31 | Dec
31 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 3pm on Tuesday, December 31 for New Year's Eve.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Dec
25 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, December 25 for Christmas.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | Dec
24 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 3pm on Tuesday, December 24 for Christmas Eve.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

22 | Dec
02:00PM
22 | Dec
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

The Myth and Reality of Jewish Life in Eastern Europe

Speaker: Professor Magda Teter of Wesleyan University

"The Myth and Reality of Jewish Life in Eastern Europe" and the Annual Meeting for election of officers. In addition, from 12:30 to 1:30, bring your lunch and meet with fellow members and experts in an informal setting to share research stories and ask questions.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

18 | Dec
06:00PM
18 | Dec
06:00PM

gallery talk

Hearing New Voices in the Synagogue: Insights from the Cairo Geniza

The contents of the Cairo Geniza have enriched, deepened – and complicated – our understanding of medieval Jewish life. From materials on the Karaite community and evidence of early Palestinian traditions to documents relating to ordinary citizens, the Geniza informs our understanding of these and other aspects of medieval Jewish life that were previously lost or blurred to us. Join historian Arnold Franklin (Queens College), in the company of original Geniza documents and beautiful medieval art and artifacts in the exhibition Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, as he discusses and allows you to hear these “new” voices.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

gallery talk

15 | Dec
03:00PM
15 | Dec
03:00PM

concert

Music Treasures of the American Yiddish Theater

Enjoy a concert featuring popular songs from American Yiddish theater. The Sidney Krum Young Artists Concert Series is devoted to rarely heard masterworks from the Sidney Krum Jewish Music and Yiddish Theater Memorial Collections at YIVO.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

11 | Dec
06:00PM
11 | Dec
06:00PM

curator's tour

Light and Shadows: The Story of Iranian Jews

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

11 | Dec
07:00PM
11 | Dec
07:00PM

lecture

Restoring Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue: A Conversation with Phyllis Lambert

From 1980 to 1993, Phyllis Lambert, acting for the World Jewish Congress and its President, Edgar M. Bronfman, led an international team of architects, archaeologists, surveyors, conservators, and photographers to preserve, restore and document the historic Ben Ezra Synagogue and its compound, site of the discovery of the Cairo Geniza. Join architect, historian, preservationist and scholar Phyllis Lambert as she reflects through images and conversation on the origins, undertaking and aftermath of the project.

The program complements Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition, Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the program, beginning at 6:00 pm.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, Canadian Centre for Architecture and the AIANY | Center for Architecture

lecture

09 | Dec
06:30PM
09 | Dec
06:30PM

panel discussion

French and Jewish: Defining a Modern Jewish Identity in the 19th Century

For the Jews of France, the attainment of citizenship in the early 19th century was far more than a political triumph. The transition from ghetto to emancipation heralded a major transformation in Jewish status, and nowhere was the metamorphosis more striking than in Metz. Looking at the Jews through the lens of French literature, politics and religion, three scholars will consider the far-reaching impact of Jewish emancipation on the meaning of being Jewish in the modern world. With Jay Berkovitz (University of Massachusetts), Lisa Leff (American University) and Maurice Samuels (Yale University).

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

08 | Dec
03:00PM
08 | Dec
03:00PM

concert

David's Harp Returns! The Hanukkah Concert

Sephardic, Israeli, Turkish, Greek, Egyptian, Ottoman, Bukarian and Yemenite songs will be featured in this thrilling performance by David’s Harp. The group returns by popular demand after its sell-out Hanukkah performance in 2011. Its five-piece ensemble will sing and play santouri, darbuka, keyboard, zills, flute, guitar, mandolin, electric bass daf and violin. A special guest will open the program with a story from the pen of a great Jewish writer - a tradition of the annual Hanukkah program.  Plus menorah lighting, singing and refreshments!

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, Canadian Centre for Architecture and the AIANY | Center for Architecture

concert

05 | Dec
07:00PM
05 | Dec
07:00PM

book talk

Black Square: Malevich and the Origin of Suprematism

Kazimir Malevich (1879-1935) was a pioneer of abstract art and a founder of the Suprematist movement in Russia. Writing about Malevich’s painting Black Square, Aleksandra Shatskikh sheds new light on his art and legacy, and the genesis of the Suprematist movement.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

04 | Dec
07:30PM
04 | Dec
07:30PM

concert

Between Words and Music: Letters and Stories

Francis Poulenc, "Story of Babar" for piano and narrator
Inessa Zaretsky, Music on the poetry of Carl Sandburg
Robert Schumann, Piano Quartet, Op.47

Catherine Cho - violin
Daniel Panner - viola
Robert LaRue - cello
Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky - piano


Enjoy this Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performance of music by Schumann and Poulenc, made possible by the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

03 | Dec
06:00PM
03 | Dec
06:00PM

roundtable discussion

Outside the Bible

Apocalyptic visions, prophecies, folktales, prayers and much more bear witness to the rich spiritual lives of ancient Jews. Join the coeditors of a landmark three-volume set of non-biblical ancient Jewish writings for a discussion of these dramatically varied texts.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, Yeshiva University, Jewish Publication Society

roundtable discussion

02 | Dec
06:00PM
02 | Dec
06:00PM

book presentation

W. Michael Blumenthal, From Exile to Washington

LBI joins the German Consulate General in New York and Germany Close Up in presenting a talk by W. Michael Blumenthal. In a life that has spanned nearly nine decades and has taken him across the world and back, W. Michael Blumenthal has borne witness to the world’s convulsions and transformations during the twentieth century. Born in Germany between the two world wars, Blumenthal narrowly escaped the Nazi horror, when, in 1939, he and his family fled to Shanghai’s chaotic Jewish ghetto, where they spent the entirety of the Second World War.

From these fraught and humble beginnings, Blumenthal would emerge as a major leader in American business and politics. In the second half of the century, Blumenthal headed two major American corporations—Bendix and Burroughs (later Unisys); served as a United States trade ambassador in the State Department and the White House, advising John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson; and served under Jimmy Carter as the Secretary of the Treasury. After his retirement from business and politics, he began an entirely new chapter in his career, when he conceived and served as the director of Europe’s largest Jewish museum—the Jewish Museum of Berlin—a position he still holds today.

An essential autobiography by one of America’s great political figures, From Exile to Washington is an engaging chronicle of the twentieth century’s greatest upheavals, and a tribute to a lifetime of courage, leadership and decisiveness.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book presentation

01 | Dec
05:00PM
01 | Dec
05:00PM

concert

SepharTango – New York Premiere!

Sephardic songs set to tango and fused with classics create an unforgettable musical experience. Enjoy Polly Ferman’s  expressive and sensitive piano-playing and Gerard Edery’s instrumental virtuosity and rich baritone. Curator and ethnomusicologist Samuel R. Thomas will be in conversation with the artists as part of the Sephardic Music Festival-Scholar Series.
4pm special event for ticketholders:  A tour of YU Museum’s current exhibition,Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue. Come early - space is limited!

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and Yeshiva University Museum

concert

29 | Nov
29 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, November 29 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

28 | Nov
28 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, November 28 and Friday, November 29 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

27 | Nov
27 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 3pm on Wednesday, November 27.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

26 | Nov
06:30PM
26 | Nov
06:30PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

The 'Reconquest' of Jewishness in Post-War America: Will Herberg and Irving Howe

Presenter: Tony Michels, University of Wisconsin-Madison 
Moderator: Daniel Soyer, Fordham University

The outbreak of the Second World War precipitated an ideological-political crisis among Marxists in the United States. For much of the 1930s, Marxian intellectuals-specifically, those hostile to the Communist Party-had struggled to understand the rise of Nazism and the consolidation of Stalinism, but did so within Marxism's parameters. However, Germany's invasion of Poland, the systematic killing of Jews that followed, and the Soviet invasion of Finland raised questions about Marxism itself. Against the backdrop of totalitarianism, war, and genocide, intellectuals undertook a thorough reconsideration of Marxism. This process of rethinking Marxism entailed a new engagement with things Jewish: religion, Yiddish literature, Zionism, and the meaning of Jewish identity. This seminar explores the turn to Jewishness by intellectuals during the 1940s and 1950s through the examples of Will Herberg and Irving Howe.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

21 | Nov
03:00PM
21 | Nov
03:00PM

lecture

The Velizh Affair: Ritual Murder in a Russian Border Town

Dr. Eugene Avrutin (UIUC) examines newly-uncovered information about the longest ritual murder case in the modern world - the Velizh Affair (1823-1835). His work draws on research conducted at the Simon Dubnow Archive at YIVO.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

21 | Nov
07:00PM
21 | Nov
07:00PM

book talk

Edokko: Growing Up a Foreigner in Wartime Japan

What was it like to grow up Jewish in Japan, survive World War II and immigrate to America? Isaac Shapiro speaks with Rabbi Markin Tokayer about his experiences and his family’s odyssey from Russia, Germany, Palestine and China to Japan.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

20 | Nov
07:00PM
20 | Nov
07:00PM

book talk

Unbroken Spirits: Yosef Mendelevich and Soviet Jewry Activists

Although less well-known than Sharansky, Yosef Mendelevich was one of the boldest and most influential Refuseniks. He will discuss his riveting new memoir and be reunited with prominent veteran activists for an evening of memory, song and inspiration.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

18 | Nov
08:00PM
18 | Nov
08:00PM

concert and lecture

Charles Valentin Alkan: His Life and Music

Alkan (1813-1888) was a remarkable and enigmatic composer and virtuoso pianist—and a friend and rival of Chopin and Liszt. This year marks the 200th anniversary of his birth. Alkan’s family roots were in Metz, but he was born and lived most of his life in Paris. His striking compositions reflect his intellect and culture as well as his strictly Orthodox upbringing. Students from Mannes College, The New School for Music perform a wide range of Alkan’s music, including solo piano, chamber, concerted and vocal works. Many of the works played at this event will be New York premieres. Donald Wagner, a leading authority on Alkan, will offer comments and context on Alkan’s life and music. Fifty years ago, New York was the site of an event that galvanized the modern revival of interest in Alkan.

Among the pieces that will be included are:
Le Festin d'Esope (from Op. 39 Douze Etudes)
Le Vent (from Op. 15 Trois Morceaux)
Andante with strings in C sharp major (from Op. 13 Trois Andantes)
2er Verset du 41me Psaume for soprano and piano

and selections from the chamber music, Esquisses Op. 63, Preludes Op. 31 and Les Mois Op. 74

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Mannes College and YIVO Institute for Jewish History

concert and lecture

14 | Nov
06:30PM
14 | Nov
06:30PM

panel discussion

Not By Bread Alone: How Traditionalists Survived Modernity

Join a provocative discussion on the resilience and adaptability of traditionalism. During the late 19th century, most East European Jews still consented to rabbinic authority, conformed to traditional gender norms, and remained attuned to the rhythms of halakhah. In the economic sphere, Jews continued to interact with non-Jews within prescribed roles, while women continued to be breadwinners in Jewish households. How did tradition survive the forces of modernity? Panel participants: Glenn Dynner (CJH NEH Scholar 2013-14), author of Yankel’s Tavern: Jews, Liquor & Life in the Kingdom of Poland, and Elli Stern (Yale University), author of The Genius: Elijah of Vilna and the Making of Modern Judaism. Moderated by Natalia Aleksiun (CUNY Graduate Center).

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

13 | Nov
03:00PM
13 | Nov
03:00PM

lecture

“Traces of the Past and the Future of Jewish Creativity”: Interwar Jewish Ethnography in Wilno

Jewish ethnography reached its apex as a popular and institutional movement in interwar Poland. Examining materials from YIVO’s Ethnographic Commission, Sarah Zarrow (NYU) shows how ethnographers of the time constructed their subjects to prove Jewish belonging on Polish soil.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

13 | Nov
06:00PM
13 | Nov
06:00PM

curator's tour

Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

12 | Nov
06:30PM
12 | Nov
06:30PM

panel discussion

German-Jewish Intellectuals in the Old World and the New

This event celebrates the publication of Against the Grain, Jewish Intellectuals in Hard Times (edited by Ezra Mendelsohn, Stefani Hoffman and Richard Cohen; Berghahn Books, NY)—a volume that reveals how Jewish intellectuals from German-speaking Europe reacted to the multiple crises of the 20th century. It honors the work of Steven Aschheim, esteemed scholar, teacher and mentor of a new generation of researchers in this field, some of whom are represented in the book. With Richard Cohen (Hebrew University), Marion Berghahn (Berghahn Books), Jerry Muller (The Catholic University of America), Adi Gordon (Amherst College), Ezra Mendelsohn (Hebrew University) and Steven Aschheim (Hebrew University).

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

11 | Nov
06:30PM
11 | Nov
06:30PM

conversation

The Short, Strange Life of Herschel Grynszpan

On November 7, 1938, 17-year-old Herschel Grynszpan shot Ernst vom Rath, a Nazi diplomat, igniting the campaign of terror that started two days later and came to be known as Kristallnacht.  Join author Jonathan Kirsch and his son Adam Kirsch, literary critic and journalist, as they discuss the new book The Short, Strange Life of Herschel Grynszpan and reexamine the historical details and moral dimensions of one of World War II’s most enigmatic cases.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute, YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Jewish Book Council

conversation

10 | Nov
06:00PM
10 | Nov
06:00PM

film, lecture and panel discussion

75 Years since “Kristallnacht” - Refuge (a film by Ethan Bensinger) and a Lecture by Sam Kassow

Refuge gives voice to the last remaining generation of survivors of Nazi persecution, retracing the lives of current residents of Chicago’s Selfhelp home for refugees.  Sam Kassow (Trinity College) will lend historical context to their stories of courage and resilience.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

film, lecture and panel discussion

07 | Nov
07:00PM
07 | Nov
07:00PM

book talk

The Vilna Gaon and the Making of Modern Judaism

How did the Vilna Gaon contribute to the development of contemporary Jewish life and identity? Eliyahu Stern (Yale University) speaks with Jeremy Dauber (Columbia University) about Stern’s award-winning book, The Genius: Elijah of Vilna and the Making of Modern Judaism.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

04 | Nov
07:00PM
04 | Nov
07:00PM

roundtable discussion

Reflecting on the Beilis Trial

This fall marks the 100th anniversary of the trial of Mendel Beilis, a factory clerk falsely accused of murdering a Christian boy in tsarist Russia. Four scholars discuss the trial and blood libel - and the relevance both have today.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Yeshiva University Museum, Museum at Eldridge Street

roundtable discussion

03 | Nov
01:30PM
03 | Nov
01:30PM

symposium and screening

Portugal and the Jewish Refugee Crisis of World War II

When the Nazis invaded France and the Low Countries, tens of thousands of Jewish refugees from all over Europe poured into neutral Portugal. Lisbon became a city of transit and intrigue, sheltering refugees, aid organizations, and Allied and Axis coalitions, all of whom populated the cafés and public gathering places. This symposium will tell these stories and that of Aristides de Sousa Mendes, named Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem for his courage as Portuguese Consul-General stationed in Bordeaux. With Marion Kaplan (NYU), author Margarida Ramalho, Mordecai Paldiel (Yad Vashem, emeritus), Louis-Philippe Mendes and Olivia Mattis (Sousa Mendes Foundation).

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute, American Sephardi Federation, Sousa Mendes Foundation

symposium and screening

28 | Oct
05:30PM
28 | Oct
05:30PM

exhibition opening

Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue

Threshold to the Sacred explores the artistic character and the religious and cultural context of an object of great beauty and significance: a decorated and inscribed medieval wood door from the Holy Ark of Egypt’s Ben Ezra Synagogue, site of the discovery of the Cairo Geniza. Featuring beautiful Jewish and Islamic works of art and artifacts, conservation and science research on the ark door, and manuscript treasures from the Cairo Geniza, the exhibition brings to life the glorious past of the Ben Ezra Synagogue and the panel’s expansive communal context.

Threshold to the Sacred has been organized by the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore and Yeshiva University Museum.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Leon Levy Foundation, lead sponsor, and The David Berg Foundation, as well as patrons and friends of Yeshiva University Museum.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

exhibition opening

27 | Oct
01:00PM
27 | Oct
01:00PM

film screening & roundtable discussion

One Thousand Children: The Untold Story of the American Kindertransport

Approximately 1,000 children were rescued from Nazi persecution and brought to America unaccompanied by their parents. Join us for a panel discussion with individuals who were saved.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film screening & roundtable discussion

24 | Oct
06:00PM
24 | Oct
06:00PM

book talk

Fritz Stern and Elisabeth Sifton: No Ordinary Men

Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Hans von Dohnanyi were two extraordinary figures who participated in German resistance against the Nazis. A new book by Fritz Stern and Elisabeth Sifton tells their stories.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

24 | Oct
07:00PM
24 | Oct
07:00PM

16th street book club

Stranger's Notebook: Poems by Nomi Stone

Nomi Stone’s moving debut collection of verse is inspired by her encounter with perhaps the last cohesive, traditional Jewish community in the Middle East and North Africa. According to their story of origin, a handful of exiles arrived on the island of Djerba, Tunisia, in 586 B.C., carrying a single stone from the destroyed Temple in Jerusalem. Drawing from this cosmology, the poems follow a stranger who arrives into an ancient community that is both at home and deeply estranged on the island. Its people occupy the uneasy space of all insular communities, deciding when to let the world in and when to shut it out.

The poems are about the daily lives and deeper cosmos of the Jews of Djerba as well as the Muslims next door. In her exploration, Stone sees vivid recurring images of keys, stones, homes, the laughter of girls, the eyes of men, the color blue, and the force of blood or bombs.

With this journey of faith, doubt, longing, and home, Stone has brought readers a rare look into a story that resonates powerfully with questions of cultural preservation and coexistence.

"Stone is a genuine poet, with the capacity of seeming artless while being extremely artful." - Alicia Ostriker

"Nomi Stone brings to life the searing heat, the balance of superstition and tradition, and the flow of history that has built up to become the tremendous monument that is daily life. Stone speaks from a point both inside and out, letting us see the frame and stand inside it at the same time. It's an electric place to be." - Cole Swensen

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

22 | Oct
07:00PM
22 | Oct
07:00PM

book talk

The Jews in Poland-Lithuania and Russia: 1350 to the Present Day

In his three-volume history, Antony Polonsky (Brandeis University) provides a masterful survey of the social, political, economic and religious aspects of Jewish life in Eastern Europe from 1350 to the present.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

21 | Oct
06:30PM
21 | Oct
06:30PM

panel discussion

Sex, Yiddish and the Law: Jewish Life in Metz in the 18th Century

How will evidence of the cultural, legal and sexual lives of members of the Metz Jewish community challenge our assumptions about Jewish modernization, religion and life in pre-revolutionary France? Jay Berkovitz (author of the upcoming Protocols of Justice: The Pinkas of the Metz Rabbinic Court, 1771-1789) and Magda Teter (scholar of early modern religion and law) provide a rare look at three individual court cases recorded in the Pinkas (Register) of Metz.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

20 | Oct
03:00PM
20 | Oct
03:00PM

book launch and staged reading

Performing Captivity, Performing Escape: Cabarets and Plays from the Terezín / Theresienstadt Ghetto

Plays first performed in the bleak surroundings of a Jewish concentration camp and ghetto over 60 years ago are to be staged again for modern-day audiences in New York, thanks to literary detective work by a UK-based academic from the University of York.

Performing Captivity, Performing Escape: Cabarets and Plays from the Terezin/Theresienstadt Ghetto (Seagull Books 2013) is a collection of twelve theatrical texts including cabaret songs, sketches, historical and verse dramas and puppet plays. The scripts were written and performed by Czech and Austrian Jews imprisoned at Terezín, also known as Theresienstadt, one of the sites of Hitler’s “Final Solution.”

The previously unknown scripts were discovered by Dr Lisa Peschel, a lecturer in the University of York’s Department of Theatre, Film and Television, during interviews with survivors of the Terezín camp and ghetto near Prague.

At the book launch, Edward Einhorn, Artistic Director of Untitled Theater Company #61 (presenter of the Jewish Theater Festival and the Vaclav Havel Festival) will direct five actors in a staged reading of scenes and songs from the scripts. Dr Peschel will outline how the plays came to light and their role in helping the prisoners deal with life in the ghetto.

Leo Baeck Institute is proud to host this event paying tribute to the cultural life that the Jewish residents of Theresienstadt struggled to maintain under oppressive conditions.  LBI’s namesake, Rabbi Leo Baeck, was also a part of this effort.  The last official leader of Germany’s beleaguered Jewish community, Baeck refused multiple offers that would have allowed him to emigrate and was deported at the age of 70 to Theresienstadt, where he continued to teach, holding lectures on philosophy and religion.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book launch and staged reading

17 | Oct
06:30PM
17 | Oct
06:30PM

book talk

Where the Wind Blew: A Boyhood Lost in Tangier

Learn about Sephardic life in 1950s Tangier through a discussion of Dr. Michel Bensadon’s compelling memoir.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

17 | Oct
07:00PM
17 | Oct
07:00PM

panel discussion

The Remarkable Life and Afterlife of Sholem Aleichem

Novelist, playwright, journalist, essayist, and editor, Sholem Aleichem was one of the founding giants of modern Yiddish literature. The creator of a pantheon of extraordinary characters, his literature provided readers with a window into the world of Eastern European Jews as they confronted the forces of modernity that tore through Russia at the end of the 19th century. But just as compelling as the fictional lives of his characters, was Sholem Aleichem's own life story. Born Sholem Rabinovitch in Ukraine in 1859, he endured an impoverished childhood, married into wealth, and then lost it all through bad luck and worse business sense. Turning to his pen to support himself, he switched from writing in Russian and Hebrew to Yiddish in order to create a living body of literature for the Jewish masses. Join Jonathan Brent, Executive Director at YIVO and Jeremy Dauber (Columbia Universy), author of the recently published book, The Worlds of Sholem Aleichem: The Remarkable Life and Afterlife of the Man Who Created Tevye, for a lively discussion about the fascinating life and work of the "Jewish Mark Twain.”

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

16 | Oct
06:00PM
16 | Oct
06:00PM

curator's tour

Transcending Tradition: Jewish Mathematicians in German-Speaking Academic Culture

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

16 | Oct
07:30PM
16 | Oct
07:30PM

concert

Composers in their Youth: Piano Trios by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Shostakovich and Bernstein

Chopin Trio, Op.8, (composed when he was 18 years old)
Rachmaninoff Trio Elegiaque in G minor, (composed when he was 19)
Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C minor, (composed when he was 17)
Bernstein Trio (composed when he was 19)

Annaliesa Place, violin
Robert LaRue, cello
Vassa Shevel, piano
Inessa Zaretsky, piano

Enjoy this Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performance made possible by the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

14 | Oct
07:00PM
14 | Oct
07:00PM

naomi prawer kadar memorial lecture

Creating Identity: Yiddish across a Spectrum of Jewish Communities Today

Isabelle Barrière and Sarah Benor examine how Hasidim, Modern Orthodox and liberal Jews use Yiddish to create group identity. How are Jews different linguistically from the surrounding society, and what role does Yiddish play in Jewish “peoplehood”?

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

naomi prawer kadar memorial lecture

09 | Oct
09 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, October 9 and Friday, October 10 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

08 | Oct
04:30PM
08 | Oct
04:30PM

open house

Preservation at Home

The archivists at the Center for Jewish History, representing the Center and its partner organizations, will hold an open house for the general public. The program include consists of informal discussion and Q&A with the Center conservator and professional archivists, followed by a tour behind the scenes at the Center, with additional input from the viewpoint of the archives staff. Topics will include:

  • Housing and environment for family papers, photographs and scrapbooks
  • What to do with obsolete audio-visual formats like VHS tapes, audio cassettes and 35mm slides
  • Examples of how not to scrapbook and how not to repair at home will be on display
Handouts will be provided.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

open house

08 | Oct
07:00PM
08 | Oct
07:00PM

staged reading

Stealing Home: The Mystery of Moe Berg

Be one of the first to enjoy a new play based on the true story (and mystery) of Moe Berg, a professional baseball player and scholar—and one of the nation’s first atomic spies. This staged reading of Stealing Home (by Allan Appel, directed by Avram Ludwig) will be performed by members of the Actors Studio

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

staged reading

07 | Oct
01:00PM
07 | Oct
01:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

Jewish Scholars and Scholarship in 18th Century Metz

Rabbi Moshe Arye Bamberger, Head of the Bet Din of the Metz Jewish Community, France
Rabbi Shmuel Klein, YIVO Archives (Moderator)

Rabbi Moshe Arye Bamberger, the Head of the Bet Din of the Jewish community of Metz, France will present a seminar on a new publication, Torat Chachmei Metz, or The Torah of the Scholars of Metz, which is based on an original manuscript in the YIVO Archives. This manuscript includes original interpretations and teachings of several important figures in 18th century Metz, such as Rabbi Yonasan Eybeschutz, Rabbi Arye Leib Ginzberg (the head of the Bet Din of Metz from 1765-1785), Rabbi Shmuel Hillman and others. Rabbi Bamberger's presentation will include an overview of the scholars of Metz represented in this new book, within the context of the history of this important Jewish community during the early modern period.

Rabbi Shmuel Klein A research scholar and archivist, Rabbi Shmuel Klein specializes in medieval rabbinic bibliographical studies and has worked on a number of publication and research projects associated with manuscripts of the Cairo Genizah. Rabbi Klein is currently working on the Sutzkever Kaczerginski Collection of Historical and Literary Manuscripts which are held in the YIVO Archives.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

06 | Oct
09:30AM
06 | Oct
09:30AM

conference

Hidden from History: The Pinkas (Register) of the Metz Rabbinic Court, 1771-1789

Rabbinic court records provide rich sources for the study of early modern European Jewish life. The authority to adjudicate civil disputes ranked among the most highly valued of all privileges extended to Jews in the course of their history. This conference explores French and German rabbinic courts of the late 1700s, just before the French Revolution, and challenges our understanding of the beginnings of Jewish modernity.

This program is part of a series of events about the early modern community of Metz, France in honor of the publication of Protocols of Justice: The Pinkas of the Metz Rabbinic Court, 1771-1789, introduction and editing by Jay Berkovitz (Brill Press, 2013). An accompanying exhibition, Circles of Justice, will open in October. The Pinkas (Register) of the Metz Rabbinic Court is a rare and little-known volume from the collections of the YIVO Institute Archives.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

conference

06 | Oct
12:00PM
06 | Oct
12:00PM

artist's tour

An Archive of My Own

An Archive of My Own is the product of a research project in Georgian Jewish History, which artist Nino Biniashvili conducted during her Prins Foundation Fellowship for Emigrating Artists and Writers-in-Residence at the Center for Jewish History.

Meet the artist for a tour of the exhibit on October 6 between 12pm and 6pm.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

artist's tour

02 | Oct
06:00PM
02 | Oct
06:00PM

exhibit opening

An Archive of My Own

An Archive of My Own is the product of a research project in Georgian Jewish History, which artist Nino Biniashvili conducted during her Prins Foundation Fellowship for Emigrating Artists and Writers-in-Residence at the Center for Jewish History.

For An Archive of My Own Biniashvili creates, following Virginia Woolf, a personal study: a room of her own. A wooden table, a chair, a lamp, and an indoor plant form a homelike atmosphere. On the table, a large picture book and an essay await the visitor. The picture book includes screen-prints inspired by the archival material Biniashvili reviewed during her research. Drawings hang on the walls and next to them slides are projected. The slides portray Jewish life and sites in nineteen seventies Georgia, USSR.

Visitors are welcome to sit at the table, touch the prints, turn the pages and read the essay as if they were looking through their old albums and readings their personal memoirs. Employing this form of presentation, Biniashvili breaks from a long tradition of displaying archival material in strict, glass cases. By thus defying common notions of archive and research, Biniashvili attempts to sustain the point of view of an artist in her historical investigation as well as to acknowledge and address her own history as a Georgian Jew who grew up during the last years of the Soviet Union.

Nino Biniashvili (b. Tbilisi, Georgia, 1980) is a visual artist. In her work, Biniashvili represents and analyzes the possibilities and problems of communication between cultures and people. She attempts to articulate the experience of living in a permanent state of otherness, the experience of lacking a homeland.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

exhibit opening

01 | Oct
07:00PM
01 | Oct
07:00PM

book talk

The House at Ujazdowskie 16: Jewish Families in Warsaw after the Holocaust

Karen Auerbach, Kronhill Lecturer at Monash University, writes about ten Jewish families living together in Poland after the war, their efforts to seek entrance into Polish society and the fate of those aspirations. Based on personal interviews and archival research.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

30 | Sep
05:30PM
30 | Sep
05:30PM

exhibition opening

Transcending Tradition: Jewish Mathematicians in German-Speaking Academic Culture

Discover the lives and works of Jewish mathematicians in Germany over a period of 150 years. This exhibit reveals their emergence from segregation into the academic limelight, documents their emigration, flight or death after 1933, and illuminates their lasting legacies.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Yeshiva University Museum

exhibition opening

27 | Sep
27 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, September 27 for Simchat Torah.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

26 | Sep
26 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, September 26 for Shemini Atzeret and Friday, September 27 for Simchat Torah.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Sep
25 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Wednesday September 25 for Erev Shemini Atzeret.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | Sep
06:30PM
24 | Sep
06:30PM

panel discussion

Naming Genocide: The Legacy of Lemkin

"Sovereignty cannot be conceived as the right to kill innocent people." —Raphael Lemkin

How can we define genocide? How is the concept of genocide interpreted in discussions of the Holocaust, the Armenian genocide, Rwanda, and other devastating events such as those in Cambodia, Darfur and the former Yugoslavia? And what about Syria?

After escaping Nazi-occupied Poland in 1940, Polish Jewish legal scholar Raphael Lemkin coined the term “genocide” and was instrumental in passing the UN Genocide Convention in 1948. Join genocide studies scholars Donna-Lee Frieze (editor of Totally Unofficial and Prins Fellow at the Center for Jewish History), Peter Balakian (Colgate University) and A. Dirk Moses (European University Institute and the University of Sydney) as they discuss how Lemkin's work and legacy can help us understand present-day conflicts.

This event is presented by the Center for Jewish History in honor of the publication of Totally Unofficial: The Autobiography of Raphael Lemkin (2013). Lemkin’s unedited manuscript is held at the NYPL.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

22 | Sep
01:00PM
22 | Sep
01:00PM

memorial event

60th Anniversary of the Nusakh Vilne Memorial Program

A commemoration of the Jewish community of Vilna at the 60th Anniversary of the Nusakh Vilne Memorial Program. This program includes a musical performance by actor-singer Yelena Shmulenson and pianist Binyumen Schaechter, a poetry reading by Ruth Baran-Gerold, and the screening of the film Vilna, My Vilna, introduced by Boris Sandler, editor of the Forverts. This program is in English and Yiddish.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

memorial event

22 | Sep
02:00PM
22 | Sep
02:00PM

celebration

Model Torah Workshop

Celebrate Simchat Torah 5774 with a new model Torah dressed in a fancy fabric cover!

Assemble your own model Torah scroll with wooden rollers and parchment-like paper. Our teaching artist will inspire you with Simchat Torah texts and help you craft a fabric collage mantle with a unique design.

When you have finished, be sure to see the beautiful Torah ornaments on display at the Museum, and visit our acclaimed exhibition It’s a Thin Line – The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond before it closes on October 13th!

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

celebration

20 | Sep
20 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, September 20 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

19 | Sep
19 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, September 19 and Friday, September 20 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

18 | Sep
18 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Wednesday September 18 for Erev Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

16 | Sep
07:30PM
16 | Sep
07:30PM

lecture

Making History: The Proliferation and Impact of Modern Jewish Archives

How do modern Jewish archives impact the way we write history? Jason Lustig (UCLA) explores this question through a close look at the creation of YIVO’s archives and its pioneering role in the “documentary imperative” of the 20th century.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

14 | Sep
14 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Saturday, September 14 for Yom Kippur.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

13 | Sep
13 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Friday September 13 for Erev Yom Kippur.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

12 | Sep
06:00PM
12 | Sep
06:00PM

archival leaders advocate: annual seminar at the center
http://archivalleaders.cjh.org/

The Role of Archives in Supporting Changing Research Practices

The annual event, Archival Leaders Advocate, features prominent figures in the archives field addressing issues of broad relevance to all archivists. This year’s panel discussion, “The Role of Archives in Supporting Changing Research Practices,” is cosponsored by the Metropolitan New York Library Council and the Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York.

Ithaka S+R's recent report, "Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Historians,” offers an insightful examination of how, as the executive summary states, "underlying research methods of many historians remain fairly recognizable... but the day to day research practices of all historians have changed fundamentally." The report includes a broad examination of the crucial role of archives and libraries in providing access to historical materials and details how changing methods of research and expectations of access among researchers are creating new challenges and opportunities for the archivists and librarians supporting historical research. The report also features a number of specific recommendations for libraries and archives as they continue to provide access to materials in an era of new record types, access technologies, and research practices.

This panel discussed the report's findings from the specific perspective of its implications for archives and as a jumping off point for discussing reference and access services in light of increasingly digitized and born-digital collections. Panelists included Roger Schonfeld, a co-author of the report and Program Director for Libraries, Users, and Scholarly Practices at Ithaka S+R; Kate Theimer, a writer and blogger on archives at ArchivesNext; David Ludden, an interview participant in the Ithaka report and Professor of History at New York University; and Melanie Meyers, Senior Reference Services Librarian for Special Collections at the Center for Jewish History. Jefferson Bailey, Strategic Initiatives Manager at the Metropolitan New York Library Council, moderated.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

archival leaders advocate: annual seminar at the center
http://archivalleaders.cjh.org/

10 | Sep
06:00PM
10 | Sep
06:00PM

artist & curator in conversation

It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist & curator in conversation

09 | Sep
07:00PM
09 | Sep
07:00PM

concert

Festival of New Yiddish Song

Melding rich tradition and contemporary vision, these composers and musicians are creating a vibrant future for Yiddish song.

This program features the North American debut of the Berlin-based singer Sveta Kundish, who has been taking the European Yiddish world by storm, and new compositions by artists such as Patrick Farrell, Benjy Fox-Rosen and Michael Winograd as well as renowned Yiddish songwriter Josh Waletzky. A reception with the artists will follow the concert.

Featuring
Sveta Kundish - vocals (North American debut) and Josh Waletsky—vocals
The Yiddish Art Trio: Patrick Farrell - accordion; Benjy Fox-Rosen - bass/vocals; Michael Winograd - clarinet
Special guest: Deborah Strauss — violin

A reception with the artists will follow the concert.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Center for Traditional Music and Dance, Sholem Aleichem Cultural Center

concert

06 | Sep
06 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, September 6 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

05 | Sep
05 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, September 5 and Friday, September 6 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

04 | Sep
04 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Wednesday September 4 for Erev Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

02 | Sep
02 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, September 2 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

28 | Aug
06:00PM
28 | Aug
06:00PM

book presentation

Irene Runge: How I Discovered my Berlin in Jewish Manhattan

Born in Manhattan and raised in East Berlin, Irene Runge reflects in her new memoir on how the urbanity and diversity of Jewish life in her native city helped inform her sense of Jewish identity and community in Berlin both before and after the fall of the Wall.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book presentation

20 | Aug
07:00PM
20 | Aug
07:00PM

16th street book club

Unterzakhn by Leela Corman

A mesmerizing, heartbreaking graphic novel of immigrant life on New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the twentieth century, as seen through the eyes of twin sisters whose lives take radically and tragically different paths.

For six-year-old Esther and Fanya, the teeming streets of New York’s Lower East Side circa 1910 are both a fascinating playground and a place where life’s lessons are learned quickly and often cruelly. In drawings that capture both the tumult and the telling details of that street life, Unterzakhn (Yiddish for “Underthings”) tells the story of these sisters: as wide-eyed little girls absorbing the sights and sounds of a neighborhood of struggling immigrants; as teenagers taking their own tentative steps into the wider world (Esther working for a woman who runs both a burlesque theater and a whorehouse, Fanya for an obstetrician who also performs illegal abortions); and, finally, as adults battling for their own piece of the “golden land,” where the difference between just barely surviving and triumphantly succeeding involves, for each of them, painful decisions that will have unavoidably tragic repercussions.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

19 | Aug
06:00PM
19 | Aug
06:00PM

lecture

The Jewish Community in Iran from 1941 until the Revolution

Lior Sternfeld, Ph.D. candidate in History at the University of Texas at Austin.

A recipient of the Fred and Ellen Lewis / JDC Archives Fellowship for 2013, Sternfeld is conducting research on the Jewish community in Iran under the reign of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (1941-1979).

Presented by: JDC Archives and the American Sephardi Federation

lecture

31 | Jul
07:00PM
31 | Jul
07:00PM

16th street book club

Market Day by James Sturm

Mendleman’s life goes through an upheaval when he discovers that he can no longer earn a living for his growing family doing the work that defines him—making well-crafted rugs by hand. A proud artisan, he takes his donkey-drawn cart to the market only to be turned away when the distinctive shop he once sold to now stocks only cheaply manufactured merchandise. As the realities of the marketplace sink in, Mendleman unravels. James Sturm draws a quiet, reflective, and beautiful portrait of eastern Europe in the early 1900s–bringing to life the hustle and bustle of an Old World marketplace on the brink of industrialization. Market Day is an ageless tale of how economic and social forces can affect a single life.

An award-winning cartoonist of the books Golem’s Mighty Swing, James Sturm’s America, Satchel Paige: Striking Out Jim Crow, and Adventures in Cartooning, Sturm is a true visionary, having cofounded the Seattle alternative weekly The Stranger and the Center for Cartoon Studies, the country’s premier cartooning school.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

24 | Jul
07:30PM
24 | Jul
07:30PM

book presentation

Return of the Jew: Identity Narratives of the Third Post-Holocaust Generation of Jews in Poland

Join us in celebrating Katka Reszke’s book "Return of the Jew: Identity Narratives of the Third Post-Holocaust Generation of Jews in Poland", published by Academic Studies Press. The author’s presentation and Q&A session will be followed by a modest reception.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History in partnership with the Museum of the History of Polish Jews

book presentation

10 | Jul
07:00PM
10 | Jul
07:00PM

seminar

Jerusalem on the Prairies: Winnipeg Yiddish Culture and the Power of Place

Winnipeg, Manitoba, in the heart of the Canadian prairies, is known as the coldest city in the world. Jewish pioneers settling there developed a vibrant, independent community, under the unique conditions of long dark winters and vast open landscapes. Winnipeg's Jews created a fiercely energetic and hyper-literate Yiddish-speaking society that supported a complete cultural universe: from newspapers, bookstores, and libraries, to the largest Yiddish school in North America, the I.L. Peretz Folk School, founded in 1914. Many of these institutions continue today, as Winnipeg furthers its reputation as a Yiddish cultural capital.

Featuring Faith Jones, recipient of the Max Weinreich Center's Tendler Research Fellowship, who will introduce new stories of Winnipeg Yiddish life uncovered in the YIVO archives.

Faith will be joined by YIVO Yiddish teachers and scholars Sheva Zucker, born and raised in Winnipeg, and a graduate of the I.L. Peretz Folk School; and Itay Zutra, I.L. Peretz Folk School Yiddish Teaching Fellow, and Yiddish and Hebrew instructor at the University of Manitoba.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

seminar

05 | Jul
05 | Jul

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, July 5 in honor of Independence Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

04 | Jul
04 | Jul

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, July 4 and Friday, July 5 in honor of Independence Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

30 | Jun
01:00PM
30 | Jun
01:00PM

memorial event

Annual Mordkhe Schaechter Memorial Program

Dr. Samuel Kassow (Professor of History, Trinity College)
"A Historian in the Ghetto: Emanuel Ringelblum and the Oyneg-Shabes Archive"

Between 1940 and 1943 Emanuel Ringelblum organized and directed the Oyneg Shabes Archive in the Warsaw Ghetto. Of the 60 people who worked in the archive, only 3 survived. The archive reminds us that one can fight not only with guns and rifles but also with ink and paper. Thanks to Ringelblum, future generations were able to write the history of the ghetto on the basis of not German, but rather, Jewish sources.

Gella Schweid Fishman (Yiddish educator, activist and poet)
"About My Neighbor Mordkhe Schaechter"

Musical Program
Anthony Mordechai-Tsvi Russell (Singer, bass)
Accompanied by Alexander Ruvinstein

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Yiddish League

memorial event

27 | Jun
07:00PM
27 | Jun
07:00PM

16th street book club

The Aleppo Codex: In Pursuit of One of the World's Most Coveted, Sacred, and Mysterious Books by Matti Friedman (2012)

Author Matti Friedman will join the 16th Street book club for this discussion.

A thousand years ago, the most perfect copy of the Hebrew Bible was written. It was kept safe through one upheaval after another in the Middle East, and by the 1940s it was housed in a dark grotto in Aleppo, Syria, and had become known around the world as the Aleppo Codex.

Journalist Matti Friedman’s true-life detective story traces how this precious manuscript was smuggled from its hiding place in Syria into the newly founded state of Israel and how and why many of its most sacred and valuable pages went missing. It’s a tale that involves grizzled secret agents, pious clergymen, shrewd antiquities collectors, and highly placed national figures who, as it turns out, would do anything to get their hands on an ancient, decaying book. What it reveals are uncomfortable truths about greed, state cover-ups, and the fascinating role of historical treasures in creating a national identity.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

24 | Jun
06:30PM
24 | Jun
06:30PM

panel discussion

Bread and Roses, Too

The labor movement has always been a place of innovation and activity for Jewish women. Exploring this path from the perspective of an early innovator, a labor historian, a union leader, and a cultural activist, this multi-generational panel explored the role Jewish women continue to play.

With Maida Rosenstein, President Local 2110, UAW; Eleanor Tilson, co-founder of the Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW) and Executive Director of 1199 Service Employees International Union Benefit and Pension Fund; and Rachel Bernstein, a co-founder and co-historian of LABOR ARTS and Adjunct Professor of History at the Program in Public History at NYU. Moderated by Esther Cohen, author, activist, former Executive Director of Bread and Roses.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History with the Jewish Women’s Archive

panel discussion

23 | Jun
11:30AM
23 | Jun
11:30AM

workshop

Translating Early 20th Century Yiddish Plays for 21st Century Audiences

This hands-on translation workshop will feature New Worlds Theater Company's Producing Artistic Director, Ellen Perecman, who will facilitate translation and discussion of short pieces from playwrights such as Hirshbein, Leivick, Ash, and Bimko.

Basic proficiency in Yiddish is required.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the New Worlds Theater Project

workshop

23 | Jun
02:00PM
23 | Jun
02:00PM

book talk

Celebration of the New Comprehensive Yiddish-English Dictionary

Co-sponsored by Indiana University Press and the Institute for Israel & Jewish Studies at Columbia University

Most of this program is in Yiddish.

A celebration of the new Comprehensive Yiddish-English Dictionary, the largest and most complete of its kind to date, published by Indiana University Press. Speakers include the editors, Dr. Solon Beinfeld and Dr. Harry Bochner, as well as the executive director of the Forward Association, Sam Norich, a major supporter of the project. Temma Schaechter (of Di Shekhter-tekhter) and Binyumen Schaechter performed musical selections.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

20 | Jun
07:30PM
20 | Jun
07:30PM

concert

From Pompeii to Fingal’s Cave - A Mendelssohn Perspective

The Chelsea Music Festival returns to LBI with an evening of music devoted to the Mendelssohn siblings. Felix and Fanny Mendelssohn wrote hundreds of letters to one another and took special delight in sharing details and discoveries of their travels. This evening’s program features the music and letters of these Mendelssohn kindred spirits, and will bring to life the sights and sounds of early 19th-century Britain and Italy through their eyes. Also on the program are folk song arrangements by Benjamin Britten and Mendelssohn’s powerful string quintet No. 2, Op.87 which reveals his genius beyond his more famous string octet. Wine reception with Festival artists to follow.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Chelsea Music Festival

concert

19 | Jun
06:30PM
19 | Jun
06:30PM

film

Kisses to the Children: A Documentary by Vassilis Loules

Five Greek-Jewish children, who were saved by Christian families during the German Occupation, tell their stories. Their personal accounts of survival add an indelible humanity to history and cover a wide range of issues, from social isolation to survivor guilt. The film also depicts the life of the Greek Jewish communities before the War, complemented with rare images of Occupied Greece from archival material, as well as amateur films by German soldiers and illegal footage shot by Greek patriots. 115 mins. Greek w/English subtitles.

The film was produced with the financial support of the American Sephardi Federation and the American Friends of the Jewish Museum of Greece. Presented under the auspices of the Consulate General of Greece and the American Friends of the Jewish Museum of Greece

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation, the Consulate General of Greece and the American Friends of the Jewish Museum of Greece

film

16 | Jun
02:00PM
16 | Jun
02:00PM

book talk

Sovietization in the Pale: The Bolshevik Experiment in Minsk, the Jerusalem of Belorussia

When describing Minsk in 1928, the Yiddish writer and journalist I. J. Singer wrote, "Everyone agrees that Minsk is a happy, lively city. Still evident is the charm typical of Lithuanian Jewish cities near the border, where ideas and smuggling, religiosity and heresy, modesty and dissoluteness, antiquity and modernity are compressed together in the grubby alleys and houses, and fill the city with life, dynamism, and hope. Here, one is still a little provincial, a tad old-fashioned, and therefore more believing."

As this book on the Bolshevik experiment in Minsk shows, the acculturation process into the Soviet system as experienced by the Jewish population was made of intricacies and inconsistensies, marked by enthusiasm for communist ideology, ambition to succeed, quest for employment, anxiety to fit in, necessity to survive, fear of marginalization and punishment, or/and pressures from family, friends, and fellow city-residents. While adapting to the new system, most ordinary Jewish men and women, whether former Bundists, Yiddish activists, political Zionists, workers, students, or religious-practicing Jews, remained committed to some expressions of Jewishness, and attempted to walk the fine line between accepted Soviet behavior and social norms and expressions of Jewish particularity. In Minsk, as in so many other places in the former Pale of Settlement, the path to sovietization did not involve a complete denial or departure from Jewishness, but allowed for the possibility of retaining aspects of Jewish identity that might have otherwise been cast off in the acculturation process. Here, acting as a Jew and a Bolshevik could sometimes coexist, intersect, and harmoniously meet, as the making of Soviet Jews resulted not only from the violent changes introduced by the Communist project, but also by the largely overlooked, lines of continuity with pre-revolutionary forms of Jewish life.

Elissa Bemporad holds the Jerry and William Ungar Chair in Eastern European Jewish history, and is assistant professor of History at Queens College, City University of New York. Dr. Bemporad was trained in Russian studies at the University of Bologna, and in Jewish studies at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. She received her PhD in history from Stanford University. Becoming Soviet Jews: The Bolshevik Experiment in Minsk has been awarded the Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary history as an outstanding work in twentieth-century history.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

13 | Jun
06:30PM
13 | Jun
06:30PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

Rise Up! Revolution or Class Mobility: Anglo-Yiddish Poems and Songs as Agents of Political Debate 1884-1914

Presented by Vivi Lachs, University of London

RSVP required via email or 212.294.6143

From the 1880s, the wave of immigration that brought East European Jews to New York also brought substantial numbers to the East End of London. In London's over-crowded housing and job market, immigrants struggled to make a living within the 'sweated trades.' Attempts to organize and unionize Jewish workers were led largely by socialists who rallied workers to strike, agitate and demonstrate for the improvement of their working conditions. Socialist activist and poet Morris Winchevsky came to London in 1879. As editor of much of the London Yiddish socialist press, he published poetry as an instrument of political debate. Popular among the Jewish immigrant workers, his poems were declaimed in meetings and sung at demonstrations.

In her talk Vivi Lachs will explore the strategies Winchevsky used in his poetry to impart ideas of socialism to immigrants in London. She will also discuss the factors which most influenced the Jewish working class in London and which ultimately undermined Winchevsky's success. Lachs' presentation will touch on issues such as unionization, the role of Jewish philanthropic organizations and the phenomenon of upward mobility in East End London. The talk will also include examples of popular poems and songs which throw light on the interface between the politics and culture of the time and which have been previously unexplored in the historiography of the period.

Vivi Lachs is a PhD student in history and music at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her thesis explores Anglo-Yiddish poetry and song that tell of the British immigrant experience 1880-1914, and analyzes the role of these creative texts as agents in political and social debate. Prior to starting her Ph.D. Program Vivi Lachs worked in secondary school education in London. Vivi Lachs is also a Yiddish folk singer with a London based Klezmer band specializing in Yiddish songs of London. Some of these are produced on the CD titled "Whitechapel, mayn vaytshepl."

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

12 | Jun
06:00PM
12 | Jun
06:00PM

artist's tour

Passages through the Fire: Jews and the Civil War

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

10 | Jun
11:00AM
10 | Jun
11:00AM

book event

Second-Hand Book Sale

The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research will be selling duplicate copies of books from their library collections.  Most books are about Jewish topics, including: memoirs, biographies, World War II, the Science of Judaism, collected works, academic studies, literature, art and photography. Books are also in languages ranging from English to Yiddish, German, Hebrew, Yiddish, Russian and Polish.

In addition, the participating organizations will be selling discounted titles from their regular publications.

All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund.

Paperbacks: $1
Hardcover: $3
Music and Movies: $1 to $3
Or priced as marked

Cash Only!

For questions or to be included on the mailing list for future book sales, please contact us.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book event

09 | Jun
11:00AM
09 | Jun
11:00AM

book event

Second-Hand Book Sale

The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research will be selling duplicate copies of books from their library collections.  Most books are about Jewish topics, including: memoirs, biographies, World War II, the Science of Judaism, collected works, academic studies, literature, art and photography. Books are also in languages ranging from English to Yiddish, German, Hebrew, Yiddish, Russian and Polish.

In addition, the participating organizations will be selling discounted titles from their regular publications.

All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund.

Paperbacks: $1
Hardcover: $3
Music and Movies: $1 to $3
Or priced as marked

Cash Only!

For questions or to be included on the mailing list for future book sales, please contact us.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book event

06 | Jun
03:00PM
06 | Jun
03:00PM

first annual new land film festival

Lost Temple

In honor of Israel's 65th Anniversary and as a part of the Russian American Foundation's Annual Russian Heritage Month®, the YIVO Institute and the Russian American Foundation are proud to present the First Annual New Land Film Festival. The most engaging short films and documentaries by Russian-speaking immigrants living all over the world were hand-picked to form a selection that reflects different and exciting aspects of Jewish life. Screenings will be held at YIVO at 3, 5, 7, and 9pm.

Lost Temple (2010, Sergey Grankin)
German journalist Dirk-Martin Heinzelmann arrives in Israel to make a reportage about the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, the place where according to Jewish tradition the last Jewish Temple stood before it was destroyed over 2000 years ago. After meeting several specialists who are convinced that the Temple stood between the two mosques currently in place, Heinzelmann decides to investigate. He begins to explore the underground Jerusalem with the help of old English maps and a team of speleologists. Despite the threat of Islamists, the warnings of rabbis, and the extremely difficult conditions of the expedition, Heinzelmann reaches his goal and discovers a tunnel leading to the ancient Temple sewage system. The system is still filled with water, but it won't stop the fascinated researcher.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the Russian American Foundation

first annual new land film festival

06 | Jun
05:00PM
06 | Jun
05:00PM

first annual new land film festival

The Territory

In honor of Israel's 65th Anniversary and as a part of the Russian American Foundation's Annual Russian Heritage Month®, the YIVO Institute and the Russian American Foundation are proud to present the First Annual New Land Film Festival. The most engaging short films and documentaries by Russian-speaking immigrants living all over the world were hand-picked to form a selection that reflects different and exciting aspects of Jewish life. Screenings will be held at YIVO at 3, 5, 7, and 9pm.

The Territory (2012, Dmitriy Khavin)
The Territory is an intimate look into the lives of Israelis from the former Soviet Union who made their new home in the West Bank settlements. While some residents move to the settlements looking for cheaper housing, others are motivated by Zionist ideology; and all are influenced by theirpast experience of being an oppressed minority in the Soviet Union. The film is an exploration of questions of identity, religion and conflict.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the Russian American Foundation

first annual new land film festival

06 | Jun
07:00PM
06 | Jun
07:00PM

first annual new land film festival

My Father Evgeni

In honor of Israel's 65th Anniversary and as a part of the Russian American Foundation's Annual Russian Heritage Month®, the YIVO Institute and the Russian American Foundation are proud to present the First Annual New Land Film Festival. The most engaging short films and documentaries by Russian-speaking immigrants living all over the world were hand-picked to form a selection that reflects different and exciting aspects of Jewish life. Screenings will be held at YIVO at 3, 5, 7, and 9pm.

My Father Evgeni (2010, Andrei Zagdansky)
From 1961 through 1979 Evgeni Zagdansky was editor-in-chief of the Kiev Popular Science Film Studio. From 1981 through 1992 his son, a film director, Andrei worked in the same film studio. In 1992 Andrei along with his family left Kiev and settled in New York.Evgeni stayed behind. Evgeni's letters to Andrei and Andrei's narrative of father's life intertwine in the multi-layered fabric of the film creating a portrait of the man, his epoch and a self-portrait of the auteur.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the Russian American Foundation

first annual new land film festival

06 | Jun
09:00PM
06 | Jun
09:00PM

first annual new land film festival

No One but Us

In honor of Israel's 65th Anniversary and as a part of the Russian American Foundation's Annual Russian Heritage Month®, the YIVO Institute and the Russian American Foundation are proud to present the First Annual New Land Film Festival. The most engaging short films and documentaries by Russian-speaking immigrants living all over the world were hand-picked to form a selection that reflects different and exciting aspects of Jewish life. Screenings will be held at YIVO at 3, 5, 7, and 9pm.

No One but Us (2011, Roman Shumunov)
This is a story about the solitude of the new immigrants and their endless struggle to survive, to be accepted and to be a part of Israeli society. Andrei, the protagonist, a new immigrant from the former Soviet Union, discovers that in order to save his sick father’s life he must buy an expensive drug that is well beyond his means. At the same time, Andrei and his two best friends, Zura and Marat, also living alone in the country, try to achieve their dream to be heard and understood via their poesy music. Andrei decides to get the money for the medicine his father so desperately needs at all costs.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the Russian American Foundation

first annual new land film festival

05 | Jun
07:00PM
05 | Jun
07:00PM

concert

Shmuel Barzilai and Daniel Gildar in Concert

Barzilai and Gildar set out on an evening exploring song and prayer through music from around the world. Their wide-ranging program includes music by: Koussevitzky, Loew, Kvartin, Malavsky, Elstein, Zim, Pucinni, Shemer, and others.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Tenor Shmuel Barzilai was born into a family of cantors in 1957 in Jerusalem, Israel. The essentials of cantorial singing were brought to him by the Viennese Cantor Zalman Polak before he graduated from the Institute of Music and Cantorial Singing in Tel Aviv. Following his classical music education, Barzilai majored in philosophy and Judaic studies at the University of Vienna. He became the Chief Cantor of the Vienna Jewish Community in 1992. Barzilai performs regularyl throughout Europe, Israel, and the US and has participated in various music festivals, both as a soloist and with the Jerusalem Great Synagogue Choir, which tours Europe every year. He also has recorded many CDs and was chosen to sing the prayer El Maleh Rachamim at the memorial service in Mauthausen in 2000.

Pianist Daniel Gildar, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, studied piano, theory, and voice at the Cleveland Institute of Music. He then took part in seven historic missions to Eastern and Central Europe under the auspices of the Chaim and Gila Weiner Society for the Advancement of Cantorial Art. Gildar has an international reputation as an accompanist of Jewish music in voice and piano and accompanied every concert produced by Cantors of the World as well as the annual conventions of the Cantorial Council of America. Daniel Gildar not only performes all around the world as a cantor and pianist but also engages in vocal coaching and teaching the art of chazanut, a form of Jewish Liturgical Music.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

concert

04 | Jun
06:30PM
04 | Jun
06:30PM

panel discussion

Hungary and the Holocaust: Assessing the Past, Preparing for the Future

Three leading experts examine the post-Holocaust and post-communist Jewish community in Hungary through both a historical and contemporary lens. The program explores three intersecting topics: the Holocaust in Hungary; anti-Semitism and Holocaust minimization in Hungary since 1989; and contemporary Hungarian Jewish ritual, practice, and identity. Together, these topics form a cohesive yet complex image of the state of history, memory, and practice in Hungary since the fall of communism.

The panelists are:
Randolph Braham, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Political Science, CUNY, who will address the complex question of why the Holocaust in Hungary occurred and unfolded;
Paul A. Shapiro, Director of the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, who will explore the current state of Holocaust memory in Hungary; and
Anna Manchin, Prins Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Center for Jewish History, who will present the multifaceted portrait of Jewish life and innovation in Hungary today.

The panel was co-sponsored by The Center for Jewish History in New York and the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies (CAHS) of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

panel discussion

03 | Jun
06:00PM
03 | Jun
06:00PM

lecture and panel discussion

Jewish Soldiers in the Civil War/Jews and the Battle of Gettysburg

Historian and Civil War scholar John Sellers details a major new research project to identify the thousands of Jews who fought in America’s deadliest conflict. Followed by a panel discussion with collector Robert D. Marcus, historian Lance Sussman and Gettysburg tour guide extraordinaire Gary Kross, who explore the little-known but significant participation of Jews in this most famous – and fateful - of Civil War battles.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Yeshiva University Museum

lecture and panel discussion

02 | Jun
03:00PM
02 | Jun
03:00PM

concert

Music in Our Time: 2013

The annual concert features music with Jewish content. This year's program features music by Judith Lang Zaimont, Joel Mandelbaum, Gerald Cohen, Gabriel Kahane, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Yehudi Wyner.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

27 | May
27 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, May 27 in honor of Memorial Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

23 | May
03:00PM
23 | May
03:00PM

racolin memorial lecture

Jews, You Should Fight to the Bitter End: Bogoraz's Literary Response to the Gomel' Pogrom

Nadja Berkovich, University of Illinois. In 1904, Russian Jewish writer-ethnographer Vladimir Bogoraz went to Gomel', a city in present-day Belarus, to document the trial regarding the 1903 Gomel' pogrom. Bogoraz wrote a book based on the testimonies given by the accused, as well as confessions and interviews. As a result, the Gomel trial became famous due to the publicity surrounding Jewish self-defense efforts, as well as the acquittal of the majority of the Jewish victims and defenders.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

racolin memorial lecture

22 | May
07:00PM
22 | May
07:00PM

film and discussion

Leah

At the age of four, after walking through the desert from Ethiopia to Sudan, Leah arrived in Israel. This moving new film employs Leah's story to illuminate the broad experiences of Ethiopian Jews who were striving to adjust to life in modern Israel. The film will be followed by a panel discussion.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, Beta Israel of North America

film and discussion

19 | May
12:30PM
19 | May
12:30PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

New York City Family History Research: An Afternoon of Learning in Memory of Steven Siegel

This event will run from 12:30pm - 5:30pm.

Rebecca Kobrin, Russell and Bettina Knapp Assistant Professor of American Jewish History, Columbia University. Destructive Creators: Jewish Immigrant “Bankers”, the Business of Mass Migration, and New Sources for Family History

Anthony W. Robins, Architectural Historian. The Genealogy of Brick and Stone: Tracing the History of New York Buildings

Kirsten Fermaglich, Associate Professor of History and Jewish Studies, Michigan State University. From Sonnenshein to Sunshine: Jews and Name Changing in NYC in the 20th Century

Robert J.Friedman, Avrum Geller, Joan Koster-Morales, Professional Genealogists. Under the Radar: a panel discussion on valuable lesser known records for family history research in NYC libraries and archives

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

19 | May
07:00PM
19 | May
07:00PM

concert

Yiddish in the City: Heather Klein and Miryem-Khaye Seigel in Concert

Featuring Heather Klein and Miryem-Khaye Seigel with Dmitri Zisl Slepovitch, pianist.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

16 | May
16 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, May 16 for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

15 | May
15 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, May 15 and Thursday, May 16 for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

14 | May
14 | May

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Tuesday May 14 for Erev Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

13 | May
06:00PM
13 | May
06:00PM

book presentation

Berlin Book Evening: “Jews in Berlin” and Essays by Kurt Tucholsky

Professor Schoeps will speak on the updated, English edition of the classic Jews in Berlin, which presents a comprehensive spectrum of Jewish life in this cosmopolitan city from the thirteenth century to the present. This whirlwind tour of Berlin’s fascinating history will focus on recent developments where young people from Tel Aviv, London, Paris and New York are choosing to live in Berlin. The resurgence of Jewish life is an important and wonderful reason why this decade-old book has just come out in a new edition.

Kurt Tucholsky was a brilliant journalist whose biting satirical dispatches and early distrust of the Nazis forced him out of Germany into exile. He was banned, his books were burned, but his writings survive, available now for the first time in English.

Professor Schoeps is Professor of Modern History at the University of Potsdam where he also directs the Moses Mendelssohn Center for European Jewish Studies.

Anne Nelson is the author of Red Orchestra: The Story of the Berlin Underground and the Circle of Friends Who Resisted Hitler and teaches at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book presentation

13 | May
07:00PM
13 | May
07:00PM

lecture & multi-media presentation

Tsimbl un Fidl - Uncovering the Lost Jewish String Music of Eastern Europe

The tsimbl (cimbalom or hammered dulcimer) is a harp-like instrument played with small mallets like a xylophone. For hundreds of years the tsimbl was one of the main instruments of klezmer ensembles across Eastern Europe, capable of dazzling melodic passages as well as transfixing accompaniment patterns in support of a fiddler. Join Pete Rushefsky of the Center for Traditional Music and Dance as we investigate the rich history of this important Jewish instrument, featuring live performance and a multimedia showcase.

This program is made possible by the support of the Keller-Shatanoff Foundation, the Atran Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Center for Traditional Music and Dance’s An-sky Institute for Jewish Culture, Brooklyn Arts Council’s Half the Sky Festival: Brooklyn Women in Traditional Performance

lecture & multi-media presentation

08 | May
06:00PM
08 | May
06:00PM

curator and artists’ conversation

It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond

Join curator Zachary Paul Levine and artists R. Justin Stewart and Elliott Malkin for a discussion-based tour on the role and value of art installation in Yeshiva University Museum’s eruv-themed exhibition.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator and artists’ conversation

08 | May
07:30PM
08 | May
07:30PM

lecture and performance

A Living Connection: The Musical Lives and Legacies of Morris Hollender, Sonia Victor, and Marty Levitt

Dr. Hankus Netsky (Founder of the Klezmer Conservatory Band) performs with New York City klezmer musicians in live examples of his talk.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

lecture and performance

06 | May
07:00PM
06 | May
07:00PM

panel discussion

Jewish Women and the Civil War

Historians detail how as volunteers in hospitals and charity groups, proud resisters of military occupation, or even spies, Jewish women played a prominent role in nearly all aspects of the war - some were also important memoirists of the conflict.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Yeshiva University Museum

panel discussion

05 | May
03:00PM
05 | May
03:00PM

concert

Sidney Krum Young Artists Concert Series: Spring Concert 2013

The Spring 2013 concert, "Jewish Composers: A German Connection," presents masterpieces by Jewish composers who were influenced by German musical culture, performed by gifted young artists from the Juilliard School, the Manhattan School of Music and other premier conservatories in the metropolitan New York area. Includes works by Mendelssohn, Mahler, Kurt Weill, Schoenberg, Louis Lewandowski, Anton Rubinstein, Joel Engel, Paul Ben Haim, and Tzvi Avni. Music from the YIVO and LBI collections are performed.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

01 | May
04:00PM
01 | May
04:00PM

prins fellowship lecture

The Quest for Justice in the Postwar Jewish Community: Function and Role of Honor Courts in the Displaced Persons Camps

Dr. Katarzyna Person, a 2012-2013 Prins Foundation Post-Doctoral Scholar, will discuss the purpose and workings of the Jewish displaced persons' honor courts, institutions intended to play a key role in the rebuilding of the Jewish community after the Holocaust. On the basis of the documentation from the YIVO Archive DP Collection, Dr. Person will assess the courts' view of justice and the responsibility towards remembrance as displayed in the courts' practices. Particular focus will be put on the court’ educational role in the community and the didactic aspects of the courts' sentences. Finally, the lecture will demonstrate how those who stood in front of the honor courts attempted to prove that they too deserved to be part of the Jewish community and had a place in its future.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

prins fellowship lecture

01 | May
07:00PM
01 | May
07:00PM

pen world voices festival event

An Evening with Guernica: Bravery and Gender in “Confessional Writing”

Why are confessional narratives penned by female writers so often deemed “brave,” “sticky,” or “opportunistic,” when the same material addressed by male writers is called by its name: art? Join Guernica magazine to confess, grieve, or take jabs at the glaring double-standard in how personal writing is consumed, marketed, and reviewed today. Moderated by Guernica’s Daily Editor, Rachel Riederer, our participants are bound to breathe in deep, let things off their chests and pray for rain. With Ben Anastas, Trisha Low, Anthony Swofford and Agata Tuszynska.

Tuszynksa is one of the most popular biographers in Poland today, also well known as a journalist and poet. Her most controversial book, Vera Gran: The Accused, is the story of a torch singer from the Warsaw Ghetto, accused of collaborating with the Germans. Lost Landscapes: In Search of Isaac Bashevis Singer and the Jews of Poland explores the geography of Singer’s fiction through research and interviews with people who remember Singer’s Poland. Her bestselling memoir, Family History of Fear, not yet published in English, is her own family’s dramatic and complex story about the problem of Jewish identity in Poland.

The Ninth Annual PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature, New York City, April 29-May 5, 2013. Writers from across the globe convene in New York City to explore bravery in art, politics and personal life. Chaired by Salman Rushdie, this year’s festival examines writers’ impact on political transformations in recent global hot spots – Burma, Palestine, South African, Haiti, and Guantanamo Bay –- as well as honor small acts of bravery displayed in daily life. Join us for a variety of events including panel discussions, one-on-one conversations, participatory workshops and performances at venues crisscrossing the city. PEN will feature several events in association with The Public Theater, a center for culture, arts and ideas, and will partner with The Standard, High Line and The Standard, East Village, which will serve as a Festival hub. worldvoicesfestival.org

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, PEN World Voices Festival, Writer’s Foundry at St. Joseph's College, Brooklyn, NY, Guernica, Polish Cultural Institute

pen world voices festival event

30 | Apr
03:00PM
30 | Apr
03:00PM

podbrodz memorial lecture

If We Will It: A History of the Yiddish Encyclopedia

In 1930, a group of Eastern European Jewish scholars, writers, and activists living in Berlin, Germany began planning the first ever comprehensive Yiddish language encyclopedia to celebrate the seventieth birthday of the historian Simon Dubnow. Unlike previous encyclopedias for Yiddish readers, Di algemeyne entsiklopedye was not to be strictly an encyclopedia of Jewish topics, but was to present knowledge of the larger world.Planned as a five year project, Di algemeyne entsiklopedye ultimately lasted three dozen years, was forced to relocate twice (first to Paris and then to New York), and to change its focus repeatedly on account of World War II, the Nazi Holocaust, and the rise of new Jewish centers in the United States and Israel.

Barry Trachtenberg is Associate Professor in the Department of History and Director of the Judaic Studies Program at the University at Albany, SUNY.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

podbrodz memorial lecture

30 | Apr
06:00PM
30 | Apr
06:00PM

discussion and film

Jewish Filmmakers in Interwar Central Europe

As in the U.S., filmmakers from Jewish backgrounds were central in creating popular culture in 1920s-30s Germany, Poland and Hungary. Join us for a lively discussion about “Jewishness” and its meaning in popular culture in Central Europe between the wars and the screening of a rarely seen Hungarian romantic comedy, The Borrowed Castle (1937, dir. Ladislao Vajda), newly subtitled in English for the first time. With authors, critics and scholars J. Hoberman, Ofer Ashkenazi, and Anna Manchin. Noah Isenberg, moderator.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute, Austrian Cultural Forum New York, Balassi (Hungarian) Institute, Goethe-Institute NY, Polish Cultural Institute

discussion and film

29 | Apr
07:00PM
29 | Apr
07:00PM

discussion

Kaddish for Lincoln

In this discussion of Jewish attitudes toward Lincoln--and Lincoln's evolving attitude toward Jews--Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer explores the 16th president's relations with Jews during the Civil War, and assesses whether the Great Emancipator deserved the name many contemporaries gave to him in the 19th century: American Moses.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

discussion

28 | Apr
02:00PM
28 | Apr
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

From DNA to Genetic Genealogy: Everything You Wanted to Know but Were Afraid to Ask

Speaker: Dr. Stephen Morse

JGS welcomes Dr. Stephen Morse, renowned in the field of family history for his web-based “One-Step” search tools, who will introduce us to the basics of genetic genealogy. Steve’s talk introduces genes, chromosomes, and DNA, and explains how DNA is inherited. That knowledge can be used both to find relatives we didn’t know and to learn about distant ancestors and the routes they traveled.

In addition, from 12:30 to 1:30: Bring your lunch and meet with fellow JGS members and experts in an informal setting to share research stories and ask questions.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

25 | Apr
07:30PM
25 | Apr
07:30PM

concert

Music in Motion: Dances through the Ages from Minuets to Tangos

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing:
Frederic Chopin: Waltz, Mazurka, Polonaise
Astor Piazzolla: " Four Seasons of Buenos Aires" for piano trio
J.S.Bach: French Suite No.5 in G Major
Bella Bartok-Zoltan Szekely: Romanian Folk Dances for violin and piano
Paul Schoenfield: Cafe Music

Edward Arron, cello
Jesse Mills, violin
Vassa Shevel, piano
Inessa Zaretsky, piano

This program is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute, Phoenix Chamber Ensemble, Stravinsky Institute Foundation

concert

23 | Apr
07:00PM
23 | Apr
07:00PM

lecture

Babel in Yiddish / Yiddish in Babel

Prof. Efraim Sicher shows how Isaak Babel, the great Soviet Jewish short-story writer, not only knew Yiddish, but was thoroughly immersed in Yiddish langauge and culture. A close friend of Shlomo Mikhoels, Babel worked in the Yiddish cinema and translated Sholom Aleichem into Russian. His own Russian prose reveals a hidden Yiddish subtext, and his Civil War epic Red Cavalry shares with the Yiddish modernists Dovid Bergelson, Peretz Markish, and Yisroel Rabon a disturbing perspective of pogroms and revolution.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

22 | Apr
07:30PM
22 | Apr
07:30PM

concert

The Momenta Quartet

The Momenta Quartet, Bernice Diener Ensemble-in-Residence at Stern College for Women, Yeshiva University will perform a program of new and 20th-century music. Featuring guest pianist Molly Morkoski; music by Stefan Wolpe, Aaron Copland and Darius Milhaud; and new compositions by David Glaser and Timothy Beyer.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

concert

21 | Apr
03:00PM
21 | Apr
03:00PM

symposium, exhibition opening & reception

Floating Worlds and Future Cities: The Genius of Lazar Khidekel, Suprematism, and the Russian Avant-Garde

“Floating Worlds and Future Cities" presents the first comprehensive exhibition in the United States of the work of the great Russian-Jewish artist, architect, designer and theoretician, Lazar Khidekel. This program explores Khidekel’s biography and work, the Jewish contribution to the Russian avant-garde, and the glory of Vitebsk, the Paris of the East, as it was known during this period.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

symposium, exhibition opening & reception

19 | Apr
12:30PM
19 | Apr
12:30PM

max weinreich center: yiddish language seminar

Easy to be a Jew: The Jewish Experience in China

Speaker: Ross Perlin

Please note: This program is in Yiddish.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich center: yiddish language seminar

18 | Apr
03:00PM
18 | Apr
03:00PM

book talk

The Taste of Ashes

Oskar has just killed himself. After waiting a quarter century, he returned to Prague only to find it was no longer his home. With his memorial service, Yale historian and prize-winning author Marci Shore leads us gently into the post-totalitarian world. The Taste of Ashes extends from Berlin to Moscow, moving from Vienna in Europe’s west through Prague, Bratislava, Warsaw and Bucharest to Vilnius and Kiev in the post-communist east. Professor Shore builds her history around people she came to know over the course of the two decades since communism’s fall: her colleagues and friends, Jews and non-Jews, the once-communists and once-dissidents, the accusers and the accused, the interrogators and the interrogated, Zionists and Stalinists and their children and grandchildren. As the author reads pages in the lives of others, she reveals the intertwining of the personal and the political, of love and cruelty, of intimacy and betrayal. The result is a lyrical, touching, and sometimes heartbreaking portrayal of how history moves and what history means.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

17 | Apr
07:00PM
17 | Apr
07:00PM

panel discussion

The Hanover Esther Scroll, 1746 – a Masterpiece of Jewish Scribal Art Rediscovered

For a long time, this gorgeous scroll, written in German and lavishly illustrated, languished unseen in the archives of the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Bibliothek in Hanover. Recently rediscovered by scholars and published in elaborate facsimile by Taschen Books, the megillah yielded some surprising information. Join us for a fascinating discussion of its journey of discovery, its history, illumination and return to prominence. With Emile Schrijver, curator of the Biblioteca Rosenthaliana in Amsterdam, Elisheva Carlebach, Salo Wittmayer Baron Professor of Jewish History, Culture and Society, Columbia University, Vivian Mann, art historian, Jewish Theological Seminary and Sharon Mintz, Curator, Library, Jewish Theological Seminary and Judaica specialist at Sotheby’s.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute, Taschen Books

panel discussion

16 | Apr
02:00PM
16 | Apr
02:00PM

israel film center festival event

Through His Eyes (Miba’ad L’eynayim)

A fascinating documentary history of Israeli cinema through the eyes of a still photographer, Yoni Hamenahem, who for the past 40 years has photographed the sets of many of Israel's classic films. Since beginning his career in 1973 on the set of The House on Chelouche Street, Yoni has photographed 150 television and film productions and become one of the leading still photographers of the Israeli film industry. (Documentary / 2012 / 95 min. Yael Klopmann, dir.)

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and the Israel Film Center

israel film center festival event

16 | Apr
03:00PM
16 | Apr
03:00PM

hort memorial lecture

American Yiddish Literature: A Tubercular Perspective

Sunny Yudkoff, a doctoral candidate in Yiddish Literature at Harvard University, presents the literary case histories of three tubercular Yiddish poets who were affiliated with the Jewish Consumptives’ Relief Society, a sanatorium in Denver, CO. These poets include the canonical figures, Yehoash and H. Leivick, and the forgotten figure, Lune Mattes.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

hort memorial lecture

16 | Apr
06:30PM
16 | Apr
06:30PM

book discussion

Lady at the O.K. Corral

For nearly 50 years, she was the common-law wife of Wyatt Earp, the charismatic hero of the O.K. Corral. Yet Josephine Sara Marcus Earp has nearly been erased from Western lore. Join us as Ann Kirschner, author of the new biography Lady at the O.K. Corral, and historian David Koffman bring Josephine out of the shadows of history to tell the colorful tale of the spirited, ambitious, adventurous Jewish girl with the New York accent, and the most famous lawman of the Old West.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

book discussion

14 | Apr
06:30PM
14 | Apr
06:30PM

discussion

An Evening with Ken Burns: Revisiting the Civil War Documentary Series 20 Years On

Over the course of 5 days in September of 1990, Americans were captivated by Ken Burns’ master history lesson on America’s bloodiest conflict. This program features the reflections of the Emmy Award-winning and Oscar-nominated filmmaker on the 150th anniversary of the War, including Jewish participation in it.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Yeshiva University Museum

discussion

10 | Apr
06:00PM
10 | Apr
06:00PM

artist's tour

Passages through the Fire: Jews and the Civil War

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

10 | Apr
06:30PM
10 | Apr
06:30PM

film screening

Rescue in the Philippines

This documentary tells the little-known story of the Philippines’ rescue of over 1,300 Jews from Nazi Europe. Orchestrated by Filipino and American politicians, Colonel Dwight Eisenhower and the Frieder brothers, Cincinnati-based businessmen, this film premiere will feature a discussion with the director, producers, former refugees and Frieder family descendants.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

film screening

09 | Apr
04:00PM
09 | Apr
04:00PM

drench memorial lecture

Visions of a Jewish Future: Jewish Bakers, Community Organizing and Yiddish Culture in East Los Angeles

Caroline Luce, UCLA. Upon arriving in East Los Angeles in the early 20th century, many Jewish immigrants applied their experience of Eastern European revolutionary movements to the civic institutions they built in their new home. The Jewish Bakers Union in particular served as a basis for Yiddish political and cultural life well into the 1940s. Though racism and anti-Communism have since obscured this community’s unique history, neighborhoods like Boyle Heights represent a distinct pattern of Jewish settlement often left out of the immigrant experience paradigm.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

drench memorial lecture

07 | Apr
01:00PM
07 | Apr
01:00PM

film screening and discussion

Yom HaShoah Program commemorating the 70th Anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

“From the YIVO Archives: Oneg Shabat: The Warsaw Ghetto Underground Archive,” with speakers David Engel and Robert Shapiro.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film screening and discussion

04 | Apr
06:30PM
04 | Apr
06:30PM

lecture

At the Edge of the Jewish World: Central Asia's Bukharan Jews

Thousands of miles east of the of Mediterranean Sea, deep in the heart of Central Asia, Bukharan Jews occupied the geographical edges of the Jewish world for over a millennium. When the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991, the population, which numbered some 50,000, left their homes en masse, resettling in the United States and Israel. As their history in the region drew to a close, Alanna E. Cooper traveled to Uzbekistan to document Jewish life there before it disappeared. A master story-teller, Cooper’s work draws on 18 months of intensive field research carried out in the 1990s, and more than a decade following Bukharan Jews' post-migration stories in Israel and the United States. Join her for an intimate portrayal of their vibrant history and culture, alongside a wide-angle lens on the maintenance of Jewish identity across the far reaches of the globe.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

lecture

04 | Apr
08:00PM
04 | Apr
08:00PM

book launch & conversation

Ari Rath and Wolf Blitzer

LBI and the Austrian Cultural Forum New York are pleased to present an evening dedicated to Ari Rath’s memoir, Ari heißt Löwe (“Ari means lion”, Zsolnay Verlag, Munich, 2012.). CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer will talk to Mr. Rath about his autobiographical book. Author Ari Rath, who was born as the son of Galician Jews, witnessed a number of significant events in the world of politics and contemporary history. He assembled all his memories and published a very personal book about them. In Ari heißt Löwe, Rath talks about the “Anschluss” and his flight from Austria to the kibbutz in Israel, where he encountered great difficulties, about his experiences as a member of the Zionist youth movement in the US, and the founding of the state of Israel. He talks about his newspaper the Jerusalem Post, a liberal voice in Israel, and his meetings with Adenauer, Ben-Gurion, Brandt, Schmidt, as well as Sadat.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Austrian Cultural Forum New York

book launch & conversation

02 | Apr
02 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, April 2 for Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

01 | Apr
01 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, April 1 and Tuesday, April 2 for Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

31 | Mar
31 | Mar

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Sunday March 31 for Erev Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

28 | Mar
03:00PM
28 | Mar
03:00PM

genealogy talk

How we share and preserve memories in a digital era?

Learn best practices for digitally collecting, storing, preserving, publishing, and sharing your research. Be better prepared to contribute, continue, and share the materials you’ve gathered over the years with younger generations.

Mr. Horowitz’s professional background includes computer programming, web design and maintenance, image digitization, and school computer instruction. As an educator, he developed and led an award winning genealogical investigation project for children called “Searching for My Roots”. Since 2006, Mr. Horowitz has served as Genealogy and Translation Manager for My Heritage, an Israel-based company that provides online genealogy tools. In that role, he builds and maintains the “MyHeritage Research” search engine, runs quality assurance tests on the company’s software and website, and oversees software and website translation into other languages.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

genealogy talk

28 | Mar
06:00PM
28 | Mar
06:00PM

artist's tour

It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

28 | Mar
07:00PM
28 | Mar
07:00PM

film and discussion

Boris Sandler presents his series Yiddish Writers Monologues: ‘Josef Kerler, Poet and Dissident’

Boris Sandler, editor of the Forverts, presents his new documentary about the Yiddish poet Josef Kerler (1918-2000). His lyrical, populist poetry was first lauded and then suppressed in his native Soviet Union. Kerler produced his best work in Israel, where he founded and edited the Yiddish literary journal Yerushalaymer Almanakh. In this film Kerler is seen reciting his poetry and recounting his life’s journey. His son, poet and linguist Dov Ber Kerler, is interviewed as well. Boris Sandler and Dov Ber Kerler will speak about the film and its subject. Chava Lapin will introduce them. The film is in Yiddish with English subtitles; the speeches will be in Yiddish.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film and discussion

27 | Mar
27 | Mar

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, March 27 for Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

26 | Mar
26 | Mar

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, March 26 and Wednesday, March 27 for Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Mar
25 | Mar

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Monday March 25 for Erev Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

21 | Mar
03:00PM
21 | Mar
03:00PM

lecture

Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace: American Jewish Women’s Activism, 1890-1940

At the turn of the 20th century, American Jewish women publicly engaged in all the major issues of their day, including suffrage, birth control, and peace. No history of these movements in the United States is complete without analyzing the impact of Jewish women's presence. Prof. Melissa Klapper (Rowan University), a former Max Weinreich Center Fellow, will speak about her newly published book from NYU Press, Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace: American Jewish Women’s Activism, 1890-1940, and about the research she completed for this book here in the YIVO library and archives.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

20 | Mar
07:00PM
20 | Mar
07:00PM

discussion

Louis Marshall and the Founding of Modern American Judaism

Marshall was a brilliant lawyer and a pioneer of civil rights and environmental causes who exerted a profound effect on the American Jewish community. Yet today Marshall’s memory has faded, even as his legacy lives on. Scholar Matt Silver discusses the paradox of Marshall’s extraordinary career in his new biography. The author in conversation with AJHS Executive Director, Jonathan Karp.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

discussion

18 | Mar
06:00PM
18 | Mar
06:00PM

exhibition opening

Beer, Art and Revolution: Jewish Life in Munich, 1806-present

Although Munich is not often thought of as a center of Jewish life, Jews were instrumental in shaping the traditions and character of the Bavarian metropolis, from Löwenbräu beer to the top purveyor of Lederhosen and Dirndl to the city’s champion soccer club. Professor Michael Brenner of the University of Munich discusses the history of a community whose members were as much Bavarians as they were Jews and Germans.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

exhibition opening

17 | Mar
11:00AM
17 | Mar
11:00AM

family passover celebration

A Family Passover Celebration with Yellow Sneaker and "The Matzo Time Crunch"

Join Yellow Sneaker’s cast of puppet characters on a hilarious journey from the kitchen to the Seder table. Families will be delighted as ordinary household items and models of ritual objects from the archives at the Center are used to interpret the story of the exodus-bringing age-old traditions to life in fantastical ways. Following the show, participants will create matzo covers.

Yellow Sneaker and "The Matzo Time Crunch" is part of Family Stories at the Center, a new series of multigenerational programs focusing on genealogy, traditions, and oral history. For more information, please visit familystories.cjh.org.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family passover celebration

13 | Mar
06:00PM
13 | Mar
06:00PM

curator's tour

Passages Through the Fire: Jews and the Civil War

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

13 | Mar
06:00PM
13 | Mar
06:00PM

lecture

Eruvin: The Streets, the Strings, and the Shabbat

6:00pm – Curator's Tour & Viewing of Exhibition
7:00pm – Shiur
Marking the beginning of study of Masechet Eruvin in the Daf Yomi cycle, this program will provide a vibrant learning experience for all audiences, exploring the eruv from the pages of the Talmud through to its meaning and impact in modern Jewish life. Following a curator's tour of the exhibition It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond, Rav Hershel Schachter, Rosh Yeshiva at Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary (RIETS) at YU, will give a shiur, providing unique insights into concepts to be introduced in Masechet Eruvin. This special participatory program is presented by Yeshiva University Museum in cooperation with the Orthodox Union and Yeshiva University’s Center for the Jewish Future.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum in cooperation with the Orthodox Union and Yeshiva University’s Center for the Jewish Future

lecture

13 | Mar
06:00PM
13 | Mar
06:00PM

book discussion

Bruce Ruben: Max Lilienthal and the Making of the American Rabbinate

The development of all three branches of Judaism in America was directly influenced by German rabbinical traditions, especially reform Judaism, and especially by Rabbi Max Lilienthal. The institutional foundations for the American reform movement can all be traced to this 19th century Rabbi who comes to life in Cantor Ruben’s new biography.

Too often remembered as an associate of Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise, German born Rabbi Lilienthal (1814-82) came to the U.S. and explored new initiatives to bring his growing immigrant community into the mainstream of American society. Lilienthal’s fervent Haskalah ideology was shaped by his familiarity with the tensions within early 19th century German Jewish life. Using that Enlightenment ideology, he went to Russia to Reform the system of Jewish education, then to America where American culture influenced his approach to the Rabbinate. For students of German Haskalah as well as American reform Judaism, Max Lilienthal is a seminal figure.

Bruce Ruben is the director of the School of Sacred Music at Hebrew Union College. Previously he served for twenty years as the cantor of Temple Shaaray Tefila and earned his doctorate in Jewish history.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book discussion

12 | Mar
03:00PM
12 | Mar
03:00PM

choseed memorial lecture

Forging a Field: Recovering Uriel Weinreich’s Research on Yiddish Culture in Eastern Europe

Max Weinreich Center Fellowship
Prof. Rakhmiel Peltz, Drexel University. Uriel Weinreich, the most prolific and wide-ranging Yiddish researcher, is ignored by new scholars, largely because they neglect the Yiddish research tradition. A reassessment of his oeuvre in relation to his biography and vision of Yiddish studies will reveal his eloquent genius.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

choseed memorial lecture

12 | Mar
06:00PM
12 | Mar
06:00PM

prins fellowship lecture

Private Films, Public Identities: Jewish Self-Representations in Hungarian and Polish Interwar Home Movies

Interwar home movies made by the substantial Hungarian Jewish bourgeoisie and by Polish American Jews traveling to Poland -- mostly for private consumption-- offer rare insight into the way the Jewish middle class fashioned and presented their identities in public well into the 1930s. Dr. Anna Manchin, Prins Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow, will present her new research on the meaning of these fascinating home movies as she completes her manuscript Jewish Identity, National Culture and Comedy Films in Interwar Hungary.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

prins fellowship lecture

07 | Mar
06:30PM
07 | Mar
06:30PM

book event

FDR and the Jews

Join Richard Breitman, Allan J. Lichtman and Elizabeth Borgwardt for a discussion of Breitman and Lichtman’s soon-to-be-published book FDR and the Jews, a fascinating new investigation of the machinations, compromises, and dilemmas surrounding the Roosevelt administration’s reactions to the Holocaust-- and of the limitations of the presidency.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, and Harvard University Press

book event

06 | Mar
12:00PM
06 | Mar
12:00PM

max weinreich center: yiddish language seminar

An Introduction to Yiddish and East European Jewish Culture: Toby Knobel Fluek

Rakhmiel Peltz (Drexel University)

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich center: yiddish language seminar

28 | Feb
03:00PM
28 | Feb
03:00PM

max weinreich center fellowship lecture

Strained Relations: Israel and Its Emigrants in the 1950s

Ori Yehudai, 2012-13 Weiss Fellow

During the 1950s Israel absorbed masses of Jewish immigrants. Some newcomers, however, returned to their original countries or reemigrated to other destinations. Yehudai considers the various ways in which Israeli society dealt with the troubling phenomenon of Jewish out-migration.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich center fellowship lecture

25 | Feb
06:00PM
25 | Feb
06:00PM

lecture and discussion

Arnold Bernstein and Gerd Bucerius

When the transatlantic shipping pioneer Arnold Bernstein became one of the first targets of the Nazi expropriation of Jews, lawyer and publisher Gerd Bucerius defended him in court. A panel discussion on the relationship between two of Hamburg’s most influential citizens, which endured through the Nazi regime, emigration, war, and reconstruction.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, American Friends of Bucerius / ZEIT-Stiftung Ebelin und Gerd Bucerius / Consulate General of Germany in New York

lecture and discussion

24 | Feb
02:00PM
24 | Feb
02:00PM

film and conversation

The Man Without a World

Film critic and author J. Hoberman will introduce Eleanor Antin's The Man Without A World (U.S., 1991, 98 min.). This fictional artifact recalls the historical formats of early silent films, the melodramatic style of Yiddish theatre, and the drama of 1920s German expressionist cinema. The story is an amalgam of silent film types, within which Antin explores the lost era of silent film history and the doomed world of Jewish life in Eastern Europe prior to the Holocaust. This event is presented in celebration of the related exhibition Roman Vishniac Rediscovered on view at ICP through May 5.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

film and conversation

22 | Feb
10:30AM
22 | Feb
10:30AM

discussion

Tailoring an Operetta to Its Audience: Rumshinsky’s Di gldene kale (1923)

Joseph Rumshinsky’s 1923 musical comedy, Di goldene kale (The Golden Bride) was a work carefully designed to both move and entertain its specialized American audience: Yiddish-speaking immigrants from Eastern Europe and their families. With pathos (the basic ingredient), love, “Jewish-style” music, a ritual kiddush, acts set in a shtetl and in America, a shadchen, a lullaby that slips into Russian, assimilated Jews speaking broken Yiddish, a paean to America, as well as other compelling features, it offered its attendees a meaningful evening based on their past and present experiences.

Dr. Michael Ochs and noted scholar on Jewish music, Professor Mark Slobin, will present the talk in what promises to be an engaging discussion of the issues surrounding the re-construction and arrangement of a Yiddish theater work. The Jewish Music Forum, a project of the American Society for Jewish Music, sponsors the talk.

Presented by: the American Society for Jewish Music

discussion

21 | Feb
07:30PM
21 | Feb
07:30PM

concert

The Best of the Classics

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing Beethoven's spectacular "Archduke Piano Trio" and Schubert's "Winterreise" with baritone Randall Scarlata. About Randall:
"A triumph! This baritone has the vocal wherewithal to do just about anything he wants."
--The Boston Globe

This program is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

20 | Feb
06:30PM
20 | Feb
06:30PM

roundtable discussion

Choosing Yiddish: The Future of Yiddish Studies

Yiddish Hip Hop, the 19th-century “Hasidic Slasher,” immigrant Yiddish writers and more. A discussion on the groundbreaking anthology Choosing Yiddish: New Frontiers of Language and Culture, featuring editors Lara Rabinovitch, Shiri Goren, Hannah S. Pressman, editors, along with Gennady Estraikh (NYU), Eddy Portnoy (Rutgers), Jennifer Young (NYU/YIVO), and many others.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

roundtable discussion

19 | Feb
06:00PM
19 | Feb
06:00PM

lecture & book signing

It Was a Long Time Ago, and It Never Happened Anyway: Russia and the Communist Past

Speaker: David Satter

Russia today is haunted by deeds that have not been examined and words that have been left unsaid. A serious attempt to understand the meaning of the Communist experience has not been undertaken, and millions of victims of Soviet Communism are all but forgotten. In this talk David Satter, a former Moscow correspondent and longtime writer on Russia and the Soviet Union, will explore the moral and spiritual crisis of Russian society. How is it possible for a government to deny the inherent value of its citizens and for the population to agree, and why do so many Russians actually mourn the passing of the Soviet regime that denied them fundamental rights? Through a wide-ranging consideration of attitudes toward the living and the dead, the past and the present, the state and the individual, Satter arrives at a distinctive and important new way of understanding the Russian experience.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture & book signing

18 | Feb
18 | Feb

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, February 18th for President's Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

17 | Feb
02:00PM
17 | Feb
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

Dr. Harry Ostrer

Speaker: Dr. Harry Ostrer, Professor of Pathology and Genetics at Albert Einstein School of Medicine; author of Legacy: A Genetic History of the Jewish People

At a time when many Jews are investigating genetic testing as a tool for family history research, Dr. Ostrer will provide the perspective of a scientist who has studied the genetics of Jewish people for 30 years. In 2007, he launched the “Jewish HapMap Project,” a collaboration of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine and Jewish communities to understand the structure of the genomes in Jewish populations.

Please note: There will be an informal qgathering in the Kovno Room to discuss research problems and methods to solve problems from 12:30 to 1:30.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

13 | Feb
06:00PM
13 | Feb
06:00PM

curator's tour

It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

13 | Feb
07:00PM
13 | Feb
07:00PM

discussion

The Sixties and Jewish Celebrity

Historian David Kaufman’s new book, Jewhooing the Sixties, explores how Bob Dylan, Barbra Streisand, Sandy Koufax and Lenny Bruce forged a new style of Jewish fame that reflected and helped reshape American popular culture. The author in conversation with AJHS Executive Director, Jonathan Karp.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

discussion

12 | Feb
06:00PM
12 | Feb
06:00PM

curator's tour

Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

10 | Feb
10:00AM
10 | Feb
10:00AM

conference

Jews and Words: A Celebration of Jewish Writing, Language, and Expression

Featuring the panels “What We Talk about When We Talk about Jewish Culture” (James Young, moderator, Deborah Dash Moore, Adam Kirsch, Liel Leibovits); “Was Irving Howe Right? The Rise and Fall of Jewish Secularism” (David Blake, moderator, Samuel G. Freedman, Alana Newhouse, Jonathan Sarna); “What Goes into a Jewish Painting” (Jill Nathanson); “Renewing Our Diasporas: Incorporating the European Past into 21st-Century Jewish Cultures” (Jonathan Brent, moderator, Rokhl Kafrissen, Barbara Mann, Antony Polonsky).

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Posen Foundation

conference

07 | Feb
06:30PM
07 | Feb
06:30PM

panel discussion

Emerging Writers / Contemporary Literary Landscapes: Fiction

Join us for the inaugural program in our new series on contemporary American Jewish writers, highlighting the work of both fiction and non-fiction authors in the long tradition of American Jewish literature. Nadia Kalman (The Cosmopolitans), Austin Ratner (In the Land of the Living and The Jump Artist), Francesca Segal (The Innocents) and Adam Wilson (Flatscreen) will offer their thoughts on the writing process, contemporary literary landscapes, and how their published works intersect with Jewish themes. Introduced by Josh Lambert, contributing editor at Tablet Magazine, Academic Director of the National Yiddish Book Center and Visiting Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Moderated by Ruth Andrew Ellenson, journalist and winner of the National Jewish Book Award for The Modern Jewish Girl’s Guide to Guilt.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Jewish Book Council

panel discussion

04 | Feb
07:00PM
04 | Feb
07:00PM

panel discussion

In the Mix: Building Community and the Eruv

The widespread introduction of eruvs in America encouraged a broader and more inclusive participation in Jewish liturgical and social life on the Sabbath. Join Professor Sylvia Barack Fishman, author Blu Greenberg, and Rabbi Yaakov Kermaier for a panel discussion, moderated by Rabbi Adam Mintz, on the dynamic role of the eruv in transforming personal and communal Jewish life in America in the late 20th century.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, JOFA: Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance

panel discussion

01 | Feb
12:00PM
01 | Feb
12:00PM

yiddish language seminar

Journalist and Political Activist Mark Khinoy

Yan Derbaremdiker (YIVO Archives)

How a young Jewish workingman who arrived in the United States from Russia in the early 20th century became a professional revolutionary, then an émigré political activist and a well-known Yiddish journalist.

Yontl Derbaremdiker (YIVO-arkhiv)
"Der zhurnalist un politisher tuer Mark Khinoy"
Vi azoy a yunger yidisher arbeter fun rusland, onheyb 20stn y"h, iz gevorn an aktiver profesyoneler revolutsyoner, nokh dem an aktiver politisher tuer in emigratsye un barimter yidisher zhurnalist

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

yiddish language seminar

30 | Jan
07:00PM
30 | Jan
07:00PM

panel discussion

Reading Holocaust Literature

To mark the publication of Holocaust Literature: A History & Guide (Brandeis University Press), you are invited to a panel discussion with the authors, David G. Roskies and Naomi Diamant. Leading the discussion will be noted Holocaust historian, Samuel Kassow (Trinity College) and the author-critic Ruth Franklin (The New Republic).

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Jewish Theological Seminary

panel discussion

28 | Jan
03:00PM
28 | Jan
03:00PM

lecture

Emil Draitser, Laughing All the Way to Freedom

Drawing on his book, Taking Penguins to the Movies: Ethnic Humor in Russia, Professor Emil Draitser of Hunter College explores the role of jokelore in helping Soviet Jews survive oppression, fight discrimination, and reaffirm their Jewish identity.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

27 | Jan
01:00PM
27 | Jan
01:00PM

celebration

Superman at 75: Celebrating America's Most Enduring Hero

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a celebration of the Man of Steel’s 75th anniversary!

How has Superman managed to thrive for 75 years and counting, long enough to rank him as America's most enduring hero of the last century? What did Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel have in mind when they brought Superman to life? What answers does Jerry Siegel's newly-discovered memoir offer? And, who knew that Superman was Jewish?

Experts on the superhero including his biographer, writers, and artists and publishers gathered to discuss these and other questions related to one of the most enduring cultural figures of the last century. Participants include:
  • Random House author Larry Tye, who wrote Superman: The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero;
  • Jenette Kahn, former publisher and president of DC Comics;
  • Denny O'Neil, who spearheaded a remake of Superman in the 1970s;
  • Jim Shooter, who sold his first Superman story as he was turning 13;
  • Nicky Nicholson Brown, whose grandfather founded the company that became DC Comics;
  • Sam Norich, publisher of The Jewish Daily Forward and
  • David Weiss, whose father was, in the eyes of Superman co-creator Joe Shuster, a dead ringer for his Man of Steel.
Birthday cake included.

Co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

celebration

24 | Jan
06:30PM
24 | Jan
06:30PM

film

Kinderbloch 66: Return to Buchenwald

On April 11, 1945 Buchenwald was liberated. Nearly 1,000 boys survived. On April 11, 2010, 65 years later, several of the surviving boys from Block 66 returned to Weimar and to Buchenwald. This is their story. Join us for this moving film and discussion with the filmmaker, Steven Moskovic, son of one of the Bloch 66 “boys.”

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Center for Jewish History

film

21 | Jan
21 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, January 21st for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

20 | Jan
02:00PM
20 | Jan
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

Searching for Living Relatives on the Internet

Speaker: Ron Arons, noted genealogist and author of “The Jews of Sing Sing”

This lecture will address the various ways in which researchers can use Google; the resources to be found in “people directories”; the numerous sites which list members of the professions; how to find court documents and other government collections; and the use of “aggregation websites” that gather data from a variety of internet sources. All of the data sources discussed are publicly available; most of the recommended websites can be used free of charge.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

16 | Jan
06:00PM
16 | Jan
06:00PM

curator's tour

Sh’ma/Listen: The Art of David Gelernter

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

16 | Jan
07:00PM
16 | Jan
07:00PM

16th street book club

The Innocents (Francesca Segal)

Note: The Innocents was inspired by Edith Wharton’s 1920 novel The Age of Innocence. It is optional to read The Age of Innocence in preparation for our discussion.

Newly engaged and unthinkingly self-satisfied, twenty-eight-year-old Adam Newman is the prize catch of Temple Fortune, a small, tight-knit Jewish suburb of London. He has been dating Rachel Gilbert since they were both sixteen and now, to the relief and happiness of the entire Gilbert family, they are finally to marry. To Adam, Rachel embodies the highest values of Temple Fortune; she is innocent, conventional, and entirely secure in her community the whereabouts of their nursery school classmates. Marrying Rachel will cement Adam's role in a - a place in which everyone still knows warm, inclusive family he loves.

But as the vast machinery of the wedding gathers momentum, Adam feels the first faint touches of claustrophobia, and when Rachel's younger cousin Ellie Schneider moves home from New York, she unsettles Adam more than he'd care to admit. Ellie offers a liberation that he hadn't known existed: a freedom from the loving interference and - beautiful, vulnerable, and fiercely independent frustrating parochialism of North West London. Adam finds himself questioning everything, suddenly torn between security and exhilaration, tradition and independence. What might he be missing by staying close to home?

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

10 | Jan
07:00PM
10 | Jan
07:00PM

lecture

Judaism and the Invention of Christian Art

Christian art, encompassing the architectural masterpieces of the Gothic era and much of the greatest painting and sculpture from the Renaissance through modern times, was molded in part by the genius of classical Greece, but ultimately owes its greatest debt, according to David Gelernter, to Judaism and the Jewish artistic sense. Join Gelernter for a discussion of the roots and nature of this debt, as well as of the duty of Jewish art and artists to help create worldwide recognition of the foundational role of Judaism in Western civilization. The program complements YUM’s exhibition Sh’ma/Listen: The Art of David Gelernter.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

09 | Jan
06:30PM
09 | Jan
06:30PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

Jewish Rights, National Rites: Exploring the Origins of Jewish Nationalism in Eastern Europe

RSVP Required: fmohrer@yivo.cjh.org or 212.294.6143
Admission: Free

Jewish life in late imperial Russia is remembered most as a time and place of residential restrictions, shrinking opportunities for professional and economic advancement, sporadic anti-Jewish violence, massive emigration, and political radicalism. Yet from the perspective of Jews living in the Russian Empire in the early years of the twentieth century, many political possibilities remained open. Jewish intellectuals, be they liberal or radical, expected the empire’s transformation—imminently or eventually—and sought to prepare the way for Jews to participate politically as equal members of a new society in a reconstituted state. Such political preparation took place noisily and in an atmosphere of intense competition between parties and ideologies, as well as growing rivalry between nationalities.

In his talk Simon Rabinovitch will assess the overriding political concerns and legal demands of Russian Jews from 1897 to 1917. He will focus on some of the individuals instrumental to YIVO’s founding, such as the historian Simon Dubnow and his political and intellectual circle. Using examples from the Revolutionary Russia collections in the YIVO Archives, he will explain how and why Jews demanded autonomous national rights. Because demanding legal recognition from the state was a rite of passage for all emerging national movements in both the Russian and Austrian empires, there was a need for Jews to define what they were as a group and to describe what they wanted. The result was the rise of the many overlapping varieties of Jewish nationalism.

Simon Rabinovitch is an Assistant Professor at Boston University, where he teaches Jewish, European, and Russian history. His publications have examined Jewish politics in revolutionary Russia, Jewish nationalist thought, and Jewish folkloristics and ethnography. His edited anthology, Jews and Diaspora Nationalism: Writings on Jewish Peoplehood in Europe and the United States, was recently published by Brandeis University Press. The current talk is taken from a larger work in progress about Jewish autonomism in late imperial and revolutionary Russia.

Inaugurated in 2008 thanks to a major gift from the family of Ruth Gay, the Ruth Gay Seminar in Jewish Studies takes place several times a year at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Established in honor of Ruth Gay (1922-2006), the noted American Jewish historian and writer, the seminar series is given by scholars who have used the resources of the YIVO Archives and who wish to share their research with the public.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

07 | Jan
07:00PM
07 | Jan
07:00PM

lecture & multi-media presentation

A Vanishing Sound: Jewish Musical Resonance in Traditional Moldavian Dance—ca. 1800-1950

Professor Walter Zev Feldman (NYU/Abu Dhabi) with Christina Crowder (researcher and musician)

For almost 150 years, a unique musical relationship developed between Jews and Gentiles in the territory of historical Bessarabia, comprising much of the Republic of Moldova and the Bucovinian territory of modern Ukraine. While the influence of Moldavian lautar (“Gypsy”) music on Jewish klezmer music is well-known, the corresponding Jewish influence upon Moldavian dance and wedding music is only beginning to be researched. Feldman and Crowder share the results of their expeditions to Moldova, which included interviews with elderly musicians and research with rare musical collections, to unearth evidence of this formerly shared musical heritage. A reception will follow the event.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Center for Traditional Music and Dance

lecture & multi-media presentation

07 | Jan
07:00PM
07 | Jan
07:00PM

yivo-bard winter program on ashkenazi civilization

Dubnov, Freud & Husserl: The Creation of Modern Consciousness in East European Jewish Culture

Keynote Address: Dr. Jonathan Brent, Executive Director, YIVO

The end of the 19thcentury saw the birth of secular Jewish nationalism, the discovery of psychoanalysis, and the founding of the philosophical movement known as phenomenology. The work of Shimen Dubnov, Sigmund Freud, and Edmund Husserl is part of a much larger development in East European Jewish life. Examining their work together leads us to ask why and how these universalist movements, which profoundly affected the shaping of modern European culture, grew out of such a specific time and place in Jewish history.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

yivo-bard winter program on ashkenazi civilization

07 | Jan
07:00PM
07 | Jan
07:00PM

celebration

YIVO Winter Program

Keynote by Jonathan Brent, Executive Director of YIVO Institute of Research

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

celebration

01 | Jan
01 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Tuesday, January 1 for New Year's Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures