Sarna (Brandeis University). Moderated by Samuel G. Freedman (Columbia University).

In the wake of the murderous attack on Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue, anti-Semitism in America fosters debate. To what extent is America different from diaspora countries? Do more recent events warrant a change in our understanding, or is this part of longer patterns? Join award-winning historians Lila Corwin Berman, Tony Michels and Jonathan Sarna for a conversation that covers recent events but is also rooted in history. Documents and images from the AJHS archives will punctuate the conversation.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

panel discussion

26 | Feb
08:00PM
26 | Feb
08:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Journey in Judeo-Arabic Songs

Moroccan Star Rachid Halihal and His Andalusian Orchestra – Journey in Judeo-Arabic Songs from Andalusia to Moroccan classics.

Join us for more sophisticated Sephardic sounds by world-renowned artists in the Sephardic and world music genres during the 2nd ASF session. Artistic direction by David Serero.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

25 | Feb
05:30PM
25 | Feb
05:30PM

panel discussion

Looking In, Speaking Out: Commemorating the Khojaly Tragedy

The Khojaly Tragedy occurred on 26 February 1992 when Armenian military forces killed 613 Azerbaijani citizens in the town of Khojaly, Azerbaijan. This year, MALA and ASF will commemorate Khojaly by creating a space for learning, remembrance, and dialogue about ending ethnic cleansing and genocide of all kinds. MALA and ASF will bring in a panel of guest speakers to facilitate a discussion about identity, erasure, genocide, and memory in the light of the 27th anniversary of the Khojaly Tragedy.

Genocide and ethnic cleansings so often begin with the erasure of histories, heritage, and the silencing of voices. MALA and the ASF are committed to building platforms for individuals and communities to share their histories and learn collectively through our profound individual stories. By holding in memory some of the most somber moments in history, we increase our ability, as a community, to work towards a unified future.

Please join us as we stand in solidarity to remember those whose lives were lost. Let us strive to build our communities with an understanding of the past to ensure a better tomorrow.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and Muslim American Leadership Alliance

panel discussion

25 | Feb
08:00PM
25 | Feb
08:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Azerbaijan Evening – In memory of the Khojaly Massacre

Jeffrey Werbock, a world renowned musician will perform Traditional Azerbaijani Instrumental Mughal Music in tribute to the Khojaly Tragedy.

Join us for more sophisticated Sephardic sounds by world-renowned artists in the Sephardic and world music genres during the 2nd ASF session. Artistic direction by David Serero.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

24 | Feb
11:00AM
24 | Feb
11:00AM

workshop

History Unfolded

The Center for Jewish History is proud to host two History Unfolded Workshop Events on February 24th and March 24th, 2019 in collaboration with History Unfolded: US Newspapers and the Holocaust, a program of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in support of their upcoming exhibition on American reactions to the Holocaust. More on History Unfolded: https://www.ushmm.org/learn/history-unfolded

Citizen historians are invited to register for a research account on the History Unfolded website prior to visiting the Center for Jewish History to conduct research in newspaper collections and investigate US press coverage for specific Holocaust events.

Participants will gain hands-on instruction for using online tools to search for newspaper articles as well as physically handling collections. These workshops help the Holocaust Memorial Museum to discover what Americans knew and how they responded to news of Nazi persecution. Users can submit their findings to the USHMM’s online database which will be available to anyone, anywhere—from historians to curators to students.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

workshop

24 | Feb
02:00PM
24 | Feb
02:00PM

lecture

Lublin’s “Grodzka Gate-NN Theatre” and the 43 Thousand Project: Documenting an Entire Lost Jewish Community of Lublin, One Individual at a Time

Olivier Szlos will present the work of Lublin’s “Grodzka Gate-NN Theatre” Centre to reclaim Jewish memory in the Lublin region of Poland, with its 43 Thousand Project, by exploring archives, personal testimonies and private collections to retrieve names, photos, documents and stories, and provide a hands-on approach to the project’s public access database that might add to your family research.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

lecture

24 | Feb
06:00PM
24 | Feb
06:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Tango Shalom

Paboli Zinger and Nicole Murad perform Tango Shalom – Jewish tangos from all over the world!

Join us for more sophisticated Sephardic sounds by world-renowned artists in the Sephardic and world music genres during the 2nd ASF session. Artistic direction by David Serero.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

24 | Feb
08:00PM
24 | Feb
08:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Cantor Shiree Kidron

Cantor Shiree Kidron – Musical pearls of Sepharad

Join us for more sophisticated Sephardic sounds by world-renowned artists in the Sephardic and world music genres during the 2nd ASF session. Artistic direction by David Serero.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

21 | Feb
06:30PM
21 | Feb
06:30PM

family history today: genealogy programs at the center

Genealogy Lecture for Sephardi and Mizrahi Families

Curious about family history outside of the Pale of Settlement? J.D. Arden, Genealogy Librarian at the Center for Jewish History, will provide an overview of tools for researching Jewish community records and Jewish life in the Sephardi and Mizrahi Diaspora.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Presented by: the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History and American Sephardi Federation

family history today: genealogy programs at the center

21 | Feb
07:30PM
21 | Feb
07:30PM

concert

Composer Karol Rathaus and His Circle

A concert of Karol Rathaus’ (1895-1954) chamber music by seven distinguished New York performers, and a roundtable discussion, with Drs. Leon Botstein and Michael Hass, about Rathaus and his circle, whose promising compositional careers were derailed by the Nazis.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

19 | Feb
06:30PM
19 | Feb
06:30PM

lecture

Kavkazi (Mountain) Jews

At the Crossroads of Sephardic, Mizrahi, and Russian-Speaking Worlds: A Three-Part Learning and Cultural Series on the Greater Sephardic Communities of the Former Soviet Union.

Back by popular demand, the American Sephardi Federation’s Young Sephardi Scholars Series is excited to once again host a 3-part learning and cultural series about the Russian-speaking Jewish (RSJ) communities of the Greater Sephardic world. The cultures and histories of Bukharian, Georgian, and Kavkazi (Mountain) Jews are situated at the fascinating, yet lesser known, intersection of RSJ, Sephardic and Mizrahi life. Led by Ruben Shimonov, this multimedia learning series will provide a unique opportunity to explore the multilayered and rich stories of the three communities.

Co-sponsored by JDC Entwine. This project was created as part of the COJECO BluePrint Fellowship, supported by COJECO and Genesis Philanthropy Group.

Light dinner reflecting the cuisine of Kavkazi Jews will be served.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation Young Sephardi Scholars Series

lecture

14 | Feb
07:30PM
14 | Feb
07:30PM

concert

Music in Our Time 2019

The combined choirs of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion and the Jewish Theological Seminary present an array of exciting Jewish choral music from noted composers of the 20th century (including some important birthday anniversaries) and their 21st-century colleagues.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

13 | Feb
07:00PM
13 | Feb
07:00PM

concert & multimedia presentation

Andy Statman and Zev Feldman: Klezmer Pioneers Reunited!

This special program reunites the legendary klezmer duo of Andy Statman (clarinet/mandolin) and Walter Zev Feldman (tsimbl/hammered dulcimer) for the first time in 35 years! The evening will include a performance and multimedia presentation celebrating the duo’s work in the 1970s with legendary klezmer clarinetist Dave Tarras and other important immigrant musicians.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Center for Traditional Music and Dance

concert & multimedia presentation

12 | Feb
06:30PM
12 | Feb
06:30PM

book talk

Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

Pauline Kael called him “the greatest American screenwriter.” Jean-Luc Godard said he was “a genius” who “invented 80% of what is used in Hollywood movies today.” With credits that include ScarfaceTwentieth Century and Notorious, novelist, reporter, and playwright Ben Hecht also emerged during WWII as an outspoken crusader for the imperiled Jews of Europe and later became a fierce propagandist for pre-1948 Palestine’s Jewish terrorist underground. Adina Hoffman speaks with Phillip Lopate about her new biography of this charismatic and contradictory figure, who came to embody much that defined America—especially Jewish America—in his time. Book sales and signing follow the program.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

10 | Feb
02:00PM
10 | Feb
02:00PM

sephardic music festival: scholar series

International Ladino Day: A Celebration of Words and Music

Celebrate a remarkable language, Ladino (Judeo-Spanish).  Hear clarinetist Danny Elias; author Jane Mushabac; scholar Bryan Kirschen (Binghamton); storyteller Rabbi Nissim Elnecavé; composer Avi Amon on his musical fantasy, Salonika; and Alhambra Sephardic Ensemble, with oud, violin, shawm, dumbek and voices.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation, American Jewish Historical Society, Sephardic Jewish Brotherhood of American & Binghamton University Judaic Studies Department

sephardic music festival: scholar series

07 | Feb
03:00PM
07 | Feb
03:00PM

book talk

Motor City Music: A Detroiter Looks Back

Marc Slobin discusses his recently published Motor City Music: A Detroiter Looks Back (Oxford University Press, 2018). Motor City Music examines the melting pot of musical life throughout Detroit.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

07 | Feb
06:30PM
07 | Feb
06:30PM

short talks on big subjects

The Treaty of Versailles with Michael Neiberg

Collection of the Australian War Memorial


The Treaty of Versailles ended more than the First World War. By putting a final end to the German, Austro-Hungarian, Russian and Ottoman Empires it also raised questions about the future of the Jews who lived in those empires. In our continuing series, Short Talks on Big Subjects, Michael S. Neiberg, author of The Treaty of Versailles: A Very Short Introduction, discusses the watershed events of 1916-1919 and their connection to the Jewish people today.  Book included with admission and a book signing follows the program.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute & Oxford University Press

short talks on big subjects

06 | Feb
06:30PM
06 | Feb
06:30PM

curator's tour

Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War

Join curator Ilona Moradof on a tour of Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War, illuminating the organized rescue efforts that brought thousands of children from Nazi Europe to Great Britain in the late 1930s. Explore the children’s difficult and often heartbreaking journeys through personal stories, artifacts and engaging media.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

05 | Feb
07:00PM
05 | Feb
07:00PM

book talk & live podcast recording

Michael Walzer Discussion with the Tel Aviv Review

Join us for an in-depth conversation between eminent author and scholar Michael Walzer and the Tel Aviv Review podcast’s Gilad Halpern, where they will be discussing Walzer’s new critically-acclaimed book A Foreign Policy for the Left. Originally adapted from a selection of Walzer’s writings previously published in the quarterly Dissent, A Foreign Policy for the Left requires leftists to reevaluate presumed ideologies regarding today's international affairs.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk & live podcast recording

04 | Feb
07:00PM
04 | Feb
07:00PM

book talk

Love and Strife: A Celebration of Saul Bellow Life and Storytelling

Join us for a celebration of the publication of the highly acclaimed Zachary Leader’s The Life of Saul Bellow: Love and Strife, 1965-2005, volumes 1 and 2, in discussion with Marc Cohen, the author of the newly published Not Bad for Delancey Street: The Rise of Billy Rose.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

03 | Feb
02:00PM
03 | Feb
02:00PM

staged reading

Out of the Depths

“She has beautiful eyes, this woman. And a beautiful face. And she is all day and all night in my thoughts. When I see the sun, I see her. When I see the moon, I see her, I hear her voice in the wind.”

So says Young Ansky in Chaim Potok’s original play, Out of the Depths. Based on the life of Solomon Rappaport (S. Ansky), the play begins in 1920 in a Warsaw rehearsal room where the Vilna Troupe are rehearsing Ansky’s The Dybbuk. Potok transports the audience to various times and locations in Ansky’s life, and against a backdrop of war and revolution, shows us how Ansky’s own life evolved into The Dybbuk. Directed by David Bassuk and introduced by Rena Potok, the performance celebrates the publication of The Collected Plays of Chaim Potok, edited by Rena Potok. A book signing follows the program. 

Chaim Potok (1929-2002) is the author of nine novels, including The Chosen, My Name is Asher Lev, Davita’s Harp, and I Am the Clay. He also wrote Wanderings: Chaim Potok’s History of the Jews as well as Young Adult fiction, children’s books, a collection of novellas, biographies, and numerous essays and short stories. An ordained rabbi, Potok served as a U.S. Army chaplain in Korea. The Collected Plays of Chaim Potok is the first volume of his plays to be published.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and the Forward

staged reading

31 | Jan
07:00PM
31 | Jan
07:00PM

book talk

Black Power, Jewish Politics: Reinventing the Alliance in the 1960s

Join us for a panel to celebrate the publication of Marc Dollinger’s Black Power Jewish Politics: Reinventing the Alliance in the 1960s with the author and special guests Including April Baskin (The Union for Reform Judaism), Cheryl Greenberg (Trinity College), Ilana Kaufman (The Jews of Color Field Building Initiative) and Rivka Press Schwartz (Associate Principal, SAR High School and Fellow, Shalom Hartman Institute of North America).In this book, Marc Dollinger charts the transformation of American Jewish political culture from the Cold War liberal consensus of the early postwar years to the rise and influence of Black Power-inspired ethnic nationalism. He shows how, in a period best known for the rise of black antisemitism and the breakdown of the black-Jewish alliance, black nationalists enabled Jewish activists to devise a new Judeo-centered political agenda—including the emancipation of Soviet Jews, the rise of Jewish day schools, the revitalization of worship services with gender-inclusive liturgy, and the birth of a new form of American Zionism.

AJHS is home to the records of the American Jewish Congress, where numerous photos trace the participation of Rabbis and other prominent Jewish leaders in the 1963 March on Washington, the 1965 March from Montgomery to Selma, Alabama, and other events and causes of the Civil Rights movement era. AJHS is also home to the collection of the American Association for Ethiopian Jews, which helped Ethiopian Jews receive recognition, aid, and refuge as they were trying to flee Ethiopia since the 1970s. 

The Shalom Hartman Institute is a leading center of Jewish thought and education, serving Israel and North America. Our mission is to strengthen Jewish peoplehood, identity and pluralism and ensure that Judaism is a compelling force for good in the 21st century.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society & Shalom Hartman Institute

book talk

30 | Jan
07:15PM
30 | Jan
07:15PM

conversation

The Changing Arab Military Threat to Israel

A special evening featuring former CIA analyst and renowned scholar Kenneth Pollack in conversation with Algemeiner editor-in-chief Dovid Efune. The talk will draw from Pollack’s new book, Armies of Sand, in which he argues that Arab forces have consistently punched below their weight since the Second World War. Mr. Pollack will explore these patterns while sharing a powerful and riveting historical account of the Middle East.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and The Algemeiner

conversation

29 | Jan
09:00AM
29 | Jan
09:00AM

conference

Jewish Africa Conference: Past, Present, and Future

Join us for a three-day cultural and scholarly conference bringing together emerging North & Sub-Saharan African scholars and leaders to analyze the history and contemporary situation of Jewish Africa, which is home to some of the oldest, most diverse and fascinating communities in the world.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation & Association Mimouna

conference

29 | Jan
06:30PM
29 | Jan
06:30PM

film festival

Jewish Africa Film Festival

Journey to Judaism: The Story of Madagascar (2016). Joshua Kristal. (12.5 minutes)

Re-Emerging : The Jews of Nigeria (2012). Jeff Lieberman. (1 hr 33 minutes)

Each evening will feature either the director or a participant in the film as a presenter, including a Q&A.

Wine and cheese reception at 6:30pm.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and Association Mimouna

film festival

28 | Jan
09:00AM
28 | Jan
09:00AM

conference

Jewish Africa Conference: Past, Present, and Future

Join us for a three-day cultural and scholarly conference bringing together emerging North & Sub-Saharan African scholars and leaders to analyze the history and contemporary situation of Jewish Africa, which is home to some of the oldest, most diverse and fascinating communities in the world.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation & Association Mimouna

conference

28 | Jan
06:30PM
28 | Jan
06:30PM

curator's talk

Lost & Found – A Family Photo Album

Join curator Jacob Wisse on a tour of Lost & Found, exploring the remarkable story of a pre-war family photo album that was owned by a woman who was deported from the Kovno Ghetto in 1943. Prior to her deportation, she smuggled the album to a non-Jewish Lithuanian family for safekeeping. After the album’s fortuitous discovery in 2013, it was reunited with the original owner’s descendants.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's talk

28 | Jan
06:30PM
28 | Jan
06:30PM

film festival

Jewish Africa Film Festival

Doing Jewish: A Story from Ghana (2016). Gabrielle Zilkha. (45 minutes)

Yearning to Belong (2007). David Vinik and Debra Gonshor Vinik. (58 minutes))

Each evening will feature either the director or a participant in the film as a presenter, including a Q&A.

Wine and cheese reception at 6:30pm.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and Association Mimouna

film festival

27 | Jan
02:00PM
27 | Jan
02:00PM

lecture

Bad Rabbi: and Other Strange but True Stories from the Yiddish Press

Eddy Portnoy, Ph.D., author of Bad Rabbi, Academic Advisor for the Max Weinreich Center and Exhibition Curator at YIVO, will discuss the Yiddish press in New York and Warsaw and the often strange stories about Jews that appear in it, as well as its use as a genealogical resource.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

lecture

27 | Jan
06:30PM
27 | Jan
06:30PM

conference

Jewish Africa Conference: Past, Present, and Future

Join us for a three-day cultural and scholarly conference bringing together emerging North & Sub-Saharan African scholars and leaders to analyze the history and contemporary situation of Jewish Africa, which is home to some of the oldest, most diverse and fascinating communities in the world.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation & Association Mimouna

conference

23 | Jan
06:30PM
23 | Jan
06:30PM

family history today: genealogy programs at the center

SOLD OUT: Case Studies from Sherlock Cohn, The Photo Genealogist

In this fun and informative workshop, Sherlock Cohn, the internationally-known Jewish genealogy sleuth, will demonstrate how and why it is important to mine the clues our ancestors left for us in their photographs. The first part of the program will focus on understanding how immigration and assimilation, as well as religious customs and practices of our Jewish ancestors, help us learn more about the personalities and the stories hidden within our family photos. In the second portion of the program, Sherlock will use case studies, including one from Yeshiva University Museum’s current exhibition, Lost and Found – A Family Photo Album, to illustrate how photo dating, photo identification, knowledge of fashion and artifact history, and matching vital records can illuminate our relatives’ lives and help us solve some of our vexing genealogy mysteries. At the conclusion, she will help workshop attendees begin the process of analyzing their own family photos.

If you plan to attend this workshop and have a family photo you would like Sherlock Cohn to analyze, please read the photo submission guidelines here.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Presented by: Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute, Yeshiva University Museum

family history today: genealogy programs at the center

23 | Jan
07:00PM
23 | Jan
07:00PM

concert and discussion

Sam Adler: Building Bridges with Music

The prolific composer and educator Sam Adler, born the son of a cantor in 1928 in Mannheim, Germany, reflects on a life in music in an intimate interview and performance of his chamber works.

Presented by: American Society for Jewish Music & the Leo Baeck Institute

concert and discussion

20 | Jan
10:00AM
20 | Jan
10:00AM

conference

Yiddish Anarchism: New Scholarship on a Forgotten Tradition

This conference, the first of its kind, highlights emerging new scholarship on the forgotten world of Yiddish-speaking anarchists. It brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars whose multilingual research examines the origin, evolution and contributions of Jewish anarchism in NYC and beyond.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, In geveb: A Journal of Yiddish Studies, Immigration and Ethnic History Society, Labor and Working Class History Association, Tamiment Library at NYU, Working-Class Studies Association & Yiddish Book Center

conference

20 | Jan
01:30PM
20 | Jan
01:30PM

workshop

Paper-Art Workshop for Tu B’Shevat with guest paper artist Marna Chester

As we prepare to mark the “birthday of the trees”, explore new ways to create art from paper. Taking inspiration from the songs and ceremonies of Tu B’Shevat – featuring flowers, birds and the seven species of the Land of Israel – this workshop explores unconventional ways to think about paper in both 2D and 3D. Our guest paper artist, Marna Chester, will inspire us to curl, fold, pinch, crumple, roll, poke, tear and cut paper, to craft new shapes and dramatic effects.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

17 | Jan
06:30PM
17 | Jan
06:30PM

book talk

The Many Deaths of Jew Süss

Princeton Historian Yair Mintzker’s innovative new book on Joseph Süss Oppenheimer’s notorious trial and execution in 1738 draws on the accounts of four contemporaries, who paint a lurid tale of greed, sex, violence and disgrace. But can these narrators be trusted?

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

14 | Jan
06:30PM
14 | Jan
06:30PM

curator's tour

Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War

Join curator Ilona Moradof on a tour of Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War, illuminating the organized rescue efforts that brought thousands of children from Nazi Europe to Great Britain in the late 1930s. Explore the children’s difficult and often heartbreaking journeys through personal stories, artifacts and engaging media.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

13 | Jan
05:30PM
13 | Jan
05:30PM

concert

Flute Music of New York Jewish Composers

How did the greatest city on earth influence the lives and music of Jewish composers? Join some of New York’s most accomplished chamber musicians for a winter afternoon of flute music by such 20th and 21st-century musical luminaries as (clockwise) Miriam Gideon, Ernest Bloch, Aaron Copland, and Leonard Bernstein. Curated by music historian Nancy Toff, the concert will be introduced by Dr. Tina Frühauf of Columbia University.

Founded in 1920, The New York Flute Club is the oldest orchestral instrument club organization in the United States.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History & New York Flute Club

concert

09 | Jan
07:00PM
09 | Jan
07:00PM

lecture

Beyond Simple Myths: History and Memory of the Shoah in Eastern Europe

Historical memory has become a deeply contentious topic in the post-communist societies of Eastern Europe, particularly with regards to World War II, communism and nationalism. Christoph Dieckmann will share his experiences and impressions of both history and memory in Eastern Europe from the perspective of an engaged German historian.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture