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Sun, Mar 29
10:00AM
Sun, Mar 29
10:00AM

conference

CANCELLED: Psalmody through the Ages: Music and the Book of Psalms


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conference

Sun, Mar 29
02:00PM
Sun, Mar 29
02:00PM

art workshop for adults

CANCELLED: Transforming Haggadah Text into Textile


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art workshop for adults

Tue, Mar 31
07:00PM
Tue, Mar 31
07:00PM

book launch

CANCELLED: Jewish Lives: Houdini


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book launch

Thu, Apr 02
07:30PM
Thu, Apr 02
07:30PM

concert

Stern College for Women Ensemble in Residence

CXX Proof Ensemble with Re’ut Ben-Ze’ev mezzo-soprano. Music by Copland, Chasalow, Adler, and a premiere by David Glaser.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 seniors, students; free for YUM members, YU community. Registration required at sternmusic2020.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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concert

Mon, Apr 06
06:30PM
Mon, Apr 06
06:30PM

conversation

Dis-Integration? Perspectives on a German Debate with Max Czollek & Rebecca Guber

Author Max Czollek’s essay collection Desintegriert Euch transformed the debate about the integration of minorities in Germany when it appeared in 2018.  His perspective on the roles of contemporary Jews in German society and its “theater of memory” struck a nerve not just among Jews, but other minority groups as well. “The threat from the right has created a new kind of solidarity,” he recently told the New York Times, speaking about his efforts to forge alliances among various minority groups in Germany. Czollek will help translate this debate for an American audience in conversation with Rebecca Guber, founder and director of Asylum Arts, a global network of Jewish Artists.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 LBI/CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at czollek.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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conversation

Tue, Apr 07
04:00PM
Tue, Apr 07
04:00PM

book launch

Please note: This is a Live Streamed Event via Zoom

In these uncertain times, with widespread myths pervading the media, government policy, and our homes, there is a deeper urge to not only discover what is true, but to be able to recognize falsehoods. This year our Passover will be different from all other Passovers – with more questions to share at real and virtual Seder tables.

That's why we're pleased to announce that the discussion between Magda Teter (Fordham University) and Sara Lipton (SUNY Stony Brook) about Dr. Teter’s new book, Blood Libel: On the Trail of Antisemitic Myth, will happen online via Zoom, right before Passover on April 7 at 4 pm EST.

The book explores the medieval myth that Jews murder Christian children to use their blood— and its surprising persistence over centuries, cultures, and continents. The invention and development of printed media contributed to widespread dissemination of the myth, turning it into a “persistent template of hate”: from mid-12th-century monastic manuscripts to the Facebook group “Jewish Ritual Murder,” shut down in 2014, and beyond.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at teter.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 to receive a link to the Zoom event


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About the Speakers:

Magda Teter is Shvidler Chair in Judaic Studies and Professor of History at Fordham University. Her work focuses on early modern religious and cultural history, with emphasis on Jewish-Christian relations, the politics of religion, and transmission of culture among Jews and Christians across Europe in the early modern period. She published numerous articles and books in English, Polish, Italian, and Hebrew. Magda Teter was recently appointed the 2020-2021 National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Fellow at the Center for Jewish History, and she will be working on her current research project, The Dissemination and Uses of the Jewish Past: The Role of The Present in The Production and Politics of History.

Sara Lipton is Professor of History at the State University of New York at  Stony Brook. Her work focuses on religious identity and experience, Jewish-Christian relations, and art and culture in the high and later Middle Ages (11th–15th centuries).  Her book,  Dark Mirror: The Medieval Origins of Anti-Semitic Iconography (Metropolitan Books, 2014) examines how changes in Christian devotion and politics affected the visual representation of the Jew. It explains the emergence of the iconographically identifiable Jew around the year 1080 and brings theoretical coherence to the dizzying proliferation of images of Jews in subsequent centuries. Sara Lipton’s current project, The Vulgate of Experience: Art and Preaching in the High Middle Ages (1180–1300), explores why and to what effect Christendom invested so much in worshiping the ineffable Word through the material thing.


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book launch

Sun, Apr 12
10:30AM
Sun, Apr 12
10:30AM

walking tour

Soapbox Walks: Arts & Politics

Union Square's soapboxes drew captivating speakers who energized crowds with ideas about America. This series pairs a wonderful roster of scholars to co-lead tours with AJHS ED Annie Polland. This installment of Soapbox Walks features Professor Daniel Soyer on politics and art on Union Square, to the International Ladies Garment Workers Union, the Rand School and Fourteenth Street School of Art.  This tour will depart from the Center for Jewish History.

The Soapbox Walks Series has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Ticket Info: $20 general; $15 CJH/partner members, seniors, students at soapboxwalks.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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walking tour

Mon, Apr 13
06:30PM
Mon, Apr 13
06:30PM

lecture

Jewish and Christian Passover Haggadot as Sites of Interfaith Engagement

Jessica Cooperman, the CJH-Fordham Fellow in Jewish-Christian Studies, will discuss her research project, examining some of the ways American Jews and Christians have reimagined their engagement with the Passover Seder, both together and separately, and the ways that the Seder has been redefined and reinterpreted as a Christian ritual.

Rarely do we have an opportunity to study recent American history through the lens of religious-political encounters – this is a wonderful chance to learn about a topic that provides insight into the history of the mid to late 20th century. And it’s right on time for Passover and Easter!

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at cooperman.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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lecture

Sun, Apr 19
02:00PM
Sun, Apr 19
02:00PM

lecture

Scandals, Shandehs, and Lies: The Stories Families Don't Tell

Speaker: Renee Steinig

In the course of decades of genealogical research, Renee Steinig has uncovered many a "skeleton in the closet" – cases of illegitimate birth, infidelity, abandonment, and even murder, all hushed up for decades. A suburban businessman who led two lives; a Romanian immigrant hanged -- or so his family thought -- for "stealing horses;" a Jewish GI's love affair in Belgium during World War II; a young woman who married, had a baby, then vanished.... Renee will talk to us about these family secrets and others, the research tools that uncovered them, and the reunions and reconciliations that followed many of her discoveries.

Renee Steinig began doing genealogical research in the 1970s. Many family trees and some 18 years later, she began to accept client work. She is member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, a past president and longtime trustee of the JGS of Long Island, and a director of Gesher Galicia.

Ticket Info: $5 at the door; free for JGS members


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lecture

Mon, Apr 20
07:00PM
Mon, Apr 20
07:00PM

concert

Beethoven in the Yiddish Imagination

Ludwig van Beethoven, a figure emblematic of the peaks of Western culture, loomed large in the Yiddish imagination. From Yiddish translations of Ode to Joy by poets such as Y. L. Peretz and M. Rivesman, to short stories written for children about Beethoven, to biographies, novellas, and poems about Beethoven, to centennial celebrations reflecting on Beethoven's legacies in the Yiddish press, there are ample testaments to Yiddish speaking Jewry's love for Beethoven.

Join us for an evening celebrating Beethoven in the Yiddish imagination including a performance of Ode to Joy in Yiddish translation, a bilingual dramatic reading of a Yiddish retelling of an apocryphal story of the origins of the Moonlight Sonata by actors Allen Lewis Rickman and Yelena Shmulenson, and performances of two of Beethoven’s masterworks with Jewish connections: his song cycle An die ferne Geliebte, written to texts by German Jewish poet Alois Isidor Jeitteles, and his String Quartet Op. 131 which uses a melodic motif from a traditional Kol Nidre recitation – a traditional Jewish liturgical melody. Musical performances will feature baritone Mario Diaz-Moresco, pianist Spencer Myer, and the Ulysses Quartet.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 YIVO members, students at yivo.org/Beethoven or 917-606-8290


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concert

Tue, Apr 21
06:00PM
Tue, Apr 21
06:00PM

exhibit opening

An Unlikely Photojournalist: Emile Bocian in Chinatown

Celebrate the opening of our newest exhibition, a collaboration with the Museum of Chinese in America, featuring highlights from a never-before-seen collection of Chinatown photographs taken in the 1970s and 80s by Emile Bocian (1912-1990), a Jewish New Yorker from a Polish immigrant family.

As a photojournalist for The China Post, a Chinese-language daily, Bocian captured protests, celebrations, and crime scenes, as well as storefronts and streetscapes that provide a glimpse into a vanishing New York. His archive, exhibited here for the first time, features snapshots of local luminaries and Chinatown visitors as far-flung as Cardinal Cook, Muhammad Ali, and Big Bird.

Kevin Chu, Collections Manager at MOCA, will share his research into Emile Bocian’s life that made it possible for MOCA to arrange and describe the photos. Also in attendance will be some of Bocian’s remaining family members, as well as Mae Wong, a Chinese-American actress and close friend of Bocian’s, who rescued the collection from his Chinatown apartment.

Refreshments will be served.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at bocian.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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exhibit opening

Thu, Apr 23
07:00PM
Thu, Apr 23
07:00PM

book launch

He created Spider-Man, Iron Man, the X-Men, and the Fantastic Four. The son of Jewish immigrants, he changed his name and transformed American pop culture. But Stan Lee’s Jewish roots ran deep. Join author Liel Liebovitz for the launch of his new book, Stan Lee: A Life in Comics and a discussion about the surprising connections between Lee’s celebrated comic book heroes and the ancient tales of the Bible, the Talmud, and Jewish mysticism. Was Spider-Man just a reincarnation of Cain? Is the Incredible Hulk simply Adam by another name? Liel speaks with Unorthodox Podcast co-host Stephanie Butnick about the deeply Jewish and surprisingly spiritual roots of Stan Lee and Marvel Comics.

Purchase the book with your ticket in advance and save $10 off list price. Pick up your book at the front desk when you arrive on the evening of the event.

Jewish Lives is Yale’s prize winning series of interpretative biography designed to explore the many facets of Jewish identity.

Ticket Info: Without book: $15 general; $12 seniors; $10 CJH/Partner members, students. With book: $31 general; $28 seniors; $26 CJH/Partner members, students at jewishlives2.bpt.me or 800-838-3006; $18 at the door (books will be available for purchase at list price of $26 on the night of the program)


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About the Speakers:

Credit: Chia MessinaBorn in Israel to a rabbinic family, Liel Leibovitz pored over Marvel comic books with the same fiery intensity his ancestors had devoted to studying the Talmud. A senior writer for Tablet Magazine and the co-host of its popular podcast, Unorthodox, Liel received his PhD from Columbia University and is the author or co-author of several works of non-fiction including, most recently, A Broken Hallelujah: Rock and Roll, Redemption, and the Life of Leonard Cohen. He lives in New York with his family.

Stephanie Butnick is the deputy editor of Tablet and has written for the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. She has a Bachelor’s degree in religion from Duke and a Master’s in religious studies from NYU. She lives in New York with her husband and their cat, Cat Stevens.


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book launch

Sun, Apr 26
10:00AM
Sun, Apr 26
10:00AM

walking tour

Walking Tour: The Unexpected Story of Jewish Williamsburg (2.5 hours)

It would be fair to call Williamsburg the Lower East Side’s lesser known sibling. Opening in 1903, the Williamsburg bridge, which connects the Lower East Side to Williamsburg, soon came to be known as “The Jewish Highway.” Jewish immigrants, seeking to escape the crowded tenements of the Lower East Side, resettled in Williamsburg in large numbers. They brought with them all of the character of similar enclaves – Yiddish, kosher butchers, and synagogues – as well as the familiar ambition of upward mobility. However, unlike the Lower East Side, Williamsburg was not soon past its heyday.

After the Holocaust, Hungarian survivors, many of whom were Hasidic, became the next wave of immigrants to make their American starter homes in Williamsburg. But this second wave did not want to move on and Americanize. They stayed in Williamsburg, despite the polluted East River, high crime and crumbling infrastructure, and maintained their traditions. Even as North Williamsburg has been reborn as a trendy hipster enclave in recent decades, the fourth generation of Hasidim continue to thrive in South Williamsburg. Our tour will take us through this story by way of the buildings, streets, and synagogues, with a nosh of the famous Hungarian kosher cooking.

About the Tour Guide: Frieda Vizel is a New York City tour guide who specializes in Jewish Williamsburg. She grew up in the Satmar Hasidic community and her four holocaust survivor grandparents lived in Williamsburg. She has since left the fold, but remains drawn to the area‘s rich legacy.

Location and other details: This tour will begin at Congregation Beth Jacob Ohev Sholom (284 Rodney St.). Please plan to arrive at 9:45 AM to check in. We will not wait more than a few minutes for late arrivals. This tour will take place rain or shine. Please dress modestly, wear weather-appropriate clothing/shoes, and bring water. Note: Some tour stops are not wheelchair accessible.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: $30 general; $25 CJH/Partner members, students, seniors at williamsburg.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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walking tour

Sun, Apr 26
10:30AM
Sun, Apr 26
10:30AM

walking tour

Soapbox Walks: History’s Intersection

Union Square is where two major roads intersected and where labor unions gathered energy, and it is also the place where Jewish history and American history intertwined in fascinating and diverse ways.  Come analyze the buildings—Macy’s, Tammany Hall, Margaret Sanger’s Planned Parenthood townhouse—and come hear what Emma Goldman, Emma Lazarus and others had to say about immigration, suffrage and free love. This tour will depart from the Center for Jewish History.

The Soapbox Walks Series has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor

Ticket Info: $20 general; $15 CJH/partner members, seniors, students at soapboxwalks.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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walking tour

Mon, Apr 27
07:00PM
Mon, Apr 27
07:00PM

concert

CANCELLED: Where is Our Homeland? Songs from Testimonies in the Fortunoff Video Archive


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concert

Tue, Apr 28
06:30PM
Tue, Apr 28
06:30PM

book talk

People of the Book Club – The Flight Portfolio

Go behind the stories and peer inside the archives at our bi-monthly book discussion, led by Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History. This session will feature a discussion of The Flight Portfolio by Julie Orringer, a work of historical fiction about American journalist Varian Fry’s attempts to rescue artists and intellectuals during the Nazi occupation of France, followed by a show and tell of documents and artworks from the Center’s collections that are connected to the historical figures in the book.

Participants will need to obtain their own copy to read before the discussion.

Light refreshments will be served.

Ticket Info: Free, registration required at bookclub2.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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book talk

Tue, Apr 28
07:00PM
Tue, Apr 28
07:00PM

conversation

Erna Rosenstein: Once Upon a Time

Curator Alison Gingeras leads a discussion with Adam Sandauer about the life and career of Surrealist postwar Polish artist Erna Rosenstein. This conversation happens on the occasion of ‘Once Upon a Time,’ Rosenstein’s first monographic exhibition outside of Poland, on view at Hauser and Wirth Gallery (April 23 – July 31). A Surrealist and member of the pre-war Communist underground, Rosenstein's practice encompasses visual languages that act as a direct expression of protest against the post-war Polish state. Featuring autobiographical artworks and fairytale texts written and illustrated by Rosenstein, the exhibition works to share the established artist's story in a grander, global context.

Ticket Info: ­­­­$10 general; $7 seniors; $5 CJH/Partner members; students free at erna.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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About the Speakers:

Alison M. Gingeras is a curator and writer based in New York and Warsaw. Gingeras has served as curator at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the National Museum of Modern Art, Centre Pompidou Paris, and Palazzo Grassi, Venice.  Currently she serves as an adjunct curator at Dallas Contemporary and a guest curator at Museum of Contemporary Art in Miami in addition to working independently.

Known for her scholarly yet anarchic approach to art history, Gingeras organized several groundbreaking exhibitions, such as “Dear Painter, Paint Me: Painting the Figure Since Late Picabia” at the Centre Pompidou, Paris (2002) and co-curated “Pop Life” at the Tate Modern (2009).  Most recently, she curated “My Life as a Man: John Currin” at Dallas Contemporary and “New Images of Man” at Blum & Poe in Los Angeles (Feb.-March 2020). Her writing regularly appears in such periodicals as Artforum, Playboy, Tate Etc., Spike, as well as in scores of books and exhibition catalogues.  The cult imprint Heinzfeller Nileisist recently published Totally My Ass and Other Esssays—an anthology of Gingeras’ writing.

Adam Sandauer: Born in Poland in 1950, he is the only son of Erna Rosenstein (1913 - 2004) - surrealist artist and poet, and Artur Sandauer (1913 - 1989) - literary critic, writer, translator, and professor at the University of Warsaw. He represents both his parents' estates. Sandauer has been politically active starting at a young age. In 1969 he was accused of distributing leaflets in protest of the arrest of university students during the antisemitic campaign of March 1968 and the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia. As a result, he was suspended from the University of Warsaw and put on trial. The penalty trial against Sandauer lasted for a few years and eventually ended in amnesty. He was able to return to college and in 1980 received a PhD in Physics from the Institute of Physics at the Polish Academy of Sciences. He is the founder and honorary president of the Primum Non Nocere Patients Association, dedicated to bringing aid to victims of medical malpractice. Since 1998 he has been actively lobbying for pensioners' rights in Poland. In 2016 he was awarded the Order of Polonia Restituta (Order of the Rebirth of Poland).


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conversation

Thu, Apr 30
06:30PM
Thu, Apr 30
06:30PM

conversation

Kabbalah and the Founding of America: Christian Uses of Jewish Thought in the Nascent Republic

Brian Ogren, the National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Scholar at the Center, will discuss his research project with Michael Hoberman.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at ogren.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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conversation

Thu, Apr 30
06:30PM
Thu, Apr 30
06:30PM

lecture

How did Jewish designers, architects, patrons, and merchants contribute to the history of modern architecture and design? What do their stories tell us about Jewish assimilation into American society?  And in the aftermath of World War II, how did creative communities like the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Walker Arts Center in Minneapolis, and Pond Farm in Guerneville, California welcome Jewish emigre architects and designers? Join the Art Deco Society of New York and author and curator Donald Albrecht for an illustrated talk about Jewish contributions to America’s 20th-century domestic landscape.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 CJH/Partner members at artdeco.org/cjh-jews-and-modernism; use password CJHDeco20 (case sensitive) to purchase tickets; $18 at the door


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About the Speaker:

Donald Albrecht is an independent curator who has organized exhibitions for the Getty Center, Library of Congress, Museum of the City of New York, and the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, among others. He served as curator of the exhibition Designing Home: Jews and Midcentury Modernism at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco in 2014.


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lecture