26 | Dec
11:59PM
26 | Dec
11:59PM

reading room closure

Please note: The Center will be open to the public Friday, December 26. The Reading Room and Ackman and Ziff Genealogy Institute will be closed.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading room closure

25 | Dec
25 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, December 25 for Christmas.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

21 | Dec
03:00PM
21 | Dec
03:00PM

holiday celebration

The Hanukkah Concert: Featuring Gerard Edery and His Virtuoso Musicians

Widely regarded as a master singer and guitarist, Gerard Edery has a remarkable range of ethnic folk styles and traditions from around the world, including songs from Europe, the Middle East, South America and ancient Persia.  Collaborating with virtuoso musicians, Edery energizes this repertoire for contemporary audiences.  A special guest will open the program with a story from the pen of a great Jewish writer, plus menorah lighting, singing and refreshments.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

holiday celebration

18 | Dec
07:00PM
18 | Dec
07:00PM

16th street book club

Suddenly, a Knock on the Door by Etgar Keret (2012)

The 16th Street Book Club is a lively group that meets to discuss modern Jewish literature.

Bringing up a child, lying to the boss, placing an order in a fast-food restaurant: in Etgar Keret’s new collection, daily life is complicated, dangerous, and full of yearning. In his most playful and most mature work yet, the living and the dead, silent children and talking animals, dreams and waking life coexist in an uneasy world. Overflowing with absurdity, humor, sadness, and compassion, the tales in Suddenly, a Knock on the Door establish Etgar Keret—declared a “genius” by The New York Times—as one of the most original writers of his generation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

18 | Dec
07:00PM
18 | Dec
07:00PM

exhibit opening, concert & reception

A Festival of Lights Sephardi Style

The American Sephardi Federation invites you to a “Festival of Lights” featuring a mélange of sumptuous sights, sounds and tastes in true Sephardi style. Join us for an exhibit opening as we inaugurate Joshua Shamsi of the Diarna Geo-Museum’s “Echoes of Jewish Morocco,” a photographic exploration of Judeo-Moroccan life. World renowned French-Moroccan baritone opera singer David Serero will treat guests to a selection of holiday songs as traditional Syrian and Moroccan delicacies will be served in our Tea Tent. Honored guests will be invited to light chanukkiot designed by acclaimed Iraqi artist Oded Halahmy.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation, NY Jewish Guide

exhibit opening, concert & reception

17 | Dec
05:00PM
17 | Dec
05:00PM

early closure

Please Note: the Center will close at 5pm on Wednesday, December 17

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

early closure

17 | Dec
06:00PM
17 | Dec
06:00PM

curator's tour

Modeling the Synagogue - from Dura to Touro

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

14 | Dec
01:00PM
14 | Dec
01:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

Albanian-Jewish Relations and the Contributions of U.S. Ambassador to Albania, Herman Bernstein (1876-1935)

Ambassador Mal Berisha delivers a talk on the role of U.S. Ambassador Herman Bernstein (1930-1933) in championing positive Albanian Jewish relations and how this set the stage for Albania sheltering its Jews during the war. Sponsored by the Family of Ruth Gay.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

11 | Dec
06:30PM
11 | Dec
06:30PM

book talk

From the Shtetl to the Lecture Hall: Jewish Women and Cultural Exchange

Until the 19th century, women were regularly excluded from graduate education. Author Luise Hirsch tells the story of Russian and German Jews who became the first female professionals in modern history.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

11 | Dec
07:00PM
11 | Dec
07:00PM

puppet theater

Radical Puppetry: The Modicut Project

Scholar Eddy Portnoy teams up with puppet theater company Great Small Works to present a reinterpretation of the scripts of Zuni Maud and Yosl Cutler, who in the 1920s formed Modicut, a bitingly satirical Yiddish puppet theater troupe. This program is part of YIVO’s Artists and Scholars Series.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, NYSCA, Scherman Foundation, Puffin Foundation

puppet theater

10 | Dec
06:00PM
10 | Dec
06:00PM

curator's tour

Echoes of the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

09 | Dec
06:30PM
09 | Dec
06:30PM

exhibit opening and lecture

Fighting for Kaiser and Fatherland: German-Jewish Soldiers and the Quest for Integration, 1914-1935

Historian Volker Berghahn’s lecture accompanied LBI’s exhibition German Jews at the Eastern Front in WWI: Modernism Meets Tradition. Volker Berghahn, Seth Low Emeritus Professor of History at Columbia University, specializes in modern German history and European-American relations. He received his M.A. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (1961) and his Ph.D. from the University of London (1964). He taught in England and Germany before coming to Brown University in 1988 and to Columbia ten years later. His publications include: America and the Intellectual Cold Wars in Europe (2001); Quest for Economic Empire (ed., 1996); Imperial Germany (1995); The Americanization of West German Industry, 1945-1973 (1986); Modern Germany (1982); Der Tirpitz-Plan (1971); Europe in the Era of Two World Wars (2006); and most recently Industriegesellschaft und Kulturtransfer, Goettingen (2010).

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

exhibit opening and lecture

03 | Dec
05:00PM
03 | Dec
05:00PM

early closure

Please Note: the Center will close at 5pm on Monday, December 3

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

early closure

03 | Dec
07:00PM
03 | Dec
07:00PM

lecture

Coming of Age in Poland: Jewish Life Stories from the 1930s

In the 1930s, YIVO scholars held a series of autobiography contests for Jewish youth. Over 600 adolescents responded from across the religious, geographic, and socioeconomic spectrum. Jeffrey Shandler (Rutgers) uses these first-person accounts to explore the formative years of a singular generation.   Event Location: Museum of the City of New York.

Visit www.mcny.org to purchase tickets.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Museum of the City of New York, in connection with Letters to Afar, a YIVO Institute for Jewish History-MCNY exhibition at MCNY

lecture

03 | Dec
07:00PM
03 | Dec
07:00PM

lbi memorial lecture

Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture with Josef Joffe

Dr. Josef Joffe delivered the 57th annual Leo Baeck Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, December 3, 2014 at the Center for Jewish History, where he was introduced by Dr. Henry Kissinger. In his lecture—The Golden Age of German-Jewry, 1871-1933: Is a Remake Possible?—Dr. Joffe looks back at the accomplishments of German Jews before the Holocaust and compare that period to the post-War Germany in which he grew up as the child of Holocaust survivors. Based on his own life experiences and his deep knowledge of history and current events, he offers an analysis of the present-day conditions and future prospects for Jews in Europe. Josef Joffe is one of the most respected contemporary voices on international affairs. As a journalist, editor, and academic, he has published and taught at Harvard, Johns Hopkins and Munich. He is the editor of the influential German weekly, Die Zeit, and he regularly contributes essays and editorials to newspapers and magazines around the world. He teaches political science at Stanford, where he is also a Fellow at the Institute for International Studies and the Hoover Institution.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

lbi memorial lecture

02 | Dec
07:00PM
02 | Dec
07:00PM

sidney krum young artists concert series

Klezmer Influences in American Jewish Music

In this lecture-concert, guest speakers and musicians present three rarely performed pieces by 20th- and 21st- century Jewish composers who integrated the sounds of klezmer and Yiddish folk songs into new classical music. Sponsored by the Estate of Sidney Krum.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

sidney krum young artists concert series

01 | Dec
06:30PM
01 | Dec
06:30PM

wwi—jewish experiences in the trenches and at the home front film series

Commissar

This film was made by Aleksandr Askoldov in 1967, but was banned by Soviet censors for 20 years. The reason is the film’s sympathetic depiction of Jews. Commissar is a heartbreaking story of a Jewish family in backwater Ukrainian shtetl ravaged by war and pogroms. When a female commissar fighting in the Red Army gets pregnant, the Jewish family takes her in, as she is expecting to give birth and to return to the front. The film is remarkable for its beautiful cinematography, contrasting the domestic Jewish life with powerful images of the Russian Civil War. Discussant: Jonathan Brent, Executive Director, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. (110 minutes, Russian with English subtitles)

This film is part of a series, “WWI – Jewish Experience in the Trenches and at the Home Front.”  Click here for information on the other films.

This program is part of our World War I and the Jews initiative.  Click here for details.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

wwi—jewish experiences in the trenches and at the home front film series

30 | Nov
02:00PM
30 | Nov
02:00PM

panel discussion

Modeling the Flood Story - from Ancient to Modern Times

How has the idea of a cataclysmic flood been imagined and represented? In what ways has the story been reinterpreted over time? How have writers and artists responded to the narrative in its religious and cultural context? In what ways does the flood story have resonance today? Speakers from various disciplines will address the flood narratives from the Ancient Near East and the Hebrew Bible, and how the biblical story has been read, interpreted, reconstructed – and modeled – through midrash, medieval and modern texts, art, and film.  The program complements the YUM exhibition Modeling the Synagogue – from Dura to Touro. A curatorial tour of the exhibition will precede the program.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, Yeshiva College & the Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies of Yeshiva University

panel discussion

28 | Nov
28 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, November 28 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

27 | Nov
27 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, November 27 and Friday, November 28 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

26 | Nov
03:00PM
26 | Nov
03:00PM

early closure

Wednesday, November 26: the Reading Room and Genealogy Institute will close at 2pm. The Center will close at 3pm.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

early closure

24 | Nov
07:00PM
24 | Nov
07:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

From the YIVO Archives: If Books Could Talk
The Story of Three Jewish Treasures Rescued from the Vilna Ghetto

David Fishman (Jewish Theological Seminary) illuminates the biographies of three gems of the YIVO archives that survived the Vilna Ghetto: Theodor Herzl’s diary, the minute-book of the Vilna Gaon’s synagogue, and an original manuscript of Jacob Gordin’s play Mirele EfrosSponsored by the Family of Ruth Gay.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

23 | Nov
02:00PM
23 | Nov
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

No One Remembers Alone: Memory, Migration, and the Making of an American Family

Speaker: Patricia Kliendienst

In addition, at 12:30 in the Chapel: Bring your lunch and meet with fellow JGS members and experts in an informal setting to share research stories and ask questions.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

20 | Nov
07:00PM
20 | Nov
07:00PM

16th street book club

The World to Come by Dara Horn (2006)

The 16th Street Book Club is a lively group that meets to discuss modern Jewish literature.

A million-dollar Chagall is stolen from a museum during a singles' cocktail hour. The unlikely thief, former child prodigy Benjamin Ziskind, is convinced that the painting once hung in his parents' living room. This work of art opens a door through which we discover his family's startling history—from an orphanage in Soviet Russia where Chagall taught to suburban New Jersey and the jungles of Vietnam.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

20 | Nov
07:00PM
20 | Nov
07:00PM

panel discussion

Towards Life: Reviving Jewish Life in Contemporary Poland

Interest in Jewish culture in Poland has blossomed over the past decades while Jews have remained less than 1% of the total population. This panel explores the reasons for the revival, and the needs of the current Jewish community.   This program is part of YIVO’s Artists and Scholars Series

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Polish Cultural Institute

panel discussion

20 | Nov
07:00PM
20 | Nov
07:00PM

lecture

Mizrahi Music, Piyyut, and the Search for Israeli Identity

From its inception, the Zionist movement looked, in the words of HaTikvah, “forward, to the east.” The actual meeting with the east, however, has been a messy one, and the eastern dimension of Israeli identity remains one of the country's most charged topics.  In honor of the date chosen by the Knesset to commemorate the Middle Eastern Jewish experience, the American Sephardi Federation presents a lecture in which Dr. Aryeh Tepper will examine how Israeli society has wrestled with the eastern dimension of its identity, particularly its Arab aspect. Join an exploration of the rise of Mizrahi pop music during the 1970's-1980’s, the emergence of eastern art music in the 1990's, and the popular turn to Middle Eastern piyyut (liturgical music) at the beginning of the 21st century.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

lecture

19 | Nov
06:00PM
19 | Nov
06:00PM

discussion

The Rosenburg Files: A Study of the Involvement of Former Nazi Party Members in the German Justice Ministry post World War II

German Federal Justice Minister Heiko Maas discusses the research of an independent commission of historians appointed to investigate how the German Federal Justice Ministry dealt with the Nazi past in the early post-war period. With moderator David G. Marwell, Director of the Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, American Jewish Committee

discussion

18 | Nov
07:30PM
18 | Nov
07:30PM

concert

Stravinsky, Ravel, and Prokofiev: Composing in War Time

The Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing Stravinsky’s Suite de L'histoire du soldat for violin clarinet and piano, Prokofiev’s Sonata in D Major for violin and piano and Ravel’s Piano Trio.

This concert is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

This program is part of our World War I and the Jews initiative.  Click here for details.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

17 | Nov
05:00PM
17 | Nov
05:00PM

early closure

Please Note: the Center will close at 5pm on Monday, November 17

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

early closure

16 | Nov
02:00PM
16 | Nov
02:00PM

panel discussion

Jews and the Berlin Wall

This panel discussion on the impact of the division of Germany on Jewish communities on both sides of the Berlin Wall was moderated by Jeffrey Peck (Baruch College). With Michael Brenner (University of Munich), Andreas Nachama (Topography of Terror Documentation Center in Berlin), and Liliane Weissberg (University of Pennsylvania).

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, German Consulate

panel discussion

13 | Nov
07:00PM
13 | Nov
07:00PM

panel discussion

Giving Women their Place in Holocaust History

The exhibition October7, 1944 recognizes and presents an artistic American response to the heroism of four young women whose names are not all well-known.  Just as these women's stories are often left out of the history of Auschwitz-Birkenau, women's experiences have been left out of Holocaust history and history in general.  Jonah Bokaer, Marisa Fox, Elisa v. Joeden-Forgey, Rochelle Saidel and Rachel Lithgow, moderator, go beyond this specific episode to also discuss integrating women's stories and experiences into history.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, Remember the Women Institute

panel discussion

12 | Nov
06:00PM
12 | Nov
06:00PM

curator's tour

Modeling the Synagogue - from Dura to Touro

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

12 | Nov
06:30PM
12 | Nov
06:30PM

lecture

Researching your Ancestors’ World War I Military and Civilian Experiences at the Center for Jewish History

Moriah Amit of the Center’s Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute will highlight primary sources from the partner collections -- community and organization records, memoirs, newspapers, photographs, and more - that shed light on the experiences of Jews in all sides and aspects of this conflict.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

lecture

10 | Nov
08:00PM
10 | Nov
08:00PM

theatrical readings

Jews and the Great War: A Reflection at the Centennial

Join us for dramatic readings that reflect the war that created the modern world—featuring memoir and theater, the music of Irving Berlin and Jewish cabaret, Emma Goldman’s activism, and the art of poets Siegfried Sassoon and Isaac Rosenberg. A reception follows the program.

This program is part of our World War I and the Jews initiative.  Click here for details.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society and Leo Baeck Institute

theatrical readings

09 | Nov
09:00AM
09 | Nov
09:00AM

conference

World War I and the Jews

An international roster of scholars will discuss the state of scholarship and introduce cutting-edge research on Jews in World War I, examining the war’s importance as a cataclysmic event in Jewish and world history. In shattering empires and creating new states, the war disrupted Jewish ties around the globe and forged new ones, bringing about an entirely new era of ideologies, nation states, and circumstances that have affected Jewish life to the present day. Visit www.cjh.org/thegreatwar for details.

This program is part of our World War I and the Jews initiative.  Click here for details.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

conference

06 | Nov
06:30PM
06 | Nov
06:30PM

discussion

Czechs, Slovaks and the Jews, 1938-48: Beyond Idealisation and Condemnation

To what degree did World War II answer questions of national belonging and minority rights in Europe that had helped fuel two world wars over the preceding decades? Historians Jan Lání?ek, University of New South Wales, Sydney and Rebekah Klein-Pejšová of Purdue University discuss the revelations of Dr. Lání?ek’s new book, Czechs, Slovaks and the Jews, 1938-48: Beyond Idealisation and Condemnation, including the stark choice between emigration and assimilation that Czechoslovak Jews faced in the war’s aftermath.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

discussion

03 | Nov
06:30PM
03 | Nov
06:30PM

wwi—jewish experiences in the trenches and at the home front film series

A Letter to Mother

This 1939 film is one of the last Yiddish films made in Poland before the Nazi invasion. The plot centers on the story of a mother's persistent efforts to support her family, while her husband moves to America. After her family is pulled apart by severe poverty and the turmoil of WWI, she finally makes her way to New York in hopes for better future. A Letter to Mother was hailed by the New York Times as one of the best Yiddish films to reach America. It was the highest grossing Yiddish film of its time. (106 minutes, Yiddish with English subtitles).

Discussant: Eric Goldman, recent co-host of the month-long Turner Classic Movies series, “The Projected Image: The Jewish Experience on Film” and Adjunct Professor of Cinema at Yeshiva University.

This film is part of a series, “WWI – Jewish Experience in the Trenches and at the Home Front.”  Click here for information on the other films.

This program is part of our World War I and the Jews initiative.  Click here for details.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

wwi—jewish experiences in the trenches and at the home front film series

02 | Nov
11:00AM
02 | Nov
11:00AM

film retrospective

The Alchemist: A Péter Forgács Film Retrospective

The first retrospective of media artist Péter Forgács’s Jewish films explores questions of memory and history through his use of home movies. Passes available for single screenings or the whole day. A discussion with the artist follows.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Museum of the City of New York, in connection with Letters to Afar, a YIVO Institute for Jewish History-MCNY exhibition at MCNY

film retrospective

30 | Oct
07:00PM
30 | Oct
07:00PM

panel discussion

Creating History: Can We Tell the Past?

How do art and scholarship shape our understanding of the past? Artists Péter Forgács and Svetlana Boym (Harvard), and scholars, Amelia Glaser (UCSD), Marci Shore (Yale) and Steven Zipperstein (Stanford) present their work and discuss attempts to tell the East European Jewish past.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Museum of the City of New York in connection with the YIVO Institute for Jewish History-MCNY exhibition Letters to Afar by Péter Forgács and part of YIVO Institute for Jewish History’s Artists and Scholars Series

panel discussion

29 | Oct
07:00PM
29 | Oct
07:00PM

concert and talk

Raysn: The Lost Jewish Music of Belarus Featuring Zisl Slepovitch and Litvakus (Special CD Release Program)

Minsk-born ethnomusicologist/clarinetist Dmitri “Zisl” Slepovitch spent a decade researching the hidden musical treasures of Jewish Belarus (White Russia, also known in Yiddish as “Raysn”) with noted scholar Nina Stepanskaya. Join Slepovitch and his amazing Litvakus ensemble in a special CD pre-release program of Belarussian klezmer, Yiddish folksong and poetry. CTMD’s Pete Rushefsky will interview Slepovitch during the program.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Center for Traditional Music and Dance

concert and talk

27 | Oct
06:00PM
27 | Oct
06:00PM

curator's tour

Modeling the Synagogue – from Dura to Touro

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

27 | Oct
06:30PM
27 | Oct
06:30PM

lecture and book signing

Jews on the Chocolate Trail

Rabbi Deborah Prinz draws from her world travels on the trail of chocolate to enchant chocoholics everywhere as she unwraps the role of Jews in the trade, retail and manufacture of chocolate since it was first introduced to Europeans, including the 1781 NYC “Chocolate Manufactory ” of Rebecca Gomez on Nassau Street.

Presented by: Gomez Mill House

lecture and book signing

27 | Oct
08:00PM
27 | Oct
08:00PM

a concert for daniel pearl

Building Bridges: From Bene Beraq to Baghdad

In February 2002, the American-Jewish reporter Daniel Pearl was murdered in Pakistan. We are proud to honor his legacy with a special concert bringing together diverse peoples and music in the spirit of Daniel and in recognition of his Middle Eastern roots. His mother, Ruth, is an Iraqi Jew who attended the Alliance Israélite Universelle Girls School at Baghdad. This performance will be headlined by one of Israel’s leading jazz musicians, Itamar Borochov, and is part of the “Daniel Pearl World Music Days” occurring in more than 60 countries throughout the month of October. These Days use the power of music to reaffirm the values of openness, understanding, the freedom of inquiry, and truth.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation and the Center for Jewish History

a concert for daniel pearl

26 | Oct
02:00PM
26 | Oct
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Passenger Manifests and the Immigrant Voyage

Speaker: Phyllis Kramer, VP of Education at JewishGen

"Passenger Manifests and the Immigrant Voyage", a comprehensive review of the immigration process beginning with the family's trip to the port of embarkation.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

23 | Oct
07:00PM
23 | Oct
07:00PM

literary reading

Two Jewish Loves: Food and Literature

A traveler is lured from his train with the promise of Shabbat dinner; a family of adult siblings convenes for a meal and sets about slicing one another to pieces. Join us for an eclectic evening of Jewish literary readings, somber and satirical. This event is a featured program in the NYC-wide Festival of Jewish Food and Literature.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation, YIVO Institute for Jewish History, The Jewish Heritage Project, Tablet Magazine and the Literature Program of the New York State Council on the Arts

literary reading

20 | Oct
06:30PM
20 | Oct
06:30PM

film and discussion

Jewish Women in American Sport: Settlement Houses to the Olympics

As athletes, administrators and activists, Jewish women have been involved in sports from the settlement houses in the 1880s into the 21st century, confronting ethnic and gender constraints and changing American society. Join us for an evening of film and discussion with historian Linda J. Borish whose recent research sheds additional light on the fascinating and growing historical impact of women in sports.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, and the Jewish Women's Archive

film and discussion

19 | Oct
06:00PM
19 | Oct
06:00PM

film and discussion

Jacques Faitlovitch and the Lost Tribes

Maurice and Sarah Dorès’ film explores the “extraordinary odyssey” of Jacques Faïtlovitch, a Polish Jew who “discovered” Ethiopian Jewry, in 1904, and thereafter set about reestablishing a connection between their community and the rest of the Jewish world. The screening will be followed by a discussion led by Emanuela Trevisan Semi, Professor of Modern Hebrew and Jewish Studies at Ca’ Foscari University in Venice, Italy. She has written several books on the Ethiopian Jewish experience, and is currently researching the memory, history and writing of the Jews from Morocco and their legacies.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and Centro Primo Levi

film and discussion

17 | Oct
17 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, October 17 for Simchat Torah.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

16 | Oct
16 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, October 16 for Shemini Atzeret and Friday, October 17 for Simchat Torah.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

15 | Oct
15 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Wednesday October 15 for Erev Shemini Atzeret.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

14 | Oct
07:00PM
14 | Oct
07:00PM

theater

The Haunted Sukke: An Evening of Participatory Theater and Open Mic

This program is in Yiddish.

Which ushpizin, or honored guests, will you invite into your sukke this season? Join puppeteer Jenny Romaine, MC Shane Baker and Sukkes musicians for an open mic and theater exploration of the permeable borders between the living and dead.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Yugntruf

theater

13 | Oct
06:30PM
13 | Oct
06:30PM

wwi—jewish experiences in the trenches and at the home front film series

La Grande Illusion (The Grand Illusion)

In this 1937 French war film directed by Jean Renoir, the story concerns class relationships among a small group of French officers who are prisoners of war during WWI plotting an escape. The perspective of the film is generously humanistic to its characters of various nationalities, a key character among them is Rosenthal, a wealthy French Jew. It is regarded by critics and film historians as one of the masterpieces of French cinema and among the greatest films ever made. Discussant: Stuart Liebman, Professor of the History and Theory of Cinema, CUNY Graduate Center.

This film is part of a series, “WWI – Jewish Experience in the Trenches and at the Home Front.”  Click here for information on the other films.

This program is part of our World War I and the Jews initiative.  Click here for details.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

wwi—jewish experiences in the trenches and at the home front film series

12 | Oct
06:30PM
12 | Oct
06:30PM

talk

Making/History: Reconstructing the Gwozdziec Synagogue

In 2011, three organizations embarked on an extraordinary mission: to reconstruct the ceiling of the destroyed wooden Gwozdziec Synagogue for the core exhibition at the Museum of the History of Polish Jews. In advance of its official unveiling on October 28, Handshouse Studio explains how an international team of 296 rebuilt Gwozdziec.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Polish Cultural Institute

talk

10 | Oct
10 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, October 10 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

08 | Oct
08 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Wednesday October 8 for Erev Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

07 | Oct
07:00PM
07 | Oct
07:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

Farewell to Communism: Howard Fast and Soviet Yiddish Writers

Novelist Howard Fast, who is mainly remembered today as the blacklisted author of Spartacus, was the Communist party’s leading intellectual until Stalin’s murderous campaigns came to light. Gennady Estraikh (NYU) reveals the debates that raged in the American Yiddish press in reaction to Fast’s departure.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

05 | Oct
01:00PM
05 | Oct
01:00PM

symposium

NY Archives Week

1pm-2pm: Open house advice session (Paul S. and Sylvia Steinberg Great Hall, first floor)
Learn how to store, preserve, and archive your family memorabilia and collections! Experts will be on hand to answer your questions about special topics such as Yiddish resources, conservation and personal digital archives.

2pm: Introduction to archival research (Lillian Goldman Reference Services Division, third floor)
Learn about how to do research with primary sources, including navigating a finding aid and proper handling of archival materials.

3pm: How to use original material in family history research (Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute, third floor)
Learn about the genealogical research process and how to evaluate archival family history documents.

4pm: Show-and-tell (Lillian Goldman Reading Room, third floor)
Discover some of the wonderful material in the collections of the Center’s five Partners.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

symposium

01 | Oct
06:00PM
01 | Oct
06:00PM

artist's tour

Echoes of the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld

From the 1920s through the 1960s, the Catskill Mountains, within easy driving distance of New York City, were a popular vacation destination for millions of Americans, many of them Jews. Known as the Borscht Belt, the resorts of Sullivan and Ulster County combined recreational activities with nighttime entertainment – especially stand-up comedy, which was born in the region's theaters and showrooms. At its peak during the post-WW II era, the region known as the Borscht Belt sustained more than six hundred year-round hotels, as well as over a thousand bungalow colonies and summer camps.

In this series of beautiful, richly textured, large-scale photographs, Marisa Scheinfeld documents the dramatic degradation of some of the most famous Borscht Belt hotels. The images reveal ghostly remnants of the glory years of the era, as well as powerful evidence of nature's claim on the resorts and their landscapes, and new uses to which the spaces have been put in recent years. Scheinfeld, who grew up in the region, began her documentary photo project in 2009; this exhibition marks the first time audiences can see her work on the large scale on which it was conceived. Echoes is complemented by original memorabilia and photographs from some of the Borscht Belt's most beloved hotels and resorts.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

30 | Sep
06:30PM
30 | Sep
06:30PM

panel discussion

Stefan Zweig: The Impossible Exile

George Prochnik, author of a brilliant new study of Stefan Zweig, leads a dialog on Zweig’s rise and fall, the gulf between the world of ideas in Europe and in America, and the consuming struggle of those forced to forsake one for the other.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

30 | Sep
07:00PM
30 | Sep
07:00PM

panel discussion

Taras Shevchenko: Ukrainian Nationalism, Poetry and the Jews

On the bicentennial of Ukrainian poet Taras Shevchenko’s birth, a group of literary scholars discuss his impact on Zionist leaders and Yiddish writers. With Gennady Estraikh (NYU), Peter Fedynsky (Shevchenko translator), Amelia Glaser (UC-SD), George Grabowicz (Harvard), and Myroslav Shkandrij (University of Manitoba). Sponsored by Ukrainian Jewish Encounter.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

29 | Sep
06:30PM
29 | Sep
06:30PM

discussion

The Lost Shul Mural: Reclaiming, Restoring and Preserving a Treasure from the Past

The rediscovered lost mural of the former Chai Adam Synagogue in Burlington, VT reveals a painted window onto a vanished past. Dr. Samuel Gruber, international expert on Jewish art and architecture, Murray Zimiles, painter, curator and authority on Jewish folk art, and Ann-Isabel Friedman, Director, Sacred Sites Program, New York Landmarks Conservancy discuss the cultural, artistic and religious context for this historic Jewish treasure.

Click here for an article about the lost shul mural in The New York Times.

Click here for additional press coverage.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and Center for Jewish History

discussion

26 | Sep
26 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, September 26 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Sep
25 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, September 25 and Friday, September 26 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | Sep
24 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Wednesday September 24 for Erev Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

23 | Sep
07:00PM
23 | Sep
07:00PM

16th street book club

The People of Forever Are Not Afraid by Shani Boianjiu (2012)

The 16th Street Book Club is a lively group that meets to discuss modern Jewish literature.

Yael, Avishag, and Lea grow up together in a tiny, dusty Israeli village, attending a high school made up of caravan classrooms, passing notes to each other to alleviate the universal boredom of teenage life. When they are conscripted into the army, their lives change in unpredictable ways, influencing the women they become and the friendship that they struggle to sustain. Yael trains marksmen and flirts with boys. Avishag stands guard, watching refugees throw themselves at barbed-wire fences. Lea, posted at a checkpoint, imagines the stories behind the familiar faces that pass by her day after day. They gossip about boys and whisper of an ever more violent world just beyond view. They drill, constantly, for a moment that may never come. They live inside that single, intense second just before danger erupts.

In a relentlessly energetic and arresting voice marked by humor and fierce intelligence, Shani Boianjiu, winner of the National Book Foundation’s “5 Under 35,” creates an unforgettably intense world, capturing that unique time in a young woman's life when a single moment can change everything.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

21 | Sep
01:00PM
21 | Sep
01:00PM

annual nusakh vilne memorial program

Commemorating the Vilna Jewish Community

Join us in commemorating the Jewish community of Vilna, the Jerusalem of Lithuania. With poetry recitations, music performances and a special presentation by Menachem Kaiser about reVilna, a new digital mapping project that reconstructs life in the Vilna Ghetto. Sponsored by Nusakh Vilne

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

annual nusakh vilne memorial program

15 | Sep
06:30PM
15 | Sep
06:30PM

wwi—jewish experiences in the trenches and at the home front film series

The Fighting 69th

A 1940 Warner Brothers film directed by William Keighley, the film is based upon the actual exploits of New York City’s 69th infantry Regiment during WWI. The plot centers on misfit Jerry Plunkett (James Cagney), a macho and a coward, unable to fit into the Irish brigade. Among the cast of characters is also Mischa Moskowitz (Mike Murphy for his Regiment friends), who speaks Yiddish, prays in Hebrew, but fights like an Irishman. Discussant: Thomas Doherty, Professor of American Studies, Brandeis University.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

wwi—jewish experiences in the trenches and at the home front film series

15 | Sep
06:30PM
15 | Sep
06:30PM

lecture

Golde and Her Daughters: Soviet Jewish Women under Stalin

This program is in yiddish.

What were Jewish women’s experiences under Stalin? Elissa Bemporad (Queens College, CUNY) explores the unique features of Jewish women’s encounters with the Sovietization process and the culture wars surrounding Stalin’s attempts to create the “New Soviet Jewish Woman.”

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

11 | Sep
07:30PM
11 | Sep
07:30PM

concert

Memorial: Trios by Schubert, Brahms and Zaretsky

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing Schubert’s Trio in E-flat major, Brahms’ Trio in C major and Zaretsky’s 9/11 – In Memoriam.

Maureen Nelson, violin
Richard Belcher, cello
Karl Kramer, horn
Jonathan Breit, voice
Vassa  Shevel, piano
Inessa Zaretsky, piano

Made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

10 | Sep
05:30PM
10 | Sep
05:30PM

lecture

Abraham Sutzkever: The Power in Poetry

For Yiddish poet Abraham Sutzkever, poetry—but only if good enough—was more than self-expression, more than beauty and truth: it was the endurance manifest in nature and in the Jewish people. Ruth Wisse (Professor Emerita, Harvard) puts Sutzkever’s poetry to his test. Sponsored by Naomi Prawer Kadar Foundation, Inc.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

08 | Sep
04:00PM
08 | Sep
04:00PM

film and discussion

Special Film Viewing: Rare Archival Footage from a Century of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC)

Features rare archival films from the JDC Archives treasures of the organization’s work over the last century. Highlights include rare footage of life in Poland on the eve of the Holocaust, excerpts from a 1941 film addressing JDC’s response to the Nazi advance in Europe, a historic sound recording about the airlift of Yemenite Jews to Israel, and documentary video footage of the life-saving JDC rescue convoy from besieged Sarajevo to safe haven. Those familiar with JDC’s history, along with the newly initiated, will appreciate this unique opportunity to experience the breadth of the organization’s life-saving work depicted on screen and through audio recordings.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

film and discussion

07 | Sep
02:00PM
07 | Sep
02:00PM

discussion

The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70 CE-1492

From an agrarian and illiterate people living in the Middle East in 70 CE to a small group of literate urbanites specializing in crafts, trade, moneylending and medicine across the Old World, from Seville to Mangalore—what caused this radical change in the Jewish people? Join Zvi Eckstein, co-author of The Chosen Few and former Deputy Governor of the Bank of Israel as he discusses this phenomenon with scholars of Jewish economic history Adam Teller, Francesca Trivellato and Derek Penslar.

Presented by: Scholars Working Group on Jews and the Modern Economy at Center for Jewish History

discussion

01 | Sep
01 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, September 1 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

31 | Aug
31 | Aug

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, August 31 and Monday, September 1 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

18 | Aug
07:00PM
18 | Aug
07:00PM

16th street book club

Stations West by Allison Amend (2010)

The 16th Street Book Club is a lively group that meets to discuss modern Jewish literature.

Oklahoma is a forgotten territory of "Indians, outlaws, and immigrants" when its first Jewish settler, Boggy Haurowitz, arrives in 1859. Full of expectations, he finds the untamed region a formidable foe, its landscape rugged, its resources strained.

In Stations West, four generations of Haurowitzes, intertwined with a family of Swedish immigrants, struggle against the Territory's "insatiable appetite." The challenges of creating a home amid betrayals, nature's vagaries, and burgeoning statehood prove too great. Each generation in turn succumbs to the overwhelming lure of the transcontinental railroad, and each returns home to find the landscape of their youth, like themselves, changed beyond recognition, their family utterly transformed.

Dramatic and lyrical, Allison Amend's first novel, steeped in the history and lore of the Oklahoma Territory, tells an unforgettable multigenerational — and very American — story of Jewish pioneers, their adopted family, and the challenges they face. Amid the founding of the West, Stations West's generations struggle to forge and maintain their identities as Jews, as immigrants, and as Americans.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

29 | Jul
02:00PM
29 | Jul
02:00PM

lecture

The Red Cross, Jewish Relief Agencies, and the Holocaust

Speaker Gerald Steinacher, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of History and the Hymen Rosenberg Professor of Judaic Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Steinacher is a recipient of the 2014 Fred and Ellen Lewis/JDC Archives Fellowship. His research focuses on the interactions between Jewish relief organizations and the Red Cross in assisting Holocaust survivors and refugees after 1945.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee Archives

lecture

22 | Jul
05:30PM
22 | Jul
05:30PM

podbrodz lecture

The Capital of Yiddishland: YIVO and its Relationship to Vilna

Cecile Kuznitz, Bard College

YIVO was founded in 1925 as the first organization dedicated to scholarship in Yiddish as well as the culture and history of Yiddish-speaking Jews. In retrospect all agreed that it could have only been established in Vilna, "the capital of Yiddishland," which was historically a center of Jewish learning, and in the interwar period a hub of secular Jewish culture. Yet the impetus for creating such an institute originally came from Berlin and for more than two years YIVO's location was uncertain. When YIVO eventually erected its headquarters in the city, it became the crown jewel among local institutions as well as the center of a widely dispersed “Yiddish nation” spanning four continents. What can the relationship between YIVO and Vilna tell us about the dynamics of interwar Yiddish culture? Why did YIVO's leadership waver for so long on whether to locate in Vilna, and what did its decision finally mean for the institute’s work and for Vilna itself?

The Podbrodzer Lecture is made possible by support from the Podbrodzer Progressive Benevolent Association. This lecture was established to honor the Jewish Community of Podbrodz, now named Padbrade.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

podbrodz lecture

15 | Jul
07:00PM
15 | Jul
07:00PM

16th street book club

A Bintel Brief: Love and Longing in Old New York by Liana Finck (2014)

The 16th Street Book Club is a lively group that meets to discuss modern Jewish literature.

In an illustrative style that is a thrilling mash-up of Art Spiegelman's deft emotionality, Roz Chast's hilarious neuroses, and the magical spirit of Marc Chagall, A Bintel Brief is Liana Finck’s evocative, elegiac love letter to the turn-of-the-century Jewish immigrants who transformed New York City and America itself.

A Bintel Brief "A Bundle of Letters"—was the enormously popular advice column of The Forward, the widely read Yiddish language newspaper begun in 1906 New York. Written by a diverse community of Eastern European Jewish immigrants, these letters spoke to the daily heartbreaks and comedies of their new lives, capturing the hope, isolation, and confusion of assimilation.

Drawn from these letters—selected and adapted by Liana Finck and brought to life in her appealing two-color illustrations—A Bintel Brief is a tour of Lower East Side New York, and includes an imaginative conversation with the Yiddish "Dear Abby," Abraham Cahan, The Forward's legendary editor and creator of the Bintel Brief column.

From premarital sex to family politics to struggles with jobs and money, A Bintel Brief is an enlightening look at a segment of America's rich cultural past that offers fresh insights for our own lives as well.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

13 | Jul
01:00PM
13 | Jul
01:00PM

mordkhe and charne schaechter memorial program

YIVO's Newest Treasure: The Chaim Grade and Ina Hecker-Grade Archive

This program is only in Yiddish.

Dr. Miriam Trinh, Postdoctoral Fellow, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore
Recipient of the Fellowship in East European Jewish Studies at YIVO

An initial introduction into the new archive of Chaim Grade and Inna Hecker-Grade, recently purchased in cooperation between the YIVO and the National Library of Israel. The preliminary description will be accompanied by some reflections on the archive's significance for future research on Chaim Grade and his literary legacy.

"My Father, Mordkhe Schaechter"
Binyumen Schaechter, son, musician

Musical Program
Amanda (Miryem-Khaye) Seigel, singer, songwriter
Accompanied by Steve Sterner

Chair: Gitl Schaechter-Viswanath

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Yiddish League

mordkhe and charne schaechter memorial program

04 | Jul
04 | Jul

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, July 4 in honor of Independence Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

22 | Jun
11:00AM
22 | Jun
11:00AM

family history today

Places You May Not Have Looked: Research on NYC and Beyond

Renowned genealogists Miriam Weiner and Avrum Geller reveal important—but relatively unknown—resources for family-history research. Mr. Geller will focus on lesser-known research tools that focus on the New York area; he’ll also highlight some of his other favorites. Ms. Weiner will talk about a number of websites based in the "old country," including archival resources, Holocaust institutions and others.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today

22 | Jun
02:00PM
22 | Jun
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Finding the Only Child's Niece: Truth and Fiction in Genealogical Sources

Speaker: Debra Braverman

In addition, at 12:30 pm in the Chapel: Bring your lunch and meet with fellow JGS members and experts in an informal setting to share research stories and ask questions.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

19 | Jun
06:00PM
19 | Jun
06:00PM

exhibition opening and benefit reception

Luis Moses Gomez: Pioneer Merchant in Colonial America

Presented by: Gomez Foundation for Mill House in partnership with American Sephardi Federation, American Jewish Historical Society

exhibition opening and benefit reception

18 | Jun
06:30PM
18 | Jun
06:30PM

family history today

Panel: Ancestors from All Over the World

Want to start diving into your own ancestry? Representatives from the Center’s Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute join the Jewish Genealogical Society of New York, the German Genealogy Group, and the Italian Genealogical Group to provide behind-the-scenes insights into the processes that allow people of any ancestry to quickly and easily search thousands of records. These organizations will also give audience members a sneak peek into their upcoming projects—and how you can take part in them. Moderated by Moriah Amit, Reference Services Librarian and Genealogy Specialist at the Center.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today

17 | Jun
07:00PM
17 | Jun
07:00PM

book event & dramatic reading

Dear Mendl, Dear Reyzl: Yiddish Letter Manuals from Russia and America

Elissa Bemporad, Moderator, Queens College, CUNY; Alice Nakhimovsky, Colgate University; Roberta Newman, YIVO; Shane Baker, Actor; Yelena Shmulenson, Actor

At the turn of the 20th century, Jewish families scattered by migration could stay in touch only through letters. But for many Jews who were unaccustomed to communicating their public and private thoughts in writing, correspondence was a challenge. A popular solution was to consult brivnshtelers, Yiddish-language books of model letters for every occasion. Join us for a lively discussion with Alice Nakhimovsky (Colgate University) and Roberta Newman (YIVO), authors of Dear Mendl, Dear Reyzl: Yiddish Letter Manuals from Russia and America (Indiana Press), the first book written about this little-known genre of literature.

Actors Shane Baker and Yelena Shmulenson begin the evening with dramatic readings of selected letters.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book event & dramatic reading

16 | Jun
02:00PM
16 | Jun
02:00PM

family history today

Film screening and How-To: The New “Big Bang” In Genealogical Research: Universal Matching of Databases and Family Trees

How do all those family histories get online? Filmmakers Adam Brown and E. Randol Schoenberg explore the ways digital tools have completely transformed our access to genealogical treasures, and predict what’s next for this exciting technology. They’ll also recommend ways for beginning and advanced genealogists, content providers, and software and web developers to take advantage of these transformative tools.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today

15 | Jun
02:00PM
15 | Jun
02:00PM

family history today

Centuries of Surnames: What Names Can Tell Us

Dr. Jeffrey S. Malka, author of the award-winning website SephardicGen, sheds light on the fascinating origins of many Jewish and Sephardic last names, which can be traced directly to the 12th century. These connections tell the story not just of names, but of Jewish history itself.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Sephardi Federation

family history today

12 | Jun
10:00AM
12 | Jun
10:00AM

family history today

StoryCorps recording sessions

As part of Family History Today, the Center for Jewish History will partner with the renowned national oral-history project StoryCorps to record and preserve visitors’ own family histories.

On June 11 and 12, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., StoryCorps staff will record participants’ personal family memories. These 40-minute recordings will be preserved both at the Center and at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Each interviewee will receive a free CD recording of the conversation. (StoryCorps interviews are typically conversations between two people who know each other. You can bring a friend or family member to participate.)

While space in the StoryCorps sessions is limited to six per day, visitors who are not able to enroll will have the opportunity for a one-on-on consultation with an expert genealogist, free of charge. The Center’s newly opened Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute makes conducting family-history research more accessible than ever.

To submit a request to be a participant in the StoryCorps sessions, please email gievents@cjh.org with your name, contact information, and availability during both June 11 and June 12.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today

12 | Jun
07:00PM
12 | Jun
07:00PM

podbrodzer lecture

Jewish-Christian Relations in Poland: How One Town Overcame Its Past

Magda Teter, Wesleyan University

In a small Polish town, over 300 years ago, Jews were accused of killing a Christian child. The lengthy and complicated trial pitted Jews' enemies and supporters against each other, agitated courts and royal and church authorities. Despite efforts to defend the Jews, the trial ended with a loss of Jewish life, a distraught community, and a legacy, preserved in iconographic representations of the trial that would come to haunt the town centuries later. But today, after decades of trying to come to terms with its past, the town has succeeded in facing it. This talk explores how the history, memory, and art about this event has impacted contemporary Jewish-Christian relations.

The Podbrodzer Lecture is made possible by support from the Podbrodzer Progressive Benevolent Association. This lecture was established to honor the Jewish Community of Podbrodz, now named Padbrade

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

podbrodzer lecture

11 | Jun
10:00AM
11 | Jun
10:00AM

family history today

StoryCorps recording sessions

As part of Family History Today, the Center for Jewish History will partner with the renowned national oral-history project StoryCorps to record and preserve visitors’ own family histories.

On June 11 and 12, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., StoryCorps staff will record participants’ personal family memories. These 40-minute recordings will be preserved both at the Center and at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Each interviewee will receive a free CD recording of the conversation. (StoryCorps interviews are typically conversations between two people who know each other. You can bring a friend or family member to participate.)

While space in the StoryCorps sessions is limited to six per day, visitors who are not able to enroll will have the opportunity for a one-on-on consultation with an expert genealogist, free of charge. The Center’s newly opened Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute makes conducting family-history research more accessible than ever.

To submit a request to be a participant in the StoryCorps sessions, please email gievents@cjh.org with your name, contact information, and availability during both June 11 and June 12.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today

11 | Jun
06:00PM
11 | Jun
06:00PM

family history today

Meet the Artist: Diane Samuels

Diane Samuels will discuss both of her installations housed permanently at the Center: the celebrated piece that graces the Center’s Great Hall, Luminous Manuscript¸ and the new artwork The Written World.

The Ackman & Ziff Genealogy Institute is home to the spectacular new installation by Diane Samuels, The Written World. Created for the Genealogy Institute, the piece is a wall-sized paper mosaic that forms a global map. Each “tile” of the mosaic is inscribed with a handwritten letter or character from one of dozens of languages collected from users of the Center and represented in its holdings.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today

11 | Jun
07:00PM
11 | Jun
07:00PM

family history today

Tour of the Genealogy Institute

Take a full tour of the Center’s newly opened Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute, a comfortable and cutting-edge facility for family history research.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today

10 | Jun
07:00PM
10 | Jun
07:00PM

16th street book club

My Father's Paradise: A Son's Search for His Family's Past by Ariel Sabar (2009)

The 16th Street Book Club is a lively group that meets to discuss modern Jewish literature. All are welcome to join us for a special genealogy-themed selection, the memoir My Father’s Paradise: A Son’s Search for His Family’s Past, in which author Ariel Sabar wrestles with his family’s origins in an obscure enclave of Kurdish Jews.

This book-club meeting will include an exploration of the Diarna online exhibit that marks the first time that the places and memories of Iraqi-Kurdistan’s Jews are being put on the map. Ezyara: A Journey to Jewish Iraqi-Kurdistan is an homage to the elaborate pilgrimage that Kurdistan’s Jews once made to the al-Qosh shrine of the Prophet Nachum. 

In addition to photographs, the exhibit presents an array of virtual documentation—summaries, video tours and interviews, immersive 360-degree panoramas, Google Earth tours—to provide an exclusive window onto a life that is now forever lost. Over 60 years since the last pilgrimage we invite you to experience something of the happiness of Ezyara—made possible with the generous support of the Cahnman Foundation. Learn more at www.JewishKurdistan.org.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Sephardi Federation

16th street book club

09 | Jun
05:00PM
09 | Jun
05:00PM

early closure

The Center will close at 5pm on Monday, June 9 due to a private event.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

early closure

05 | Jun
05 | Jun

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, June 5 for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

04 | Jun
04 | Jun

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, June 4 for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

03 | Jun
02:00PM
03 | Jun
02:00PM

early closure

The Center will close at 2:00PM on Tuesday, June 3 for Erev Shavuot

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

early closure

02 | Jun
07:00PM
02 | Jun
07:00PM

book talk

Rethinking Jabotinsky

Hillel Halkin, Author and Translator; Rebecca Kobrin, Columbia University; Edward Rothstein, New York Times; Abraham Socher, Moderator, Jewish Review of Books

How do we understand Vladimir Jabotinsky’s legacy? Born in Odessa, a celebrated Russian journalist, first-rate novelist, and progenitor of today’s Likud Party, Jabotinsky’s life and work have been rife with contradictions and misunderstandings. In his new, insightful biography, Jabotinsky: A Life (Yale University Press) – the first in English in nearly twenty years – celebrated author Hillel Halkin provides a fresh look at Jabotinsky as a writer, political thinker and leader.

This event features Hillel Halkin in conversation with celebrated New York Times cultural critic, Edward Rothstein, Columbia University historian Rebecca Kobrin, and moderator Abe Socher, editor of The Jewish Review of Books.

Jabotinsky – A Life appears Spring 2014 in the Jewish Lives Series of Yale University Press..

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

01 | Jun
03:00PM
01 | Jun
03:00PM

concert

Music in Our Time 2014: Jewish Music by 20th and 21st Century Composers

Works by Paul Schoenfield, Stanislav Fridman, Lazar Weiner, A.W. Binder, Ross Bauer and John Zorn (in honor of his 60th birthday), performed by Cantor Robert Abelson, Pianist Laura Leon, the Masada Trio, and Young Artists from Mannes College The New School for Music.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

29 | May
07:00PM
29 | May
07:00PM

concert

Prayers for Fellow Prisoners

Norway’s acclaimed Ullern Kammerkor presents music dedicated to the victims of the Holocaust—“Bøner for medfangar” (“Prayers for Fellow Prisoners”) by Kristian Hernes with a text by Dietrich Bonhoeffer—and music by Gideon Klein and Viktor Ullmann, composers active during imprisonment in Theresienstadt.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

28 | May
06:30PM
28 | May
06:30PM

book talk

City of the Sun

CAIRO, EGYPT 1941. In Juliana Maio’s debut novel, espionage, love and power play upon the shifting sands of wartime Cairo as WWII rages. The city known as “Paris on the Nile” plays host to an international set who seem more interested in polo matches and swanky nightclubs than the Germans’ unrelenting advance across North Africa. Meanwhile, as refugees, soldiers, and spies stream into the city, the Nazis conspire with the emerging Muslim Brotherhood to fuel the Egyptian people's seething resentment against their British overlords. Deftly blending the romantic noir of the classic film Casablanca with a suspenseful narrative and vivid historical detail, City of the Sun offers a stunning portrayal of a time and place that was not only pivotal for the war, but also sowed much of the turbulence in today's Middle East. Join Egyptian-born author, Juliana Maio, for a discussion and book signing.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

27 | May
06:00PM
27 | May
06:00PM

lecture

Warriors in Blue: Soldiers, Seders and Solidarity

Meki Tate (Senior Vice President and National Chief of Staff of the New York Department of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War) explores the experiences and contributions of the 7,000 Jewish servicemen who fought in the Union Army during the Civil War. Join us to learn how to research your ancestors’ Civil War service records.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

lecture

26 | May
26 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, May 26 in honor of Memorial Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

22 | May
07:00PM
22 | May
07:00PM

mixed media program

We Are Children Just the Same

Join us for an encore presentation of an original production about the children at Theresienstadt, written and performed by Columbia Prep Theatre high school students. This special evening will feature a video presentation of the play and a talk-back with the student artists about their creative process — which included a visit to the Center for Jewish History to meet a survivor of the Nazi ghetto and examine archival material from the Leo Baeck Institute.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

mixed media program

21 | May
07:00PM
21 | May
07:00PM

theater

“How is this Professor Freud, and how does he actually behave?” Diary of an Analysis, April 1921

Program change note: The performance of the one-woman play “Sabina Spielrein” originally scheduled for this date will not take place. Instead, LBI and The Zurich Meets New York Festival offer the following theatrical performance featuring Graziella Rossi.

During a house cleaning in 1988, a historical and sensational diary was found, which gave new insight into Sigmund Freud’s working method. In 1921, young Zurich doctor Anna G. had been engaged to her fiancé for seven years. She had ever-growing doubts about her future but could not find the strength to break off the engagement. In order to clarify matters, she turned to Freud, then 65 years old, who agreed to see her under the following conditions: she must visit him one hour a day, six days a week, for fourteen weeks. Swiss actress Graziella Rossi and Tom Regan vividly capture their fascinating sessions in this 45-minute staged reading.

The material is based on a book edited by the granddaughter of Anna G., psychoanalyst Anna Koellreuter. Wie Bennimmt sich der Prof. Freud Eigentlich? (2009) will be published in the US in 2015. A talk by Dr. Henry Zvi Lothane, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Mr. Sinai Hospital, will follow the performance.

Performance: Graziella Rossi and Tom Regan
Music: Saxophonist Harry White

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute in partnership with the Zürich Meets New York Festival

theater

19 | May
11:00AM
19 | May
11:00AM

book event

Second-Hand Book Sale

The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research will be selling duplicate copies of books from their library collections. Most books are about Jewish topics, including: memoirs, biographies, World War II, the Science of Judaism, collected works, academic studies, literature, art and photography. Books are also in languages ranging from English to Yiddish, German, Hebrew, Russian and Polish.

In addition, the participating organizations will be selling discounted titles from their regular publications.

All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund.

Paperbacks: $1
Hardcover: $3
Music and Movies: $1 to $3
Or priced as marked

Cash Only!

http://booksale.cjh.org/

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book event

19 | May
06:00PM
19 | May
06:00PM

film and discussion

Watchers of the Sky

Join us for a special preview screening of Watchers of the Sky, the Sundance Film Festival award-winning documentary that uncovers the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin. Lemkin coined the term “genocide” and campaigned for international laws that would prevent and punish this crime against humanity. The post-screening discussion will include Philippe Sands, distinguished international criminal lawyer and Professor of International Law at University College London, filmmaker Edet Belzberg, and Donna-Lee Frieze, editor of Lemkin’s recently published autobiography Totally Unofficial. A reception will follow the program.

“Edet Belzberg's sweeping survey of global genocide is an impressive and artful cinematic thesis of palpable substance.” –Variety

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

film and discussion

18 | May
11:00AM
18 | May
11:00AM

book event

Second-Hand Book Sale

The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research will be selling duplicate copies of books from their library collections. Most books are about Jewish topics, including: memoirs, biographies, World War II, the Science of Judaism, collected works, academic studies, literature, art and photography. Books are also in languages ranging from English to Yiddish, German, Hebrew, Russian and Polish.

In addition, the participating organizations will be selling discounted titles from their regular publications.

All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund.

Paperbacks: $1
Hardcover: $3
Music and Movies: $1 to $3
Or priced as marked

Cash Only!

http://booksale.cjh.org/

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book event

18 | May
11:00AM
18 | May
11:00AM

gesher galicia meeting

Austria, Poland, Ukraine: 3 Countries, 5 Archives, 12 Wonderful Days of Discovery

Speakers: Pamela Weisberger and John Diener

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

gesher galicia meeting

18 | May
02:00PM
18 | May
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Immigration and Naturalization Records: Beyond the Basics

Speaker: Zack Wilske of the US Citizenship and Immigrations Services

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

15 | May
07:00PM
15 | May
07:00PM

book talk

YIVO and the Making of Modern Jewish Culture: Scholarship for the Yiddish Nation

Enjoy a celebration of the first history written of YIVO by Cecile Kuznitz (Bard College). Founded after WWI, YIVO became the premier institution for Yiddish culture. This roundtable explores its history and future. With Cecile Kuznitz, Samuel Kassow (Trinity College), Simon Rabinovitch (Boston University) and Steven Zipperstein (Stanford University).

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

14 | May
07:30PM
14 | May
07:30PM

concert

Season Finale: Concerto Celebration

Enjoy this Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performance of piano concerti by Mozart, Bach and Chopin and a Beethoven string quartet. Featuring Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky on piano and the Emmy-nominated Enso Quartet.

Made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

13 | May
06:30PM
13 | May
06:30PM

film

The Last Jews of Baghdad

Produced by Carole Basri, Adriana Davis, Bryan Durr. USA 2005. 105 mins.

Today, only 5 Jews remain in Iraq from a population of 160,000. It is most shocking considering there has been a Jewish community in Iraq since 586 BCE. This year, 2014, is exactly the 2600 year anniversary of the destruction of the first temple and the beginning of the Babylonian exile.

This film asks the question, “Why did the Iraqi Jews leave?” The answer is found in the discriminatory laws and policies enacted by Iraq's government and leaders against these formerly important members of Iraqi society who today still consider themselves “Iraqi Jews”. “The Last Jews of Baghdad” offers personal recollections from members of this exiled group, contextualizing the country’s complicated political history. Through the words of those who survived discrimination, persecution and even hangings, we are painted a picture of what it meant to be a Jew in Iraq - from joyous picnics on the Tigress to the unbearable terror of life under the Saddam Hussein that came to define their lives.

Also showing Abdallah Simon: an Officer and a Gentleman Always. Produced by Carol Basri. USA 2012. 6 mins.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

film

07 | May
06:00PM
07 | May
06:00PM

curator's tour

Modeling the Synagogue - from Dura to Touro

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

07 | May
06:30PM
07 | May
06:30PM

theater

"Native Genius": A Night of Entertainment Celebrating the History of Jewish Contributions to American Theatre, 1800-1860

Join us for an evening of lively and interactive 19th-century theater featuring the drama, comedy, music and poetry of Jewish playwrights and artists from the pre-Civil War period. In conjunction with the exhibition By Dawn’s Early Light: Jewish Contributions to American Culture from the Nation’s Founding to the Civil War, on view through June 30.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

theater

07 | May
06:30PM
07 | May
06:30PM

book talk

Jewish Pasts, German Fictions

Jewish Pasts, German Fictions is the first comprehensive study of how German-Jewish writers used images from the Spanish-Jewish past to define their place in German culture and society. Jonathan Skolnik (UMass Amherst) argues that Jewish historical fiction was a form of cultural memory that functioned as a parallel to the modern, demythologizing project of secular Jewish history writing.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

05 | May
06:30PM
05 | May
06:30PM

panel discussion

The Quest for Jewish Ethics

What can we learn about Jewish ethics and the nearly 1,000-year-old tradition of mussar literature through the writings of key thinkers like Luzzatto and Levinas? Join expert scholars in a discussion of mussar’s formulation of Jewish ethics and the important role it plays in Jewish philosophy and observance. With Jonathan Garb (Hebrew University, Jerusalem), Patrick Koch (Center for Jewish History) and Elliot Wolfson (NYU), moderated by Shaul Magid (Indiana University).

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

04 | May
12:00PM
04 | May
12:00PM

meetup

Women in Jewish History Edit-a-thon

Have you ever been surprised to see that Wikipedia does not cover a certain notable Jewish woman? Or have you considered editing Wikipedia articles that exist? Perhaps you are simply curious about Wikipedia in general, or you’d like to take a look at some of the resources the Center’s partners hold on Jewish women.

The Center for Jewish History invites you to join us, either on-site or from a distance, for the Women in Jewish History Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on Sunday, May 4th at the Center for Jewish History, 15 W. 16th Street from noon to 5 pm.

No special knowledge of Jewish history or Wikipedia is required to participate. Experts will be on hand to demonstrate basic Wikipedia editing and answer your questions, and you will have access to relevant resources. If you cannot make it to the Center that day, you are welcome to participate virtually from wherever you are!

To participate, please (1) bring your own laptop, and (2) get a head start by creating a Wikipedia user account: click here.

Light refreshments will be provided. More information and inspiration can be found on this page.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

meetup

04 | May
03:00PM
04 | May
03:00PM

concert and lecture

Open Secret: The Jewish Sound in Soviet Music

James Loeffler (University of Virginia), Maestro Yuval Waldman and the artists of the Sidney Krum Young Artists Concert Series perform a special lecture-concert about major Soviet composers who found deep inspiration in Ashkenazi Jewish folk music and incorporated it into their work. This series is made possible by a gift from the Estate of Sidney Krum.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert and lecture

30 | Apr
06:00PM
30 | Apr
06:00PM

artist's tour

Home Suite - Drawings by Traci Tullius

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

30 | Apr
08:00PM
30 | Apr
08:00PM

panel discussion

Uprooted: New Perspectives on Jewish Refugees and Migrants after World War II

The events surrounding the end of World War II and the establishment of the State of Israel prompted mass migrations of Jews. Journalist Peter Beinart leads a discussion of this dramatic period, bringing together the experiences of Ashkenazi and Mizrahi Jewish migrants in Eastern Europe, Allied-occupied Germany and Israel. With Natalia Aleksiun (Touro College), Avinoam Patt (University of Hartford), Orit Bashkin (University of Chicago) and Ori Yehudai (Center for Jewish History/Israel Institute).

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish History

panel discussion

29 | Apr
06:00PM
29 | Apr
06:00PM

discussion

Preservation Week: Ask the Experts

Join us at our “Ask the Experts” information and demonstration evening, 6-7.30pm. Bring one artifact from your personal heritage collections (see the list of covered material types below) to get specialized preservation information. Speak to archive & library professionals and get informational handouts for preserving your collections at home. See demonstrations of what is good and what not to do.

Topics: Library materials, Photographic materials, Scrapbooks and archival, materials, Audio-visual materials, Digital preservation

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

discussion

29 | Apr
06:30PM
29 | Apr
06:30PM

panel discussion

Reinventing Jewishness in Post-Communist Hungary: Antisemitism and Jewish Renaissance

How can young Hungarian Jews shape public history and memory in a country ruled by an antisemitic party? How does a Jewish community that has historically defined itself against conservatism, traditionalism and religion make sense of its Jewish heritage? Historian Anna Manchin (Prins Postdoctoral Fellow, CJH), historian Michael Miller (Central European University), and activist Adam Schonberger will discuss contemporary Jewish life in Budapest.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

28 | Apr
06:00PM
28 | Apr
06:00PM

tour

Preservation Week: Behind the Scenes

Come on a “Behind the Scenes” tour of CJH preservation spaces: Conservation Laboratory, Digitization Laboratory, Archival Processing center. There will be tours at 6pm & 6.30pm, places are limited.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

tour

28 | Apr
06:30PM
28 | Apr
06:30PM

tour

Preservation Week: Behind the Scenes

Come on a “Behind the Scenes” tour of CJH preservation spaces: Conservation Laboratory, Digitization Laboratory, Archival Processing center. There will be tours at 6pm & 6.30pm, places are limited.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

tour

28 | Apr
07:00PM
28 | Apr
07:00PM

16th street book club

Wide Awake by David Levithan (2006)

In the not-too-impossible-to-imagine future, a gay Jewish man has been elected president of the United States. Until the governor of one state decides that some election results in his state are invalid, awarding crucial votes to the other candidate, and his fellow party member. Thus is the inspiration for couple Jimmy and Duncan to lend their support to their candidate by deciding to take part in the rallies and protests. Along the way comes an exploration of their relationship, their politics, and their country, and sometimes, as they learn, it's more about the journey than it is about reaching the destination.

Only David Levithan could so masterfully and creatively weave together a plot that's both parts political action and reaction, as well as a touching and insightfully-drawn teen love story.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

28 | Apr
07:00PM
28 | Apr
07:00PM

discussion

The Life and Art of Krystiana Robb-Narbutt (1945-2006)

Featuring Marek Bartelik, Dorota Jarecka and Wanda Siedlecka

Award-winning Polish Jewish artist, Krystiana Robb-Narbutt was one of the most influential, socially-engaged artists in Poland in her lifetime. But for years Robb-Narbutt's art was dominated by loss. Drawing the same motif again and again of a tombstone or an ominous mountain, Robb-Narbutt used her art to try and come to terms with the horror of the Holocaust and her own personal tragedy of losing family in the war. How did Robb-Narbutt's Polish Jewish identity impact her work? How do we understand Robb-Narbutt's art? In this program, art historian, Marek Bartelik, art critic, Dorota Jarecka, and artist, Wanda Siedlecka, will discuss Robb-Narbutt’s life, her compulsive exploration of her Jewishness through her work, and new approaches to understanding her art.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

discussion

27 | Apr
02:00PM
27 | Apr
02:00PM

film screening and lecture

The Forbidden Tragedy: History and Memory of the Shoah in the Soviet Union Yom Hashoah Memorial Program

Nearly 3 million Soviet Jews died in the Holocaust. However, unlike Jews in Eastern Europe, Soviet Jews were not sent to concentration camps. Join Anna Shternshis, University of Toronto, to examine the scale, story and lack of memorialization of the Holocaust in the USSR.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film screening and lecture

24 | Apr
07:00PM
24 | Apr
07:00PM

discussion

Jews and the Ukrainian Revolution 2014

Josef Zissels, Vaad, Association of Jewish Communities and Organizations of Ukraine; David Fishman (Moderator), Jewish Theological Seminary

“Your certainty of the growth of anti-Semitism in Ukraine...does not correspond to the actual facts. It seems you have confused Ukraine with Russia, where Jewish organizations have noticed growth in anti-Semitic tendencies last year.”
– March 26, “Open Letter of Ukrainian Jews to Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin”

What is the political situation in Ukraine post-Maidan? What is the new Ukrainian government’s attitude towards its Jews and minorities? On March 26, leaders of the Ukrainian Jewish community published an open letter in The New York Times disputing Putin’s claims of high levels of anti-Semitism and accusing him of using these claims to destabilize the region. But others are expressing deep concerns about recent anti-Semitic violence in Ukraine, as well as about the Svoboda party, a junior partner in the protest movement, which is overtly anti-Semitic, and some would argue, neo-Nazi.

Join Josef Zissels, the preeminent leader of Ukrainian’s Jewish community, for a look at the political situation in Ukraine today, Ukraine’s relationship to Russia and the EU, and what Ukrainian Jews and minorities can expect from the new government.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

discussion

23 | Apr
06:30PM
23 | Apr
06:30PM

film and discussion

There Was Once…

The second of two films screened in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of nationwide Jewish deportations in Hungary, There Was Once… documents the contemporary struggles of a Hungarian high school teacher who sparks controversy by uncovering the Jewish past of her small town, Kalocsa. Director Gábor Kálmán, a Holocaust survivor from Kalocsa, will introduce the film and discuss the memory of Jewish life in Hungary.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

film and discussion

22 | Apr
22 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, April 22 for Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

21 | Apr
21 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, April 21 for Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

20 | Apr
11:00AM
20 | Apr
11:00AM

screening

The Story of the Jews: Parts 1 and 2

See the entire PBS series, narrated by Simon Schama, with a 1-hour intermission between Parts 1 and 2.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

screening

17 | Apr
07:00PM
17 | Apr
07:00PM

performance

Speak Up! Open Mic in Yiddish

Join celebrated host, actor and singer Shane Baker—and special guests—for a fun, intimate night of performance. Bring your instruments, poems, monologues, manifestos and films in Yiddish to share.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Congress for Jewish Culture

performance

16 | Apr
16 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, April 16 for Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

15 | Apr
15 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, April 15 for Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

14 | Apr
14 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Monday, April 14 for Erev Pesach.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

09 | Apr
06:00PM
09 | Apr
06:00PM

curator's tour

Light and Shadows: The Story of Iranian Jews

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

09 | Apr
06:30PM
09 | Apr
06:30PM

book talk

Loyalty Betrayed: Jewish Chaplains in the German Army during the First World War

Around 30 Jewish chaplains served in the German army during WWI, providing spiritual care for 100,000 Jewish soldiers plus Jewish refugees made homeless by the Tsarist army. Author Peter Appelbaum has collected, translated, and annotated their memoirs and diaries for the first time in English.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

07 | Apr
06:30PM
07 | Apr
06:30PM

book talk

The Jews in the Caribbean

Explore Caribbean Jewry, and Jamaican Jewry in particular, from its Sephardic beginnings in the 17th century until the 20th century. Join Professor Jane S. Gerber (editor of this volume) and Ainsley Henriques (leader of the 350-year-old Jewish community of Jamaica) for a discussion and book signing.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

06 | Apr
11:00AM
06 | Apr
11:00AM

symposium

Passing the Torch: Jewish Music Archives and the Future of Yiddish Song

How can music archives foster new art and scholarship? This symposium brings together archivists, scholars and musicians to discuss the history of Yiddish folk music archives and its potential to inspire new work. Chaired by Mark Slobin, Wesleyan University.

Panel 1: Jewish Music Archives: Structuring a Passion for Folksong
In the Beginning Were Ginzburg and Marek: A Brief History of Yiddish Folksong Collecting
Robert Rothstein, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

“Hobn Mir A Nigndl”: The Songs Our Israeli Grandchildren Don't Sing Yiddish Song Collections at the National Library of Israel as a Source for Research
Gila Flam, National Library of Israel

Rediscovering Yiddish Folk Songs in Ukraine: History, Archival Access and Future
Lyudmila Sholokhova, YIVO Institute

Songs of Generations: Contributions of Chana Mlotek
Mark Slobin, Wesleyan University

Performance and Presentation of Materials from the Ruth Rubin Archive at YIVO

Zog mir, mayn shvester/Tell Me, My Sister: Working with the Ruth Rubin Archive
Lorin Sklamberg, The Klezmatics, YIVO Institute

Panel 2: Passing the Torch: Archives and Activism in the 21st Century

Roundtable discussion with: Mark Slobin, Wesleyan University (Moderator); Gila Flam, National Library of Israel; Mark Kligman, Hebrew Union College, Columbia University; Hankus Netsky, New England Conservatory; and Lorin Sklamberg, The Klezmatics, YIVO Institute

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and American Society for Jewish Music

symposium

02 | Apr
07:00PM
02 | Apr
07:00PM

screening

Story of the Jews Premier - Part II

Prize-winning author of 15 books and Emmy Award-winner Simon Schama brings to life Jewish history and experience in a new five-part documentary series, The Story of the Jews with Simon Schama.

The Story of the Jews draws on primary sources that include the Elephantine papyri, a collection of 5th-century BC manuscripts illuminating the life of a town of Jewish soldiers and their families in ancient Egypt; the astonishing trove of documents — the Cairo Geniza — recording the world of the medieval Jews of the Mediterranean and Near East; the records of disputations between Christians and Jews in Spain; correspondence between the leader of the Arab revolt during World War I, Emir Feisal, and the leader of the Zionist movement, Chaim Weizmann.

Click here for information and tickets to Part I of The Story of the Jews.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

screening

31 | Mar
07:30PM
31 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

The Momenta String Quartet: Jewish Composers, Old and New

The Momenta String Quartet, Bernice Diener Ensemble-in-Residence at Stern College for Women, Yeshiva University performs the work of Jewish composers with music by Felix Mendelssohn and a world premiere by YU faculty composer David Glaser.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

concert

30 | Mar
02:00PM
30 | Mar
02:00PM

panel discussion

Eastern Jews - Western Jews: World War I and the Transformation of the Jewish Experience

The upheaval and mass migrations of World War I led to new encounters between Eastern and Western European Jews, and narrowed the divide between these two cultures. This roundtable examines the consequences of these encounters and the origins of the Jewish East-West division. With Steve Aschheim (Hebrew University), Hasia Diner (NYU), and Anson Rabinbach (Princeton University).

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

27 | Mar
06:30PM
27 | Mar
06:30PM

film and discussion

Free Fall

Acclaimed director Peter Forgacs explores the unique circumstances of the Holocaust in southern Hungary in his intimate film Free Fall, told through the home videos of a Jewish family in the 1940s. Forgács will introduce the film and join us for a post-screening discussion. This film screening commemorates the 70th anniversary of the beginning of nationwide mass deportations in Hungary.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish History

film and discussion

25 | Mar
07:00PM
25 | Mar
07:00PM

screening

Story of the Jews Premier - Part I

Prize-winning author of 15 books and Emmy Award-winner Simon Schama brings to life Jewish history and experience in a new five-part documentary series, The Story of the Jews with Simon Schama.

The Story of the Jews draws on primary sources that include the Elephantine papyri, a collection of 5th-century BC manuscripts illuminating the life of a town of Jewish soldiers and their families in ancient Egypt; the astonishing trove of documents — the Cairo Geniza — recording the world of the medieval Jews of the Mediterranean and Near East; the records of disputations between Christians and Jews in Spain; correspondence between the leader of the Arab revolt during World War I, Emir Feisal, and the leader of the Zionist movement, Chaim Weizmann.

Click here for information and tickets to Part II of The Story of the Jews.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

screening

24 | Mar
07:00PM
24 | Mar
07:00PM

lecture with musical examples

Mixing Musics: Istanbul Jews and Their Sacred Songs

Dr. Maureen Jackson traces the linked histories of Istanbul and its Jewish community, as well as the historical-musical vestiges of multi-religious music-making in Ottoman and Turkish society. She focuses on the Jewish religious repertoire that developed in interaction with Ottoman court music, and people, places, and practices that shaped an Ottoman music world and Jewish cultural life to present day. Dr. Munir Beken, ethomusicologist and oud master, will bring to life the Turkish musical forms at the heart of Dr. Jackson’s talk.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

lecture with musical examples

23 | Mar
02:00PM
23 | Mar
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

My Father's Wars: Migration, memory and the Violence of a Century

Speaker: Alisse Waterston, Ph.D, Professor at John Jay College of CUNY

In addition: From 12:30-1:30 in the Kovno Room : Bring your lunch and meet with fellow JGS members and experts in an informal setting to share research stories and ask questions.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

23 | Mar
05:00PM
23 | Mar
05:00PM

reading

Jewish Poetry Now: A Reading and Discussion Celebrating The Bloomsbury Anthology of Contemporary Jewish American Poetry

Prominent American poets read their contributions to this landmark anthology and engage in a discussion about what’s Jewish in Jewish poetry. Featuring Edward Hirsch, Jacqueline Osherow, Victoria Redel, Amy Gottlieb, Nomi Stone, Judith Baumel, Jason Schneiderman, Sharon Dolin, Cheryl J. Fish and Deborah Ager. Moderated by Miriam R. Haier. A wine and cheese reception will follow the discussion.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading

20 | Mar
07:00PM
20 | Mar
07:00PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Closing Night

Film:  Would I Lie to You #3 (New York Premiere)
La Verite si Je Mens #3
Director: Thomas Gilou
Would I Lie to You #3 has the buddies in business as garment workers-cum-dealmakers trying to salvage their professional and personal livelihoods amid countless obstacles. ASF honoree, Enrico Macias, has a role in this fun film. Will their escapades tear them apart or will they, once again, triumph with panache!  

France, 2012. 115 mins. French, Mandarin, Hebrew, English w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

19 | Mar
03:00PM
19 | Mar
03:00PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Would I Lie to You #3 (Sneak Preview)

La Verite si Je Mens #3
Director: Thomas Gilou
Would I Lie to You #3 has the buddies in business as garment workers-cum-dealmakers trying to salvage their professional and personal livelihoods amid countless obstacles. ASF honoree, Enrico Macias, has a role in this fun film. Will their escapades tear them apart or will they, once again, triumph with panache!

France, 2012. 115 mins. French, Mandarin, Hebrew, English w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

19 | Mar
06:30PM
19 | Mar
06:30PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Stolen Documents? Franco and the Holocaust (US Premiere)

Documentos robados? Franco y el Holocausto
Director: Yolanda Villaluenga
With the outbreak of WWII, Jews from all over Europe looked to Spain as a possible refuge or as the only possible transit route to safety in the Americas. How did the Franco regime treat Eastern European Jews and the Sephardim trying to escape Europe by crossing the Pyrenees? What was the role of Spanish consuls in Paris, Berlin, or Budapest, as deportations to concentration camps accelerated? Why have thousands of documents having to do with Franco’s policy regarding the Jews during WWII disappeared? Was Franco, the Spanish dictator who admired Hitler and Mussolini, a defender of the Jewish people during the Holocaust or was a myth created with a clear purpose in mind? The film attempts to answer these questions with testimonies of Jewish families, people who helped save them, and historians. Included are fragments of a unique film shot in Sephardic communities of Greece at the beginning of the 20th century.

Spain, 2012. 53 mins. Spanish w/English subtitles.

Post-screening discussion with the filmmaker.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

19 | Mar
07:00PM
19 | Mar
07:00PM

book talk

Beyond the Myth of the Shtetl: A New History of Jewish Life in East Europe

In his new book, Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern (Northwestern University) challenges popular misconceptions of the shtetl as an isolated Jewish village stricken with poverty and pogroms, and explains why shtetls in the 18th and 19th centuries were thriving, dynamic Jewish societies.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

19 | Mar
08:00PM
19 | Mar
08:00PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

The Stigma? (US Premiere)

l’Estigma?
Director: Martí Sans
The Stigma? grew out of its director’s practically expiatory need to take a second look at his own prejudices. Focused on Spain, and more specifically, on Catalonia, the film unravels the history and mutations of Judeophobia, from the Christian accusations of “deicide” to the appearance of the modern State of Israel. It exposes the widespread ignorance that exists in many quarters regarding things Jewish and discusses the anti-Israel slant of a part of the Spanish press.

Spain, 2012. 73 mins. Catalan, Spanish and Hebrew w/English subtitles.

Post-screening discussion with the filmmaker.

A wine reception follows the films!

The presentation of Stolen Documents? and The Stigma? is made possible through the generous support of the Consulate General of Spain in New York, Cultural Consul, Iñigo Ramirez de Haro, Cultural Officer, Águeda Sanfiz and Alba Parejo.

Thanks to the Institut Ramon Llull for its support of the translation of The Stigma?

Sincere appreciation to Daniel Sherr for his work in translating both scripts from Catalan and Spanish into English.
 

Thanks to Dr. Moisés Cohen and Elvi Wines (www.elviwines.com) for providing the wine for this evening’s reception.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
06:30PM
18 | Mar
06:30PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Enrico Macias: A Life in Song

Director: Antoine Casubolo Ferro
A Jewish pied-noir musician and singer, Enrico Macias, is a unique figure in the French musical landscape.  Over the past 50 years, the boy from Constantine, Algeria, has become the spokesman for the thousands of North African, and other Middle Eastern Jews, who fled their homelands in the 1950’s and 1960’s.  A utopian, singing of love and friendship between nations, he has gradually become not only a messenger for peace, but also one of the most popular singers in France.

France, 2012. 52 mins. French w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
07:30PM
18 | Mar
07:30PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Shadow in Baghdad (New York Premiere)

Director: Duki Dror
For 2000 years Jews played a major role in Iraqi society and an important role in the making of modern Iraq. Later the would be brutally driven out and virtually annihilated as a community. In this film a young journalist from Baghdad sets out to write about the family of Linda Abdul Aziz, an Iraqi Jew who escaped to Israel in the early 70's. Linda left Iraq, but her father stayed, only to disappear and his fate remain unknown. The film uncovers the tragic end of Linda's father, as well as that of the whole Jewish community, and shows how a generation of young Iraqis are beginning to acknowledge the tragedy inflicted on the Jewish community and the void they left behind.

The presentation of Shadow in Baghdad is made possible through the generous support of Jamil Ezra/Bweta Foundation.

Post-screening discussion with the filmmaker.

Israel, 2013. 65 mins. English and Hebrew w/English subtitles.

preceded by

What We Left Behind

Director: David Langer
In 2003, thousands of Jewish religious artifacts were saved from the basement of Suddam Hussein’s intelligence headquarters when American troops entered Baghdad. The film chronicles the final journey in New York ten years later (2013) of forty-nine Torah scrolls and religious documents framed in the turbulent history of Babylonian-Iraqi Jewry.

USA, 2014. 6mins

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

17 | Mar
03:00PM
17 | Mar
03:00PM

opera

Kisses to the Children

Director: Vassilis Loules
The stories of five Greek-Jewish children who were saved by Christian families during the German Occupation.  Their personal accounts of survival add an indelible humanity to the history and cover a wide range of issues, from social isolation to survivor guilt.   The film also depicts the life of the Greek Jewish communities before the War, with rare images of Occupied Greece from archival material, as well as amateur films by German soldiers and illegal footage shot by Greek patriots. 

Greece, 2011. 115 mins. Greek w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

opera

17 | Mar
05:30PM
17 | Mar
05:30PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

A Bookstore in Six Chapters:The Story of Renee and Solon Molho

Writer/Director: Edward Serotta
Renee Saltiel and Solon Molho grew up in one of the greatest Sephardic Jewish communities, Salonika, or Thessaloniki, in today's Greece. 90,000 Jews lived there before WWII and by the time the Germans had rounded up the city's Jews, almost none were left. A few returned. Renee and Solon did manage to survive, thanks to a Spanish diplomat and some very brave Greek families.

Produced by Centropa in cooperation with the Jewish Museum Berlin and the Jewish Museum Thessaloniki.

Vienna, 2013. 25 mins.

followed by

Once Upon a Time at 55th and Hoover

Director: Andrés Enrique-Arias
In the early 20th century 300 Sephardic families from Rhodes emigrated to Los Angeles (USA) and established a Judeo-Spanish (Ladino) language neighborhood in the area around 55th St and Hoover, in South Central Los Angeles. A century later the last survivors of that generation tell the story of the community and reflect upon their vanishing language and culture.

USA and Spain, 2013. 28 mins. English and Judeo-Spanish (Ladino), with English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

17 | Mar
06:30PM
17 | Mar
06:30PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

The Longest Journey: The Last Days of the Jewish Community of Rhodes

Director: Ruggero Gabbai
The 2,000 year-old Jewish community of Rhodes was almost destroyed when the majority of its residents were transported to Auschwitz on July 19, 1944. The film weaves together testimonies of three of the few Jews to have survived Auschwitz. They, along with the film crew, returned to Rhodes from their respective lives in New York, Rome and Brussels and recount memories of family and communal life, interactions with the local Greeks, Turks and Italians, cultural traditions, as well as the tragic last days of their community. The film provides a view of Jewish life in Rhodes under Italian dominion before the War. Through the lens of these narrators, their early lives in Rhodes unfold as a sort of ‘paradise lost’.

The presentation of The Longest Journey is made possible through the generous support of Florence Amzallag Tatistcheff.

Post-screening discussion with Stella Levi and Alessandro Cassin, Centro Primo Levi.

Italy, 2012. 50 mins. Italian w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

17 | Mar
08:00PM
17 | Mar
08:00PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Breaking the Wall (US Premiere)

Writer/Director: Yitzhak Halutzi
Dr. Vicki Shiran led a major social struggle for equal rights and for the advancement of Mizrahim in Israel for 30 years until her untimely death in 2004. Shiran’s story is also the story of the rise, and some say the fall, of the social struggle for equality that has characterized Israel in the past 40 years.

Post-screening discussion with the filmmaker and Dr. Shiran’s daughter, Ofrit Peres.

Israel, 2012. 66mins. Hebrew w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

16 | Mar
01:00PM
16 | Mar
01:00PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Joann Sfar Draws From Memory

Director: Sam Ball
The prolific Joann Sfar has published 150 graphic novels, including the French bestseller, The Rabbi’s Cat.  This portrait tracks his odyssey through the Algerian and Eastern European Jewish heritage that serves as the wellspring of his work. 

USA, 2012. 56 mins. French w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

16 | Mar
02:00PM
16 | Mar
02:00PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

The Rabbi's Cat

Directors: Joann Sfar, Antoine Delesvaux
This colorful, highly original and beautifully animated film adaptation of Joann Sfar’s bestselling graphic novel tells the story of a talking cat and his philosophical musings on religion.  It also reveals the colorful seaside world of 1920s Algiers, when Jews and Arabs coexisted in relative peace.

France, 2009. 89 mins. French w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

16 | Mar
04:00PM
16 | Mar
04:00PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Rita Jahan Farouz

Director: Ayal Goldberg
Rita Jahan Farouz immigrated to Israel from Iran with her family when she was eight years old. On the eve of her forty-ninth birthday, with tension between Tehran and Jerusalem looming, she records her first album in Farsi. At the same time we discover an intimate portrait of a family missing their homeland and their extended family, now scattered around the world.  A year later, Rita is invited to perform at the United Nations. The warm response she receives proves what is often forgotten: countries are made up of individuals, and there is nothing like music to bring them together.

Israel, 2013. 76mins. Hebrew, Farsi & English w/English subtitles.

preceded by

Reading Tehran in Tel-Aviv (World Premiere)

Director: George Itzhak
Iranian-Jewish identity is expressed through the stories of two women artists and activists, Orly Noy and Josephine Mairzadeh, who are engaged in creative work that attempts to create a bridge between Iran and Israel, and their identities:  the Iranian and the Jews.

The presentation of Reading Tehran in Tel-Aviv is made possible through the support of Yeshiva University Museum.

Join filmmaker George Itzhak, singer, composer, scholar Galeet Dardashti and artist Josephine Mairzadeh in conversation and Q&A following the films.

The film complements Yeshiva University Museum's exhibition, Light and Shadows: The Story of Iranian Jews. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the films.

USA, 2013. 20mins

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

16 | Mar
06:30PM
16 | Mar
06:30PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Handa Handa 4 (New York Premiere)

Directors: David Ofek, Neta Shoshani
Ronen and his girlfriend, Orit, have been dating for almost three years and her parents are demanding they either marry or break up.  They both come from highly respected Bukharian families.  Ronen and his brother, Hay, are the stars of the much loved Handa Handa theatre troupe.  Between tradition and modernity, we follow their story as we follow the brothers on the road with their show. 

Followed by a discussion and special presentation with Ronen and Hay Davidov!

Israel, 2013. 58 mins. Hebrew, English and Bukhari, Hebrew & English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

15 | Mar
08:00PM
15 | Mar
08:00PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

My Best Holiday (New York Premiere)

Director: Phillipe Lellouche
Claude and Isabelle, their sons, Simon (12) and Bibou (8), and his mother-in-law, travel to Brittany.  Isabelle has caught Claude cheating on her and has chosen the village of her childhood for their holiday.

Joined by friends, they are all greeted with a particularly chilly attitude at the Café Pondemer. North African Jews, Catholic Bretons, Parisians, provincial types: it's not easy to get along.  But, with humor and humility, bonds are formed. For Bibou and Simon, who falls in love for the first time, it’s their best vacation!

France, 2012. 94 mins. French w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

15 | Mar
09:45PM
15 | Mar
09:45PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Ballad of the Weeping Spring

Director: Benny Toraty
Twenty years after a car accident, for which he was held responsible, the legendary tar (lute) player Yosef Tawila (Uri Gavriel) is running a bar in northern Israel. The son (Dudu Tassa) of his band mate Avram, who also survived the accident, arrives with news that his father is dying. He brings notations for “The Weeping Springtime Symphony,” a piece Yosef and Avram worked on together but never performed . Yosef decides to reunite the remaining members of the band to grant his dying friend’s final wish—and perhaps to heal his own tortured soul. The film is filled  with outstanding music.

Israel, 2012. 105mins. Hebrew w/English subtitles.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

13 | Mar
06:30PM
13 | Mar
06:30PM

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Opening Night Benefit Gala Reception

Film:  Enrico Macias: A Life in Song
Director: Antoine Casubolo Ferro
A Jewish pied-noir musician and singer, Enrico Macias, is a unique figure in the French musical landscape.  Over the past 50 years, the boy from Constantine, Algeria, has become the spokesman for the thousands of North African, and other Middle Eastern Jews, who fled their homelands in the 1950’s and 1960’s.  A utopian, singing of love and friendship between nations, he has gradually become not only a messenger for peace, but also one of the most popular singers in France. 

France, 2012. 52 mins. French w/English subtitles.

followed by

Presentation of the ASF Pomegranate Lifetime Achievement Award to International Singer, Songwriter and Actor Enrico Macias.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

17th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

12 | Mar
06:00PM
12 | Mar
06:00PM

curator's tour

Light and Shadows: The Story of Iranian Jews

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and American Sephardi Federation

curator's tour

12 | Mar
07:30PM
12 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Famous Duos: Masterpieces for Violin and Piano

Enjoy this Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performance of Schubert’s Sonatina in D Major, Brahms’ Sonata No 2 in A Major and Prokofiev's Violin Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op 80, made possible by the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

10 | Mar
02:00PM
10 | Mar
02:00PM

lecture

Lost Souls: Retrieving Jewish War Orphans after the Holocaust

Dr. Pamela Joy Shatzkes, a London-based scholar and a recipient of the 2013 Fred and Ellen Lewis / JDC Archives Fellowship, will speak about the retrieval of Jewish war orphans who survived the Holocaust in the care of Christian families, monasteries and convents.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

lecture

10 | Mar
07:00PM
10 | Mar
07:00PM

panel discussion

Exploring Esther: The Origins, Values and Power of Purim

Join a cross-disciplinary panel of Yeshiva University scholars as they discuss the interpretive history of the Book of Esther, the story of the Jews in Persian lands, and the values and meaning of Purim today.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, Yeshiva University, Jewish Publication Society

panel discussion

09 | Mar
02:00PM
09 | Mar
02:00PM

purim celebration

The Whole Megillah

Yellow Sneaker Puppets will celebrate Purim in their family show Harry the Hamantaschen Tells the Whole Megillah…and then some! Purim has never been so mysterious, as Harry the Hamantaschen, Private Eye, takes the audience through the Purim story, back in time to the city of Shushan. Kids will cheer (and boo!) as the story unfolds and Esther and Mordechai save the day (with a little help from a hamantaschen in a fedora). Stay after the show to share some hamantaschen with Harry and for a special Purim art project, inspired by the YU Museum exhibition, Light & Shadows: The Story of Iranian Jews."

For families with children of all ages.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and Center for Jewish History

purim celebration

06 | Mar
04:00PM
06 | Mar
04:00PM

lecture and interactive presentation

Facets of Holocaust Research: Victims and Survivors, Possessions and Plunder Search strategies and Integrating Resources

In this interactive presentation, Dr. Rose Lerer Cohen will provide instruction to genealogists and other researchers interested in finding information about Holocaust victims, survivors, and their descendents around the world. While taking a closer look at a wide range of related resources, from major repositories to online databases, Dr. Cohen will outline research strategies useful to new and experienced genealogists alike.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

lecture and interactive presentation

06 | Mar
06:30PM
06 | Mar
06:30PM

book talk

Please Note: This Event Has Been Cancelled
Crossing the Borders of Time: A True Story of War, Exile, and Love Reclaimed

In her recent book, investigative reporter Leslie Maitland vividly depicts a world at war as she retraces her mother’s escape from Nazi Germany. During this event, she will discuss her family’s history in Freiburg in the Black Forest.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

04 | Mar
07:00PM
04 | Mar
07:00PM

lecture

Jacob Glatstein: A Yiddish Genius in Anglicizing America

Yiddish writers took off in America at the beginning of the 20th century and continued developing their talent even as their readers joined the English mainstream. Ruth Wisse (Harvard University) explores how Yiddish writer Jacob Glatstein wrestled with the decline in his readership through his work.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

02 | Mar
01:00PM
02 | Mar
01:00PM

symposium

Tevye's Daughters: How East European Jewish Women Confronted Modernity

Sholem Aleichem’s paradigm of Tevye’s rebellious daughters staking out new, secular alternatives to their parents’ traditional culture at the end of the 19th century has had a profound impact on our notions of East European Jewish women’s history. However, historians studying the women who tenaciously maintained tradition in the face of modernity have discovered that the effects of modernization on Jewish women were far more complex and varied. Elissa Bemporad and Glenn Dynner, co-chairs.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

symposium

25 | Feb
07:00PM
25 | Feb
07:00PM

max weinreich fellowship lecture

YIVO, Freud, and American Jewry: Discourse on Eastern Europe as a “Talking Cure” for American Jewish Ambivalence

Doctoral candidate Marcus Krah (JTS) explores how American Jews in the 1940s-50s used competing narratives of aspects of the East European Jewish past - from the shtetl, to pogroms, to Hasidism and Socialism - to find meaning in their American present.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich fellowship lecture

24 | Feb
06:30PM
24 | Feb
06:30PM

book talk

American Jewish Political Culture and the Liberal Persuasion

Henry L. Feingold speaks about his new book (Syracuse University Press, 2013). The sustained loyalty of the Jewish electorate to the Democratic party, while other ethnic voters cast their ballots elsewhere, has long puzzled political pundits and chagrined Republican stalwarts. Yet efforts to turn the Jewish vote have thus far failed. The majority of Jewish voters continue to pull down the democratic voting lever as if guided by some divine force. No Republican presidential candidate has won the Jewish vote since the election of Theodore Roosevelt in 1904.

Since the heady years of the New Deal, Jewish liberalism has found shelter under the left wing of that party and Jewish voters have become some of the most politically engaged citizens of the Republic. American Jewish Political Culture and the Liberal Persuasion searches for the source of such political engagement, exploring the constantly adapting liberalism at the heart of American Jewish political behavior. Drawing on sociology and philosophy to inform his historical synthesis of a centuries-long, transcontinental pattern, Feingold eschews voting statistics and political theory. Instead, he tells the story of three overarching concerns that weave throughout the political priorities of contemporary American Jews: an ever-changing definition of liberalism; the hope and turmoil of Israel; and the obsession with the Holocaust. The resulting tapestry demonstrates a culture of great complexity and a political voice that often lacks coherence despite these consistent threads.

The book begins with the historical background of American Jewish politics before delving into old roots and then moving onto a thematic understanding of American Jewry’s political psyche. This exhaustive work answers the grand question of where American Jewish liberalism comes from and ultimately questions whether the communal motivations behind such behavior are strong enough to withstand twenty-first-century America.

Henry L. Feingold is Professor Emeritus of history at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and Baruch College. He is the author of several books, including The Politics of Rescue: The Roosevelt Administration and the Holocaust and Bearing Witness: How America and Its Jews Responded to the Holocaust. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of Leo Baeck Institute.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and the American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

23 | Feb
02:00PM
23 | Feb
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

From Genealogy to History: Exploring the Jewish 20th Century through One Family's Story

Speaker: David Laskin

David Laskin's new book "The Family: Three Journeys into the heart of the 20th Century" tells the story of his mother's family, East European Jews who split into three branches at the turn of the last century. He will describe his genealogical research, using archives and resources in Europe, the U.S., and Israel, and the way in which family letters, memoirs, and historical documents helped him to understand family history in the broader context of the 20th Century.

In addition: From 12:30-1:30 in the Chapel: Bring your lunch and meet with fellow JGS members and experts in an informal setting to share research stories and ask questions.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

20 | Feb
07:00PM
20 | Feb
07:00PM

panel discussion

The Power of the Geniza

The Cairo Geniza is the single-most important resource for understanding the character of Jewish life in the Near East, where most of the world’s Jews lived in the Middle Ages. Join three top scholars - Arnold Franklin, Eve Krakowski and Marina Rustow - as they reflect on the intellectual power and potential of the Geniza and their own personal experiences studying it.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and American Sephardi Federation

panel discussion

19 | Feb
06:00PM
19 | Feb
06:00PM

curator's tour

Light and Shadows: The Story of Iranian Jews

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and American Sephardi Federation

curator's tour

19 | Feb
07:00PM
19 | Feb
07:00PM

The Impact of World War I and the Russian Revolution on the World of Russian and East European Jewry

Eminent historian Richard Pipes (Baird Professor of History, Emeritus, Harvard University) examines the impact of World War I and the Russian Revolution on Russian and East European Jewry, and the political and social upheaval it caused for these communities.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

18 | Feb
06:30PM
18 | Feb
06:30PM

film and discussion

American Jerusalem: Jews and the Making of San Francisco

Jewish immigrants played a central role in transforming San Francisco from a sleepy village to a thriving metropolis. In the process they reinvented themselves as well, becoming a distinctly new kind of Jew - a San Francisco Jew. Join us for a discussion in which a panel of scholars explore the intertwined destinies of San Francisco and the Jews who settled there.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute and The National Center for Jewish Film

film and discussion

17 | Feb
17 | Feb

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, February 17th for President's Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

14 | Feb
10:30AM
14 | Feb
10:30AM

roundtable discussion

Unresolved History: Jews and Lithuanians after the Holocaust

This event is a critical discussion about the issues facing Jews in Lithuania today and the controversies surrounding mainstream perceptions of the Holocaust in Lithuania. With Leonidas Donskis (European Union Parliament), Faina Kukliansky (Chair, Lithuanian Jewish Community) Saulius Sužiedelis (Millersville University), Tomas Venclova (Yale University), and Mikhail Iossel (Moderator).

Co-sponsored by Tablet Magazine, SLS/Summer Literary Seminars, and the University of Illinois at Chicago

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

roundtable discussion

13 | Feb
06:00PM
13 | Feb
06:00PM

book talk

PLEASE NOTE: Loyalty Betrayed: has been rescheduled for April 9, 2014

Around 30 Jewish chaplains served in the German army during WWI, providing spiritual care for 100,000 Jewish soldiers plus Jewish refugees made homeless by the Tsarist army. Author Peter Appelbaum has collected, translated, and annotated their memoirs and diaries for the first time in English.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

13 | Feb
07:00PM
13 | Feb
07:00PM

roundtable discussion

PLEASE NOTE: This event is rescheduled for tomorrow (2/14) at 10:30am. Unresolved History: Jews and Lithuanians after the Holocaust

Join us for a critical discussion about the issues facing Jews in Lithuania today and the controversies surrounding mainstream perceptions of the Holocaust in Lithuania. With Leonidas Donskis (European Union Parliament), Faina Kukliansky (Chair, Lithuanian Jewish Community) Saulius Sužiedelis (Millersville University), Tomas Venclova (Yale University), and Mikhail Iossel (Moderator).

Co-sponsored by Tablet Magazine, SLS/Summer Literary Seminars, and the University of Illinois at Chicago

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

roundtable discussion

06 | Feb
06:30PM
06 | Feb
06:30PM

panel discussion

Jews, Cities and Culture: Hamburg, New York and Kiev

Art museums, galleries, libraries, concert halls and political arenas have long been hallmarks of culturally sophisticated urban centers. Join us for a lively discussion of how the features of three distinct cities provided settings for the flowering of Jewish cultural and intellectual life, and how Jews, in turn, contributed to the larger life of the cities in which they lived, often on the margins. With Emily J. Levine (Dreamland of Humanists), Tony Michels (A Fire in their Hearts: Yiddish Socialists in New York), Natan Meir (Kiev: Jewish Metropolis - A History 1859-1914) and Alisa Solomon (Wonder of Wonders: A Cultural History of Fiddler on the Roof).

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish History

panel discussion

06 | Feb
07:00PM
06 | Feb
07:00PM

lecture and conversation

Y. L. Peretz in a Time of Revolution

In this talk, Michael Steinlauf (Gratz College) examines Peretz’s ideas during the 1905 Revolution when he developed his fullest articulation of the glories and dangers of building a modern culture in the diaspora. This program is in Yiddish.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture and conversation

03 | Feb
07:00PM
03 | Feb
07:00PM

panel discussion

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the inclement weather, this event will be rescheduled.
Iranian Jewish Identity

A large community of Iranian Jews – both within and outside Iran – continues the traditions of one of the world's oldest Jewish communities. Join a panel of writers, scholars and local community members as they discuss the richness and complexity of being an Iranian Jew.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, American Sephardi Federation and Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

27 | Jan
07:30PM
27 | Jan
07:30PM

book talk

A Guide for the Perplexed - A Conversation with Dara Horn

In her critically acclaimed new novel, A Guide for the Perplexed, Dara Horn uses the Cairo Geniza as the backdrop for a powerful story about our search for knowledge, intimacy and enlightenment. Intertwining the remarkable story of the Geniza's discovery with a dramatic contemporary tale of a futuristic software program that records everything its users do, A Guide is a riveting story and an insightful meditation on the power and limits of human imagination, as well as on the tension between faith and reason.

Join us for a special conversation with the author in combination with a viewing of Yeshiva University Museum's Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo's Ben Ezra Synagogue. Featured in the exhibition are two manuscripts by Moses Maimonides, including a draft of a portion of his Guide for the Perplexed, one of the greatest philosophical works of the Middle Ages - and an inspiration for Horn's novelistic tour-de-force. Guests are invited to visit the exhibition before the program, beginning at 6:45pm.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

book talk

26 | Jan
03:00PM
26 | Jan
03:00PM

lecture with musical examples

America's Enduring Cantorate

The roles of cantors, and the music they sing, have developed from European heritage and responded to changing aesthetic needs across centuries. Noted scholars Dr. Mark Kligman and Dr. Mark Slobin, and Cantors Jack Mendelsohn and Barbara Ostfeld-Horowitz, will explore the legacies of cantors in America.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

lecture with musical examples

20 | Jan
20 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed on Monday, January 20th for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

19 | Jan
11:00AM
19 | Jan
11:00AM

film roundtable

The Afterlives of Edgar G. Ulmer

Long overshadowed by the more celebrated careers of fellow Austrian- and German-born Jewish émigré filmmakers, Edgar G. Ulmer’s work is now finally receiving a new wave of critical appreciation more than four decades after his death. This event marks the publication of Noah Isenberg’s new biography - Edgar G. Ulmer: A Filmmaker at the Margins - and serves as the culmination of two weekends of film screenings organized by the Film Society of Lincoln Center. The roundtable discussion features Arianné Ulmer Cipes, the director’s daughter and head of the Edgar G. Ulmer Preservation Corp., Viennese film critic Stefan Grissemann, and New School Professor and author Noah Isenberg. A light breakfast will be served at 11:00 am and the program will begin at 11:30 am.

Related program:
Edgar G. Ulmer: Back From the Margins (January 10 - 18 at the Film Society of Lincoln Center): Long overshadowed by the more celebrated careers of his fellow Austrian- and German-born peers, the work of Edgar G. Ulmer—ranging from daring and original horror films and B-pictures of diverse genres to powerful Yiddish features and film noir classics like Detour (1945)—is finally receiving a new wave of critical appreciation over four decades after his death. Visit http://filmlinc.com/ulmer for details.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute, the Film Society of Lincoln Center, Austrian Cultural Forum NYC, Dietrich W. Botstiber Foundation, and Eugene Lang College - The New School for Liberal Arts

film roundtable

19 | Jan
02:00PM
19 | Jan
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

Jewish Records Indexing-Poland: A New Era Has Begun

Speaker: Hadassah Lipsius

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

15 | Jan
07:00PM
15 | Jan
07:00PM

concert and artist talkback

Two Worlds/Tsvey Veltn: CD Release Concert

Benjy Fox-Rosen and his ensemble perform Two Worlds/Tsvey Veltn, a stunning new song cycle based on the poetry of Mordechai Gebirtig. Fox-Rosen combines traditional and new music to interpret Gebirtig’s poetry and Gebirtig’s searing depictions of Poland before and during the war. This event is part of the YIVO-Bard Winter Program on Ashkenazi Civilization, January 6-23, 2014.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert and artist talkback

13 | Jan
03:00PM
13 | Jan
03:00PM

archive launch

Survey of Jewish Archival Records in Southern Transylvania and Bukovina

In 2013, LBI conducted an extensive survey of Jewish-related archives in Bukovina and Transylvania, formerly German-speaking regions of Romania. At this event celebrating the launch of the survey’s online catalog, archivists Julie Dawson and Ryan Mendenhall and historian Leo Spitzer present what they uncovered.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

archive launch

13 | Jan
07:00PM
13 | Jan
07:00PM

discussion/performance

Judah Halevi in Word and Sound - Poetry, Piyyut, and Liturgy

The writing of Judah Halevi bridges poetry and piyyut, secular text and religious liturgy. Join anthropologist and vocalist Galeet Dardashti, professor Raymond Scheindlin and cantor Emanuel Shalom, together with musicians, as they trace the origins and cultural contexts of Halevi’s work and bring to life the sounds of his words.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and American Sephardi Federation

discussion/performance

08 | Jan
06:00PM
08 | Jan
06:00PM

curator's tour

Threshold to the Sacred: The Ark Door of Cairo’s Ben Ezra Synagogue

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

06 | Jan
07:00PM
06 | Jan
07:00PM

Rethinking Kishinev: How a Riot Changed 20th Century Jewish History

Kishinev's 1903 pogrom was the first event in Russian Jewish life to receive international attention. Steven Zipperstein (Stanford University) examines why it had such impact, and why it became a prism through which Russian Jewish history has been defined. This event was the keynote address for the YIVO-Bard Winter Program on Ashkenazi Civilization, January 6-23, 2014.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

05 | Jan
01:00PM
05 | Jan
01:00PM

memorial program

Remembering Mikhl Herzog

Mikhl Herzog (1927-2013) was the first dean of YIVO’s Max Weinreich Center and editor-in-chief of the monumental project, The Language and Culture Atlas of Ashkenazic Jewry. Join us to celebrate his life, work and contributions to Yiddish culture and YIVO.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

memorial program

01 | Jan
01 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, January 1 for New Year's Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures