28 | Dec
12:30PM
28 | Dec
12:30PM

lecture

Highlights and Treasures from the YIVO Archives

As part of the first Yiddish New York festival (December 24-29), YIVO’s archivists present a rare and inside look at YIVO Institute for Jewish History's collection with examples from its book holdings, manuscripts, and sound recordings.

Presented by: YIVO, the 14th Street Y, The Educational Alliance, The Museum at Eldridge Street, The New York Klezmer Series, and The Town and Village Synagogue. yiddishnewyork.com

lecture

26 | Dec
08:00PM
26 | Dec
08:00PM

4th annual adrienne cooper memorial concert

Dreaming in Yiddish: Adrienne Cooper Memorial Concert

*Venue: Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

36 Battery Place, NYC
Celebrate the life and work of Adrienne Cooper, Yiddish singer, scholar, and former Assistant Director at YIVO. Stars of the klezmer and Yiddish world, including Frank LondonSarah GordonMichael Winograd, and Joshua Dolgin present an evening of music dedicated to her legacy.

Presented by: the Adrienne Cooper Fund for Dreaming in Yiddish; co-sponsored by YIVO in association with Yiddish New York, GOH Productions, The National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene, and The Museum of Jewish Heritage

4th annual adrienne cooper memorial concert

25 | Dec
25 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, December 25 for Christmas.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | Dec
24 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm on Thursday, December 24, and is closed Friday, December 25 for Christmas.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

21 | Dec
03:00PM
21 | Dec
03:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

The Polish Underground and the Jews, 1939-1945

In this lecture, Joshua Zimmerman (Yeshiva University) discusses his new book, The Polish Underground and the Jews, 1939–1945, confronting one of the central sources of contention in Polish-Jewish history: the Polish Underground’s treatment of Jews during WWII.

Sponsored by the family of Ruth Gay.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

14 | Dec
06:30PM
14 | Dec
06:30PM

family history today 2015 lecture

Jewish Populations in Europe, 1750-1950: Maps for Your Research

With the frequently changing borders of European countries in the 18th – 20th centuries, it can be a challenge to understand the locations of Jewish communities of interest within those countries. On behalf of the International Institute for Jewish Genealogy, Sandy Crystall developed a series of digital maps that show the populations of as many as 700 Jewish communities, along with the contemporaneous boundaries of countries and smaller administrative units (provinces), serving as snapshots of the geopolitical context of Jewish demographics over the course of this tumultuous period. This presentation will provide information about the creation of these digital maps and how they can be used to assist in genealogical research. Sandy Crystall has a post-baccalaureate certificate in Geographic Information Systems and has been an amateur genealogist for more than 25 years.

This program will be held in the Kovno Room on the 2nd floor.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today 2015 lecture

14 | Dec
07:00PM
14 | Dec
07:00PM

celebration

The Silk Road Experience: a Night of Food, Fashion, and Music

Come experience the sumptuous sights, sounds, and tastes of the Silk Road as the American Sephardi Federation hosts a fashion show and souk. For hundreds of years, people, goods, and ideas traveled along the famous trade route, creating a rich and diverse cultural legacy. Sephardi travelers and traders, publishers and philosophers, scientists and singers used the Silk Road to transcend borders and barriers (linguistic, cultural, religious) as they pioneered today’s globalized world.

Focusing on textiles, our celebration will feature original designs by Siona Benjamin and Shahin Yousefzadeh (Shahin Design Madison Avenue). Mumbai-born artist Siona Benjamin, having grown up in the enigmatic community of the Bene Israel in India, synthesizes her Jewish roots with the Hindu, Catholic, Muslim, and Zoroastrian iconography of her homeland. Shahin Yousefzadeh, a member of New York’s Persian-Jewish community, creates custom made couture fashion for professional, stylish and spirited women in New York and across the globe.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

celebration

13 | Dec
03:00PM
13 | Dec
03:00PM

annual hanukkah concert

The Klezmer All-Stars with Frank London & Eleanor Reissa

The Klezmer All-Stars with Frank London and Eleanor Reissa invigorate Chanukah! Get the magic of the music and share the miracle of the lights. Plus a story from the pen of a great Jewish writer,menorah lighting, singing and refreshments.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

annual hanukkah concert

13 | Dec
06:00PM
13 | Dec
06:00PM

sidney krum young artists concert series

Gershwin, Copland, Bernstein: Jewish Roots in American Music

In this lecture-concert, Orin Grossman (Fairfield University) and the artists of the Sidney Krum Concert Series explore three giants of American music and the Jewish influences on their work: Aaron Copland (1900-1990), George Gershwin (1898-1937), and Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990).

Sponsored by the Sidney Krum Estate.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

sidney krum young artists concert series

09 | Dec
07:00PM
09 | Dec
07:00PM

film

Alyad: The Refusenik Movement

Jewish Museum and Tolerance Centre in Moscow presents the documentary film "Alyad" about the Refusenik movement in the U.S. Director and screenwriter: Nika Vashakidze, Cinematography: Maxim Drozdov, Concept and academic advisor - Olesya Shayduk-Immerman.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society in collaboration with the Moscow Museum

film

08 | Dec
07:00PM
08 | Dec
07:00PM

exhibit opening & hanukkah celebration

Shmattes

Join us to celebrate the opening of Shmattes and light the third Hanukkah candle! Shmattes surveys the numerous ways in which hip, secular, young American Jews wear their Jewishness on their sleeves, literally.  Featuring contemporary, funny, edgy Jewish-themed t-shirts on display. Special wine, latkes and music reception for Hanukkah -- come schmooze!  Live t-shirt printing: buy 1 ticket, get 1 tee printed for you on-site for FREE!  Exhibit on display through March 2016.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

exhibit opening & hanukkah celebration

07 | Dec
06:30PM
07 | Dec
06:30PM

first response: postwar cinema and the holocaust

The Unvanquished

Remarkably, The Unvanquished (1945) was the first Soviet film portraying the mass murder of Jews and one of the first ever Holocaust films. Rare scenes of mass executions were filmed on location in Babi Yar, a symbol of the Holocaust in the Soviet Union. The Unvanquished depicted the Holocaust using motifs that would reappear in later international films.

Discussants: Anna Shternshis, University of Toronto and Olga Gershenson, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

The First Response: Postwar Cinema And The Holocaust Series is curated by Olga Gershenson.This series explores films of the immediate postwar era produced in the US, Poland, Germany, and Soviet Union. Coming from both sides of the Iron Curtain, these four films present international cinema’s first responses to the Holocaust, influencing both later Holocaust representations and our present understanding of the catastrophic events. First Response Film Series has been supported by a generous grant from The David Berg Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

first response: postwar cinema and the holocaust

06 | Dec
01:00PM
06 | Dec
01:00PM

artist's workshop

Family Portraits with Andi Arnovitz

Join Israel-based artist Andi Arnovitz for a hands-on workshop that uses photographs and stories to create collaged portraits of family members across the generations. Participants should bring copies of personal photographs to use within the collage. The program complements Threatened Beauty, an exhibition of Arnovitz's collage and watercolor works.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's workshop

06 | Dec
02:30PM
06 | Dec
02:30PM

lecture and theatrical reading

Exile in the Spotlight: Kurt Hirschfeld and German- language Theater at the Schauspielhaus Zurich

Kurt Hirschfeld built Zurich into the last bastion of free German theater in the 30s, premiered Brecht’s Mother Courage during WWII, and introduced audiences to Swiss literary giants Max Frisch and Friedrich Dürrenmatt. Theater scholar Wendy Arons (Carnegie Mellon) presents her research on Hirschfeld and actors read from his correspondence.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

lecture and theatrical reading

06 | Dec
08:00PM
06 | Dec
08:00PM

concert

Soviet Songs with a Jewish Flavor: Evgeny Kissin, Boris Sandler, Margarit and Nukhim Koyfman

Join Evgeny KissinBoris Sandler, and the Koyfmans to celebrate their CD, Songs with a Jewish Flavor, with an evening of music performance, Yiddish poetry readings, and excerpts from Soviet films. Evgeny Kissin concludes the evening with a solo performance.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

03 | Dec
03:00PM
03 | Dec
03:00PM

podbrodz memorial lecture

Chronicling a Dead City: The Fate of the Dubovo Shtetl in 1919

Elissa Bemporad (Queens College, CUNY) examines the fate of the Ukrainian shtetl of Dubovo during the Russian Civil War. A micro study of one shtetl, Dubovo in 1919 sheds light on future conditions for Soviet Jewry, and the Holocaust in Ukraine.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

podbrodz memorial lecture

03 | Dec
07:30PM
03 | Dec
07:30PM

concert

The Immortal German Classics: Chamber Music of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing  Haydn’s Trio in E H:XV:28, the second Mozart Quartet in E flat, a Beethoven violin-piano sonata and more.

This concert is made possible by the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

02 | Dec
06:00PM
02 | Dec
06:00PM

artist's tour

Threatened Beauty with Andi Arnovitz

Walk with Israel-based artist Andi Arnovitz through her exhibition of richly textured collage and watercolor works, which draw on the artistic legacy of the Islamic world to respond to contemporary events. Manipulating Persian, Anatolian and Uzbek textiles, rugs and ceramics, Arnovitz reflects on today’s nuclear arms race and political turmoil, and the tension between present-day Iran and the tradition of beauty it represents.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

02 | Dec
07:00PM
02 | Dec
07:00PM

concert

Judith Berkson Presents: Cantorial Music from the YIVO Archives

Acclaimed singer-musician Judith Berkson presents arrangements of cantorial music from YIVO’s sound archives. Berkson, Frank London, and ensemble play works from East Europe's golden age of cantorial singing, followed by the premiere of Berkson’s original pieces inspired by YIVO’s collections.

Sponsored by the Sidney Krum Estate.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

01 | Dec
06:30PM
01 | Dec
06:30PM

family history today 2015 lecture

JewishGen's Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR) and the Importance of Jewish Burial Records

Jewish headstone inscriptions and burial records can provide crucial information to genealogists. Hebrew name inscriptions, based on patronymics, can link together two generations of Hebrew names unlike any other source document. This can be especially helpful when trying to link first generation American ancestors to their European families. Through photographic examples and case studies, this event will discuss how the information and symbols found on stones can help to create your family tree. Nolan Altman, Vice President for Data Acquisition and Coordinator of the Online Worldwide Burial Registry project for Jewish Gen will be the featured speaker.

This program will be held in the Kovno Room on the 2nd floor.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today 2015 lecture

27 | Nov
27 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, November 27 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

26 | Nov
26 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, November 26 and Friday, November 27 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Nov
25 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm on Wednesday, November 25. It will remain closed Thursday, November 26 and Friday, November 27 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | Nov
06:30PM
24 | Nov
06:30PM

exhibition opening

Jewface: "Yiddish" Dialect Songs of Tin Pan Alley

With his fake beard, putty nose, and thick Yiddish accent, the “stage Jew” was once a common character in vaudeville, part of a genre that mocked immigrants and minorities. Essentially a variant of blackface minstrelsy, the music that accompanied these “Jewface” performances was not only performed on stage, but also published as colorfully illustrated sheet music so fans could play them at home. Outrageous and offensive by today’s standards, these “Yiddish” dialect songs exploited a variety of unpleasant stereotypes about Jews. 

Based in part on the sheet music collection of The New York Times’ Sunday Magazine Critic-at-large Jody Rosen, YIVO presents its exhibition, Jewface: “Yiddish” Dialect Songs of Tin Pan Alley.  Eddy Portnoy (Academic Advisor & Research Associate, YIVO), the curator of Jewface, and Jody Rosen lead a discussion with Tablet Magazine editor-in-chief Alana Newhouse about this form of early 20th-century entertainment, how it mocked Jews, engaged Jews, and developed Yiddish-accented English for comic effect. 

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

exhibition opening

23 | Nov
03:00PM
23 | Nov
03:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

Mobilizing the Shtetl: Betar and the Quest to Transform Small-Town Jewish Life in Interwar Poland

Throughout the 1930s, Jewish political movements in Warsaw set out to recruit Jewish youth in small towns across Poland. In this lecture, Daniel Heller (McGill University) discusses the tension that arose between Betar’s activists and the shtetl youth they sought to transform.

Sponsored by the family of Ruth Gay.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

23 | Nov
07:00PM
23 | Nov
07:00PM

panel discussion

Ezrat Nashim - The Women's Section across Time and Space

Featuring Blu Greenberg and Vivian Mann, this panel discussion will address the history, evolution and contemporary character of the women’s section (ezrat nashim) in synagogues across the generations. The program complements YUM’s exhibition Modeling the Synagogue - from Dura to Touro.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, JOFA: Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance

panel discussion

22 | Nov
11:00AM
22 | Nov
11:00AM

edit-a-thon

Soviet Jewry Wikipedia Edit-a-thon

The Center for Jewish History and the American Jewish Historical Society are hosting a Wikipedia edit-a-thon centered on the American Soviet Jewry movement in celebration of the recently-completed digitization of over 75,100 items and 500 hours of audio from the Archive of the American Soviet Jewry Movement.

Join us anytime between 11 am and 4 pm to help write and edit Wikipedia articles. The event is open to everyone, and we especially welcome new Wikipedia editors. Training sessions on editing Wikipedia will be held at 11:15 am and 1:00 pm. For more information, visit the Soviet Jewry Edit-a-thon Wikipedia event page.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

edit-a-thon

22 | Nov
02:00PM
22 | Nov
02:00PM

concert and lecture

Jankiel's Legacy: Poland's Klezmer Music Heritage

Join two internationally acclaimed tsimbl players, Pete Rushefsky, Executive Director of the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, and Walter Zev Feldman, as well as special guests for a multi-media presentation and performance exploring Poland's klezmer heritage.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, Center for Traditional Music and Dance

concert and lecture

19 | Nov
07:00PM
19 | Nov
07:00PM

naomi prawer kadar memorial lecture

"And Now I Have to Read in Jewish Something": Yiddish Performances by Holocaust Survivors

The USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive—the largest collection of videotaped interviews with Holocaust survivors—includes hundreds of interviews conducted entirely or partially in Yiddish. Jeffrey Shandler (Rutgers University) presents excerpts of these performances and discusses their significance.

Sponsored by the Naomi Prawer Kadar Foundation, Inc.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

naomi prawer kadar memorial lecture

18 | Nov
11:00AM
18 | Nov
11:00AM

presentation

How is Europe Responding to the Rise of Anti-Semitism?

A presentation by Paul Nemitz, European Commission Director, Fundamental Rights and Union Citizenship

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, the Center for Jewish History, and the European Commission

presentation

18 | Nov
07:00PM
18 | Nov
07:00PM

panel discussion

Shmita Past, Present and Future - A Conversation with Rav Rimon

Explore the practices and ideals of shmita, the sabbatical year, with Rabbi Yosef Zvi Rimon of the Halacha Education Center. Learn how shmita impacts the religious and non-religious, the relevance of shmita for people in and outside Israel, and the vision of shmita for the future. The program complements YUM’s exhibition, Fields of Dreams: Living Shmita in the Modern World.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and Orthodox Union

panel discussion

17 | Nov
06:00PM
17 | Nov
06:00PM

celebration

LBI Annual Award Dinner Honoring Dr. Eric R. Kandel

Dr. Kandel is a neuroscientist whose work on the molecular biology of memory opened new methods of inquiry into the study of brain and mind. In 2000, he won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for demonstrating how memories are formed and stored at the molecular level. He is currently a University Professor, Kavli Professor in Brain Science, and a co-Director for the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University. In addition to his ground-breaking work as a brain scientist, Dr. Kandel is a keen observer of the history of ideas who has consistently placed his work on mind in the context of a larger cultural history. His 2012 book The Age of Insight locates the roots of his own quest to understand mind in the cultural ferment of early-20th-century Vienna—the city of his birth—where artists and scientists began a revolution that expanded our conception of mind to include both conscious and unconscious thoughts and emotions. His 2006 memoir In Search of Memory recounts his journey from a childhood in Nazi-occupied Vienna to the forefront of a 21st-century revolution in the science of mind.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

celebration

16 | Nov
06:30PM
16 | Nov
06:30PM

first response: postwar cinema and the holocaust

Our Children

Poland’s last Yiddish feature film, Our Children (1948) tells the story of Jewish orphans living in the Polish countryside after World War II. The Yiddish comedy duo Shimon Dzigan and Israel Shumacher struggle to come to terms with the Holocaust upon visiting an orphanage where they encounter children’s awe-inspiring resilience.

Discussants: Atina Grossmann, The Cooper Union, and Gabriel Finder, University of Virginia

The First Response: Postwar Cinema And The Holocaust Series is curated by Olga Gershenson.This series explores films of the immediate postwar era produced in the US, Poland, Germany, and Soviet Union. Coming from both sides of the Iron Curtain, these four films present international cinema’s first responses to the Holocaust, influencing both later Holocaust representations and our present understanding of the catastrophic events. First Response Film Series has been supported by a generous grant from The David Berg Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

first response: postwar cinema and the holocaust

16 | Nov
06:30PM
16 | Nov
06:30PM

family history today 2015 lecture

Connecting to Your Extended Family Using DNA

DNA is rocking the world of genealogy. It is the definitive way to determine if you are related to someone and how close that relationship might be. This lecture is for all who are interested in learning about the various tests available, which to use for specific goals, and how to determine who is a suitable candidate for different types of testing. With Nora Galvin, biologist, genealogist and editor of Connecticut Ancestry.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today 2015 lecture

15 | Nov
02:00PM
15 | Nov
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Author Glenn Kurtz speak about Three Minutes in Poland

Author Glenn Kurtz will speak about his award winning book, Three Minutes in Poland. Traveling in Europe in August 1938, David Kurtz, the author's grandfather, captured three minutes of ordinary life in a small, predominantly Jewish town in Poland on 16mm film. More than 70 years later, these few minutes of home movie footage would become a memorial to an entire community-an entire culture-annihilated in the Holocaust.

Three Minutes in Poland traces Glenn Kurtz's four-year journey to identify the people in his grandfather's haunting images. His search took him across the United States and to Canada, England, Poland and Israel.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

15 | Nov
06:00PM
15 | Nov
06:00PM

memorial program

Remembering Benjamin Harshav

A celebratiion of the life and work of Benjamin Harshav (1928-2015), eminent translator, poet, and scholar of Hebrew and Yiddish literature with family, friends and colleagues.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

memorial program

12 | Nov
06:30PM
12 | Nov
06:30PM

performance

A Musical Journey through Jewish Space

Take a musical journey through Modeling the Synagogue – from Dura to Touro, an exhibition of beautiful scale synagogue models. Guests will listen, within the gallery in the company of the models, to diverse musical selections inspired by the synagogues and their communities. Hosted by cellist Elad Kabilio of MusicTalks, accompanied by clarinet and singer.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

performance

12 | Nov
07:00PM
12 | Nov
07:00PM

book talk

Lessons in Exile (Jews of Iraq Series)

Cynthia Shamash was eight when her family tried to escape Iraq over the Iranian border, but they were captured and jailed for five weeks. Returning home, to Baghdad revealed how all of their belongings had been confiscated. Hear the author talk about her new memoir, The Strangers We Become.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

10 | Nov
06:00PM
10 | Nov
06:00PM

family history today 2015 lecture

Tour of the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute

Moriah Amit, Senior Reference Services Librarian for Genealogy, will tour the Center's newly redesigned Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute, a comfortable and cutting-edge facility for family history research. The Institute makes available to the public an enormous wealth of genealogical resources.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today 2015 lecture

10 | Nov
06:30PM
10 | Nov
06:30PM

max weinreich fellowship lecture in baltic jewish studies

The Gymansium Yavne: Jewish Girls’ Education in Telz

Isabelle Rozenbaumas discusses her multi-part project, “Bat Kama Ate” (How old are you?), documenting the history and culture of Lithuanian Jewry through the lens of Jewish education for girls during the interwar period.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich fellowship lecture in baltic jewish studies

10 | Nov
07:00PM
10 | Nov
07:00PM

panel discussion

Legalizing Acts, Illegal Enactments: Illegal Immigration in Comparative Perspectives

Regarding  how contemporary American and Jewish-American history challenges the confining and often exclusionary binaries and definitions that immigration and nationality acts have constructed, with an interdisciplinary focus on Jewish-Latino Studies.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

panel discussion

09 | Nov
06:00PM
09 | Nov
06:00PM

exhibition opening

After the War: Recovery, Relief, and Return, 1945-1949

Please join us for a program and reception to celebrate the opening of a new exhibit in the David Berg Rare Book Room.

The far-reaching impact of World War II resulted in massive destruction, decimation, deprivation, and the unparalleled displacement of people across and far beyond the European continent. In commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, After the War uses photographs, artifacts, and archival material to document and provide insights into the end of the war and post-war disorder and revitalization in Europe and the United States. Selected photographs from the Roman Vishniac Archive at the International Center of Photography in New York are brought together with materials from American Jewish Historical Society and Leo Baeck Institute, whose collections reside at the Center for Jewish History.

After the War:  Recovery, Relief, and Return, 1945-1949 has been supported by a generous grant from The David Berg Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

exhibition opening

08 | Nov
02:30PM
08 | Nov
02:30PM

lecture

German Jews: The History and the Heritage, Celebrating Sixty Years of the Leo Baeck Institute

Michael Meyer, Adolph S. Ochs Professor of Jewish History Emeritus at Hebrew Union College, surveys the history of German-speaking Jews and the Leo Baeck Institute’s ˜efforts to document it in celebration of LBI’s 60th anniversary.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

lecture

03 | Nov
07:00PM
03 | Nov
07:00PM

film and exhibition opening

Blue Like Me: An Indian-Jewish Artist's Boundless Imagination and "Baghdadis & the Bene Israel in Bollywood & Beyond"

Mumbai-born artist Siona Benjamin synthesizes her Jewish roots with Hindu, Catholic, Muslim, and Zoroastrian iconography. Join us for a documentary screening, a post-film Q&A with the artist, as well as to inaugurate a new exhibition on Indian Jews in the movies by Kenneth X. Robbins.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and the Indian Consulate at NY

film and exhibition opening

03 | Nov
07:30PM
03 | Nov
07:30PM

discussion

Stef Wertheimer - “The Habit of Labor”

German-born Israeli industrialist Stef Wertheimer discusses his exceptional new biography, The Habit of Labor (Overlook Press, 2015) with Jane Eisner, Editor-in-Chief of the Forward.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

discussion

02 | Nov
06:30PM
02 | Nov
06:30PM

120th anniversary of peretz markish's birth symposium

Peretz Markish and the Destruction of Soviet Jewish Culture

Poet and playwright Peretz Markish--the only Yiddish writer to be awarded the Order of Lenin--produced an enormous body of work, including lyric, epic poetry and prose. An early supporter of the Communist regime, Markish was later caught up in Stalin’s attack on Jewish cultural activities in the late 40’s and early 50’s and executed along with other Jewish writers on August 12, 1952. Jonathan Brent (YIVO), Gennady Estraikh (NYU), and David Markish, son of Peretz Markish, lead a discussion of Markish's Yiddish writing, biography and the political context surrounding the 1952 murders.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, and and the Moscow Jewish Museum & Tolerance Center

120th anniversary of peretz markish's birth symposium

01 | Nov
02:00PM
01 | Nov
02:00PM

panel discussion

Hope and Fear: Y.L. Peretz and the Forging of Modern Jewish Culture

Y. L. Peretz was the father of the Yiddish cultural revolution that transformed Jewish life in the early 20th century. Four scholars Jeremy Dauber, Ken Frieden, Martin Peretz, and Michael Steinlauf discuss Peretz’s contributions on the 100th anniversary of his death.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

01 | Nov
02:00PM
01 | Nov
02:00PM

family history today 2015 lecture

Searching for Relatives in the Joint Distribution Committee Names Database

The JDC Archives Names Database includes more than 500,000 names of individuals who received assistance from the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (or JDC) between 1915 and 1973. This important resource for genealogists is drawn from client lists and index cards from the JDC's rescue, relief, and rehabilitation operations worldwide. This presentation will focus on World War II-era lists of refugees assisted during and after the Shoah in British Mandate Palestine, Spain, China, Australia, Germany, and South America, among others, with a particular focus on children, orphans and students. Naomi Barth, Manager of the JDC Names Database, will be presenting.

Naomi Barth is the Archives Project Specialist in the Global Archives of the JDC and manager of the JDC Names Database. She holds a B.A. in History with a concentration in Near Eastern and Judaic Studies from Brandeis University. She has published articles in Avotaynu: The International Review of Jewish Genealogy and Dorot.

Co-sponsored by the JDC Archives

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family history today 2015 lecture

28 | Oct
06:00PM
28 | Oct
06:00PM

model-maker's tour

Modeling the Synagogue – from Dura to Touro

In conjunction with its foundation in 1973, YUM commissioned 10 scale models of historic synagogues reflecting the geographic breadth of the Jewish world across the centuries.  Join top model makers Mary Creede and John Jerard for an in-depth tour of the exhibition, exploring the modeling process and the changing approaches of modeling over the past decades.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

model-maker's tour

28 | Oct
07:00PM
28 | Oct
07:00PM

book talk

Iraq’s Last Jews

Dennis Shasha, one of the editors of Iraq’s Last Jews,will present recollections from this remarkable collection of first-person accounts. More than their own stories the book provides critical insights into the indelible Jewish imprint on Iraq’s history and culture.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

27 | Oct
03:00PM
27 | Oct
03:00PM

lecture

The Great Terror in the USSR (1937-1938) and the Destruction of the Agro-Joint Program

One of the lesser-known groups persecuted during Stalin’s Great Purge were the employees of Agro-Joint, an organization created by the Joint Distribution Committee (JDC). Misha Mitsel, JDC Senior Archivist, searches interrogation files, state archives and memorial books for their stories.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the JDC Archives

lecture

25 | Oct
10:00AM
25 | Oct
10:00AM

symposium

Roman Vishniac Rediscovered: A Symposium

Interior of the Anhalter Bahnhof railway terminus near Potsdamer Platz, Berlin, 1929–early 1930s. © Mara Vishniac Kohn, courtesy International Center of Photography

The recent discovery of an enormous body of previously unknown work, including more than 10,000 negatives, by renowned photographer Roman Vishniac, has revealed a far more versatile, innovative and accomplished artist than previously thought. The New Yorker called the images “a revelation.” A day-long symposium with a wide range of scholars, photography curators and cultural critics reappraise Vishniac’s radically diverse body of work that spans the 1920s through the 1970s.

This symposium is organized in conjunction with the publication of Roman Vishniac Rediscovered by Maya Benton (co-published by the International Center of Photography and DelMonico Books•Prestel. 384 pages, $75). The book spans six decades of the photographer’s work and includes 475 images and essays by 23 world-renowned scholars, curators and cultural critics.

“Roman Vishniac Rediscovered” was been supported by generous grants from The David Berg Foundation, The Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany, Joyce B. Linker and the Andrew and Marina Lewin Family Foundation.

For more information, please visit: www.cjh.org/Vishniac.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History in partnership with the International Center of Photography; co-sponsored by American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

symposium

22 | Oct
07:00PM
22 | Oct
07:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

A Guest at the Shooters' Banquet: My Grandfather and the SS, My Jewish Family, A Search for the Truth

Born into a family of East European Jews and Lithuanian Catholics, Rita Gabis (Hunter College) recently discovered that her Lithuanian grandfather worked for the Gestapo. Gabis discusses researching her family’s story and new memoir.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

19 | Oct
06:30PM
19 | Oct
06:30PM

first response: postwar cinema and the holocaust

The Blum Affair

The end of the war signaled a clean break in East Germany with Nazi filmmaking and focused on a wide range of antifascist  themes, including those dealing with the anti-Semitic roots of Nazism. The Blum Affair (1948), directed by Erich Engel, tells the story of a 1926 court case in Magdeburg. The film investigates the intertwined anti-Semitism and conservative nationalism that existed in Germany before the rise of Hitler Discussant: Barton Byg, University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Co-sponsored by LBI.

The First Response: Postwar Cinema And The Holocaust Series is curated by Olga Gershenson.This series explores films of the immediate postwar era produced in the US, Poland, Germany, and Soviet Union. Coming from both sides of the Iron Curtain, these four films present international cinema’s first responses to the Holocaust, influencing both later Holocaust representations and our present understanding of the catastrophic events. First Response Film Series has been supported by a generous grant from The David Berg Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

first response: postwar cinema and the holocaust

18 | Oct
03:00PM
18 | Oct
03:00PM

lecture

Using the Collections Catalog to make the most of your research visit to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Conducting research at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum can be challenging because of the sheer volume and variety of resources available. Megan Lewis, reference librarian at the Museum, will demonstrate how to plan your research visit using its Collections Catalog.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

lecture

16 | Oct
12:00PM
16 | Oct
12:00PM

exhibition opening

JDOCU Photography Exhibition

Exhibition of selected works by JDOCU, who document activities of Tikkun Olam ('Repair the World') with special emphasis on Israeli and Jewish culture. All the proceeds will be donated to promote social justice projects in the documented communities.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

exhibition opening

15 | Oct
06:30PM
15 | Oct
06:30PM

lecture

Lawrence H. Summers on Academic Freedom and Anti-Semitism

Former Treasury Secretary and President Emeritus of Harvard University, Lawrence H. Summers discusses growing concerns of anti-Semitism on American college campuses amidst the Boycott Divestment and Sanctions movement against Israel.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

14 | Oct
07:00PM
14 | Oct
07:00PM

book talk

Seth Siegel's Let There Be Water

ASF invites you to a conversation with Seth M. Siegel, author of Let There Be Water: Israel’s Solution For A Water-Starved World. The evening will treat the unknown story of how Israel came to develop Iran’s water system prior to the Revolution.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

13 | Oct
06:30PM
13 | Oct
06:30PM

film and discussion

Ida: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of Nostra Aetate

October 2015 marked the 50th anniversary of the landmark document “Nostra Aetate,” issued at the Second Vatican Council, a document that changed the direction of Jewish-Catholic dialogue. The program included the showing of the acclaimed Oscar winning film Ida followed by discussion with Magda Teter, Fordham University; Jonathan Brent, Executive Director of YIVO, and Father Guy Massie, Chair, Catholic-Jewish Relations for the Diocese of Brooklyn.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and Fordham University

film and discussion

12 | Oct
07:00PM
12 | Oct
07:00PM

concert

2nd Annual Concert for Daniel Pearl: "Building Bridges: From Bene Beraq to Baghdad"

Daniel Pearl, armed with a pen and a fiddle, loved to connect with people the world over, building a “coalition of the decent.” The ASF is proud to honor his legacy with a special concert bringing together diverse peoples and music.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

concert

11 | Oct
06:00PM
11 | Oct
06:00PM

film and discussion

No Asylum: The Untold Chapter of Anne Frank's Story

Based on recently-discovered letters by Otto Frank in YIVO’s archives, No Asylum reveals for the first time the story of the Frank family’s attempts to escape to America. Discussion with filmmaker Paula Fouce, Anne Frank’s stepsister Eva Schloss Geiringer and Jonathan Brent (YIVO) follows screening. YIVO is a co-producer of No Asylum.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film and discussion

08 | Oct
09:00AM
08 | Oct
09:00AM

panel discussion

Combating Terrorism through American Law: On the Occasion of the 30th Anniversary of the Murder of Leon Klinghoffer

A blue-ribbon legal panel will discuss the difficulties faced in prosecuting terrorism against American citizens at home and abroad, including remedies through criminal and civil law. A limited number of seats will be available to the general public for this portion of the event. More information available at cjh.org/klinghoffer.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

08 | Oct
07:00PM
08 | Oct
07:00PM

an evening of conversation & stories

A Special Evening Commemorating the 30th Anniversary of the Murder of Leon Klinghoffer Aboard the Achille Lauro

On October 8, 1985, terrorists representing the Palestinian Liberation Organization stormed the Achille Lauro cruise ship, murdering Leon Klinghoffer, who was vacationing with his wife and friends. His tragic death became a rallying cry in the fight against terrorism. In the ensuing years the story was co-opted and retold through the lens of popular culture. Featuring Ilsa Klinghoffer, Lisa Klinghoffer, Justin Davidson (New York Magazine), Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Julia Wolfe, and filmmaker Carla Singer.

This program has been supported by a generous grant from Jonathan and Dina Leader.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Center for Jewish History

an evening of conversation & stories

07 | Oct
06:30PM
07 | Oct
06:30PM

book talk

The House of Twenty Thousand Books

In his new book The House of Twenty Thousand Books, journalist and writer Sasha Abramsky weaves together a moving family story of radical politics, passionate book collecting, and the eclectic mind of a Jewish intellectual. Join us for a lively discussion with Abramsky about the ways books have shaped Jewish lives and culture in the modern world.


Review from The Wall Street Journal:
by Jeremy Dauber (09/25/2015)

Books Do Furnish a Home: Chimen Abramsky replaced one totalizing faith—Orthodox Judaism—for another: leftist politics.

Intellectualism - the practice of being and living in the world as an intellectual, rather than simply using one’s intellect—poses a set of diametrically opposed challenges. On the one hand, there’s the magpie-like drive of intellectual curiosity, the desire to winkle out everything one can about an endlessly complex world. On the other, there’s the rigorously analytical drive of systematization, of trying to fit all that everything into clearly explicable channels.

Any public intellectual’s posterity depends in no small part on how well they navigate the tensions between the two. A chronicle of intellectual life like “The House of Twenty Thousand Books,” Sasha Abramsky’s tale of his brilliant grandfather, must measure its success in how well it lives up to the challenges of addressing those disparities.

Before you ask: The house in question is the externally unprepossessing 5 Hillway, Highgate, London. Though there’s no list or catalog, Mr. Abramsky’s depiction of the treasures stacked, heaped and hoarded inside its walls renders the number 20,000 utterly persuasive. But Mr. Abramsky’s book ultimately revolves around not the house, nor the books, but their reader; structured like an architectural floor plan, the book presents each room’s holdings (like a library, except they’re all reading rooms) as a jumping-off point to discuss the different interests, drives, intellectual obsessions, and emotional and psychological pulls of their occupant.

Mr. Abramsky’s grandfather Chimen Abramsky was by all accounts a remarkable man of prodigious intellect and enormous energy. (He died at age 93 in 2010.) Chimen himself was the heir to a familial tradition of intellectual achievement: His father, Yehezkel Abramsky, was considered one of the great intellects of the 20th-century rabbinate and arguably the most important Orthodox rabbi in Britain during his lifetime, having immigrated after spending time in Stalin’s Siberia for refusing to lie about the maltreatment of religious Jewry there. Chimen’s photographic recall and his voracious love of reading and scholarship could easily, had he followed in that path, suggested a similar destiny.

But the transformations of modernity had their effect on Chimen, as they did on numberless Jewish men and women born in Europe in the early part of the 20th century. By his teenage years, Chimen switched his allegiances from the Talmud to Marx, and, as the decades went on, became one of the truly great collectors of books, letters and other archival documents related to the history of socialism in Europe, earning much of his living cataloging and evaluating similar materials for auction houses.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book talk

07 | Oct
06:30PM
07 | Oct
06:30PM

panel discussion & auction

Comics and the Jews

Join us for a panel on the history of the Jewish formative contribution to the establishment of the comic books industry in the US, and a special silent art auction. With Karen Green, Danny Fingeroth, Arie Kaplan, and Paul Levitz.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

panel discussion & auction

06 | Oct
06 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, October 6 for Simchat Torah.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

05 | Oct
05 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, October 5 for Shemini Atzeret and Tuesday, October 6 for Simchat Torah.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

04 | Oct
04 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Sunday October 4 for Erev Shemini Atzeret.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

01 | Oct
07:30PM
01 | Oct
07:30PM

concert

French Chamber Masterpieces: Fauré Piano Quartet and Franck Piano Quintet

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble joined by Grammy nominated Enso Quartet, performing Gabriel Fauré’s Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, op. 15; César Franck’s Piano Quintet in F minor.  Also on the program:  Esa-Pekka Salonen’s Homunculus for String Quartet.  This concert is made possible through the generous support of Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

30 | Sep
06:30PM
30 | Sep
06:30PM

book talk

Final Sale in Berlin: The Destruction of Jewish Commercial Activity, 1930-1945

Reconstructing the fate of more than 8,000 companies, historian Christoph Kreutzmueller’s new study offers the first comprehensive analysis of Jewish economic activity and its obliteration in Berlin. Psychiatrist and author Joanne Intrator will offer a personal perspective by discussing her fight for restitution of her own family’s expropriated commercial assets in the heart of Berlin.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

30 | Sep
07:00PM
30 | Sep
07:00PM

conversation

The Justice of Shmita

6pm Exhibition viewing
7pm Conversation
Join Suzanne Last Stone (University Professor of Jewish Law and Contemporary Civilization, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University) in conversation with Israel’s Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked as they discuss the role of shmita, the sabbatical year, in contemporary Israeli society, the prospect of economic reform and debt relief, Israeli constitutional law, and the model that shmita offers for Israeli and international social justice. The program complements YUM’s special exhibition, Fields of Dreams: Living Shmita in the Modern World, which includes original letters by the most important figures of the early Zionist movement.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, Center for Jewish Law and Contemporary Civilization

conversation

29 | Sep
29 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, September 29 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

28 | Sep
28 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, September 28 and Tuesday, September 29 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

27 | Sep
27 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Sunday, September 27 for Erev Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

23 | Sep
23 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, September 23 for Yom Kippur.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

22 | Sep
22 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Tuesday, September 22 for Erev Yom Kippur.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

21 | Sep
06:30PM
21 | Sep
06:30PM

first response: postwar cinema and the holocaust

Crossfire

Directed by Edward Dmytryk, Crossfire (1947) is an Academy Award-nominated film noir that was one of the first films to raise the subject of anti-Semitism in the postwar U.S., along with the better-known Gentlemen’s Agreement. Crossfire stars Robert Mitchum and Robert Young as police investigators gradually piecing together the fragments of the night leading to the brutal killing of an innocent Jewish man.

Discussant: Thomas Doherty, Brandeis University. Co-sponsored by AJHS.

The First Response: Postwar Cinema And The Holocaust Series is curated by Olga Gershenson.This series explores films of the immediate postwar era produced in the US, Poland, Germany, and Soviet Union. Coming from both sides of the Iron Curtain, these four films present international cinema’s first responses to the Holocaust, influencing both later Holocaust representations and our present understanding of the catastrophic events. First Response Film Series has been supported by a generous grant from The David Berg Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

first response: postwar cinema and the holocaust

20 | Sep
01:00PM
20 | Sep
01:00PM

annual nusakh vilne memorial program

Both Ground and Plow: Looking for Vilne

Join us in commemorating the Jewish community of Vilna through poetry, music and presentation. This year, guest speaker Rita Gabis (Hunter College) discusses her quest to recover Vilna through poetry and personal memory.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

annual nusakh vilne memorial program

20 | Sep
06:30PM
20 | Sep
06:30PM

book event and film screening

Alexandrian Summer

Meet the Egyptian-born Gormezano-Goren family, and learn about Sephardi-Mizrahi histories in Israel and the U.S.  Reading, screening, and discussion to celebrate the publication of Yitzhak Gormezano-Goren’s Alexandrian Summer in English, and Amit Goren’s premiere of Alexandrian Summers Again and Forever.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation with the Mizrahi Film Series, the Taub Center for Israel Studies, the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Department, and the Kevorkian Center for Near Eastern Studies, NYU

book event and film screening

17 | Sep
06:30PM
17 | Sep
06:30PM

book talk

The Legacy of the Alliance: Letty Cottin Pogrebin in Conversation with Marcia Ann Gillespie

Join us as Letty Cottin Pogrebin, celebrated writer and social activist, and Marcia Ann Gillespie, iconic journalist and editor, discuss race, religious identity, gender and the legacies of the black/Jewish relationship during the Civil Rights Movement. The discussion is inspired by Pogrebin’s novel Single Jewish Male Seeking Soul Mate. 

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

15 | Sep
15 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, September 15 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

14 | Sep
14 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, September 14 and Tuesday, September 15 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

13 | Sep
13 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Sunday, September 13 for Erev Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

10 | Sep
07:00PM
10 | Sep
07:00PM

panel discussion

Shmita - On the Eve of Rosh Hashana

PLEASE NOTE:  Instead of a panel discussion, this program will consist of a special New Year-themed tour of the exhibition Fields of Dreams: Living Shmita in the Modern World by Jacob Wisse, curator of the exhibition and director of Yeshiva University Museum.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

panel discussion

10 | Sep
07:00PM
10 | Sep
07:00PM

book talk

Nicole Dweck’s Debt of Tamar

Ranging from the Inquisition to Israel’s Independence, and Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent’s court to modern-day Manhattan, bestselling author Nicole Dweck’s The Debt of Tamar weaves a tapestry of love, resilience, and fate. Join ASF for a discussion with the author.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

07 | Sep
07 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, September 7 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

06 | Sep
06 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, September 6 and Monday, September 7 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

23 | Aug
11:59PM
23 | Aug
11:59PM

reading room closure

The Reading Room and Ackman and Ziff Genealogy Institute are closed today.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading room closure

21 | Aug
11:59PM
21 | Aug
11:59PM

reading room closure

The Reading Room and Ackman and Ziff Genealogy Institute are available by appointment only today. Please email mmeyers@cjh.org for more information.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading room closure

20 | Aug
11:59PM
20 | Aug
11:59PM

reading room closure

The Reading Room and Ackman and Ziff Genealogy Institute are available by appointment only today. Please email mmeyers@cjh.org for more information.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading room closure

19 | Aug
11:59PM
19 | Aug
11:59PM

reading room closure

The Reading Room and Ackman and Ziff Genealogy Institute are available by appointment only today. Please email mmeyers@cjh.org for more information.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading room closure

18 | Aug
11:59PM
18 | Aug
11:59PM

reading room closure

The Reading Room and Ackman and Ziff Genealogy Institute are available by appointment only today. Please email mmeyers@cjh.org for more information.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading room closure

17 | Aug
11:59PM
17 | Aug
11:59PM

reading room closure

The Reading Room and Ackman and Ziff Genealogy Institute are available by appointment only today. Please email mmeyers@cjh.org for more information.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading room closure

11 | Aug
06:30PM
11 | Aug
06:30PM

memorial program

Night of the Murdered Poets

On August 12, 1952, thirteen Jews were murdered by Stalin’s regime, falsely accused of treason and espionage. Half of these Jews were celebrated Yiddish writers and artists including David Bergelson, David Hofshteyn, Peretz Markish, Itsik Fefer and Benjamin Zuskin. In this program, Ala Zuskin Perelman, daughter of Soviet Yiddish actor, Benjamin Zuskin discusses her recent biography, The Travels of Benjamin Zuskin about her father’s tragic life and work as an actor and artistic director of the Moscow State Jewish Theater. Jonathan Brent, Executive Director of YIVO and Professor Tom Bird of Queens College will deliver introductory remarks; and Yelena Shmulenson will present a brief musical program. Shane Baker, Executive Director of the Congress for Jewish Culture will chair the program. The Travels of Benjamin Zuskin will be available for sale and signing by the author following the program.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the Congress for Yiddish Culture

memorial program

04 | Aug
06:30PM
04 | Aug
06:30PM

film screening and discussion

New York Premiere of "Chava Rosenfarb: That Bubble of Being"

Chava Rosenfarb, noted Yiddish writer and major Holocaust literary figure, discusses her life in Lodz before the Holocaust, her years in the Lodz Ghetto, in Auschwitz, in Bergen-Belsen, and her career as a Yiddish writer in Montreal, in an unscripted interview with Yiddish teacher and activist Anna Fishman Gonshor. This is the third in the series Worlds within a World: Conversations with Yiddish Writers produced by the League for Yiddish and directed by noted filmmaker Josh Waletzky.

Yiddish with English subtitles. Followed by a panel discussion.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Yiddish League

film screening and discussion

12 | Jul
01:00PM
12 | Jul
01:00PM

memorial program

Annual Memorial in Honor of Mordkhe Schaechter

This program will be in Yiddish.

Former students, colleagues, family, and friends of the celebrated Yiddish language teacher, linguist and scholar gather in his honor for this annual commemoration. Guest speaker Kenneth (Binyomen) Moss will deliver a talk, "Nationalism, the State and the New Antisemitism in Zionist, Diasporist and Territorialist Thought, 1929-1939,” followed by a musical program by Zhenya Lopatnik.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Yiddish League

memorial program

09 | Jul
06:00PM
09 | Jul
06:00PM

exhibit opening & film premiere

Allied in the Fight: Jews, Blacks and the Struggle for Civil Rights

Special guests, including civil rights  activist Julian Bond, historian Hasia Diner, author Eli Evans and filmmaker Aviva Kempner discuss the remarkable story of a Jewish partnership with African American communities in the struggle for civil rights. This panel discussion followed a screening of the film, Rosenwald.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute

exhibit opening & film premiere

09 | Jul
07:00PM
09 | Jul
07:00PM

book talk and signing

New York 1, Tel Aviv 0

"Sharply observed, beautifully rendered stories about gender, sexuality, and nationality by a fresh and original literary voice.”

Join us as we welcome Shelly Oria, a brilliant New York based Israeli author, to read from her best-selling debut New York 1, Tel Aviv 0, and talk to us about writing between the here and there of spaces and languages, about the amalgamating Israeli and American literary influences on her work, and more.

Enter the world of New York 1, Tel Aviv 0, where the characters are as intelligent and charming as they are lonely. A couple discovers the ability to stop time together; another couple lives with a constant, loud beeping in their apartment, though only one of them can hear it. A father leaves his daughter in Israel to pursue a painting career in New York; a sex worker falls in love with the Israeli photographer who studies her.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

book talk and signing

06 | Jul
01:00PM
06 | Jul
01:00PM

discussion and reading

The Shtetl of Eden

Novelist Julia Kissina will present an excerpt from her work-in-progress “The Shtetl of Eden”—an imaginative fictional treatment of a little-known episode in modern Jewish history.

As waves of pogroms decimated Russia’s Jewish communities in the wake of the failed Revolution of 1905, London-based author Israel Zangwill and his Zionist Territorialist Movement raced against time to send teams on exploratory missions to exotic locales around the globe, hoping to establish a refuge and possible autonomous state for the besieged Jews of Russia. 

At the narrative’s core is the town of Chernobyl, a center of Hasidism, where Jewish residents were caught between crushing poverty and the antisemitic nationalists of the Black Hundreds. In this context they tried to imagine life the jungles of Angola and the deserts of Africa—braving perilous circumstances and acting on wild hopes for safety and freedom.

“The Shtel of Eden” was inspired by research conducted in the partner collections housed at the Center for Jewish History. It inventively recreates the astonishing experiences of Jews imagining their own versions of paradise and redemption, and the harsh realities that they encountered. 

Julia Kissina, a 2015 Prins Foundation Artist-in-Residence at the Center for Jewish History, was born in the former Soviet Union and was a member of the Russian underground Samizdat movement during the 1980s and 1990s. She now lives in Berlin, where she is active as a leading novelist and visual artist. Her books include Springtime on the Moon, Goodbye Tarantino and the forthcoming Elephantina’s Moscow Years.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

discussion and reading

04 | Jul
04 | Jul

holidays and closures

Happy Independence Day

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

03 | Jul
03 | Jul

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, July 3 in honor of Independence Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | Jun
08:00PM
24 | Jun
08:00PM

play with music

The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

The American Sephardi Federation invites you to the world première of David Serero's Merchant of Venice. The French-Moroccan baritone opera singer directs and stars (as Shylock) in his own Sephardi adaptation of Shakespeare's play about love, commerce, and bigotry.  Featuring a diverse cast and Sephardi music.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

play with music

23 | Jun
06:00PM
23 | Jun
06:00PM

book celebration and talk

Changing Lives, Making History: CBST - The First Forty Years – CBST’s 40th Anniversary Book

Join us as we mark pride month by celebrating the publication of Changing Lives, Making History: CBST - The First Forty Years – CBST’s 40th Anniversary Book. This special program will host the book’s author, Rabbi Ayelet S. Cohen, and the author of its preface, Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum, for a stimulating conversation on their longtime work at CBST. We will discuss the enduring and changing visions and missions of CBST as the first synagogue designated especially for LGBTQ Jews, the place, voice, and status of the LGBTQ Jewish community within the NYC Jewish community and the American Jewish community as a whole, the histories and intersections of Jewish and LGBTQ struggles for minority rights in NYC and in America.

“The story, or rather the stories in Changing Lives, Making History: Congregation Beit Simchat Torah illuminate 40 revolutionary and transformative years in the life of New York City. These past forty years have witnessed, among other things, the impact of AIDS, breakthroughs in reproductive technologies and the gay baby boom, the emergence of queer and trans movements, and major Supreme Court decisions in support of equal rights. Through it all, CBST has been at the epicenter.”

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

book celebration and talk

23 | Jun
06:30PM
23 | Jun
06:30PM

book talk

The Pious Ones: The World of Hasidim and Their Battles with America

In his most recent book, The Pious Ones (Harper Collins), veteran New York Times journalist Joseph Berger investigates the complex web of issues surrounding American Hasidim today. Beginning with an examination of their origins in 18th-century Eastern Europe and their codified lifestyle, Berger takes a close look at the sectarian politics and conflicts arising today over housing, transportation, schooling, and gender roles. What lies ahead for the Hasidim, and how will they engage with American society in the future?

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

22 | Jun
08:00PM
22 | Jun
08:00PM

play with music

The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

The American Sephardi Federation invites you to the world première of David Serero's Merchant of Venice. The French-Moroccan baritone opera singer directs and stars (as Shylock) in his own Sephardi adaptation of Shakespeare's play about love, commerce, and bigotry.  Featuring a diverse cast and Sephardi music.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

play with music

21 | Jun
05:00PM
21 | Jun
05:00PM

exhibition opening

Shtetl: Graphic Works and Sketches of Solomon Yudovin (1920-1940)

Join us on June 21 for the opening reception of Shtetl: Graphic Works and Sketches Of Solomon Yudovin (1920-1940).

Presented in collaboration with the Russian American Foundation and the Russian Museum of Ethnography, this exhibit features works of the renowned Russian-Jewish artist, ethnographer and scholar of Jewish traditional art, Solomon Yudovin. From the collections of the Russian Museum of Ethnography, St. Petersburg, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, NY.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

exhibition opening

18 | Jun
07:00PM
18 | Jun
07:00PM

concert and cd release party

Night Songs from a Neighboring Village: Ballads of the Ukrainian & Yiddish Heartland

Musicians Michael Alpert and Julian Kytasty draw on Ukrainian folk and liturgical music, klezmer, Yiddish folk song, and Hasidic music to create a performance that illustrates the centuries-long mutual influence Ukrainian and East European Jewish musical traditions have had on one another.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, Center for Traditional Music and Dance

concert and cd release party

17 | Jun
02:00PM
17 | Jun
02:00PM

lecture

Shadow Diplomats: American Jewish Foreign Policy in the Era of World Wars

Andrew J. Falk, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of History at Christopher Newport University in Virginia. Falk is the recipient of the 2015 Ruth and David Musher/JDC Archives Fellowship. He is using the fellowship for research that examines how American NGO’s and private citizens served as “proxies” for the US government to provide humanitarian assistance to refugees before and during World War II. This talk will focus on the work of global Jewish organizations in the mid- 20th century. Dr. Falk will present the concept of humanitarian agencies acting as informal “shadow” diplomats by raising national awareness of global humanitarian crises, by forming partnerships with policymakers and diplomats, and by acting as “proxies” for the U.S. government in overseas relief activities.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

lecture

17 | Jun
06:00PM
17 | Jun
06:00PM

curator's tour

Fields of Dreams: Living Shmita in the Modern World

Join us for a tour of an exhibition on Shmita, exploring the dynamic process through which the Biblical concept of Shmita was revived, debated and engaged by early settlers of the Land of Israel. The exhibition features rare, original documents and letters by the most significant rabbinic voices of the late 19th and 20th centuries, as well as by contemporary photographs, artifacts and works of art that demonstrate the resonance and impact of this ancient custom today.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

17 | Jun
07:30PM
17 | Jun
07:30PM

concert

Chelsea Music Festival

Chelsea Music Festival returns to Leo Baeck Institute with a program of chamber music focused on Finland (to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Jean Sibelius) and Hungary.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Chelsea Music Festival

concert

16 | Jun
07:00PM
16 | Jun
07:00PM

puppet theater

The Modicut Project: World Premiere

Puppet theater company Great Small Works and Eddy Portnoy return to YIVO for the world premiere of their reinterpretation of the work of Modicut, the first Yiddish puppet theater in America.

co-presented with National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene as part of KulturfestNYC.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, NYSCA, the Scherman Foundation, and the Puffin Foundation

puppet theater

14 | Jun
02:00PM
14 | Jun
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

"Jews, Liquor, and Life in Eastern Europe" presented by Glenn Dynner PhD.

Glenn Dynner, PhD., Professor of judaic Studies and Chair of Humanities at Sarah Lawrence College, will speak about how in pre-modern Poland the Jewish-run tavern was often the center of leisure, hospitality, business and even religious festivities.  As liquor became the region's boom industry, Jewish tavern keepers became integral to both local economies and local social life.  Nevertheless, reformers and government officials sought to drive Jews out of the liquor trade. Newly discovered archival sources demonstrate that nobles often helped their Jewish tavern keepers evade fees, bans and expulsions. The result-a vast underground Jewish liquor trade-reflects an impressive level of local Polish-Jewish co-existence that contrasts with the more familiar story of anti-Semitism and violence.  Dynner was the Senior NEH Scholar at the Center for Jewish History and is a Member of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University. Among his publications is Yankel's Tavern: Jews, Liquor & Llfe in the Kingdom of Poland (Oxford U. Press, 2013).

From 12:30 to 1:30 join us in the Kovno Room for Lunch & Learn....Meet with fellow JGS members to share research stories and ask questions in an informal setting.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

14 | Jun
07:00PM
14 | Jun
07:00PM

play with music

The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

The American Sephardi Federation invites you to the world première of David Serero's Merchant of Venice. The French-Moroccan baritone opera singer directs and stars (as Shylock) in his own Sephardi adaptation of Shakespeare's play about love, commerce, and bigotry.  Featuring a diverse cast and Sephardi music.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

play with music

10 | Jun
03:00PM
10 | Jun
03:00PM

play with music

The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare

The American Sephardi Federation invites you to the world première of David Serero's Merchant of Venice. The French-Moroccan baritone opera singer directs and stars (as Shylock) in his own Sephardi adaptation of Shakespeare's play about love, commerce, and bigotry.  Featuring a diverse cast and Sephardi music.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

play with music

09 | Jun
06:30PM
09 | Jun
06:30PM

nyc film premiere and discussion

Price for Freedom

Persian Jews have a 2,700 year history in the land that is contemporary Iran. Since the rise of Ayatollah Khomeini’s Islamist regime, however, the Jewish community has collapsed from a pre-Revolution population of over 100,000 to less than 9,000 today. Join us for a New York City première of a new motion picture, Price for Freedom, dedicated to telling the harrowing history of terror, torture, and triumph of author Dr. Marc Benhuri, who is now a successful entrepreneur and member of New York’s vibrant expatriate community.  Discussion and reception to follow with Dr. Benhuri, David Menashri, Head of Centre for Iranian Studies, Tel Aviv University, Ellie Cohanim, Senior Vice President & Correspondent for Jewish Broadcasting Service (JBS), members of the film cast, and others (to be announced).

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Sephardi Federation

nyc film premiere and discussion

07 | Jun
06:30PM
07 | Jun
06:30PM

conversation

Isaac Babel: Life and Works

Lionel Trilling wrote in 1955 that "no event in the history of Soviet culture is more significant than the career, or, rather, the end of the career, of Isaac Babel." Notoriously secretive and evasive, a genius of style and literary compression, a Jew with spectacles who rode with the Cossack army of Semyon Budyonny in 1920, friend of Andrei Malraux and protege of Gorky, and the lover of the wife of Nikolai Yezhov (the Head of the NKVD), Babel is one of the great writers of the modern period whose life and work presents enduring enigmas. Arrested in 1939, Babel was shot in January, 1940. His manuscripts, diaries, journals, and letters were confiscated and have never been discovered in post-Soviet Russia.

Join prominent Russian poet, writer and journalist Dmitry Bykov and Jonathan Brent, Russian scholar and the Executive Director of the YIVO Institute, for an intimate conversation about Isaac Babel's Russian Jewish identity, his life, the myth of Babel, and his contribution to literature.

conversation

07 | Jun
08:00PM
07 | Jun
08:00PM

film

Touchdown Israel

Join us for a special screening of Paul Hirschberger’s Touchdown Israel (2015), learn about the Jewish connection to football, and enjoy a fabulous display of some of AJHS’ rare football items, on view especially for the screening night! America's favorite sport is spreading to Israel and bringing together a diverse cast of characters. Israeli Jews, Muslims and Christians as well as Americans living in Israel, and religious settlers all playing together, shows how sports can be a unifier in a complex, multifaceted society.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society in partnership with JCC Manhattan’s 2015 Israel Film Festival

film

03 | Jun
06:30PM
03 | Jun
06:30PM

nyc film premiere and discussion

Return to a Burning House

Feature documentary Return to a Burning House portrays the life of heroine Haviva Reick (1914-1944), an activist during the Slovak National Uprising, a member of British Intelligence and the Palmach, and a passionate Zionist leader. Haviva left her beloved native Slovakia to found a Hashomer Hatzair kibbutz in British Mandate pre-Israel Palestine. After joining the Palmach strike force of pre-Israel's army, she was recruited by the British military in 1944 and sent back to Slovakia to rescue Allied airmen and help the remnant of the Jewish community. Using interviews with people in Slovakia, Israel, and Great Britain, some of whom knew Haviva, as well as archival material, the film tells the story of a compelling and inspiring woman. More info at www.haviva.sk.

After the film, join Mirka Molnar Lachka, producer of the film, Thomas Ort, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Rochelle Saidel, Director of Remember the Women Institute, for a discussion and Q & A.

A reception will follow.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute, Remember the Women Institute. Presentation of this program under the auspices of the Consulate General of Slovakia in NY

nyc film premiere and discussion

02 | Jun
07:00PM
02 | Jun
07:00PM

book launch

A Night at Lewando's: The Vilna Vegetarian Cookbook

Come revel in the mouthwatering recipes of Vilna restaurateur Fania Lewando as YIVO, in partnership with Random House, releases the first English translation of her 1938 Vilna Vegetarian Cookbook. Featuring recipe tastings, live music, and more.   Sponsored by Ruth and David Levine.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book launch

31 | May
03:00PM
31 | May
03:00PM

concert

Music in Our Time: 2015

Music from Golijov's The Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind; Yulzari's Le Grand Méchant, l'Oud and Il était une Fois; Kaminsky's Duo for Cello and Piano; Cohen's Steal a Pencil for Me; Fine's A Short Alleluia; and Ladino songs by Neumann. Performed by Charles Neidich, Rémy Yulzari, Ilana Davidson, Laura Leon, Donna Breitzer, Nadav Lev, and artists from Mannes College The New School of Music.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

28 | May
07:00PM
28 | May
07:00PM

exhibit opening and discussion

Sephardic Journeys: An Evening of Exploration

Rabbi Marc Angel and Rabbi Yamin Levy will discuss The David Berg Rare Books Room's latest exhibit, Sephardic Journeys, created by the Center for Jewish History with the American Sephardi Federation. The rare books and artifacts in this exhibit reflect a rich tradition of scholarship and culture shaped by migrations, and they invite, in turn, reflection upon the physical, emotional and spiritual journeys of Jewish history. The evening will also feature a performance by Itamar Borochov, a member of Yemen Blues and the New Jerusalem Orchestra, who recently played Dizzy's Club Coca Cola (Jazz at Lincoln Center).

Sephardi refreshments by Nahmias et Fils Distillery and desserts will be served.

Please click here for information on the exhibition.

Sephardic Journeys has been made possible by a generous grant from The David Berg Foundation.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation and the Center for Jewish History

exhibit opening and discussion

25 | May
25 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, May 25 in honor of Memorial Day and in celebration of Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | May
24 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, May 24 for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

20 | May
07:00PM
20 | May
07:00PM

book talk

Exile from Egypt: Jean Naggar

Jean Naggar will discuss her much acclaimed memoir Sipping from the Nile: My Exodus from Egypt.  Hear her recollections of the story book world of an Egyptian Jewish aristocratic family, forced into exodus by the political turmoil following the failed Anglo-French invasion of Suez in 1956.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

19 | May
07:00PM
19 | May
07:00PM

concert and discussion

Sara Levy’s World: Music, Gender, and Judaism in Enlightenment Berlin

A group of elite, cosmopolitan Jewish women played a central role in shaping the dynamic cultural world of late 18th-century Berlin. Sara Levy, an influential salon hostess and performing musician interacted with important composers and intellectuals of her day. Nancy Sinkoff (Rutgers) and Christoph Wolff (Harvard) comment on Levy’s life and times and the music performed on period instruments (Rebecca Cypess, Rutgers) in this concert.

Media sponsor: Lilith Magazine

Presented by: American Society for Jewish Music, Leo Baeck Institute in conjunction the School of Arts and Sciences and the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University

concert and discussion

18 | May
11:00AM
18 | May
11:00AM

book event

Second-Hand Book Sale

The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research will be selling duplicate copies of books from their library collections. Most books are about Jewish topics, including: memoirs, biographies, World War II, the Science of Judaism, collected works, academic studies, literature, art and photography. Books are also in languages ranging from English to Yiddish, German, Hebrew, Russian and Polish.

In addition, the participating organizations will be selling discounted titles from their regular publications.

All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund.

Paperbacks: $1
Hardcover: $3
Music and Movies: $1 to $3
Or priced as marked

Cash Only!

http://booksale.cjh.org/

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book event

18 | May
07:00PM
18 | May
07:00PM

film and panel discussion

A Wing and a Prayer: A Secret Operation to Prevent a Second Holocaust

A Wing and a Prayer tells the virtually unknown story of World War II aviators who risked their lives and freedom in 1948 to prevent a second Holocaust. This hour-long film features exclusive interviews by the operation’s key members, including mastermind Al Schwimmer and chief pilot Sam Lewis.  Written, directed and produced by Penn State University Senior Lecturer Boaz Dvir (Jessie’s Dad, Discovering Gloria), A Wing and a Prayer features firsthand accounts of daring escapes and heart-pounding action by Schwimmer, Lewis, and other members of the group, including Christian radio operator Eddie Styrak, who was arrested by the British for trying to bring Holocaust survivors into the burgeoning Jewish state.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

film and panel discussion

17 | May
11:00AM
17 | May
11:00AM

book event

Second-Hand Book Sale

Sunday May 17 11:00am - 4:30pm
Monday May 18 11:00am - 4:30pm

The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research will be selling duplicate copies of books from their library collections. Most books are about Jewish topics, including: memoirs, biographies, World War II, the Science of Judaism, collected works, academic studies, literature, art and photography. Books are also in languages ranging from English to Yiddish, German, Hebrew, Russian and Polish.

In addition, the participating organizations will be selling discounted titles from their regular publications.

All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund.

Paperbacks: $1
Hardcover: $3
Music and Movies: $1 to $3
Or priced as marked

Cash Only!

http://booksale.cjh.org/

During the book sale on Sunday May 17, the Jewish Genealogical Society will have their monthly May meeting at the Center for Jewish History.  The JGS event will include the Gesher Galicia regional meeting at 11am and a lecture titled “Holly Golightly Was a Nice Jewish Girl: Our Ancestors Reinvented” by speaker Pamela Weisberger at 2pm. Earlier, at 11:00am Gesher Galicia will hold its regional meeting with Andrew Zalewski discussing "Galician Portraits: In Search of Jewish Roots" and Valerie Schatzker on "Jewish Oil Magnates of Galicia."  All are welcome to attend; the lecture costs $5 for non JGS members.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book event

17 | May
11:00AM
17 | May
11:00AM

genealogy talk

Gesher Galicia Regional Meeting

Project and website updates from Pamela Weisberger, followed by author Andrew Zalewski discussing "Galician Portraits: In Search of Jewish Roots" and by Valerie Schatzker on "Jewish Oil Magnates of Galicia."

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

genealogy talk

17 | May
02:00PM
17 | May
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

"Holly Goligtly Was a Nice Jewish Girl" presented by Pamela Weisberger

Our poor immigrant ancestors not only shed their old world clothing and shtetl names, but reinvented their personalities, creating new identities and obscuring old ones. Hear the story of two who inspired one of the world's great literary characters and learn how investigative genealogy and creative methodology helped solve the mystery.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

14 | May
06:30PM
14 | May
06:30PM

max weinreich fellowship lecture

On the Waves of Ether: Yiddish Language Programming on Polish Radio, 1945-1958

This program is in Yiddish. YIVO Max Weinreich Fellow, Anna Rozenfeld 
(Museum of the History of Polish Jews) discusses this little-known aspect of post-war Polish Jewish history,
and the central role these radio programs played for survivors and Jews abroad.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich fellowship lecture

14 | May
07:30PM
14 | May
07:30PM

concert

Grand Trios: Masterpieces of Brahms, Haydn and Rachmaninoff

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing Haydn’s Trio in C Major, Hob.XV, No.27, Brahms’ B Major Trio, Op.8, and Rachmaninoff’s Trio Elegiaque No.2 in D Minor. Featuring Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky (piano); Anca Nicolau (violin) and Myron Lutzke (cello) of the St. Luke’s Orchestra and the Mozartean Players; and Jay Freivogel (first violin) and Rachel Freivogel (cello), of the Award-winning Jasper String Quartet.

This concert is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

13 | May
06:30PM
13 | May
06:30PM

book talk

In the Unlikeliest of Places: How Nachman Libeskind Survived the Nazis, Gulags, and Soviet Communism

Annette Libeskind Berkovits' new book is about the remarkable story of her father, Nachman Libeskind, whose life was an odyssey through crucial events of the 20th century. With an unshakable will and a few drops of luck, he survives a pre-war Polish prison; witnesses the 1939 Nazi invasion of Lodz and narrowly escapes; is imprisoned in a brutal Soviet gulag where he helps his fellow inmates survive, and upon regaining his freedom treks to the foothills of the Himalayas, where he finds and nearly loses the love of his life. Later, the crushing communist regime and a lingering postwar anti-Semitism in Poland drive Nachman and his young family to Israel, where he faces a new form of discrimination. Then, defiantly, Nachman turns a pocketful of change into a new life in New York City, where a heartbreaking promise leads to his unlikely success as a modernist painter that inspires others to pursue their dreams.

In her three-decade career with the Wildlife Conservation Society in New York, Annette Libeskind Berkovits spearheaded the institution's nationwide and worldwide science education programs. Her achievements include the first-ever agreement to bring environmental education to China's schools. The National Science Foundation has recognized her outstanding leadership in the field. Her brother Daniel Libeskind is an internationally renowned architect, known for the Jewish Museum in Berlin, the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, and the Dublin Performing Arts Center in Dublin, Ireland. His practice is designing commercial, residential, and cultural buildings around the world. His Master Plan for rebuilding the World Trade Center site in New York City was selected in 2003 and has served as the blueprint for the entire site, including the Freedom Tower, the Memorial, the Museum, and the PATH Terminal.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book talk

12 | May
06:30PM
12 | May
06:30PM

lecture

Anti-Jewish Violence in Poland before the Holocaust: The Przytyk Pogrom, National Democrats and the Polish Countryside

The history of 20th-century Poland was profoundly shaped by international conflict that contributed to the two world wars and the Holocaust. How can we understand the anti-Jewish violence that took place within the independent Polish state between the two world wars? Kamil Kijek, CJH Prins Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow, will present new research on the notorious Przytyk pogrom of March 9, 1936. David Engel (NYU) will respond to Dr. Kijek’s presentation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

lecture

12 | May
07:00PM
12 | May
07:00PM

book talk

Leaving the Jewish Fold: Conversion and Radical Assimilation in Modern Jewish History

What did Jews need to do, and what would they do, to escape mass stigmatization and discrimination, and earn a living and some pride, in 19th century Christian Europe and America? We are delighted to host Todd Endelman for a talk on his new book on Jews’ conversions to Christianity in the early modern period, on the desire for and toll of Jewish assimilation in the Euro-American Christian world, and about the relevance of conversion and assimilation to today’s Jewish American culture, life, and conversation.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

11 | May
06:30PM
11 | May
06:30PM

book talk

The Paradox of Liberation: Secular Revolutions and Religious Counterrevolutions

Michael Walzer’s new book presents the paradox of the secular establishment of three post-World War II nations, conceived in democratic ideals, then forced to confront entirely unexpected religious fierceness. Join Walzer and writer Paul Berman as they explore India and its Hindu militants, the ultra-Orthodox and messianic Zionists of Israel, and Algerian Islamic radicals.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Sephardi Federation

book talk

10 | May
04:30PM
10 | May
04:30PM

sidney krum young artists concert series

Shostakovich and Weinberg: A Musical Friendship

Examines the relationship between Dmitri Shostakovich and Mieczyslav Weinberg, a Jewish composer whom Shostakovich considered exceptional but who was ignored by the Soviet musical establishment. Works by both composers will be performed by the young artists of the Krum Concert Series.

Sponsored by the Estate of Sidney Krum.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

sidney krum young artists concert series

05 | May
06:30PM
05 | May
06:30PM

book talk

To the Gates of Jerusalem: The Diaries and Papers of James G. McDonald

The private diaries and papers of James G. McDonald reveal through personal observation and colorful description how closely today’s Israeli-Arab struggles are a legacy of little-known and confidential events of the years preceding Israel’s formation.  McDonald was a member of the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry, charged with finding solutions to both the problems of Jewish refugees at the end of World War II and to the resolution of British Mandate Palestine.  A panel of historians including McDonald's daughter provide personal as well as analytical context for these deliberations.  With Richard Breitman, Norman J. W. Goda, Severin Hochberg, Barbara McDonald Stewart and Ronald Zweig.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

05 | May
06:30PM
05 | May
06:30PM

discussion

By the Rivers of Babylon

Join leading scholars as they focus on the Babylonian Exile and Al-Yahudu texts, a collection of cuneiform clay tablets dating to the 6th and 5th centuries BCE considered a momentous discovery opening up the study of the beginnings of the Jewish Diaspora in Babylonia.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, American Friends of the Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem, Skirball Department of Hebrew & Judaic Studies at NYU

discussion

03 | May
11:00AM
03 | May
11:00AM

celebration

Building a Future in America: YIVO's 90th Anniversary Celebration

A day-long celebration of YIVO’s pioneering work in America and discussion about its future, followed by a birthday party. See yivo.org/events for complete schedule.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

celebration

30 | Apr
06:00PM
30 | Apr
06:00PM

concert

A Musical Journey through Jewish Space

Take a musical journey through Modeling the Synagogue – from Dura to Touro. Guests will listen – within the gallery, in the company of historic scale synagogue models -- to diverse musical selections inspired by the synagogues and their communities. Hosted by cellist Elad Kabilio of MusicTalks, and accompanied by clarinet and singer.  Dedicated to the memory of Rabbi Aaron Landes.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, Center for Jewish History and American Sephardi Federation

concert

29 | Apr
06:30PM
29 | Apr
06:30PM

book talk

The Frankfurt School on Israel

In the decades following Israel’s establishment, subtle variations appeared in the attitudes of key Jewish members of the Frankfurt School toward the Jewish state. In his new book, The Frankfurt School, Jewish Lives and Antisemitism (Cambridge University Press), Jack Jacobs (John Jay College; Graduate Center, CUNY) offers new insights into why.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

27 | Apr
06:30PM
27 | Apr
06:30PM

book talk

Stefan Zweig and World Literature: 21st Century Perspectives

The 21st century has seen a resurgence of interest in the works of Stefan Zweig, who was among the most acclaimed authors worldwide before he fell into obscurity. Mark Gelber and Birger Vanwesenbeck present a new volume of essays that reassess Zweig’s legacy from a global perspective.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

27 | Apr
07:30PM
27 | Apr
07:30PM

concert

Momenta Quartet, the Beatrice Diener Ensemble-in-Residence

Featuring guest artists Re’ut Ben-Ze’ev, mezzo-soprano, Christopher Grymes, clarinet and Molly Morkoski, piano.

Matthew Greenbaum: More Venerable Canons (2013)
Hana Ajiashvili: String Quartet (2014) world premiere
Darius Milhaud: String Quartet No. 3, Op. 32 (1916)
David Glaser: Koheleth (2015) world premiere

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and the Stern College for Women

concert

26 | Apr
03:00PM
26 | Apr
03:00PM

conversation

That Old Jewish Magic? Harold Arlen and American Popular Song

Music scholar Walter Frisch and Jewish historian Jonathan Karp discuss the life and legacy of Harold Arlen (1905-1986). Born Hyman Arluck, the son of a cantor from Buffalo, NY, Arlen composed some of the most beloved and admired songs of the 20th century.  The conversation situates Arlen’s work within the broader phenomenon of popular songwriting by American Jewish composers.

Presented by: the American Society for Jewish Music

conversation

22 | Apr
06:00PM
22 | Apr
06:00PM

curator's tour

Modeling the Synagogue - from Dura to Touro

In 1973, the Museum commissioned 10 scale models of historic synagogues reflecting the geographic breadth of the Jewish world across the centuries. Join us for an in-depth tour of the models and related objects that document the conception and process of the commission.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

20 | Apr
07:00PM
20 | Apr
07:00PM

16th street book club

Yeshiva Boys by David Lehman (poetry collection, 2009, 112 pages)

The 16th Street book club is a reading group that meets to discuss contemporary literature. All book club sessions are free and open to the public.

In celebration of National Poetry Month

All book club sessions are free and open to the public. Please try to bring your books or e-readers with you.

Our April selection is Yeshiva Boys by David Lehman (poetry collection, 2009, 112 pages).

David Lehman, a poet of wit, ingenuity, and formidable skill, draws upon his heritage as a grandson of Holocaust victims and offers a stirring autobiographical collection of poems that is his most ambitious work to date. It covers an expansive range of subjects — from love, sex, and romance to repentance, humility, the meaning of democracy, Existentialism, modern European history, military intelligence, and the rituals associated with faith and prayer. The title poem, "Yeshiva Boys," is a work in twelve parts that blends the elements of espionage fiction, memory, history, and moral philosophy. It reflects David's experience as a student in an orthodox Yeshiva, and it, along with many other poems in the book, explores what it means to be a Jew in America, what is gained and lost in assimilating to secular culture, how to understand the peculiar destiny of the Jewish people, and how to reconcile the existence of God with the knowledge of evil. Beautiful, provocative, and accessible, this is David Lehman's most inspired collection.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

20 | Apr
07:00PM
20 | Apr
07:00PM

book talk

Pepper, Silk & Ivory: Amazing Stories about Jews and the Far East

Join the American Sephardi Federation for a discussion with Rabbi Marvin Toyaker and Ellen Rodman, co-authors of Pepper, Silk & Ivory, a new book exploring the colorful and captivating history of Jews in Asia.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

book talk

19 | Apr
02:00PM
19 | Apr
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Paper Love: Searching for the Girl My Grandfather Left Behind

Sarah Wildman will speak about her search to find information about the woman her grandfather had to leave behind in Vienna when he left Austria before WWII.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

15 | Apr
06:30PM
15 | Apr
06:30PM

book talk

Loyal Sons: Jewish Soldiers in the German Army in the Great War

Peter Appelbaum’s Loyal Sons, with an introduction by Jay Winter and personal reminiscences by Inge Auerbacher and Peter Waldmann, traces the experiences of Jews in the German army during WWI through a remarkable collection of first-hand testimony translated into English for the first time.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

15 | Apr
06:30PM
15 | Apr
06:30PM

yom hashoah program

From Hell to Liberation: Jewish Displaced Persons in 1945

On this 70th anniversary of the end of the Shoah, this program takes a special look at Jewish life immediately following liberation. Avinoam Patt and others look at YIVO’s DP collection and discuss how survivors rebuilt their lives and communities in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

yom hashoah program

14 | Apr
03:30PM
14 | Apr
03:30PM

max weinreich center fellowship lecture

Libe and Linguistics: Towards an Archive of Yiddish Sexuality

In this talk, Zohar Weiman-Kelman (University of Toronto) draws on multiple projects that examined Yiddish sexuality in the twentieth century, and takes initial steps in generating a queer Yiddish archive of sexuality. This archive, situated at the confluence between sexual expression and the history of the Yiddish language, focuses on Yiddish sexologist Leonard Landes and on the projects of Max Weinreich and Mordekhe Schaechter pertaining to sexuality. Sharing her recent findings from the YIVO archives, Weiman-Kelman argues that non-normative and non-reproductive sex(ualities) are vital tools for accessing the Yiddish past and finding pleasure in its precarious present.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich center fellowship lecture

14 | Apr
06:30PM
14 | Apr
06:30PM

film and discussion

The Flat

At age 98, director Arnon Goldfinger’s grandmother passed away, leaving him the task of clearing out the Tel Aviv flat that she and her husband shared for decades after immigrating from Nazi Germany in the 1930s. Sifting through a mountain of photos, letters, files, and objects, Goldfinger undertook the complex process of making sense of the accumulated ephemera of a lifetime. In the process, he began to uncover clues pointing to a complicated and shocking story: a chronicle of the unexpected yet inevitable ethical ambiguities and repressed emotions that arise when everyday friendships suddenly cross enemy lines.

In his award-winning, emotionally riveting documentary, The Flat, Goldfinger follows the hints his grandparents left behind to investigate long-buried family secrets and unravel the mystery of their painful past. The result is a moving family portrait and an insightful look at the ways dif- ferent generations deal with the memory of the Holocaust.

Director Arnon Goldfinger and film scholar Noah Isenberg (The New School) were on hand to discuss this remarkable story and film.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

film and discussion

13 | Apr
07:00PM
13 | Apr
07:00PM

theatrical excerpts, launch of educational unit & panel discussion

Women, Theater and the Holocaust

A special evening to launch Women, Theatre, and the Holocaust, Remember the Women Institute’s new on-line educational unit.  The evening features three short dramatic presentations by professional actors and musicians and a panel discussion.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, Remember the Women Institute

theatrical excerpts, launch of educational unit & panel discussion

10 | Apr
10 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, April 10 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

09 | Apr
09 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Thursday, April 9 for Erev Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

05 | Apr
05 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, April 5 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

03 | Apr
03 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Friday, April 3 for Erev Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

01 | Apr
06:30PM
01 | Apr
06:30PM

lecture

Synagogues of New York: History, Architecture, and Community

In recognition of the 50th anniversary of the establishment of New York City’s Landmarks Law, architectural historian and preservationist Samuel D. Gruber will trace the rich and varied architectural history of New York synagogues. With an introduction by art historian Carol Krinsky.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute, the American Jewish Historical Society, the American Sephardi Federation, the Center for Jewish History and Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

30 | Mar
07:00PM
30 | Mar
07:00PM

book talk

"What If?" in American Jewish History and Contemporary Jewish Life

The Holocaust Averted (Rutgers University Press), a new book by historian Jeffrey S. Gurock, boldly considers an alternate history: What might have happened to the Jewish community in the United States if the Holocaust had never occurred? Join Professor Gurock  in conversation with Rabbi Golub as they explore the implications of this alternative reality.  This program will be broadcast live at 7:30pm on the Jewish Broadcast Service.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, American Jewish Historical Society, Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies of Yeshiva University, in partnership with Rutgers University Press

book talk

29 | Mar
11:00AM
29 | Mar
11:00AM

holiday celebration

Why is this Hunt Different? Passover Family Workshop

Get ready to hunt for the afikoman! Join a scavenger hunt for Hebrew words that appear on objects in our special exhibitions Modeling the Synagogue: From Dura to Touro and Shabbat: Inside and Out. Create your own cloth matzah cover with fabric markers and decorative trims using traditional and modern Hebrew fonts and Passover images. Rediscover the beauty of Hebrew words and lettering through rare objects and modern design. Ages 5 and up.

This event is part of the Hagigah Ivrit Celebration of the Hebrew Language in Metropolitan New York.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

holiday celebration

29 | Mar
02:00PM
29 | Mar
02:00PM

concert

'Lib'Ele Duo' Present the Yiddish-French Connection

French singers Eléonore Biezunski and Eléonore Weill team up as the ‘Lib’Ele Duo’ (The Dragonflies) to present this rare concert blending French and Yiddish music with special musical guest Pete Rushefsky. Featuring Yiddish songs by French songwriter Jacques Grober, and translations of French songs into Yiddish, this concert also includes traditional Yiddish songs from various folklore collections and rare klezmer melodies from Romania, Ukraine, and beyond. As a special treat, the Duo will perform excerpts from their new theatrical adaptation of Aaron Zeitlin’s mystical and image-rich poem, the Esoterishe Poem (1932), with director and puppeteer Jon Levin.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

26 | Mar
03:30PM
26 | Mar
03:30PM

max weinreich fellowship lecture

Creating Songs in Boiberik: Singing Peace at "Felker Yontev"

Joseph Kremen Memorial Fellowship in East European Jewish Music, Theatre, and Arts

Each year from 1922 until 1978, the secular Yiddish summer camp, Camp Boiberik, hosted the “Felker Yontev” (Holiday of Nations) Yiddish pageant, enacting Isaiah’s prophetic vision of world peace. In this lecture, Eléonore Biezunski examines the structure of these pageants and how they continue to impact the music scene in Yiddish today.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich fellowship lecture

26 | Mar
07:00PM
26 | Mar
07:00PM

discussion

The Borscht Belt - Past, Present and Future

6pm: Gallery viewing of Echoes with the photographer on hand to answer questions
7 pm: Discussion, followed by Q&A

Join historian and Forward columnist Jenna Weissman Joselit and photographer Marisa Scheinfeld for a lively discussion about the history, legacy and future of the Borscht Belt. This program complements YUM’s exhibition Echoes of the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

discussion

24 | Mar
07:00PM
24 | Mar
07:00PM

16th street book club

A Pigeon and a Boy by Meir Shalev, translated by Evan Fallenberg (novel, 2009, 321 pages)

The 16th Street book club is a reading group that meets to discuss contemporary literature. All book club sessions are free and open to the public.

“Images of home in its many guises permeate Israeli novelist Shalev's latest work to be translated into English, following Blue Mountain, The Loves of Judith, and Esau. With the land of Israel in the background and frequently the foreground, the intertwined stories introduce two teenage handlers of messenger homing pigeons whose love blooms in the 1940s through the War of Independence and the battle for Jerusalem, as well as narrator Yair Mendelson, his unusual conception, his unhappy marriage, and his longing for a home of his own. Yair achieves his wish: he builds his new home with the help of his female contractor, with whom he falls in love. All the characters and their families are linked, homing pigeons make their nests, and the characters whose lives come together all have ‘homing’ stories as well. Magical realism works beautifully in this powerfully suffused novel of love, loss, and the need for home. Highly recommended.”
—Molly Abramowitz in Library Journal

“Shalev has deftly layered Yair's story in such a manner that a refreshingly nuanced picture of Israel emerges.”
The Miami Herald

“Vivid characters and sharp dialogue... By working stories in the past and present against each other, Shalev brings into questions the validity, and the reliability, of memory.”
The New York Times Book Review

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

22 | Mar
02:00PM
22 | Mar
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Understanding Our Families, Understanding Ourselves

Ron Arons, author of "Jews of Sing Sing" and of "Mind Maps for Genealogy," will introduce basic concepts of "family systems theory."

For more than 40 years, people in the mental health and social services have used “family systems theory” to analyze family dynamics through multiple generations. Unfortunately, most genealogists don’t know much about family therapy.  Conversely, those in the mental health and social services fields know very little about genealogical research.  Yet genealogy and family therapy go hand in hand.   In this talk, Ron will introduce basic concepts of family systems theory.  He will also show how families can be represented a different way, using ‘genograms’ (social workers, family therapists, and psychologists use these ‘family diagrams’ every day to understand family dynamics in the family).

Ron Arons is a nationally recognized writer and lecturer, best known for his research on New York’s Jewish criminals and for his book, The Jews of Sing Sing. In the process of researching his own criminal ancestor’s past, Ron traced his roots to England, Poland, Romania, Ukraine, Belarus, and Lithuania. He appeared on the PBS television series, “The Jewish Americans” as the acknowledged expert on Jewish criminals in New York’s Lower East Side.

Before turning his attention full-time to genealogy, Ron was employed for many years as a marketer for high-tech companies. He received a B.S. degree in Engineering from Princeton University, and an MBA from the University of Chicago.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open before the meeting at 11:00 a.m. for access to research materials and computers and networking with other researchers.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

19 | Mar
06:00PM
19 | Mar
06:00PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Moroccan Jews: Destinies Undone

Director: Directed by Younis Laghari
Morocco, 60 min
In French, Arabic, & English with English subtitles
U.S. Premiere

Once upon a time, there were over 250,000 Jews in Morocco. Why they left has rarely been of interest, until now. A probing and comprehensive exploration of the many reasons the Jews of Morocco left their homeland, leaving behind a rich and vibrant history.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

19 | Mar
06:30PM
19 | Mar
06:30PM

book talk

Dark Mirror: The Medieval Origins of Anti-Jewish Iconography

Sara Lipton’s new book, Dark Mirror, sheds new light on the history of anti-Semitism by exploring social and religious tensions within the Catholic Church in the middle ages. Previously benign representations of biblical Jews were transformed as Church leaders searched for new ways to warn Christians about the dangers of greed and the taste for luxury goods. Lipton and renowned historian Magda Teter will discuss the intersection of art with medieval and early modern notions of anti-Semitism in Europe.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book talk

19 | Mar
08:00PM
19 | Mar
08:00PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Orange People

Directors: Directed by Hanna Azoulay Hafsari
Israel, 90 min
In Hebrew with English subtitles

This vibrant and sensual story of three generations of Moroccan women living in Israel playfully examines the universal struggle between following past traditions and the desire to break free and be independent.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
06:30PM
18 | Mar
06:30PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

24 Days

Director: Alexandre Arcady
France, 108 min
In French with English subtitles
New York Premiere

This award-winning thriller tells the true story of the kidnapping and murder of Ilan Halimi. Targeted by the self-described “Gang of the Barbarians,” Halimi was kidnapped and taken to an apartment in the Bagneux neighborhood of Paris. There he was held captive and tortured for three weeks before being dumped in the woods by his captors.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
09:00PM
18 | Mar
09:00PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Jews & Money

Directors: Lewis Cohen
France, 90 min
In French & English with English subtitles

In 2006, Ilan Halimi had been seized for ransom, allegedly because, as a Jew, he would have easy access to money. Using the trial of Ilan Halimi’s murderers as the base, this film delves into the centuries old stereotype that Jews often have easy and deceitful access to money.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

17 | Mar
07:00PM
17 | Mar
07:00PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Iranian Intrigue: Before the Revolution

Before the Revolution

Directors: Dan Shadur
Israel, 60 min
In Farsi & Hebrew with English subtitles

Drawing on rare archival footage, personal histories, and interviews, this is the untold story of the Israeli Paradise in Iran: During the 60’s and 70’s, thousands of Israelis lived in Tehran, enjoying special status under the Shah’s dictatorial rule. Protected by large arms deals and complex financial ties, this community relished in luxury, until the Revolution turned their lives, and the country, upside down.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

17 | Mar
09:00PM
17 | Mar
09:00PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Iranian Intrigue: The Iranian Americans

The Iranian Americans, 9pm

Directors: Andrew Goldberg
USA, 60 min
In Farsi & English with English subtitles

Short synopsis: With Iran in the news virtually every day, most Americans have little knowledge of the story of the hundreds of thousands of Iranians who live in the U.S. including a huge sub-community of Iranian Jews. This PBS documentary chronicles the underreported history of a group of emigrants finding refuge, overcoming adversity, and ultimately creating new Persian-American lives.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

16 | Mar
06:00PM
16 | Mar
06:00PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Making Aliyah: the Road to Israel

Many roads have led to Israel, and the vast number of stories are thought-provoking and powerful.  Tonight’s films feature the stories of Jews from Rhodes, Ethiopia, and Iraq. Divided into two programs, the second half of the evening will be accompanied by Iraqi hors d’oeuvres.

It Never Rained on Rhodes, 6pm

Director: Barry Saltzman
USA, Canada, Belgium, Greece, South Africa,
30 min, In English

A short experimental film about the universality of loss. Avoiding specific geographic, demographic and historic references, the director attempts to transform the story of one small community into a vehicle that emotionally engages the audience in personal notions of loss and history.

The Dove Flyer, 8pm

Director: Nissim Dayan
Israel, 88 min
In Arabic with English subtitles

Sixteen year old Kabi is typical teenager in Iraq in the 1950’s – surrounded by activists, he tries to decipher the difference between the various Jewish underground movements until a single act brings them together. Based on the award- winning novel by Eli Amir, this is the modern exodus story of one of the world’s most ancient Jewish communities.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

15 | Mar
11:00AM
15 | Mar
11:00AM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Family Day: Free - Kids Holiday Shorts!

With something for all ages, the day begins with a free program for children to learn about upcoming Jewish and Persian holidays. For older children and people of all ages, the afternoon program features films about Bukharian veterans of World War II, a celebration of the Judeo-Moroccan musical tradition, and the magic of matchmaking.

Babak & Friends: A First Norooz, 33 min

Norooz, the Persian New Year, is a holiday for Persians of all persuasions, including Jews and Muslims. In this short film, Babak, a little boy, travels to the ancient capital of the Persian Empire, Persepolis, to learn about the traditions of Norooz and rejoice in the rich culture of Iran.

Be Happy, it’s Purim, 30min

Everyone’s dressing-up for Purim, so get out your costumes and join the fun! Presented by Shalom Sesame, Israel’s Sesame Street, this short film explores the story of Esther, the Persian Jewish Queen, who saved her community from the evil Hamman. 

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

15 | Mar
01:00PM
15 | Mar
01:00PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Bukharian Shorts

Aron Aronof & the Bukharian Museum, 6 min

On the top floor of a yeshiva in Queens, Aron Aronov has gathered unique items to memorialize the history and culture of Bukharian Jews, a Sephardi minority group from Central Asia. But maintaining a museum single-handedly has its challenges.

Bakhsh in Rego Park, 5min

A Bukharian Jew living in Rego Park, Queens, takes us throughthe process of making Bakhsh, a traditional meal that her family has been preparing for generations.

Bukharian Lens: The Untold Story of Bukharian Jews, 18min

Denied for decades by the Soviet regime’s anti-Jewish propagandists, learn the untold story of bravery and sacrifice by Bukharian Jewish veterans of World War II who fought the Nazis. This unique, inter-generational film project features interviews with veterans, many of whom have since passed.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

15 | Mar
04:00PM
15 | Mar
04:00PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Direct From Casablanca!

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

15 | Mar
06:30PM
15 | Mar
06:30PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Do you Belive in Love?

Directors: Dan Wasserman & Barak Heymann
Israel, 50 min
In Hebrew with English subtitles

Get ready to meet the most unexpected and charming matchmaker in Israel: Tova. Apart from being hugely successful, she’s also paralyzed from the neck down. This award-winning festival-favorite is a heart- warming documentary that is sure to woo even the hardest of hearts.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

14 | Mar
08:30PM
14 | Mar
08:30PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Argentina in the News: God's Slave

In January 2015, an unsolved terrorist act from 1994 was recently thrust back into the spotlight with news of the death of the prosecutor in charge of resolving the crime. God’s Slave reimagines the preparation and execution of the heinous crime and its aftermath.

God's Slave

Director: Joel Novoa

Venezuela & Argentina, 90 min

In Spanish with English subtitles

Based on the true story of the bombing of the AMIA Community Center in Buenos Aires in 1994, this heart-pounding and nuanced political thriller closely follows the game of cat and mouse between an Islamist terrorist and a Mossad operative as they each follow their convictions.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

12 | Mar
06:30PM
12 | Mar
06:30PM

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Opening Night: El Gusto

Enrico Macias, the Algerian-born international recording superstar, presents El Gusto! The much-loved 2014 Pomegranate Award Recipient for Sephardi Excellence in the Arts will be on hand to present this year’s award, and for a performance. This Opening Night reception will include authentic Sephardi hors d’oeuvres and desserts

El Gusto!

Director: Safinez Bousbia 

Ireland, UAE, Algeria, 88 min

In French & Arabic with English subtitles

The remarkable story of Jewish and Muslim musicians from the Casbah separated by political conflicts for over 50 years and reunited to celebrate their common passion: Chaabi music, a.k.a the people’s music of Algeria.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

18th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

11 | Mar
06:00PM
11 | Mar
06:00PM

artist's tour

Echoes of the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld

Join the artist, Marisa Scheinfeld, as she explains her creative process and explores this series of beautiful, richly textured, large-scale photographs that document the dramatic degradation of some of the most famous Borscht Belt hotels.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

10 | Mar
06:00PM
10 | Mar
06:00PM

concert

A Musical Journey through Jewish Space

Take a musical journey through Modeling the Synagogue – from Dura to Touro. Guests will listen – within the gallery, in the company of historic scale synagogue models -- to diverse musical selections inspired by the synagogues and their communities. Hosted by cellist Elad Kabilio of MusicTalks, and accompanied by clarinet and singer.  Dedicated to the memory of Rabbi Aaron Landes.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, Center for Jewish History, American Sephardi Federation

concert

10 | Mar
06:30PM
10 | Mar
06:30PM

panel discussion

Personal History: Searching for the Past in Home Movies

What can home movies reveal about the past? Two celebrated writers, Dani Shapiro and Glenn Kurtz, present excerpts from their family home movies taken in prewar Poland, and discuss their relationships to these films and what they tell us about this vanished world.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Museum of the City of New York in connection with the YIVO Institute for Jewish History-MCNY exhibition Letters to Afar now on view at MCNY

panel discussion

09 | Mar
07:00PM
09 | Mar
07:00PM

film and discussion

Above and Beyond

The first major feature-length documentary about the foreign airmen in the ’48 war, this filmbrings together new interviews with the pilots, as well as stunning aerial footage, to present a fascinating, little-known tale filled with heart, heroism and high-flying chutzpah. The film follows the pilots on their circuitous route from the United States – where they met and trained in secret and struggled to stay two steps ahead of the FBI – to Panama, Italy and Czechoslovakia, where they flew versions of the very Nazi planes they had tried to shoot down in World War II. Machal Veterans will be here along with the film’s producer, Nancy Spielberg.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

film and discussion

05 | Mar
07:30PM
05 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Music by Russian Composers Living in America

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing  Les Oiseaux de Rameau  for flute and piano by Inessa Zaretsky, Caravan for two cellos by Tanya Anismova, Church Bells and Holiday Fair by Yekaterina Merkulyeva, Yiddish Lexicon for oboe, bassoon and piano by Jakov Jakoulov, Aestoria for cello and piano by Igor Tkachenko and Orangutango for two pianos by Igor Tkachenko. 

This concert is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

05 | Mar
07:30PM
05 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Rita Live

ASF is proud to co-sponsor Queens College Hillel’s hosting of Rita, the Israeli-Persian pop music star, for a performance at Queens College on March 5th at 7:30pm in LeFrak Concert Hall.

Born in Iran, Rita emigrated to Israel with her family at the age of 8. Since coming on the scene in the 1980’s (her first album remains the best-selling debut album in Israel’s musical history), Rita has sung for sold-out crowds worldwide, represented Israel at the UN, won the Israeli Cinema Award for “Actress of the Year,” and, more recently, her Persian-language album—featuring such songs as “Shah Doomad”—has become an underground hit in Iran.

Location:  Lefrak Concert Hall, Queens College

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation and Queens College Hillel

concert

03 | Mar
02:00PM
03 | Mar
02:00PM

lecture

Jewish Rehabilitation, European Reconstruction: Holocaust Survivors and the Right to Health

Sara Silverstein, a Ph.D. candidate at Yale University, is a recipient of the 2014 Fred and Ellen Lewis/JDC Archives Fellowship and will use the fellowship toward her research on the way Jewish Eastern European doctors in the mid-20th century shaped national and international health services, as well as the understanding of social and human rights in the post-Holocaust period.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and the Joint Distribution Committee Archives

lecture

03 | Mar
04:00PM
03 | Mar
04:00PM

film & lecture

Arnold Schoenberg and Jewish Modernity

4:00pm: Film Moses und Aron
6:30pm: Lecture
Andrew Marc Caplan, 2014-15 Cahnman Senior Scholar at CJH, will present his groundbreaking research on Jewish modernity in conjunction with a screening of Arnold Schoenberg's Moses und Aron. His research in the collections at the Center informs his reinterpretation of Schoenberg's famous opera that was written in the context of growing anti-Semitism in the 1920s. A screening of the film will precede the lecture and enrich the conversation. Light refreshments at 6 pm.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

film & lecture

02 | Mar
07:00PM
02 | Mar
07:00PM

book talk & music

Greeted with Smiles: Bukharian Jewish Music and Musicians in New York

Today 30,000 Bukharian Jews reside in NYC in close-knit communities. Music is an essential part of their communal self-definition, and musicians frequently act as their cultural representatives. Book talk by Evan Rapport with live musical examples by some of the city’s renowned Bukharian musicians.

Presented by: the American Society for Jewish Music

book talk & music

01 | Mar
01:30PM
01 | Mar
01:30PM

symposium

The Role of Scholarship in Shaping Jewish Identity

The Wissenschaft des Judentums, or the “scientific” study of Judaism, was launched in 19th-century Germany and formed the basis of modern academic Jewish studies. A panel of distinguished scholars and leaders involved in various aspects of contemporary Jewish culture examine how it has shaped both the practice of Judaism and Jewish identity today.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania

symposium

25 | Feb
06:30PM
25 | Feb
06:30PM

panel discussion

Argentina and the Nisman Case: Why is it so Hard to Understand What Really Happened?

The mysterious death of Argentina's federal prosecutor, Alberto Nisman, has become a subject of endless speculation.  His death is just the latest event in a case that has enveloped its protagonists since it began with the Jewish Community Center (AMIA) bombing of 1994, the worst terrorist attack in Argentina's history, and the deadliest anti-Jewish attack since WWII.   Argentine journalists Graciela Mochkofsky, current Prins Foundation Fellow at the Center for Jewish History, Gabriel Pasquini and Jonathan Blitzer of The New Yorker discuss why there has been no justice in the 20-year-old case, put recent events in their correct context, and explain why almost everything you've read about it is wrong.

Biographies:

Jonathan Blitzer is on the editorial staff of The New Yorker, where he wrote a recent piece about Nisman. He is a journalist, critic, and translator. He has written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, The Nation, The New Republic, Prospect (UK), n+1, and Bookforum. He has lived in Argentina, Madrid, and Lisbon, and is now based in New York. He was a Fulbright scholar (2010-11).

Graciela Mochkofsky is an Argentine journalist and author, widely considered one of Argentina’s most important nonfiction writers. She writes about the relationship between the media and the political and economic powers of Argentina and was one of the first reporters to arrive at and record the scene of the AMIA bombing on the morning of July 18, 1994. Mochkofsky is the author of six books, two of which deal with this subject, as does her recent biography of Jacobo Timerman. She is currently a Prins Foundation Fellow at the Center for Jewish History in New York, researching a book about an unprecedented wave of mass conversions to Judaism throughout Latin America, to be published by Knopf in 2017. She was a 2009 Nieman fellow at Harvard University, and a 2014 Cullman Center fellow at the New York Public Library.

Gabriel Pasquini is an Argentine author and journalist. He covered national politics and the world of the intelligence apparatus for over two decades, writing for Buenos Aires’ premier newspapers and magazines. He wrote about the AMIA bombing case for 10 years after the event for some of the most important Argentine newspapers.  Pasquini is a contributor to South American and European publications such as Piaui (Brazil) and Internazionale (Italy), the author of three books of investigative journalism, two critically acclaimed novels and an award-winning theatre play. He was the founder and editor of the Spanish language online magazine el puercoespin.

For a film related to the Jews of Argentina, please visit www.nysephardifilmfestival.org.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

24 | Feb
06:30PM
24 | Feb
06:30PM

book talk

Roads Taken: The Great Jewish Migrations to the New World and the Peddlers Who Forged the Way

Between the late 1700s and the 1920s, nearly one-third of the world’s Jews immigrated to new lands. This new publication is the first attempt to tell the remarkable story of the Jewish men who put packs on their backs and traveled forth to sell their goods to peoples across the world, propelling a mass migration of Jewish families out of central and eastern Europe, north Africa, and the Ottoman Empire to destinations as far as the U.S., Great Britain, South Africa, and Latin America.  Historian and author Hasia Diner, New York University, tells the story of discontented young Jewish men who sought opportunity abroad brought change to the geography of Jewish history. With Jose Moya, Barnard College.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Center for Jewish History

book talk

23 | Feb
03:30PM
23 | Feb
03:30PM

max weinreich center fellowship lecture

Towards a Yiddish Architecture

Workmen’s Circle Dr. Emanuel Patt Visiting Professor in Eastern European Jewish Studies

How did Jews in the Diaspora put a distinct stamp on the cities in which they lived? Cecile Kuznitz (Bard College) explores how Jews asserted their presence in cities by looking at buildings constructed by Yiddish-speaking communities in Poland and America.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich center fellowship lecture

22 | Feb
12:30PM
22 | Feb
12:30PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Ancient Texts Lead to Genealogical Discoveries: Genealogical Resources at the Jewish Theological Seminary

At 12:30 in the Chapel, join us for Lunch & Learn, which will focus on Ukraine Research. Our speaker, JewishGen Ukraine SIG Coordinator, will participate in the discussions

At 2:00pm Speaker: Dr. Janette Silverman

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

18 | Feb
06:00PM
18 | Feb
06:00PM

concert

A Musical Journey through Jewish Space

Take a musical journey through Modeling the Synagogue – from Dura to Touro. Guests will listen – within the gallery, in the company of historic scale synagogue models -- to diverse musical selections inspired by the synagogues and their communities. Hosted by cellist Elad Kabilio of MusicTalks, and accompanied by clarinet and singer.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and Center for Jewish History

concert

18 | Feb
06:30PM
18 | Feb
06:30PM

staged reading

Don’t Cry, We’ll All Meet on the Other Side

Professional actors will present a new play by Andreea Valean, noted Romanian playwright, producer, scriptwriter, and theater director. Her new play, “Don’t Cry, We’ll All Meet on the Other Side,” explores the story of Jewish life in Communist Romania in the aftermath of the Holocaust. Valean is a Prins Foundation Fellow this season at the Center for Jewish History. Her work has won awards at the Cannes Film Festival and Berlin Film Festival.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

staged reading

17 | Feb
07:00PM
17 | Feb
07:00PM

lecture and panel discussion

Planning for the Jewish Future: Standards for Yiddish in the 20th and 21st Centuries

How does standardizing Yiddish relate to planning a healthy Jewish future? In this lecture, Dr. Rakhmiel Peltz (Drexel University) leads us on a panoramic trip through the struggle for standards in society and Jewish culture. Featuring some of the strongest architects of the Jewish future—Birnbaum, Borokhov, Uriel Weinreich, and Schaechter—Peltz demonstrates how the concern for Yiddish spelling is not only synonymous with creating a future for Yiddish, but with a roadmap for Jewish continuity.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture and panel discussion

16 | Feb
16 | Feb

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, February 16th for President's Day.

Presented by: (none)

holidays and closures

12 | Feb
01:00PM
12 | Feb
01:00PM

screening

Commemoration of the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz

Rescheduled from January 27th
Video excerpts of the ceremony held at Auschwitz-Birkenau on January 27, reception including conversation with our survivor guests, musical selections and an exhibition of the work of Mikhail Turovsky.

Generously funded by Dina and Jonathan Leader.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Sephardi Federation, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Museum of Jewish Heritage, Mikhail Turovksy Virtual Art Museum

screening

12 | Feb
07:00PM
12 | Feb
07:00PM

legacy council event

The History of Matchmaking in the Jewish Community with Dr. Ruth Westheimer

Hosted by the Legacy Council at the Center for Jewish History
Includes open bar, heavy hors d’oeuvres, and Dr. Ruth’s newest book Myths of Love.  Music will be provided by the Ben Trio Jazz Band.  This event is open to young professionals.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

legacy council event

11 | Feb
06:00PM
11 | Feb
06:00PM

artist's tour

Echoes of the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld

Artist’s Tour  Join the artist, Marisa Scheinfeld, as she explains her creative process and explores this series of beautiful, richly textured, large-scale photographs that document the dramatic degradation of some of the most famous Borscht Belt hotels.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

11 | Feb
07:00PM
11 | Feb
07:00PM

lecture with film & song

Joseph Bau: From Schindler’s List to Syria

Join the American Sephardi Federation for a special evening with Hadasa Bau, Co-Director of the Joseph Bau Museum at Tel Aviv.

The life of Joseph Bau was saved by being on Schindler’s “List,” as portrayed, along with his wedding to Rebecca Tannenbaum, in Steven Spielberg’s eponymous movie. A prolific artist, animator, filmmaker, and author, Bau’s portrait of Schindler is now on display at the Park Avenue Synagogue.

Unbeknownst to his fans and even family until recently, Bau moonlighted for the Mossad. His clandestine contributions to the agency included fabricating the documentation used to extract Adolph Eichmann from Argentina and to establish the Syrian credentials of Elie Cohen, the Egyptian Jew who infiltrated the Syrian Defense Ministry ahead of the Six Day War.

Hadasa’s program, illustrated with film and original song, conveys the humor and strength of the human spirit, which allowed Joseph to transcend the Holocaust’s horrors with art and actions that epitomize Israel’s first fifty years.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

lecture with film & song

04 | Feb
06:00PM
04 | Feb
06:00PM

archival leaders advocate: annual seminar at the center
http://archivalleaders.cjh.org/

Archives Matter

Speaker: Kathleen D. Roe

Archives are the substance of the past, the individual and collective voice, the evidence of action and events, the thread and fabric of our society. Yet archives often occupy a hallowed but hazy role in our communities, universities and schools, places of business, and government. There are pressing issues the archival community must address effectively both to ensure the availability and use of the historical record as well as to ensure that key stakeholders and the public recognize the importance and value of archives. Those issues include: ensuring that a comprehensive archival record survives; concerns over “competition” for prestigious collections; issues regarding freedom of information laws and efforts to restrict access to information; and the need for informed stakeholders and the general public to value and appropriately support the functions of archives. This talk focuses on these “matters” of concern to the archival community, and the need for archivists to promote a strong understanding of why “archives matter”.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

archival leaders advocate: annual seminar at the center
http://archivalleaders.cjh.org/

03 | Feb
06:30PM
03 | Feb
06:30PM

book talk

The Luminous Heart of Jonah S.

Join us for an evening with award-winning author Gina B. Nahai, who will read from and discuss her new novel The Luminous Heart of Jonah S. Part murder mystery and part family saga, The Luminous Heart of Jonah S. is the first novel written about the experience of the Iranian Jewish community in the United States. It is set between Tehran and Los Angeles over the course of a century and draws from real events—including an ongoing investigation into $40 million missing from special funds from the L.A .Department of Water and Power. The Luminous Heart of Jonah S. is a captivating, hilarious, and affecting story that examines the eternal bonds of family and community, and the lasting scars of exile. A light reception and book-signing will follow the reading.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Sephardi Federation, Akashic Books

book talk

02 | Feb
06:00PM
02 | Feb
06:00PM

film screening and discussion

When Comedy Went to School

6 pm:   Echoes of the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld: Open gallery with the photographer
7 pm:   Film screening & discussion

This lively film provides a taste of a remarkable group of young Jewish-American comedians as they honed their craft in the hotels and resorts of the Borscht Belt and became worldwide legends. A Q&A with the comedian, singer and actor Robert Klein will follow the screening.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and Center for Jewish History

film screening and discussion

29 | Jan
07:00PM
29 | Jan
07:00PM

16th street book club

Hope: A Tragedy by Shalom Auslander (novel, 2012, 304 pages)

The 16th Street Book Club is a lively group that meets to discuss modern Jewish literature.

Hope: A Tragedy is a hilarious and haunting examination of the burdens and abuse of history, propelled with unstoppable rhythm and filled with existential musings and mordant wit. It is a comic and compelling story of the hopeless longing to be free of those pasts that haunt our every present.

The rural town of Stockton, New York, is famous for nothing: no one was born there, no one died there, nothing of any historical import at all has ever happened there, which is why Solomon Kugel, like other urbanites fleeing their pasts and histories, decided to move his wife and young son there. To begin again. To start anew. But it isn’t quite working out that way for Kugel...

His ailing mother stubbornly holds on to life, and won’t stop reminiscing about the Nazi concentration camps she never actually suffered through. To complicate matters further, some lunatic is burning down farmhouses just like the one Kugel bought, and when, one night, he discovers history—a living, breathing, thought-to-be-dead specimen of history—hiding upstairs in his attic, bad quickly becomes worse.

Reviews:

“A virtuoso humorist, and a brave one: beware Shalom Auslander; he will make you laugh until your heart breaks.” – New York Times Book Review

“A caustic comic tour de force.” – NPR

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

28 | Jan
06:00PM
28 | Jan
06:00PM

curator's tour

Modeling the Synagogue - from Dura to Touro

In 1973, the Museum commissioned 10 scale models of historic synagogues reflecting the geographic breadth of the Jewish world across the centuries. Join us for an in-depth tour of the models and related objects that document the conception and process of the commission.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

28 | Jan
07:00PM
28 | Jan
07:00PM

cd release concert

Toyznt tamen: A Thousand Flavors

Celebrate the release of Toyznt tamen: A Thousand Flavors, a new recording by Yiddish singer and songwriter Miryem-Khaye Seigel, featuring her original Yiddish songs and other adapted repertoire, including dynamic theatre gems and subversive folk songs. With musicians Patrick Farrell, Alicia Svigals, Michael Winograd and Rémy Yulzari.

Location: Museum at Eldridge Street

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Museum at Eldridge Street

cd release concert

27 | Jan
04:00PM
27 | Jan
04:00PM

screening

Commemoration of the 70th Anniversary of the Liberation of Auschwitz

Rescheduled for February 12th at 1pm.

Video coverage of the ceremony being held at Auschwitz-Birkenau, reception including conversation with our survivor guests, musical selections and an exhibition of the work of Mikhail Turovsky.

Generously funded by Dina and Jonathan Leader.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Sephardi Federation, American Jewish Historical Society, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Museum of Jewish Heritage, Mikhail Turovksy Virtual Art Museum

screening

25 | Jan
02:00PM
25 | Jan
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Speaker: Judy G. Russell

Judy G. Russell, well-known as The Legal Genealogist, will speak about the ethical considerations underlying genealogy, from privacy issues-how to handle family secrets, what to say about living people - to the courtesies we should extend to other researchers.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

21 | Jan
06:30PM
21 | Jan
06:30PM

film

An Unknown Country

An Unknown Country is an independent film that tells the story of European Jews who escaped the Nazi terror and found refuge in an unlikely destination: Ecuador, a South American republic barely known at the time.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

film

21 | Jan
06:30PM
21 | Jan
06:30PM

panel discussion

Behind the Lens: New York Jews between the Wars

Five historians dig up film footage, Yiddish newspapers, autobiographies, and landsmannschaften records from the YIVO archives, and present a rare portrait of NY Jewish life between the wars. With Rebecca Kobrin (Columbia), Eddy Portnoy (YIVO; Rutgers), Roberta Newman (YIVO), Daniel Soyer (Fordham), and Annie Polland, moderator (Tenement Museum).  
Location: Museum of the City of New York (MCNY)

YIVO Institute and the Museum of the City of NY Letters to Afar a video installation by Peter Forgacs and the Klezmatics, now on view at MCNY.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY)

panel discussion

14 | Jan
06:00PM
14 | Jan
06:00PM

artist's tour

Echoes of the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld

Join the artist, Marisa Scheinfeld, as she explains her creative process and explores this series of beautiful, richly textured, large-scale photographs that document the dramatic degradation of some of the most famous Borscht Belt hotels.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

11 | Jan
02:00PM
11 | Jan
02:00PM

memorial event

Mina Bern: A Celebration

This event marks the 5th anniversary of Mina Bern's passing at the age of 99, the last great star of the interwar European Yiddish stage who was still active. Bern’s absence is felt among the Yiddish and theater communities, who wish to honor her memory and remind the world of her contribution. A wonderful actress and entertainer in her own right, Bern was also mentor to many of those who keep the field of Yiddish theater vibrant. She was also one of the most colorful personalities in a milieu not short on colorful personalities.

The program will feature material associated with Mina Bern, including sketches from the Broadway shows Those Were the Days and Let’s Sing Yiddish; songs that she put her mark on; documentary footage of Bern talking about her life and performing; and of course reminiscences by those who worked with and were influenced by her.

Most importantly, Mina Bern mentored artists of all ages who sought to keep the flame of Yiddish language and theater alive. Among those who worked with and learned from her are the event organizers, Tony-nominated director and actress Eleanor Reissa, Congress director Shane Baker, and photographer Joan Roth; as well as event participants including founding Klezmatics member and world-renowned trumpet star Frank London; Broadway actresses Lori Wilner and Joanne Borts, and Broadway actors Allen Lewis Rickman and Bob Abelson; actresses Yelena Shmulenson and Rachel Botchan; Rabbi Avram Mlotek; Chazzan Shira Flam; actors Sandy Leavitt and Hy Wolfe; pianist and actor Steve Sterner; and stage manager David Rosenberg.

Kosher refreshments will be served.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, Congress for Jewish Culture

memorial event

05 | Jan
06:30PM
05 | Jan
06:30PM

yivo-bard winter program on ashkenazi civilization keynote address

Poets as Smugglers: Sutzkever, Kaczerginski, and How the Remnants of the YIVO Archive Reached New York

In this lecture, David Fishman (JTS; Jacob Kronhill Visiting Scholar in East European Jewish History) will tell, for the first time, the dramatic story of how Yiddish poets Abraham Sutzkever and Shmerke Kaczerginski rescued hundreds of treasures from YIVO’s archives following WWII and brought them to YIVO’s new headquarters in New York.  This program is presented in connection with the YIVO-Bard Winter Program on Ashkenazi Civilization 2015. A reception will follow the lecture.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

yivo-bard winter program on ashkenazi civilization keynote address