25 | Dec
11:00AM
25 | Dec
11:00AM

hanukkah celebration

HANUKKAH CELEBRATION-ALL DAY CELEBRATION

Sunday, December 25 YUM/HANUKKAH CELEBRATION 11am to 5pm ACTIVITIES THROUGHOUT THE DAY ·Exhibition Tours for Adults ·Family Gallery Activities ·Craft Workshops for all ages 1:30 pm & 3:00 pm The amazing DRUM CAFÉ -- YUM’s Participatory Percussion Performance! Everyone gets a drum to play. Tickets: Adults $ 12 (Members $8); Children (ages 5- 17) $8 (Members $ 5). Includes one concert performance and museum admission to a Day of Special Events with exhibition tours and family activities throughout the day. After the performance, join us for the first night of our ANNUAL HANUKKAH LIGHTING in the Steinberg Great Hall, featuring a Hanukkiah by sculptor Oded Halahmy.

hanukkah celebration

19 | Dec
06:30PM
19 | Dec
06:30PM

asf/ nfjc “icon” lecture

LATE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY SYRIAN-JEWISH PIZMONIM

Dr. Kay Shelemay, Professor of Ethnomusicology, Harvard University Syrian Jewish immigrants to America are a little-known minority within a minority.This group creates pizmonim, hymns written in Hebrew set to a borrowed melody,usually taken from Arab popular music. In addition to their significance as cultural hybrids, uniting Jewish and Arab traditions, the pizmon incorporates into its text family names and information about the circumstances under which it was composed. An ethnographic perspective reveals much about the history of an immigrant community and its performance practice.This presentation is part of the American Jewish Icons national lecture series sponsored by the National Foundation for Jewish Culture with major support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations in this program do not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information and to participate in the conversation, go to http://www.jewishculture.org/jewishicons Admission $8/$4 students & seniors

asf/ nfjc “icon” lecture

18 | Dec
03:00PM
18 | Dec
03:00PM

concert

A HANUKKAH CONCERT IN JAZZ!

With Dick Hyman, piano; Annette Sanders, singer; Ellen Gould, singer/actress; Isaiah Sheffer, storyteller Presented by American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

16 | Dec
02:00PM
16 | Dec
02:00PM

seminar

"YIDDISH CULTURE BEYOND THE PALE"

Free, reservations required With Faith Jones, New York Public Library
Visit www.yivo.org for more information

seminar

15 | Dec
06:30PM
15 | Dec
06:30PM

panel discussion

DO IT YOURSELF JUDAISM: EXTREME JEWISH MAKEOVER

$10 reg./$5 for AJHS members, students & seniors
Ever since Sinai, Jews have been creating Jewish life on their own and on their own terms. Whether it be the codification of the Talmud or the creation of Reform Jewry, Jewish communities have always imagined versions of Judaism that suited their contemporary needs, wants and worldviews. Since the publication of The Jewish Catalog in 1973, American Judaism has experienced a dramatic expansion in expressions of religious life. What drives people to reinvent and reinvigorate Jewish tradition? What forms do these experiments take? Do these efforts threaten or strengthen tradition? This exciting discussion will approach these questions by bringing together some of the most influential and engaged practitioners of “Do It Yourself” Judaism in America.
Panelists:
Nathaniel Deutch, Professor of Religion at Swarthmore College and co-editor of The Bad JewsÂ’ Bible
Faye Lederman, Filmmaker and member of the Park Slope Minyan
Rabbi Rona Shapiro, Founding editor of Ritualwell.org
Richard Siegel, Co-editor of the first Jewish Catalogue
Shira Stutman, Former Executive Director of Lights in Action and rabbinical student

panel discussion

13 | Dec
02:00PM
13 | Dec
02:00PM

lecture

JEWISH HISTORIOGRAPHY IN EAST CENTRAL EUROPE: A COMPARATIVE APPROACH

Max Weinreich Lecture Series
Free, reservations required
With Heidemarie Petersen, Tendler Fellow, University of Leipzig

lecture

13 | Dec
07:00PM
13 | Dec
07:00PM

film & lecture

LBI 50th ANNIVESARY EVENT

Robert Frye, internationally known filmmaker and documentarian, will preside at a showing of the 30-minute video, which he produced and directed. This will be the first showing of the film, generously supported by the German Information Center in Washington, D.C. Mr. Frye will be available for questions and commentary. Admission $10/$5 LBI members

film & lecture

12 | Dec
07:00PM
12 | Dec
07:00PM

lecture

PERSPECTIVES ON FRANKISM

YIVO/Dina Abramowicz Memorial Lecture With Pawel Maciejko, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Admission Free, Reservations required.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

12 | Dec
07:30PM
12 | Dec
07:30PM

concert

JEWISH-AMERICAN CLASSICAL COMPOSERS OF THE 20TH CENTURY

"Gershwin's America" Russian Music Concert Series During the 20th Century composers of Jewish descent dominated the classical music scene in the United States. George Gershwin, Aaron Copland, Leonard Bernstein are considered by many the greatest American composers. Phoenix Chamber Ensemble will perform music of these and other composers in its second concert in the series on composers of Jewish descent in classical music tradition. Tickets: $12/$6 for AJHS members, students and seniors.

concert

07 | Dec
11:00AM
07 | Dec
11:00AM

genealogy workshop

INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH GENEALOGY

Learn how to start your family history research in these two hour workshops. 10:30 am–12:30 pm $25/Advance registration suggested.

genealogy workshop

07 | Dec
07:00PM
07 | Dec
07:00PM

lecture

LAW'S EMPIRE AND THE SEA OF THE TALMUD: RONALD DWORKIN ON JEWISH LAW AND INTERPRETATION

Jews & Justice Lecture Series LawÂ’s Empire and the Sea of the Talmud: Ronald Dworkin on Jewish Law and Interpretation. Professor Ronald Dworkin, Oxford University and New York University School of Law, is one of the foremost legal philosophers of our time. He will, for the first time, address the application of his theories on justice and the nature of legal interpretation to Jewish law. Professor Dworkin is the author of numerous books, including Law's Empire, and is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. The Jews & Justice series is made possible through the generous support of The David Berg Foundation. $10/$5 for students/seniors

lecture

06 | Dec
06:30PM
06 | Dec
06:30PM

lecture

IN THE BEGINNING WAS THE WORD: HUMOR, DREAMS, INTERPRETATION AND SYMBOLISM IN PSYCHANALYSIS AND JUDAISM

$10.00. Reservations are required. With Joseph Newirth, Ph.D. and Robert Mendelsohn, Ph.D. Presented by the Derner Institute for Advanced Psychological Studies, Adelphi University and the Center for Jewish History

lecture

06 | Dec
07:00PM
06 | Dec
07:00PM

lecture & book signing

MASTER MIND: THE RISE AND FALL OF FRITZ HABER, THE NOBEL LAUREATE WHO LAUNCHED THE AGE OF CHEMICAL WARFARE

Daniel Charles will give a talk on this brilliant German-Jewish Nobel Prize-winner whose discoveries gained their greatest notoriety in the gas chambers of Auschwitz. $10/$5 for LBI members

lecture & book signing

02 | Dec
10:00AM
02 | Dec
10:00AM

jewish music forum

FROM ROSSI TO ROSSINI: SHIFTING PARADIGMS IN ITALIAN JEWISH MUSICAL CULTURE

"From Rossi to Rossini: Shifting Paradigms in Italian Jewish Musical Culture Francesco Spagnolo Hebrew University Of California -Santa Cruz Respondent: David Ruderman - University of Pennsylvania

jewish music forum

01 | Dec
04:00PM
01 | Dec
04:00PM

symposium

WOMEN AND BOOKS IN RENAISSANCE ITALY

The Gisella Levi Cahnman Open Seminar Speaker: Evelyn Cohen, Jewish Theological Seminary Admission per session: $25/$10 students and faculty. In collaboration with the NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimo and the Italian Cultural Institute in New York, under the auspices of the Consulate General of Italy Humanism and Rabbinic Tradition in Italy and Beyond / Seminars

Presented by: Primo Levi Center

symposium

01 | Dec
06:00PM
01 | Dec
06:00PM

symposium

THE HUMANISM OF AZARIAH DE' ROSSI

Joanna Weinberg, James Mew Lecturer in Rabbinical Hebrew, University of Oxford; and Catherine Lewis Fellow in Rabbinics, Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. Admission per session: $25/$10 students and faculty. In collaboration with the NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimo and the Italian Cultural Institute in New York, under the auspices of the Consulate General of Italy.

Presented by: Primo Levi Center

symposium

01 | Dec
07:00PM
01 | Dec
07:00PM

lecture

Jews, Genes, and Intelligence: Stephen Pinker

This was a lecture prepared especially for the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research by the renowned psychologist and cognitive scientist, Steven Pinker, author of six books including The Blank Slate, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in non-fiction. A recently publicized study claims that Ashkenazi Jews have been biologically selected for high intelligence and tend to suffer genetic diseases as a by-product. Steven Pinker discussed this claim in the context of current debates on nature, nurture, intelligence and race.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

30 | Nov
05:00PM
30 | Nov
05:00PM

lecture

SHABBATAI DONNOLO BETWEEN MYSTICISM AND MEDICINE

Admission per session is $10 for students/faculty and $25 for the general public. Open Seminar Pass: $40 for students/faculty; $100 for the general public (which gives 10% discount at the Center Shop and Date Palm Café). Humanism and the Rabbinic Tradition in Italy With Vadim Putzu, Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati Speakers’ bios and abstracts at http://www.primolevicenter.org/program.htm

Presented by: Primo Levi Center

lecture

29 | Nov
05:00PM
29 | Nov
05:00PM

lecture

YOCHANAN ALEMANNO AND JEWISH SCHOLARSHIP AT THE MEDICI COURT

Admission per session is $10 for students/faculty and $25 for the general public. Open Seminar Pass: $40 for students/faculty; $100 for the general public (which gives 10% discount at the Center Shop and Date Palm Café). Humanism and the Rabbinic Tradition in Italy With Fabrizio Lelli, University of Lecce Speakers’ bios and abstracts at http://www.primolevicenter.org/program.htm

Presented by: Primo Levi Center

lecture

28 | Nov
04:00PM
28 | Nov
04:00PM

lecture

KABBALAH IN THE AGE OF REASON: ELIJAH BENAMOZEGH

Admission per session is $10 for students/faculty and $25 for the general public. Open Seminar Pass: $40 for students/faculty; $100 for the general public (which gives 10% discount at the Center Shop and Date Palm Café). Humanism and the Rabbinic Tradition in Italy With Alessandro Guetta, Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales, Paris Speakers’ bios and abstracts at http://www.primolevicenter.org/program.htm

Presented by: Primo Levi Center

lecture

28 | Nov
06:00PM
28 | Nov
06:00PM

lecture

THE SEPHARDIC JEWISH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY OF SABATO MORAIS

Admission per session is $10 for students/faculty and $25 for the general public. Open Seminar Pass: $40 for students/faculty; $100 for the general public (which gives 10% discount at the Center Shop and Date Palm Café). Humanism and the Rabbinic Tradition in Italy With Arthur Kiron, University of Pennsylvania Speakers’ bios and abstracts at http://www.primolevicenter.org/program.htm

Presented by: Primo Levi Center

lecture

28 | Nov
07:00PM
28 | Nov
07:00PM

lecture

SLOVAK JEWISH HERITAGE: JEWISH COMMUNITIES AND THEIR URBAN CONTEXT

Free admission, reservations required With Maros Borsky, Curator for Slovak Jewish Heritage, Slovak National Museum - Museum of Jewish Culture, Bratislava, Slovakia.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

18 | Nov
10:00AM
18 | Nov
10:00AM

jewish music forum

THE SEPHARDIC VOICE IN OTTOMAN SONG: THE LIFE AND ART OF TANBURI ISAK FRESCO (1745-1814)

Free With Dr. Walter Zev Feldman (Bar-Ilan University) and Respondent: Dr. Karl Signell (University of Baltimore, Maryland).

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

jewish music forum

16 | Nov
07:00PM
16 | Nov
07:00PM

genealogy workshop

INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH GENEALOGY

$25.00. Advance registration suggested Learn how to start your family history research in these two hour workshops

genealogy workshop

16 | Nov
07:00PM
16 | Nov
07:00PM

lecture

NOSTRA AETATE/VATICAN COUNCIL II 40 YEARS LATER: WHAT WAS ACCOMPLISHED? WHERE ARE WE GOING?

$5 suggested donation Presented by Centro Primo Levi/Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding/New York Board of Rabbis

lecture

08 | Nov
07:00PM
08 | Nov
07:00PM

lecture

LBI 49TH ANNUAL MEMORIAL LECTURE-MEMORIAL TO THE MURDERED JEWS OF EUROPE

$10.00/$5.00 LBI members We are honored that architect Peter Eisenman will deliver this important lecture. Mr. Eisenmann is the architect of this memorial, recently inaugurated in the heart of Berlin, and dedicated to the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. He will speak not only of the controversy and debate that preceded the project, but also of the remarkable will by the Germans to establish a very visible permanent memory for future generations.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

lecture

06 | Nov
09:00AM
06 | Nov
09:00AM

conference

Jews and Medicine: In the Footsteps of Maimonides: the Jewish Doctor as Healer, Scientist and Intellectual

This historic and groundbreaking multi-disciplinary national conference, presented by the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, explored the distinctive history of Jews in medicine and their roles and responsibilities today. Some of the nation's most outstanding experts in medicine and related fields examined these issues.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

conference

04 | Nov
10:00AM
04 | Nov
10:00AM

jewish music forum

BETWEEN CHURCH AND SYNAGOGUE: THE ORGAN IN GERMAN JEWISH CULTURE

FREE ADMISSION With Dr. Tina Frühauf (CUNY Graduate Center) and Respondent: Dr. Philip Bohlman (University of Chicago).

jewish music forum

03 | Nov
06:30PM
03 | Nov
06:30PM

lecture

AMERICAN SYNAGOGUE ARCHITECTURE, 18TH AND EARLY 19TH CENTURIES

$8.00/$4.00 students and seniors Dr. Karla Goldman, Historian in Residence, Jewish Women's Archive An examination of early American synagogue architecture suggests that, even in the colonial era, physical structures responded to new definitions of women's religious identity in ways that are unparalleled among European Jews at the time. Changes in American synagogue architecture offer evidence that women played a meaningful role in early American Judaism and helped to shape a distinctive Judaism in the American context. This presentation is part of the American Jewish Icons national lecture series sponsored by the National Foundation for Jewish Culture with major support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations in this programdo not necessarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more information and to participate in the conversation, go to http://www.jewishculture.org/jewishicons

lecture

01 | Nov
10:30AM
01 | Nov
10:30AM

genealogy workshop

INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH GENEALOGY

$25.00. Advance registration suggested. Learn how to start your family history research in these two hour workshops.

genealogy workshop

01 | Nov
07:00PM
01 | Nov
07:00PM

concert

ELYSIUM – “A CRACK IN THE CREATION”

$15.00/$10.00 LBI members A Musical Literary Collage presenting works by composers and writers who were declared "degenerate" by the Nazis and were subsequently forced to emigrate. Musical Director: Dan Franklin Smith. Directed by : Gregorij H. von Leitis.

concert

30 | Oct
11:00AM
30 | Oct
11:00AM

symposium

ELIAS CANETTI CENTENNIAL SYMPOSIUM

ELIAS CANETTI A SPANISH POET OF GERMAN LANGUAGE A Celebration of the Nobel Laureate On His Centennial Anniversary presented at the Center for Jewish History Behind the accessible smoothness of his autobiography, there is a reserve which, twisting and taking on disguise, conceals an unsuspected otherness, an ungraspable and unconceivable identity. (…) Both of them are teaching us, day in and day out, how to unmask the mad delusion of power and of death, and both remind us of a statement in “The Human Province:” “Everyone is the center of the world. Everyone.” Claudio Magris, author of the “Danube,” winner of the 2001 Erasmus Prize October 10, 2005, New York City -- On Sunday, October 30, 2005, the American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, and Centro Primo Levi at the Center for Jewish History will present day-long festivities to mark the centennial year of writer, intellectual, and Nobel Laureate, Elias Canetti. With special events dedicated in several European cities to honor Canetti’s 100th anniversary this past year, the Center for Jewish History represents the only venue in the US to pay homage to one of the great revolutionary thinkers of the 20th century. The Center for Jewish History is located at 15 West 16 Street, New York City. Elias Canetti’s considerable reputation, and one that is especially revered by his peers, is based largely on his articulation – outside of ephemeral ideologies and short-lived battles – of the way in which totalitarian rulers come to power through the mythical culture of historical heroes. Through films, readings, and talks by preeminent scholars at the Center, audiences will be given a rare opportunity to participate in a dialogue exploring the link between Canetti’s Sephardic roots and his Mittlel European identity that formed the basis for his ideas. Of all his contemporaries, Canetti is the one who by the very nature of his persona and his writings, most drastically defies general expectation and eludes specific explanation. The internationally acclaimed Italian author, Claudio Magris, will lead the talks in exploring the man and his work. Speakers from the academic community will examine Canetti’s life-long reticence to be public, his eclectic; quasi-Renaissance interest for the human experience as a whole; his annoyance at ethnic labels; the almost disorienting absence in his writing of any obvious rhetoric and any ready-made morale; the unemotional way in which he analyzes the ability of humans to commit horrors; all of which contributed to alienating Canetti from the wider readership he so richly deserved. Yet, writers and intellectuals with an international perspective, e.g. the late Susan Sontag or Salman Rushdie have been able to treasure these traits and have written beautifully of the importance of Canetti’s thought, placing his work into an immediate relation to American culture. Following is the program schedule: Sunday, October 30, 2005 BRUNCH TIME FILM SCREENING 12 noon - ELIAS CANETTI by Thomas Honickel, Germany, 2005 (60 min., German w/English subtitles. U.S. premiere). TALKS AND DEBATES 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm Gloria Ascher, Tufts University Michael Taussig, Columbia University Dagmar Barnouw, University of Southern California Robert Elbaz, University of Haifa READINGS, LECTURE, AND PUBLIC DIALOGUE 7:30 pm - An evening salon on Elias Canetti with Claudio Magris and other guests. Introduced and moderated by Liliane Weissberg, University of Pennsylvania. For reservations, please call the Center for Jewish History Box Office at 917-606-8200. Film & talks: $20 and $10 students /faculty, and members of LBI and ASF. Evening lecture: $20 and $10 students/faculty, and members of LBI and ASF. The Date Palm Café will remain open all day. All-day Pass: $35 (includes 10% discount at the bookstore and café). This event is presented by the Primo Levi Center, the Leo Baeck Institute, and the American Sephardi Federation and is made possible through the generous contributions of The Cahnman Foundation, the Italian Cultural Institute, and the New York Council for the Humanities, a State affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The following organizations have contributed to the outreach for this symposium: Center for the Humanities at CUNY Graduate Center, Institute for the Humanities at New York University, the Goethe Institute New York, the Deutsches Haus at NYU, and the National Book Foundation. The Canetti Centennial Celebration is being presented as part of the Gisella Levi Cahnman Open Seminar Series at the Center for Jewish History, which brings together international scholars and public audiences. It is made possible through the support of the Cahnman Foundation, the Italian Cultural Institute and the New York Council for the Humanities, a State affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For further information and a complete press packet, including biographical information on Elias Canetti, Cluadio Magris and speakers, visit www.cjh.org. You may also contact Natalia Indrimi, Program Curator for the Center for Jewish History at 212-294-8314, nindrimi@cjh.org. BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON ELIAS CANETTI AND HIS WORK Novelist, essayist, sociologist, and playwright, Elias Canetti, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1981. Canetti was born in Roustschouk, a small port in Bulgaria on the river Danube, into a well-to-do Jewish family of Sephardic descent. His parents Jacques Canetti and Mathilde Canetti run an amateur theater. One of his brothers became a famed producer who launched among others, Georges Brassens, Jacques Brel, Serge Gainsbourg, and Boris Vian. At age six, his family moved to Manchester, England. After the death of his father, his mother took the family to Vienna. From 1916 to 1921 Canetti studied in Zürich, and produced his first literary work. During a visit to Berlin in 1928 he met Bertolt Brecht, Isaak Babel, and George Grosz, and started to plan a series of novels on the subject of human madness. He graduated in 1929 with a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Vienna, where he became exposed to the salon of Karl Kraus and met his lifelong companion Venethiana Taubner-Calderon. In 1938 he fled to Paris and a year later to England, where he lived for the rest of his life. Canetti has defined himself by defining his languages: “A Spanish poet of German language;” “The only literary person in whom the languages of the two great expulsions are found in close proximity." The dialogue between his Sephardic roots and his Mittel-European identity is essential to his self-perception, and at the same time is what makes his experience completely foreign to many, Jews and non-Jews. His place in the history of ideas is twice removed from the current “center:” The entire historical memory he represents is rooted in the exile from Spain and the successful resettlement all across Europe and the Ottoman Empire of a highly sophisticated, integrated, and multifaceted strand of the people of the book. Canetti’s mental map lies on the European-Ottoman axle, which, by the end of World War I, had been supplanted by the Soviet-American axle. Secondly, even in the face of what he defines as “Hitler’s most monstrous undertaking,” Canetti chooses to continue his battle against “the culture of the survivor,” which his people, the Jews of Spain, had always, even as conversos, refused to accept as a possible way of life. To understand Canetti, his fierce rejection of death, and the adoring exploration of life in all its forms, colors, inventive as well as destructive manifestations, his non-normative, ever-open approach to the queries of the mind, we must understand the Sephardic perspective on history and the way in which Inquisition changed the face of Europe. Furthermore, from the Sephardic tradition of sages, healers, thinkers, and practitioners of all trades of life, Canetti draws a form of humility that has long been won over by the “culture of the survivor.” It’s a humility that at the same time regards one’ self as a respected given, valuable part of the creation, but not as a primary object of one’s own inquiry. A humility thanks to which one’s ego does not need to be harnessed, because it is simply understood as one of the many points of view co-existing in the universe. It is precisely in this perspective that his three autobiographical works can be better understood, not as a way to conceal his “true” (and possibly mystifying) self, as most critics lament, but as a way to use facts from one’s relatively (un)important life, to disclose a broader human reality. This background is equally relevant to fully appreciate Canetti’s masterpiece, Auto-da-Fé. Auto-da-fé is a puzzling work. It is a modern epic on the folly brought about by the separation of the book from the world. Unlike Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, however, Auto-da-Fé does not entrust to the book per se any saving power. While composing some of the most heartbreaking paragraphs on book burning, Canetti clearly sees that the book is an instrument, a means of expression and communication, but is not the primary source of life. Nor can be called upon as a justification for isolation or death. For Canetti the ultimate responsibility to communicate and renew life rests with no other but man. THE SPEAKERS Gloria Joyce Ascher was born in the Bronx, New York of parents from Izmir, Turkey. Descended from the Jews expelled from Spain in 1492, she grew up in the Sephardic (Judeo-Spanish) tradition. She attended the Bronx High School of Science, Hunter College (B.A., summa cum laude), the University of Bonn, Germany (Fulbright Grant), and Yale University (M.A., Ph.D., Germanic Languages and Literatures). She is the co-director of the Program in Judaic Studies at Tufts University. Her Ladino (Judeo-Spanish) Language and Culture course is the only one offered by a US college. Gloria Ascher also teaches German and Scandinavian literature. She is a writer and composer. Her poems are included in the trilingual (Judeo-Spanish, German, and Turkish) anthology of Sephardic poetry published in Austria in 2002 as part of the series “Lyrik der Wenigerheiten” (poetry of minority peoples). Ascher’s translation of Matilde Koén-Sarano’s two-volume Ladino grammar text (2002, 2003) is the only Ladino grammar available in English. Dagmar Barnouw is a professor of German and Comparative Literature at the University of Southern California. She has taught at Brown University, University of Texas and as a guest professor at numerous German universities, notably a semester at Rostock University. Her research and teaching has been interdisciplinary, extending into the fields of historiography, anthropology, sociology, political science, the history and theory of documentary photography, and more recently also clinical and cognitive psychology. She is the author of 11 books, including studies of Eduard Moerikes poetry, the cultural politics of Thomas Mann, of Elias Canetti's poetic anthropology and sociology of death (1979 and 1996), on utopian discourse from Thomas More to feminist science fiction (1985); her books published in the US include Weimar Intellectuals and the Threat of Modernity (1988); Visible Spaces: Hannah Arendt and the German-Jewish Experience (1990); Critical Realism: History, Photography, and the Work of Siegfried Kracauer (1994); Germany 1945 Views of War and Violence (1997); Naipaul’s Strangers (2003). Her current book project is The Uses of Remorse: Memory and Politics in Postwar Germany which begins with a critical comparative discussion of fundamentalisms in political Zionism and Islam. Born in Morocco under French colonization, Robert Elbaz is professor and chairman of French studies at the University of Haifa. He received his PhD. in comparative literature from McGill University. A literary critic and a fascinating reader of Maghrebian, Mediterranean, and Sephardic literature of the 20th century, Elbaz wrote on extensively on authors such as Tahar Ben-Jelloun, Albert Memmi, Mouloud Feraoun, Rachid Mimouni, Albert Cohen, Elias Canetti. Robart Elbaz’ interests span from semiotics to 19th century political theory and many of his studies wrestle with the notion of marginality in the narrative of the contemporary global world. The shifting of cultural paradigms and power centers from Europe and the former Ottoman Empire to the United States and former Soviet Union provides the backdrop for some of his work on the theory of autobiography and the changing nature of the self. His new book, Literature and Society in Elias Canetti will be published in January. An internationally acclaimed writer, scholar and public figure, Claudio Magris began his literary career in 1963 when, at the age of 24, he published his first book, Il mito absburgo nella letteratura austriaca moderna (The Hapsburg Myth in Modern Austrian Literature). One of the last commentators of Central European intellectual history. Magris has significantly contributed to contextualize for a broad readership the works of such writers as Arthur Schnitzler, Hugo von Hofmansthal, Karl Kraus, Franz Kafka, Elias Canetti, and Joseph Roth. Their books, collectively and individually, document the dissolution of the Hapsburg Empire and reveal the existential predicament of individuals faced with the cultural crisis of a once monolithic social order. Magris's most critically acclaimed works are Danube, published in Italy in 1986 and in the United States in 1989, and Microcosms, which was published in Italy in 1997 where it won the Strega Prize, Italy's top literary award; it was published in English by Harvill Press. Michael Taussig is a professor of anthropology at Columbia University and is considered one of the most eminent cultural anthropologists and public intellectuals working in the United States today. With an international reputation for scholarly work that crosses disciplinary boundaries, addresses contemporary issues and is innovatively engaged with the process of writing and performance, Professor Taussig speaks to and writes for a broad audience within and outside the academy. An Australian by birth and originally trained in medicine at the University of Sydney, Professor Taussig's internationally renowned major works have been stimulated by continuing fieldwork in South America, principally Colombia, over more than thirty years. His writing has addressed areas of theoretical interest in the social sciences and humanities apart from anthropology, including geography, history, political science, cultural studies, post-colonial studies, international studies and creative writing. Taussig has talked about Elias Canetti in relation to ethnological concepts expressed in Crowds and Power. Liliane Weissberg is professor of Germanic languages and literatures at University of Pennsylvania. She is an extensively published scholar and frequent lecturer both in the U.S. and abroad. After completing her M.A. at the Freie Universität Berlin, she earned her A.M. and Ph.D. in comparative literature from Harvard. She arrived at Penn from Johns Hopkins University in 1989 and was named the Joseph B. Glossberg Term Professor in the Humanities (Almanac October 21, 2003). She has had visiting appointments at universities throughout Germany. Before her current term as graduate chair of the Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Liliane Weissberg served for seven years as chair of the Program in Comparative Literature and Literary Theory. She teaches a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses and is a member of the Center for Folklore and Ethnography, the graduate group in art history, the Jewish Studies Program, and the Women's Studies Program. Her commitment to teaching was recognized in 2003 with a Lindback Award (Almanac April 22, 2003). ###

symposium

20 | Oct
04:00PM
20 | Oct
04:00PM

panel and book launch

“OLD DEMONS, NEW DEBATES: ANTI-SEMITISM IN THE WEST”

Free Admission With David Kertzer, Duppe University Professor of Anthropology, Brown University and other panelists TBA. Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel and book launch

28 | Sep
07:30PM
28 | Sep
07:30PM

concert

“THE MUSIC WORLD OF FELIX MENDELSSOHN”

$12.00/$6.00 students, seniors, and Leo Baeck Institute members Leo Baeck Institute is the sponsor of the first in a series of four concerts featuring music of Jewish composers which will be performed by the critically acclaimed Phoenix Chamber Ensemble. The compositions of Felix Mendelssohn were hailed as "a moment of beauty" in German music. The concert will be preceded by a short presentation of the composerÂ’s German-Jewish cultural milieu. Following the concert, the musicians will be available for a conversation with the audience.

concert

27 | Sep
07:00PM
27 | Sep
07:00PM

lecture

“THE KETUBOT OF MOGADOR: A MOROCCAN JEWISH EVENING”

$20.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, International Sephardic Education Foundation members and Advance Reservations/$25.00 at the door David Bensoussan, President of the Sephardic Community of Quebec, Canada, among others, will present a talk on traditional marriage certificates known as “Ketubot,” named after the Moroccan city of Mogador-Essaouira. A selection of “Ketubot” he assembled for his book, A Jewish Wedding in Mogador will be on exhibit in the Leon Levy Gallery. Moroccan food and music follows the lecture. Presented by the American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and the International Sephardic Education Foundation

lecture

25 | Sep
02:00PM
25 | Sep
02:00PM

memorial service

ANNUAL MEMORIAL YIZHOR SERVICE AND LECTURE IN MEMORY OF THE JEWS OF THE VILNA GHETTO

Free admission With Professor Samuel Kassow, Northam Professor of History, Trinity College, CT. Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

memorial service

23 | Sep
10:00AM
23 | Sep
10:00AM

jewish music forum

"THE PHILADELPHIA RUSSIAN SHER MEDLEY: VIEWING THE IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE THROUGH A MUSICAL TEXT"

Free With Dr. Hankus Netsky (New England Conservatory of Music) and Respondent: Dr. Mark Slobin (Wesleyan University)

jewish music forum

22 | Sep
07:00PM
22 | Sep
07:00PM

screening & reception

GO FOR ZUCKER

$20.00/$15.00 for Leo Baeck Institute members LBI ADVANCE MOVIE PREVIEW. This is your chance to see it first. Comedy sensation “GO FOR ZUCKER!” A cultural phenomenon and box office smash in Germany, opens in U.S. November 2005. It has won every German film prize, including best picture, best actor, best direction and best screenplay. Paul Spiegel, the president of the Central Committee of Jews in Germany, said the film “helps bring Jews and non-Jews back on track to normality.” Produced by X-Filme, the company responsible for “Good Bye, Lenin!” and “Run, Lola, Run”, “Go for Zucker!” is said to be the first German-Jewish film comedy since World War II. It was written and directed by Dani Levy, whose mother escaped Nazi Germany in 1939, leaving behind many relatives who perished. In a recent interview, Levy said: “Germans no longer have any experience or relation to Jews, and that creates a natural discomfort, an irrational fear. I want to change that.” Following the film, there will be a discussion and reception with Hans-Jürgen Heimsoeth, German Consul General in New York and Oliver Marhrdt, American based representative for the film, who has been in the international film business for more than a decade. We are very grateful to Pierre Schoenheimer for his support of this evening.

screening & reception

21 | Sep
07:00PM
21 | Sep
07:00PM

lecture

DIALOGUE ON THEODORE HERZL

$10.00/$5.00 for students and seniors With Professor Steven Beller, author of Herzl. Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

20 | Sep
06:00PM
20 | Sep
06:00PM

lecture and reception

"SPORTS AS A METAPHOR FOR AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY"

$10.00/$5.00 for students and seniors/Free for American Jewish Historical Society members With Professor Jeffrey Gurock, Libby M. Klaperman Professor of Jewish History, Yeshiva University. Presented by American Jewish Historical Society

lecture and reception

19 | Sep
07:00PM
19 | Sep
07:00PM

film

ALFRED STIEGLITZ, THE ELOQUENT EYE*

*Suggested donation of $10/$5 for seniors and students The span of Stieglitz's life, 1864 to 1946, saw some of the most rapid and radical transformations ever to occur in the landscape of American society and culture. Contemporary American art was being revolutionized into a new arena that infiltrated all areas of culture, society, and politics that was to propel New York art into a place of dominant influence throughout the rest of the world. Directed by Perry Miller Adato. Narrated by Tovah Feldshuh. USA, 2001, 90 mins. Post-screening discussion with historian and writer, Henry Feingold, and writer and critic, Judith Mara Gutman.

film

15 | Sep
01:00PM
15 | Sep
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

15 | Sep
07:00PM
15 | Sep
07:00PM

book signing & reception

LOSING THE RAT RACE, WINNING AT LIFE

Free admission A book signing and reception with Marc Angel, Senior Rabbi of the Congregation Shearith Israel and scholar will take place. Rabbi Angel, author of numerous books articles on Sephardi history and culture, will discuss his latest work, Losing the Rat Race, Winning at Life, which examines the obstacles of the rat race, stimulates thought about the direction of our lives take, and how we can draw on our strengths to get beyond the mundane. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House

book signing & reception

14 | Sep
01:00PM
14 | Sep
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

13 | Sep
01:00PM
13 | Sep
01:00PM

film screenings

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

film screenings

12 | Sep
07:00PM
12 | Sep
07:00PM

film

THE EXILES

$10/$5 for seniors and students Interviews with and footage of European émigrés in the context of the founding of The New School for Social Research, including Hannah Arendt, Albert Einstein, Thomas Mann, Sigmund Freud, Bruno Bettelheim, Leo Lowenthal, Leo Strauss and Herbert Marcuse, Walter Gropius, Maholy-Nagy, and Jacques Lipchitz. Producer/Director: Richard Kaplan; Writers: Richard Kaplan and Lou Potter. 1989, 116 mins. Post-screening discussion with Richard Bernstein, Graduate Faculty, New School University.

film

08 | Sep
01:00PM
08 | Sep
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

07 | Sep
01:00PM
07 | Sep
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

07 | Sep
07:00PM
07 | Sep
07:00PM

panel discussion

IS INDIVIDUAL HEALING A PRECONDITION FOR THE MENDING OF THE WORLD?

Admission: $10.00 Participants: Joanne Greenberg, author of I Never Promised You a Rose Garden Prof. Gail Hornstein, Professor of Psychology at Mount Holyoke College Moderator: Peter Stastny, psychiatrist and author Madness is not a particularly Jewish phenomenon. Aside from a few treatises on despair and suicide by Maimonides and Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav, little has been said from Jewish sources about the meaning and treatment of major mental illness. Freud too stayed away from the more challenging forms of disturbance, following his initial rather unhappy foray into these realms. Therefore, it is a preciously rare confluence of Jewish and psychoanalytic sources that is embodied by Frieda Fromm-Reichmann, a psychologist of Orthodox German-Jewish extraction, who undertook possibly the most well-known treatment of a psychotic woman in our days. I Never Promised you a Rose Garden was the popular account written by Fromm-Reichmann’s former patient Joanne Greenberg, who spent years in hospitals for “severe schizophrenia,” and who introduced the possibility of complete recovery to a wide readership. When Gail Hornstein, a psychologist at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst undertook to write a much belated biography of Fromm-Reichmann, her book To Redeem one Person is to Redeem the World, connected the idea of individual healing to the Kabbalistic concept of “Tikkun” - the notion that broken vessels can be mended, on a cosmological and personal level. Fromm-Reichmann may not have seen her intense devotion to individuals fragmented and overwhelmed by psychotic experiences as a reflection of her Orthodox beliefs. And yet, it is tempting to wonder, whether the parallelism alluded to by Hornstein between spiritual and personal Tikkun, has merit in today’s world, where there is no longer a premium on a deep understanding of individuals who leave rationality behind.

panel discussion

06 | Sep
01:00PM
06 | Sep
01:00PM

day-time film screening

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

day-time film screening

01 | Sep
01:00PM
01 | Sep
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

31 | Aug
01:00PM
31 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

30 | Aug
01:00PM
30 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

film screenings

29 | Aug
07:00PM
29 | Aug
07:00PM

film

MAX FLEISCHERÂ’S UNPOLISHED HEROES

$10/$5 for seniors and students Mark Langer, Carleton University will host.

film

25 | Aug
01:00PM
25 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

24 | Aug
01:00PM
24 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

23 | Aug
01:00PM
23 | Aug
01:00PM

day-time film screening

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

day-time film screening

23 | Aug
07:00PM
23 | Aug
07:00PM

lecture

REDISCOVERING THE JEWISH COMMUNITY OF SALONIKA: PERSPECTIVES AND INSIGHTS GLEANED FROM THE YIVO ARCHIVES

Free admission A PRESENTATION BY DEVIN NAAR, HISTORIAN AND LEADING AUTHORITY ON LADINO AND TWENTIETH CENTURY JEWISH HISTORY IN SALONIKA, GREECE Sponsored by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the American Sephardi Federation August 23, 2005 @ 7:00 pm The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House are co-sponsors of, Rediscovering the Jewish Community of Salonika: Perspectives and Insights Gleaned from the YIVO Archives, a lecture which will be presented by Devin Naar, Project Historian of the Salonika Jewish Community Archives Project at YIVO. The lecture will take place on Tuesday, August 23, 2005 at 7:00 pm, in the Kovno Room at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011. Free Admission; reservations required. Mr. Naar is a Doctoral Candidate at Stanford University Graduate Program in Jewish History. He is the recipient of a 2005 Fulbright Fellowship for the study of Greek Jewry. One of the few scholars who have mastered solitreo, the handwritten version of Ladino, Mr. Naar, , has specialized in the Jewish history of Salonika in the 20th century with emphasis on the effects of the Great Fire of 1917, which left about 50,000 Salonika Jews homeless. NaarÂ’s great grandfather was a rabbi in Salonika. The ancestral Jewish community of Salonika, which had a population of close to 60,000 on the eve of World War II, was destroyed during the Nazi occupation and 95% of the Jews of Salonika were killed in Auschwitz in 1943. The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research is the recipient of grants from the Maurice Amado Foundation and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum for cataloging, microfilming, and the digitization of the Salonika Jewish Communal Archive housed at YIVO. The American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, which specializes in the history of Sephardic Jewry, has provided its intellectual support and bibliographic resources for the project. An Academic Advisory Committee, consisting of leading scholars of Sephardic and Greek Jewry, has been formed to provide guidance to project staff.

lecture

22 | Aug
07:00PM
22 | Aug
07:00PM

film

WILLIE THE LION

$10/$5 for seniors and students A musical biography about jazz legend, and chazan of a Harlem Synagogue. Willie "The Lion" Smith, was the son of an African American jazz singer and a chazan of Polish descent. Directed by Marc Fields. 57 mins. Speaker: Marc Fields

film

18 | Aug
01:00PM
18 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

CALL IT SLEEP, WHERE WE CAME FROM & ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free

film screenings

17 | Aug
01:00PM
17 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

17 | Aug
07:30PM
17 | Aug
07:30PM

concert

MARC BERNSTEIN'S "KIBRICK"

$10/$5 for students and seniors. Marc Bernstein and his group will be performing new compositions inspired by Jewish culture/music from Eastern Europe and the Bernstein’s (nee Kibrick) own history as immigrants during the start of the turbulent 20th century. This concert is part of the “Talk and Play” series which was created in the summer of 2004 by Paul Weinstein. The group’s newest recording – Marc Bernstein 4 “Kibrick” – was released in January 2005 in Copenhagen, Denmark and Marc Bernstein has performed the music all over Europe. The concert at the Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street (between 5th and 6th Avenues), New York City will be the first performance of this music in the United States. Some of the finest jazz musicians in New York City will join Marc Bernstein, saxophones including Mike McGuirk, bass; Bill Campbell, drums and Pete Rende, piano. Marc Bernstein was born in Brooklyn and lived in and around New York City until he moved to Denmark in 1995 to lead the jazz department at The Danish Conservatory of Music and Communication. Marc has recorded and performed with jazz greats such as Tom Harrell, Billy Hart, Billy Cobham, Chico Hamilton, Jimmy Cobb, Bob Mintzer and Hal Galper. Visit www.marc-bernstein.com for more information. This concert is In conjunction with the exhibition “Greetings from Home: 350 Years of Jewish Life in America” presented by the American Jewish Historical Society in cooperation with Yeshiva University Museum and the American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and the film ”Willie the Lion”, part of the Editing America film series at the Center on Monday, August 22 at 7:00 pm. Admission to the film is $10.00/$5.00 for The son of a Jewish cantor and an African-American organist, Willie “the Lion” Smith, a cantor himself, is considered, along with Fats Waller, one of the greatest pianists of his era. Conversation and stride piano performance hosted by Paul Weinstein with Marc Fields, and pianist Terry Waldo. “On “Kibrick”, Bernstein deploys the special Slavic footprints he has in his past and combines them with jazz to create an inspired global cocktail. His gorgeous tone and playful open grooves are presented energetically, expressively and poetically… “ Information-Copenhagen “Extremely elegant saxophone playing and an absolutely brilliant recording…” Helsingin Sanomat-Helsinki “Interesting, exciting and serious music performed with precision, energy and humor…” Dagbladid Visir-Reykjavik

concert

16 | Aug
01:00PM
16 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

film screenings

15 | Aug
07:00PM
15 | Aug
07:00PM

film

LENNY BRUCE: PERFORMANCE FILM

$10/$5 for seniors and students The only full-length unedited film from this brilliant comic, which includes the animated masterpiece, Thank You Masked Man. Filmed in August of 1965 at San Francisco's Basin Street West, this captures one of the last performances Bruce did before his death exactly one year later. Directed by: John Magnuson, 1966, 68mins. Post-screening discussion with John Magnuson.

film

14 | Aug
01:00PM
14 | Aug
01:00PM

theater

City Lights Youth Theater

"Lost and Found" At 1pm and 5pm Presented by American Jewish Historical Society

theater

11 | Aug
01:00PM
11 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

10 | Aug
01:00PM
10 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

09 | Aug
01:00PM
09 | Aug
01:00PM

day-time film screening

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

day-time film screening

08 | Aug
07:00PM
08 | Aug
07:00PM

film

BOB DYLAN: A NIGHT OF FILM: DONÂ’T LOOK BACK AND THE LAST WALTZ

DON’T LOOK BACK Hailed as one of the best documentaries about a performing artist ever created, the film is “a portrait of the young Dylan tearing the pop world apart!” (S.F Examiner). Directed by D.A. Pennebaker, 1967, 96mins. THE LAST WALTZ “The most beautiful rock film ever made.” (The New Yorker). Directed by Martin Scorcese, 1978, Color, 117mins.

film

04 | Aug
01:00PM
04 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

03 | Aug
01:00PM
03 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

02 | Aug
01:00PM
02 | Aug
01:00PM

film screenings

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

film screenings

01 | Aug
07:00PM
01 | Aug
07:00PM

film

ALLEN GINSBERG ON FILM

$10/$5 for seniors and students An evening of poetry and film, hosted by Bob Rosenthal, Director of the Allen Ginsberg Trust.

film

28 | Jul
01:00PM
28 | Jul
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

27 | Jul
01:00PM
27 | Jul
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

26 | Jul
01:00PM
26 | Jul
01:00PM

day-time film screening

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

day-time film screening

25 | Jul
07:00PM
25 | Jul
07:00PM

film

THE TEN YEAR LUNCH: THE WIT AND LEGEND OF THE ALGONQUIN ROUND TABLE

$10/$5 for seniors and students This joyful, Academy-award winning documentary film celebrates the legendary wits who lunched daily at the Algonquin Hotel in New York City during the 1920's, including short story and verse writer Dorothy Parker; comic actor and writer Robert Benchley; The New Yorker founder Harold Ross, columnist and social reformer Heywood Broun, critic Alexander Woolcott and playwrights George S. Kaufman, Marc Connelly, Edna Ferber and Robert Sherwood. Produced and Directed by Aviva Slesin. 1987, Color, 56 mins. Post-screening discussion with Aviva Slesin.

film

21 | Jul
01:00PM
21 | Jul
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

20 | Jul
01:00PM
20 | Jul
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

19 | Jul
01:00PM
19 | Jul
01:00PM

film screenings

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

film screenings

18 | Jul
07:00PM
18 | Jul
07:00PM

film

BEN SHAHN: PASSION FOR JUSTICE

$10/$5 for seniors and students This documentary, filmed over a period of three years (coinciding with the 100th anniversary of Shahn's birth), contains rare television and radio interviews featuring the artist before his death in 1969. Also, multiple interviews were recorded with his widow, Bernarda Bryson, an artist in her own right. Executive Producer: Nila Aronow. Producer: Susan Wallner. 2001, Color, 58 mins. Guest Speaker: TBA.

film

13 | Jul
01:00PM
13 | Jul
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

12 | Jul
01:00PM
12 | Jul
01:00PM

day-time film screening

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

day-time film screening

11 | Jul
07:00PM
11 | Jul
07:00PM

film

INTIMATE STRANGER

$10/$5 for seniors and students Combining biography, personal inquiry, twentieth century history and striking home movies, Alan Berliner creates a stunning and totally original memoir of his elusive grandfather, Joseph Cassuto. "The film walks the fine line between sorting the family dirty laundry and polishing the precious jewel." Director: Alan Berliner. 60 mins. A post-screening discussion with Alan Berliner.

film

07 | Jul
01:00PM
07 | Jul
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

06 | Jul
01:00PM
06 | Jul
01:00PM

film screening

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screening

05 | Jul
01:00PM
05 | Jul
01:00PM

film screenings

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

film screenings

30 | Jun
01:00PM
30 | Jun
01:00PM

day-time film screening

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

day-time film screening

29 | Jun
01:00PM
29 | Jun
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

28 | Jun
01:00PM
28 | Jun
01:00PM

day-time film screening

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

day-time film screening

27 | Jun
07:00PM
27 | Jun
07:00PM

film

THEY WERE NOT SILENT:THE JEWISH LABOR MOVEMENT AND THE HOLOCAUST AND THE FORWARD: FROM IMMIGRANTS TO AMERICANS

$10/$5 for seniors and students THEY WERE NOT SILENT:THE JEWISH LABOR MOVEMENT AND THE HOLOCAUST The story of the anti-Nazi and rescue activities of the American Jewish labor movement, including their aid to the Underground fighters of the ghettoes of East Europe, and their assistance to Holocaust survivors in refugee camps across the globe. Rare archival footage, photos, and interviews with labor veterans, Holocaust survivors and scholars. Director: Roland Millman, 1998, color, 30mins. THE FORWARD: FROM IMMIGRANTS TO AMERICANS Between 1880 and 1925, two and a half million Yiddish speaking Jews immigrated to America, leading to a flourishing Yiddish publishing industry. The Forward, founded in 1897 by Abraham Cahan, was the most famous and influential of the Yiddish newspapers. The film follows the paper up to 1987, when it became a weekly. Directors: Linda Matchan and Marlene Booth. 1989, 58 mins. Post-screening discussion with Gail Malmgreen, Rutgers University.

film

23 | Jun
01:00PM
23 | Jun
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

22 | Jun
01:00PM
22 | Jun
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

21 | Jun
01:00PM
21 | Jun
01:00PM

film screenings

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

film screenings

16 | Jun
01:00PM
16 | Jun
01:00PM

day-time film screening

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

day-time film screening

15 | Jun
01:00PM
15 | Jun
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820"; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

12 | Jun
01:30PM
12 | Jun
01:30PM

concert

THE CANTORS CONCERT-HAZZANUT: THE MUSIC OF THE SOUTHERN JEWISH TRADITION

$15/$10 for Leo Baeck Institute members Featuring Cantor Erik L.F. Contzius, Temple Israel, New Rochelle, NY; Cantor Bruce Halev, Congregation Habonim, New York City. Accompanists: David Shuler and Martha Hirsch; Dr. Ralph M. Selig, Artistic Director. With reflections by Fred Kirschner, grandson of composer Emanuel Kirschner. Presented by Leo Baeck Institute

concert

09 | Jun
01:00PM
09 | Jun
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

film screenings

09 | Jun
07:00PM
09 | Jun
07:00PM

lecture

SWIMMING AGAINST STEREOTYPE: AN EVENING WITH HELEN EPSTEIN

$5.00/free for LBI members Helen Epstein presents a sketch of Czech water polo champion Kurt Epstein (1904-1975) and his generation of Jewish sportsmen and women. Ms. Epstein is the author of five books of literary non-fiction and social history of 200 years of Central European Jewish life. Presented by Leo Baeck Institute & The Czech Centre

lecture

08 | Jun
01:00PM
08 | Jun
01:00PM

film screenings

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

film screenings

08 | Jun
07:00PM
08 | Jun
07:00PM

staged play reading

DISOBEDIENCE

$50.00 (includes reception) RSVP by June 1 A staged play reading by Luis Francisco Rebello

staged play reading

07 | Jun
01:00PM
07 | Jun
01:00PM

film screenings

SONGS OF A JEWISH COWBOY; A HOME ON THE RANGE: THE JEWISH CHICKEN RANCHERS OF THE PETALUMA; TEXAS: WEST OF HESTER STREET and FREE VOICE OF LABOR: THE JEWISH LABOR ANARCHISTS

Free Song of a Jewish Cowboy Directed by Bonnie Burt. 2002, English/Yiddish with English subtitle, 18 minutes. Scott Gerber, an unlikely mix of Yiddish and cowboy cultures, learned Yiddish and progressive songs from his mother and grandmother. A descendant of the left wing Petaluma chicken ranchers, Scott carries on the Yiddish and ranching traditions and proudly works in agriculture today. He rides the range and sings cowboy and Yiddish songs at Simcha Sunday and at an Irish bar. A Home on the Range: The Jewish Chicken Ranchers of Petaluma Co-produced and Directed by Bonnie Burt and Judith Montell. 2002, English, 56 minutes. The little-known story of Jews who fled the pogroms and hardships of Eastern Europe and traveled to California to become chicken ranchers. Even in the sweatshops of New York, word spread about the town of Petaluma where the Jews were not the shopkeepers and the professionals, they were the farmers. Texas: West of Hester Street Written, Produced and Directed by Allen Mondell and Cynthia Salzman Mondell. Narrated by Sam Jaffe. 1983, 58 minutes. Millions of Eastern European Jews poured into America in the early 1900s, and crowded into ghettos along the Eastern seaboard. Jewish leaders, concerned that the U.S. government would soon close its doors to these new immigrants, devised a plan to bring thousands of immigrants through the port of Galveston, Texas, and to settle them throughout America's heartland. This plan became known as the “Galveston Movement.” With great warmth and humor, the film interweaves the dramatized events of the Galveston Movement with the story of a young Jewish peddler who journeys from Russia to Texas. Free Voice of Labor: The Jewish Anarchists A film by Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher. Pacific Street Film Collective. Cinematography by Judy Irola. Editing by Kristina Boden Music by Zalmen Mlotek. Research by Erika Gottfried. Sound by Steven Fischler. Consultants: Paul Avrich and Ahrne Thorne. 1980, 60 minutes. A dramatic portrait of immigrant life in the U.S. as seen through the eyes of the sweatshop workers who made up the Jewish anarchist movement. Between 1900 and World War I they built trade unions, organized schools, sponsored lectures and discussions, as well as dances and a wide range of cultural events. The film includes interviews with participants in the movement, archival photos and newsreel footage, excerpts from old motion pictures, and Yiddish songs and poems.

film screenings

06 | Jun
07:00PM
06 | Jun
07:00PM

film

THE NEW OLD COUNTRY AND MAXWELL STREET: A LIVING MEMORY

$10/$5 for seniors and students THE NEW OLD COUNTRY In this film, we explore the question of how nostalgia and memory diverge, by weaving together a variety of footage. Together with interviews with urban historians, the film creates a visual essay which raises discussion about the immigrant experience, the formation of cultural identity, and the acts of storytelling, remembering and writing history. Director: Faye Lederman, 2003, 27mins. AND MAXWELL STREET: A LIVING MEMORY New York Premiere! The Jewish Experience in Chicago is captured in this film of the once famous Chicago market through the children and grandchildren of the Eastern European Jewish immigrants who built it. It is a story of an extraordinary cultural adjustment that took freedom's promise and made history. Produced and Directed by: Shuli Eshel. Executive Producer: Elliot Zashin. USA, 29 mins. Post–screening discussion with filmmakers Shuli Eshel and Faye Lederman,with historian Hasia Diner.

film

02 | Jun
01:00PM
02 | Jun
01:00PM

day-time film screening

THEY CAME FOR GOOD-PART II: "TAKING ROOT, 1820-1880"; A STORM OF STRANGERS; THE ROAD TO NEW YORK FROM EASTERN EUROPE AND BLACKS AND JEWS

Free They Came for Good – Part II “Taking Root, 1820-1880” Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. Beginning in the 19th century, waves of German and Central European Jews spread out across America, founding most of the Jewish communities that exist today. While the most successful of this group rose to prominence as financiers and merchants, in fact the vast majority of the 250,000 Jews who arrived in the U.S. during this time earned their living in small retail businesses. 15,000 Jewish peddlers were the main distribution system in rural areas for goods manufactured in the newly industrialized northern cities. This film chronicles the first major split in the practice of Judaism where conservative and reform movements vied for Jewish souls, while on the battlefields of the Civil War, Jews were profoundly divided along regional lines and took up arms on both sides. A Storm of Strangers Directed by Ben Maddow. 1974, 26 minutes A rich portrait of the teeming Jewish “ghetto” that was New York’s Lower East Side at the turn of the century. Narrated by Herschel Bernardi, this classic uses period photographs to create the fictional life of Manya, a young Jewish woman whose life is turned around by the tragic Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911. The Road to New York from Eastern Europe 1998, 17 minutes This film traces the path taken by over 30 percent of all European Jewry from 1880-1914, as they left the “old country” for America, arrived on Ellis Island and pursued their dreams on New York’s Lower East Side. Blacks and Jews Producers: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman and Bari Scott, Directors: Alan Snitow, Deborah Kaufman. 1997. 85 minutes The film cuts through the sensationalized media coverage and the stereotypes to re-examine key conflicts from the perspectives of activists on both sides.

day-time film screening

01 | Jun
01:00PM
01 | Jun
01:00PM

day-time film screening

THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820; THE TRAPDOOR; THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER; THE GIFT and ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933

Free IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE EXHIBITION: “GREETINGS FROM HOME: 350 YEARS OF AMERICAN JEWISH LIFE” WEDNESDAYS FREE DAYTIME FILMS / 1 TO 4PM THEY CAME FOR GOOD – PART I “PRESENT AT THE CREATION, 1654-1820 Produced and Directed by Amram Nowak. Written by Manya Starr. 2001, 60 minutes. A group of 23 Jews (from Brazil) landed on Manhattan Island (New Amsterdam). These Jews and their descendents kept their Jewish identities hidden so as to better mix in their host society. Colonial paintings of upwardly mobile Jews are indistinguishable from those of their Gentile contemporaries. The film profiles the lives of important figures of the time. THE TRAPDOOR Alden Films, 30 minutes. How Jewish settlers in Newport, Rhode Island came to understand the American principle of religious freedom. Expecting bigotry and intolerance, one of the group built into the new synagogue a secret tunnel and trapdoor for escaping from an eventual pogrom, but soon discovered that it was not necessary. THE PUGNACIOUS SAILING MASTER Alden Films, 30 minutes. The story of Uriah P. Levy who eventually disposed of corporal punishment in the U.S. Navy. The film depicts the anti-Semitism shown to him by crew members, and how he refused to conceal his Jewish origin or be meek in the face of their tauntings. He later became a Commodore in the U.S. Navy. THE GIFT Alden Films, 30 minutes. The generosity and philanthropic activities of Judah Touro, the first Jew to settle in New Orleans, are now legendary. This film dramatizes how Touro’s freeing Tom, a slave, leads him to a deepened understanding of the gift of freedom. (Received the Brotherhood Award of the National Conference of Christians and Jews.) ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE: THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS OF JEWISH LIFE IN CHICAGO, 1833-1933 Produced by the Chicago Jewish Historical Society, 30 minutes. The film tells the story of Jewish life in Chicago, from 1833-1933 and includes rare footage of the 1933 spectacular Jewish pageant ROMANCE OF A PEOPLE.

day-time film screening

27 | May
02:30PM
27 | May
02:30PM

yiddish language seminar

Yiddish in Medieval German Responsa Literature

Free admission With Shlomo Eidelberg, Yeshiva University Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

yiddish language seminar

26 | May
06:00PM
26 | May
06:00PM

concert

Israel Independence Day & Lag B'Omer Concert

(With YU singers) Co-sponsored by Yeshiva University

concert

24 | May
08:00PM
24 | May
08:00PM

reading

From Italy to America and Back

Free admission. Reservations required. A reading and book presentation of Carla Pekelis' memoir, "My Version of the Facts". A panel discussion follows with Dr. Judy Serafini-Sauli, Professor of Italian, Sarah Lawrence College, Fabio Girelli-Carasi Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures, CUNY Brooklyn College, Carla PekelisÂ’ daughters, Simona and Rossella, and a reprsentative of the American Jewish Congress who worked with Alexander Pekelis(TBA). Presented by Centro Primo Levi for Italian Studies in collaboration with New York University/Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimo

reading

23 | May
07:00PM
23 | May
07:00PM

The Life and Art of Henryk Glicenstein (1870-1942) in the Context of Jewish Art and Ideology

Max Weinreich Center Lecture Series Free with Yeshiva University Museum admission. With Tamara Sztyma, Copernicus University, Torun, Poland Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

23 | May
07:00PM
23 | May
07:00PM

book signing & discussion

Buried by the Times

"Buried by The Times"-The Holocaust and America's Most Important Newspaper is an in-depth look at how The New York Times failed in its coverage of the fate of European Jews from 1939-1945. It examines how the decisions that were made at The Times ultimately resulted in the minimizing and misunderstanding of modern history's worst genocide. Laurel Leff, a veteran journalist and professor of journalism, recounts how personal relationships at the newspaper, the assimilationist tendencies of The Times' Jewish owner, and the ethos of mid-century America all led the Times to consistently downplay news of the Holocaust. It recalls how news of Hitler's ‘final solution’ was hidden from readers and - because of the newspaper's influence on other media - from America at large. Buried by The Times is required reading for anyone interested in America's response to the Holocaust and for anyone curious about how journalists determine what is newsworthy. Presented by American Jewish Historical Society

book signing & discussion

18 | May
06:00PM
18 | May
06:00PM

family workshop

An Evening of Stories, Drawing and Cookies: ArtistÂ’s Talk and Slide Presentation with Andras Koerner

Free with Yeshiva University Museum admission

family workshop

17 | May
09:00AM
17 | May
09:00AM

exhibit opening

Greetings from Home: 350 Years of American Jewish Life

"Greetings From Home: 350 Years of American Jewish Life" features more than 200 treasures of American Judaica, many of which have never been exhibited before. Tracing American Jewry's dramatic growth from a small contingent of 23 refugees to the world's most influential Jewish community, the exhibition explores how Jews made themselves at "home" in the United States, where they invented new expressions of Judaism and Jewish culture that impacted Jewish communities around the world. For group tours, please call 212-294-8330x8805.

exhibit opening

17 | May
07:00PM
17 | May
07:00PM

film

MEREDITH MONK: ELLIS ISLAND

$10/$5 for seniors and students In conjunction with the exhibition opening of “Greetings from Home:350 Years of Jewish Life in America” Spare, sober, and exquisitely directed, the film visits the ruins with late-19th century ghosts while it recalls the formality and beauty of the vintage photos. Directed by Meredith Monk; Produced and Co-directed by Bob Rosen. Music by Meredith Monk. 1981, Black & White and Color, 28 mins. Post-Screening discussion with Meredith Monk and John Schaefer, host of WNYC’s New Sounds.

film

15 | May
09:00AM
15 | May
09:00AM

conference

"At Home in Academia"?

In honor of the 350th Anniversary of American Jewish life, the American Jewish Historical Society and the Goldstein-Goren Center for American History present a day-long symposium entitled "At Home in Academia?" The symposium will convene a diverse group of young academics--advanced graduate students and relatively new professors--for a critical and comparative dialogue between American Jewish history and its associated branches of "ethnic" studies. The event is an opportunity for those practicing American Jewish history to learn from their peers. It also provides a forum for young academics from around the nation to engaged in discussions that transcend disciplinary boundaries.

conference

13 | May
10:00AM
13 | May
10:00AM

jewish music forum

Between Wissenschaft adn Etnografia: The Search for a Jewish Musical Science in Eurasia, Past and Present

Free admission. With James Loeffler, Columbia University. Guest chair and respondent: Dr. Ludmila Sholokhova, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Presented by American Jewish Historical Society and Amerian Society for Jewish Music

jewish music forum

12 | May
07:00PM
12 | May
07:00PM

lecture and reading

Meet the Authors: The Schocken Book of Modern Sephardic Literature

Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House

lecture and reading

11 | May
07:00PM
11 | May
07:00PM

film

Hill 24 Doesn't Answer

Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film

10 | May
05:00PM
10 | May
05:00PM

exhibit opening and reception

Books to Bytes: The Timeless Talmud

$6/$4 for seniors and students. Panel Discussion: From the Bomberg Talmud to the Modern ShasPod. 5:00-6:15 pm-Exhibition viewing and Reception 6:30-8:00 pm-Panel Discussion Daniel Bomberg and His Grand Enterprise with Dr. Bruce E. Nielsen, Assistant Dean, Graduate School, Jewish Theological Seminary The Audacity of the Sages: Images Inspired by the Talmud with Janet Shafner, visual artist Have ShasPod Will Travel with Yehuda Shmidman, Co-Founder, ShasPods.com, VP Business Development at Earthbound LLC

exhibit opening and reception

06 | May
02:00PM
06 | May
02:00PM

yiddish language seminar

Emanuel Ringelblum, The Historian and Activist

Free admission With Samuel Kassow, Trinity College. Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

yiddish language seminar

05 | May
07:00PM
05 | May
07:00PM

film screening

Watermarks

With Director Yaron Zilberman. Presented by Leo Baeck Institute

film screening

04 | May
07:00PM
04 | May
07:00PM

lecture

Workmen's Circle-Patt Memorial Lecture-All in the Family: The Yiddish Culture of the East European Family as Recalled by Holocaust Survivors

Free admission. With Rakhmiel Peltz, Drexel University. This lecture will be given in Yiddish. Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

01 | May
09:00AM
01 | May
09:00AM

the center is closed

CENTER CLOSED FOR PASSOVER

the center is closed

29 | Apr
09:00AM
29 | Apr
09:00AM

the center is closed

CENTER CLOSED FOR PASSOVER

the center is closed

25 | Apr
09:00AM
25 | Apr
09:00AM

the center is closed

CENTER CLOSED FOR PASSOVER

the center is closed

24 | Apr
09:00AM
24 | Apr
09:00AM

the center is closed

CENTER CLOSED FOR PASSOVER

the center is closed

20 | Apr
07:00PM
20 | Apr
07:00PM

concert

Jewish Composers for the Musical Stage: Burton Lane

$10/$5 for AJHS members, students and seniors Presented by American Jewish Historical Society and Sholom Aleichem Memorial Foundation

concert

19 | Apr
07:00PM
19 | Apr
07:00PM

drench memorial lecture

"Everyday Was a Battle: Jewish Labor Activists and the Cold War in New York City"

Free admission, reservations required Speaker: Dan Link, New York University

drench memorial lecture

18 | Apr
07:00PM
18 | Apr
07:00PM

documentary

Partisans of Vilna

$8/$6.50 for YIVO members/$4 for students and seniors Dir. Josh Waletzky. Discussion with producer Aviva Kempner, Waletzky, and former partisan leader, Eta Wrobel. 1½-hour documentary based on interviews with former partisans in Hebrew, Yiddish and English. Explores moral dilemmas faced by Jewish youth who organized underground resistance in the Vilna ghetto and then fought as partisans vs. the Nazis. DVD’s of the film will be available. Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

documentary

14 | Apr
07:30PM
14 | Apr
07:30PM

concert

The Thomashefsks: Music & Memories of Life in the Yiddish Theatre

$500.00 Hosted by Michael Tilson Thomas. At Carnegie Hall, internationally acclaimed conductor and composer Michael Tilson Thomas narrates this premier celebration of his grandparents, Yiddish theater legends Boris and Bessie Thomashefsky. Tilson Thomas has been Music Director of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Special appearances by Debra Winger and Judy Kaye

concert

13 | Apr
08:00PM
13 | Apr
08:00PM

musical performance

Zvi

A new electro-acoustic opera by Richard Teitelbaum. A work in progress featuring Adrienne Cooper, Jacob Ben Zion Mendelson, Omar Faruk Tekbilek, David Krakauer, Zafer Tawil, and Richard Teitelbaum, with performance discussion. Co-presented by American Society for Jewish Music

musical performance

12 | Apr
07:00PM
12 | Apr
07:00PM

film

Passport to Life: the Rescue of Budapest Jews

$8/6.50 YIVO members/$4 students & seniors. In collaboration with the Hungarian Consulate. PASSPORT TO LIFE (2003, 56 minutes). Winner of the 2003 Telly & Aurora Awards (Canada). Discussion with filmmaker, Agnes Vertes, a member of the diplomatic corps, and an academic representative. This 56-minute documentary celebrates the heroic work of six non-Jewish diplomats who, while stationed in Budapest from 1944 to 1945, saved countless Jews from Nazi genocide

film

10 | Apr
11:45AM
10 | Apr
11:45AM

breakfast

Continental Breakfast-Contemporary Jewish American Composers

Free breakfast prior to concert. Co-presented by American Society for Jewish Music

breakfast

10 | Apr
02:30PM
10 | Apr
02:30PM

concert

Contemporary Jewish American Composers

$12/$6 for American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music members Presented by American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

08 | Apr
11:00AM
08 | Apr
11:00AM

jewish music forum

"Beyond Yiddishland: New Studies from the Jewish Musical Mediterranean"

Free admission, reservations required Prof. Uri Sharvit, Bar-Ilan University, will be responding The Jewish Music Forum is a series presented by the American Society for Jewish Music in association with the American Jewish Historical Society.

jewish music forum

06 | Apr
02:30PM
06 | Apr
02:30PM

lecture

Yiddish and Contemporary Ethnographic Research

Free admission, reservations required. With Rakhmiel Peltz, Drexel University who explores the usefulness of the Yiddish language in interviews with elderly children of immigrants and with Holocaust survivors. To be delivered in Yiddish.

lecture

06 | Apr
07:00PM
06 | Apr
07:00PM

lecture and book signing

Blood Libel: The Damascus Affair of 1840

$5/free for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House members A Lecture and Book Signing with author Ronald Florence Blood Libel: The Damascus Affair of 1840 In Damascus in February 1840, a Capuchin monk and his servant disappeared without a trace. Within weeks, the entire Jewish community is accused of wrongdoing with its leaders awaiting execution.

lecture and book signing

31 | Mar
06:00PM
31 | Mar
06:00PM

" Ma Nishtana - The Fascination of the American Passover Experience"

With Rabbi David Geffen. The American Heritage Haggadah A profound and meaningful addition to the Passover seder, this unique Haggadah showcases the inherent respect for religious diversity in American society, and is a moving and timely tribute to the values of freedom and liberty. First published in 1992, and compiled and edited by David Geffen, this reprinted edition includes an attractive new cover featuring what has recently come to be the most poignant symbol of freedom - the Statue of Liberty. The back cover displays the proposed seal for the United States submitted by the committee of Franklin, Jefferson and Adams in 1776. With the image of the splitting of the Red Sea, and the words ‘Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God’, it is a fitting tribute to the current world situation and also highlights the tenacious link between Jewish and American values. The Hebrew text of the American Heritage Haggadah is an exact replica of one of the earliest Haggadot published in the States. Combined with anecdotes and images sourced from Chicago to California, this Haggadah provides an inspiring historical framework in which to contemplate the meaning of slavery and freedom.

30 | Mar
07:30PM
30 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Robin Hirsch: Mosaic, Fragment of Jewish Life

$15/$10 for students, seniors and LBI members A one-man show “Kinderszenen: Scenes from a Childhood,” is the first of a seven part performance cycle adapted by scholar and writer Robin Hirsch from his memoir, Last Dance at the Hotel Kempinski (“one of the best books ever written on the long arm of the Holocaust”-Jewish Book News). Presented by Leo Baeck Institute

concert

29 | Mar
07:30PM
29 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Robin Hirsch: Mosaic, Fragment of Jewish Life

$15/$10 for students, seniors and Leo Baeck Institute members. A one-man show “Kinderszenen: Scenes from a Childhood,” is the first of a seven part performance cycle adapted by scholar and writer Robin Hirsch from his memoir, Last Dance at the Hotel Kempinski (“one of the best books ever written on the long arm of the Holocaust”-Jewish Book News). Presented by Leo Baeck Institute

concert

25 | Mar
02:00PM
25 | Mar
02:00PM

symposium

“Kafka and Yiddish, Kafka in Yiddish”

Free admission, reservations required. With Amy Blau, University of Illinois, a YIVO Fellow. To be delivered in Yiddish.

symposium

23 | Mar
06:00PM
23 | Mar
06:00PM

exhibit opening and reception

Manhattan Mincha Map by Jaime Permuth

Free with Yeshiva University Museum admission Yeshiva University Museum exhibition tour and panel 6pm Tour of the current exhibition, Jaime Permuth’s Manhattan Mincha Map. 7pm Latin American Art and Identity. Panelists: Ilan Stavans, Lewis-Sebring Professor of Latin American and Latino Culture, Amherst College; Rabbi Marcello Bronstein, Congregation B'nai Jeshurun. Moderator: Julián Zugazagoitia, Director, El Museo del Barrio.

exhibit opening and reception

17 | Mar
06:30PM
17 | Mar
06:30PM

symposium

Understanding the Divide Between Judaism and Christianity: What Happened Centuries Ago? Why Does it Matter Now?

$10/$5 for students and seniors. Presented by Leo Baeck Institute and Fordham University Center on Religion and Culture, in association with the Tanenbaum Center for Interreligious Understanding Panelists: Dr. Bruce D. Chilton, Institute of Advanced Theology, Bard College; Dr. Jacob Neusner, Institute of Advanced Theology, Bard College; Father Donald Senior, President, Catholic Theological Union. Moderator: Susannah Heschel, Jewish Studies Program, Dartmouth College.

symposium

13 | Mar
05:00PM
13 | Mar
05:00PM

lecture

"Near to the Jewish Heart: Brazilian Identity & Jewish Discourse in Clarice Lispector"

$15/$10 for students, seniors, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and Congregation Beth Simchat Torah members. The Cultural Politics of Dislocation- Clarice Lispector and Ways of Being Jewish in Brasil. A discussion with Nelson Vieira, Professor of Brazilian Literature, Brown University and translator Gregory Rabassa, on the work of the brilliant Brazilian novelist and short story writer, Clarice Lispector (1920-1977).

lecture

11 | Mar
10:00AM
11 | Mar
10:00AM

jewish music forum

"Who Will Reclaim the Golden Sounds? Judaism, Tradition, and Music Scholarship in an American Context"

Free admission. Prof. Judah Cohen, New York University and Prof. Mark Slobin, Wesleyan University will be responding. The Jewish Music Forum is a series presented by the American Society for Jewish Music in association with the American Jewish Historical Society.

jewish music forum

02 | Mar
06:00PM
02 | Mar
06:00PM

exhibit opening and reception

Having Trouble to Pray by Moico Yaker

Free with Yeshiva University Museum admission. 6pm: Tour of the current exhibition, Moico Yaker’s Having Trouble to Pray. 7pm: Panel: Praying with meaning is not always easy to achieve. We will explore the subject from a variety of perspectives. Panelists: Jaime Permuth, photographer, Manhattan Mincha Map exhibition; Erica Schacter Schwartz, writer for The Jewish Week, and author of the essay, “Struggling with Prayer”; and Moico Yaker, painter. Moderator: Rabbi Avi Weiss, Senior Rabbi, Hebrew Institute of Riverdale, Dean of Yeshiva Chovevei Torah, and author of Women at Prayer, and Principles of Spiritual Activism. Presented by Yeshiva University Museum.

exhibit opening and reception

27 | Feb
03:00PM
27 | Feb
03:00PM

concert

Sephardic Songs of Love, Joy and Prayer

With Richard Botton and Gerard Edery & ensemble. Music of the early Ladino/Sephardic period (15th & 16th Century) Adios, Isabella: Sephardic Songs of Love, Joy and Prayer. Presented by American Jewish Historical Society and American Society Jewish Music

concert

22 | Feb
07:00PM
22 | Feb
07:00PM

lecture

Abromowicz Memorial Lecture-The Legend of the Ger Tsedek of Vilna: Polemics and Reassurance

Free admission. Speaker: TBA. YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

21 | Feb
09:00AM
21 | Feb
09:00AM

the center is closed

CENTER CLOSED

the center is closed

13 | Feb
03:00PM
13 | Feb
03:00PM

book party

CANCELLED! Funny, It Doesn't Sound Jewish -- How Yiddish Songs and Synagogue Melodies Influenced Tin Pan Alley, Broadway, and Hollywood"

By Jack Gottlieb. Presented by American Society for Jewish Music

book party

09 | Feb
06:00PM
09 | Feb
06:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: Bonjour Monsieur Shlomi

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. Bonjour Monsieur Shlomi, written and directed by Shemi Zarchin, is a heartwarming comedy and surprising love story focusing on the captivating character of one boy blessed with extraordinary talents, who discovers through the power of love, that the sky is the limit. A Q & A will follow. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

09 | Feb
08:00PM
09 | Feb
08:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: The Last Jews of Baghdad: End of an Exile, Beginning of a Journey

CLOSING NIGHT! WORLD PREMIERE $10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. The Last Jews of Baghdad, Directed by Carole Basri and Adriana Davis, 2004. The Iraqi Jewish community, once a flourishing center for Jewish culture, was devastated over the last 75 years by anti-Semitic persecution and the reign of Saddam Hussein. The Last Jews of Baghdad takes a historical and personal look at the persecution, torture, escape and exodus of over 160,000 Iraqi Jews between 1940 and 2003 utilizing documentary footage and interviews with the Jews who fled their beloved homeland of over 2500 years. A Q & A will follow with directors Carole Basri and Adriana Davis. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

08 | Feb
04:00PM
08 | Feb
04:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: Bar Mitzvah

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. Bar Mitzvah, directed by Daniel Wachsmann. This is the U.S. premiere. Hebrew with English subtitles. Also playing at 6:30 PM. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

08 | Feb
07:00PM
08 | Feb
07:00PM

choseed memorial lecture

“The Silent Revolution: Jewish Emigration from the Russian Empire in the Early Twentieth Century"

Free. Speaker: Gur Alroey, University of Haifa. Presented by YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

choseed memorial lecture

08 | Feb
08:30PM
08 | Feb
08:30PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: La Terza Luna

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. La Terza Luna, directed by Matteo Bellinelli, a Swiss-Italian-French co-production. An architectÂ’s assignment to renovate an old mansion in Venice brings him into contact with an elderly novelist and the young woman who takes care of him. As the architect becomes involved in the writerÂ’s turbulent life, which includes a love story with a Jewish girl during World War II, fact and fiction begin to melt together. A Q & A will follow with director Matteo Bellinelli. Parental advisory recommended. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House.

film festival

07 | Feb
07:00PM
07 | Feb
07:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: Desperate Hours

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. Desperate Hours, directed by Victoria Barrett. This is a powerful documentary film about TurkeyÂ’s efforts to rescue thousands of Jews from the Holocaust, reminiscent of the Ottoman acceptance of Jews expelled from Spain in 1492. Through interviews with historians, diplomats, clergy and survivors, the film reveals how Turkish diplomats put their lives at risk to save Jews from being shipped to concentration camps. The film will be followed by a round-table discussion led by the Consul General of Turkey in New York. A roundtable will follow with Turkish Consul General Omar Onhon, Victoria Barrett, Turkish Jewish Expert Niso Abuaf and survivor Bernard Turiel. Hebrew and Turkish with English subtitles. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

07 | Feb
09:00PM
07 | Feb
09:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: Abjad

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. Abjad, written and directed by Abolfazl Jalili, is a coming of age film about a boy in search of himself amidst the revolution in Iran with a sensitive portrayal of the secret love affair that develops between him and a Jewish girl before the fundamentalists take over. A Q & A will follow with Haiden Sahim. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

06 | Feb
02:00PM
06 | Feb
02:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: Pillar of Salt

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. Pillar of Salt, directed by Chaim Shiran. This 1980, drama based on the story of Albert Memmi, was awarded the international UNESCO prize and the Kinor David. A Q & A will follow with Director Haim Shiran with a tribute to Viki Shiran. Hebrew with English subtitles. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

06 | Feb
02:30PM
06 | Feb
02:30PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-The Rock and the Star and Paths of Memory: The Trajectory of the Jews in Portugal

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. The Rock and the Star, directed by Katia Mesel, a new documentary about the Jews who left Portugal in the 15th century to find refuge and a new life in Recife, Brazil where they enjoyed 24 years of relative religious freedom and prosperity under Dutch rule. This film traces their history to the Port of New Amsterdam where 23 of them arrived in 1654 to establish the first Jewish community in North America. Portuguese with English subtitles and Paths of Memory: The Trajectory of the Jews in Portugal, directed by Elaine Eiger and Luize Valente, Portuguese with English subtitles. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

06 | Feb
05:00PM
06 | Feb
05:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival: Derrida

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. Derrida, directed by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering Kofman, U.S., 2002. A playful, personal and theoretical portrait of one of the most brilliant and influential thinkers of our time, the internationally renowned French philosopher Jacques Derrida. Born in 1930 to a Sephardic Jewish family in what was then French Algeria, Darrida is best known as the “father of deconstruction.” A Q & A will follow with NYU Professor Avital Ronell. English and French with English subtitles. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

06 | Feb
07:30PM
06 | Feb
07:30PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: La Terza Luna

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. La Terza Luna, directed by Matteo Bellinelli, a Swiss-Italian-French co-production. An architectÂ’s assignment to renovate an old mansion in Venice brings him into contact with an elderly novelist and the young woman who takes care of him. As the architect becomes involved in the writerÂ’s turbulent life, which includes a love story with a Jewish girl during World War II, fact and fiction begin to melt together. A Q & A will follow with director Matteo Bellinelli. Parental advisory recommended. Italian with English subtitles. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House.

film festival

05 | Feb
06:30PM
05 | Feb
06:30PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: Abjad

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. Abjad, written and directed by Abolfazl Jalili, is a coming of age film about a boy in search of himself amidst the revolution in Iran with a sensitive portrayal of the secret love affair that develops between him and a Jewish girl before the fundamentalists take over. A Q & A will follow with Haideh Sahim, Executive Director of the International Society for Iranian Studies. Farsi with English subtitles. This is the New York premiere. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

05 | Feb
09:00PM
05 | Feb
09:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins: Bonjour Monsieur Shlomi

$10.00/$8.00 for American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House, Yeshiva University Museum members, seniors and students. Bonjour Monsieur Shlomi, written and directed by Shemi Zarchin, is a heartwarming comedy and surprising love story focusing on the captivating character of one boy blessed with extraordinary talents, who discovers through the power of love, that the sky is the limit. A Q & A will follow with actor Oshri Cohen who plays Shlomi. Hebrew with English subtitles. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum.

film festival

03 | Feb
07:00PM
03 | Feb
07:00PM

film festival

9th International Sephardic Film Festival-Roots and Origins-The Last Sephardic Jew

$35.00. Opening Night Screening and Reception. Kicking off an exciting week of films, the Opening Night Screening and Reception on February 3rd, will be the New York premiere of The Last Sephardic Jew followed by a Q & A session with its Spanish director Miguel Angel Nieto. In this moving film, a young Sephardic rabbi, Eliezer Papo, takes a trip into the past, journeying all the way back to medieval Spain in search of answers to the puzzle of why the flourishing Jews of that country were forced to convert or flee. The Last Sephardic Jew follows the post-Inquisition wanderings of Spanish Jewry, bringing to light the hidden traces of Jewish life in such far-flung destinations as Thessaloniki and Istanbul. Ladino and Hebrew with English subtitles. Presented by American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House and Yeshiva University Museum in conjunction with the Instituto Cervantes.

film festival

01 | Feb
07:00PM
01 | Feb
07:00PM

book launch and reception

Nazi Laws, Jewish Lives: Letters from Vienna

$5.00/free for Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research members. With Edith Kurzweil and Professor Marian Kaplan, New York University.

book launch and reception

27 | Jan
06:30PM
27 | Jan
06:30PM

anniversary film

Giorno della Memoria-60th Anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz

Free. Film: Memoria, scripted by Marcello Pezzetti and Liliana Picciotto Fargion, directed by Ruggero Gabbai, Italy, 85 mins., with English subtitles. Presented by Centro Culturale Primo Levi. Abstract In November 1995 Elisa Springer enters the ‘sauna’ of Auschwitz-Birkenau again. She is only one of the survivors of the Holocaust who have acted as witness for the ‘Archivio della Memoria’ (Archive of memory) on which the film draws. For forty years she remained silent about this tragedy. Now she has decided to talk in order to make disavowal impossible. More than 8500 Jews from Italy are deported to Auschwitz and other camps between 1943 and 1945. About 800 Jews suvive. Fifty years after the Holocaust ninety of 800 survivors are still able to bear witness. The protagonists talk in places where historical events took place, i.e. in the Jewish district in Rome, in Milan’s prisons, Rome, Florence, Trieste, Genoa, camp Risiera di San Sabba, in the tranist camp Fossoli, in Milan central station etc. Another aspect is the fact that witnesses are not questioned by journalists or media specialists but by qualified historians who have done extensive research for the project and who have precise knowledge of the circumstances of each interviewee’s life.

anniversary film

19 | Jan
07:30PM
19 | Jan
07:30PM

sephardic resonances

Myrna Herzog in Concert

$25/$18 for seniors, students and American Sephardi Federation with Sephardic House members. A concert with Brazilian born Israeli Musician Myrna Herzog performing Early Music from the Sephardic Golden Age to New York. Ms. Herzog performed on a rare 1685 viola da gamba made by famed British instrument maker Edward Lewis.

sephardic resonances

17 | Jan
09:00AM
17 | Jan
09:00AM

the center is closed

CENTER CLOSED

the center is closed

13 | Jan
07:00PM
13 | Jan
07:00PM

performance

Noble Laureate (Mr. Singer and His Demons)

$5.00/$3.00 for seniors, students/Free for Yeshiva University Museum members. Includes a special viewing of the exhibit, "Becoming an American Writer: The Life and Works of Isaac Bashevis Singer." In this play, which incorporates SingerÂ’s personal diary entries as well as his family memoirs and his fictional characters, the audience imagines what it was like for Singer as he faced the final journey to the afterlife. The show explores the parallels between SingerÂ’s family members and some of his fictional characters, especially Yentl the Yeshiva Boy and Gimpl the Fool. A journalist's interview frames the "action" - a dialogue of interwoven memories about his characters and his dysfunctional family. Avi Hoffman, creator and performer of the award-winning one-man hit shows Too Jewish? and Too Jewish, Too!, directs and stars in this exciting new play about the Nobel Prize-winning writer Isaac Bashevis Singer, the influential and beloved Jewish-American author. Says Avi Hoffman, "Singer, the most famous and controversial of Jewish writers, was born 100 years ago, and continues to be as fascinating and relevant as ever." Noble Laureate also features performances by: Anita Keal, Vanessa Lemonides, Steve Liebman, Chad A. Suitts and Suzannne Toren. The production is part of the Theatre's Immigrant Voices Project (IVP), sponsored by Emigrant Savings Bank. Now in its fourth year, IVP is a developmental program for the creation of new theatrical works.

performance

11 | Jan
07:30PM
11 | Jan
07:30PM

lecture and book signing

RESCUED FROM THE REICH: HOW ONE OF HITLERÂ’S SOLDIERS SAVE THE LUBAVITCHER REBBE

$5.00/free for Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research members. Rescued from the Reich…” by acclaimed author and scholar Bryan Mark Rigg tells the harrowing story of the Hitler led German forces invasion of Warsaw in the fall of 1939, which trapped hundreds of thousands of civilians in the city; many of them Jews. Among this group was Rebbe Joseph Schneersohn, the leader of the ultra-Orthodox Lubavitcher Jews. His followers throughout the world were unable to confirm whether he and his family were alive or dead. Working with officials in the United States government, a group of American Jews initiated what would ultimately become one of the strangest, and most miraculous, rescues of World War II.

lecture and book signing

10 | Jan
07:00PM
10 | Jan
07:00PM

film

Enemies, A Love Story

$10/$5 for seniors and students. Director: Paul Mazursky. Speaker: Jeremy Dauber, Columbia University.

film

10 | Jan
07:00PM
10 | Jan
07:00PM

lecture

Maria Salit-Gitelson Tell Memorial Lecture-"Moses Mendelssohn, Elijah of Vilna and the Making of Modern Judaism"

Free admission. Speaker: Eliyahu Stern, University of California, Berkeley. YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

lecture