19 | Nov
02:00PM
19 | Nov
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Sleuthing in Yiddish: The Yiddish Forward as a Source for Family History Information

In this presentation, Samuel Norich, vice-president of the Forward Association, will provide an overview of the role of the Yiddish Forward has played for American Jews for the past 120 years.

He will examine the features and innovations that made it the most widely read Jewish publication in the world for the first six decades of the 20th century, and now make it a resource for

historians and others delving into the Jewish communities of America and Europe of those times.

Samuel Norich has distinguished himself as an analyst of American Jewry's communal structures. He is the author of "What Will Bind Us Now? a report on the institutional ties between Israel

and American Jewry." He has served at president of the World Jewish Congress, as executive director of YIVO (1980-1992), and as chief executive of the Forward Association.

Born in Displaced Persons camp in Germany in 1947, the son of Polish Jews, Mr. Norich emigrated to the U.S. with his family in 1957, and was educated at Columbia, Hebrew University in 

Jerusalem, and University of Wisconsin.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

19 | Nov
06:30PM
19 | Nov
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

Giuseppe Valadier’s Restoration of the Arch of Titus

Marina Caffiero (University of Rome La Sapienza) will discuss the restoration of the Arch of Titus; as Stendhal put it, of the original arch, “only a copy remains.” Restored by Raffaele Stern and Giuseppe Valadier under the post-Napoleonic restoration rule of Pope Pius VII, the Arch of Titus is one of the earliest examples of preservation of antiquity in the Eternal city. Loaded with symbolism for both Jews and Christians, the Flavian monument returned to public sight during a papacy that reshaped anew Jewish-Catholic relations in public spaces.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

19 | Nov
07:00PM
19 | Nov
07:00PM

discussion and book signing

From Daniel Pearl to Steven Sotloff: Jews and Political Kidnapping

The Algemeiner Editor's Club and the American Sephardi Federation cordially invite you to join us for a discussion and exclusive book signing with Jere Van Dyk, former CBS journalist and captive of the Taliban. The conversation -- which will be moderated by Algemeiner Editor-in-Chief Dovid Efune -- is titled From Daniel Pearl to Steven Sotloff: Jews and Political Kidnapping.

Van Dyk is one of the most celebrated journalists covering the Middle East, and his new book THE TRADE: My Journey Into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping adds to his list of already impressive credentials. His unheralded knowledge positions him as an authority to discuss breaking news in relation to Middle Eastern geopolitics as well as his own experience being held hostage by jihadists and the ever-evolving business of political kidnapping.

The discussion will be followed by a Q & A session and a book signing. VIP entry to the event includes access to an exclusive reception preceding the talk and a signed copy of the book.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation & Algemeiner Editor’s Club

discussion and book signing

16 | Nov
06:30PM
16 | Nov
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

Roman Travelers in Eretz Israel

In the middle of the night on July 9, 1746, two Jews of the Roman ghetto, Amadio Abbina and Sabato Isacco Ambron, left the city, The description of their adventures and the places they visited during their long pilgrimage to the Holy Land have reached us for the first time in 2012 in manuscripts published by Paola Abbina and Asher Salah. By providing a biographical sketch of these two intrepid Jewish friends, this lecture by Asher Salah (Bezalel Academy) aims at understanding the reasons why they undertook such a perilous journey.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

15 | Nov
06:30PM
15 | Nov
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

The City of Rome as Storehouse of Jewish Artifacts

Ra’anan Boustan (Princeton University) will speak on the paradoxical image of Rome as a repository for “Jewish” artifacts and strategies by which Roman Jews and Roman Christians utilized these artifacts to make claims on the ancient past.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

13 | Nov
07:00PM
13 | Nov
07:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

The Virtual Archive: Imagining I.N. Steinberg’s Jewish Refuge in the Kimberley

This presentation reviews an exciting collaborative project that constructs a virtual world to image and imagine I. N. Steinberg’s plans for a Jewish refugee settlement in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. This virtual world takes shape by mobilizing thousands of digitized documents from the Steinberg collection at the YIVO archives in an innovative and informative way. I.N. Steinberg was the charismatic leader of the Freeland League who lived in Australia from 1939-1943 and who sought a refuge for the persecuted Jews of Europe against the backdrop of World War II and the Holocaust. The presentation will feature a Unity gaming demo that illustrates how the archival documents are used to texture the architectural models in the virtual world. This five-year digital art and humanities project is funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Melissa Shiff is Research Associate at the Sensorium Research Centre for Digital Art and Technology at York University in Toronto. She is a digital media artist whose current work utilizes virtual reality to engage with Jewish cultural memory. Melissa Shiff’s highly acclaimed projects have been exhibited internationally at such institutions as The Jewish Museum New York, The Jewish Museum in Prague, The Contemporary Jewish Museum San Francisco, and The Israeli Center for Digital Art. She is the artistic director of “The Imaginary Jewish Homelands of I.N. Steinberg.”

Louis Kaplan is Professor of History and Theory of Photography and New Media at the University of Toronto and he is affiliated faculty at its Centre for Jewish Studies. He is the author of numerous books including most recently Photography and Humour (Reaktion Books/University of Chicago Press, 2016). Professor Kaplan was a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Jewish History during the 2013-2014 academic year. He serves as the chief historian and theorist on “The Imaginary Jewish Homelands of I.N. Steinberg.”

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

12 | Nov
06:30PM
12 | Nov
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

Dressing the Sacred Text: Mappòt, Me’ilim and Parochyot in the Synagogues of Rome

The blessing of the women who dress the sacred text is the idea at the heart of the Rome Lab, the philological trace of a tradition that ties Roman Jews to Antiquity. Eight women are said to have worked in the Temple of Solomon to weave the parochet, the curtain that shielded the sacred Ark. The connection between the dressing of the text and the women who made the fabric is sealed in the Roman liturgy. Alessandra Di Castro (Jewish Museum of Rome), Serena Di Nepi (University of Rome La Sapienza) and Rav Amedeo Spagnoletto (Collegio Rabbinico Italiano) will discuss this tradition that challenges historical methods and Jewish law.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

09 | Nov
06:30PM
09 | Nov
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

Traditions of Roman Jews: Life and Religion

A captivating story-teller and profound connoisseur of Talmudic literature and Roman Jewish lore, Rav Amedeo Spagnoletto (Collegio Rabbinico Italiano) will guide listeners through the community narratives and century-old customs of the oldest community in the Western hemisphere.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

08 | Nov
06:30PM
08 | Nov
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

To be a Scribe in Italy: A Century Old Legacy

Working as a sofer (scribe) and restorer for more than thirty years, Rav Amedeo Spagnoletto recently appointed chief rabbi of Florence, has become a keeper of the Italian tradition handed down for centuries. In his presentation Rav Spagnoletto will discuss the history, art, and halakhic norms that converge in the making of handwritten Hebrew text.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

07 | Nov
07:30PM
07 | Nov
07:30PM

lecture & multi-media presentation

No Friends but the Kurds: A Story of Surviving Saddam

At a time when the freedom of the Kurdish people is imperiled, the American Sephardi Federation is hosting a two-part program. 

First, researchers from the Diarna Geo-Musuem of North African and Middle Eastern Jewish Life will present a virtual guided tour of Jewish historical sites in Iraqi-Kurdistan, ranging from synagogues and communal caves to the purported shrines of Biblical prophets and the tomb of the first woman rabbi.

Afterward, ASF Board Member Jamil Ezra, a native of Baghdad, will share his inspiring story of fleeing 1970s Baathist Iraq with the help of the Kurdish fighters known as Peshmurga, who included a young Masoud Barzani. Now President of the Kurdish Regional Government, Barzani personally drove Jamil to freedom.

The Diarna virtual guided journey to Jewish-Iraqi Kurdistan is the product of nine years of research and multiple research expeditions.

Just before the rise of ISIS, a team of researchers from Diarna journeyed to Iraqi-Kurdistan to document the last remnants of Jewish life, more than fifty years after the community disbanded. Warmly greeted by Kurds who fondly remembered their Jewish neighbors and Peshmurga who invited them for tea at a checkpoint, the Diarna researchers discovered hidden Jewish history in caves and behind crumbling walls. Learn about fascinating sites in Amediye, Akre, al-Qoosh, Betanur, Kirkuk, and elsewhere.

More recently, as detailed in Newsweek’s March 3, 2017 cover story, a Diarna researcher survived an ISIS chemical attack at Sinjar as work continues to discover and document the area's rich Jewish history.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

lecture & multi-media presentation

06 | Nov
09:00AM
06 | Nov
09:00AM

conference

Jews In and After the 1917 Russian Revolution

Attend a 2-day conference to explore the 1917 Russian Revolution, Jewish life in the Soviet Union, and the Revolution’s lasting impact today.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, Genesis Fund, Harriman Institute at Columbia University, and Russian American Foundation

conference

05 | Nov
09:00AM
05 | Nov
09:00AM

conference

Jews In and After the 1917 Russian Revolution

Attend a 2-day conference to explore the 1917 Russian Revolution, Jewish life in the Soviet Union, and the Revolution’s lasting impact today.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, Genesis Fund, Harriman Institute at Columbia University, and Russian American Foundation

conference

05 | Nov
06:30PM
05 | Nov
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

Rome and the Jews at the Times of the Ghetto

Lecture by Serena Di Nepi (University of Rome La Sapienza). The Roman ghetto was established by a Papal decree in 1555 on the backdrop of major geo-political upheaval. Whatever the Pope’s goal and motivations actually were, the ghetto represented an alternative to the Iberian expulsion and a way to keep Jews within the Christian society.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

02 | Nov
06:30PM
02 | Nov
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

Rome in Talmudic Imagination

The story of Yavneh and Rabban Yohanan ben Zakkai is among many literary strategies used in the Jewish texts to illustrate the encounter between Judaism and Rome. Amram Tropper (Ben Gurion University), Ron Naiweld (French National Centre for Scientific Research), and Shai Secunda (Bard College) will explore how the rabbinical elite’s views of the Romans played out in the formation of modern Judaism.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

02 | Nov
07:00PM
02 | Nov
07:00PM

book talk

Before Brooklyn: Jewish Communities in Egypt

Book talk launching and celebrating Najat Abdulhuq’s Jewish and Greek Communities in Egypt: Entrepreneurship and Business before Nasser, followed by a response from Joyce Zonana (CUNY BMCC), author of Dream Homes: From Cairo to Katrina, an Exile's Journey.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

01 | Nov
07:00PM
01 | Nov
07:00PM

discussion

9 Out of 400 at 20: Meir Gal and Ortal Ben Dayan in Conversation

Join Meir (Miro) Gal and Ortal Ben Dayan to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Meir Gal’s widely acclaimed “9 Out of 400: the West and the Rest.” Gal, an NYC based artist and SVA faculty, has created the groundbreaking artwork in 1997, resolutely helping a renewed struggle to radically change the politics of education in the Israeli school system. Gal’s work inspired many Mizrahi artists and activists to continue the work of previous generations in the long struggle to change the politics of historiography, memory, and self-representation. In 1997, in a text that accompanies the artwork, Gal wrote that “The book shown in the photograph is the official textbook of the history of the Jewish people in recent generations that was used by high school students (including myself) in the 1970’s. The nine pages I’m holding are the only pages in the book that discuss non-European Jewish history”. Thirteen years later, Tel Aviv based Ortal Ben Dayan created the memorable “6 Out of 511 Mizrahi Artists according to Zalmona: a Tribute to Meir Gal”. This action is only one chapter in Ben Dayan's ongoing critical work as a public intellectual, artist, and designer. Gal and Ben Dayan will discuss their histories, issues concerning the labeling of political art, is there indeed a genre of “Mizrahi art”, and identities in shifting transatlantic and diasporic contexts.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

discussion

29 | Oct
06:30PM
29 | Oct
06:30PM

conference

The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back

This international conference, featuring scholars from Israel, Italy, Sweden and the United States, explores the historical context and cultural significance of the Arch of Titus from Imperial Rome to modern-day Israel. Complements YUM’s exhibition The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & YU Center for Israel Studies

conference

26 | Oct
06:30PM
26 | Oct
06:30PM

panel discussion

The “Pew Jew” Study: American and German-Jewry in Comparison

Samuel Norich, (Forward) moderates a discussion withSteven Cohen (Hebrew Union College) and Robin Judd (Ohio State University) about the parallels and contrasts between the situations of German Jews a century ago and American Jews today.

Part of the series: German-Jewish History in the Now: The Contemporary Relevance of German-Jewish History

Made possible by Abraham Lowenthal, in memory of his parents, Rabbi Eric I. Lowenthal and Mrs. Suzanne S. Lowenthal. With additional support from Robert Rifkind and Elliot Sander.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

26 | Oct
06:30PM
26 | Oct
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

The Temple in Renaissance Imagination

Giuseppe Veltri, University of Hamburg. Which Temple did they long for and why?

Together with Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back, Centro Primo Levi and the Jewish Museum of Rome present the Rome Lab, a learning space dedicated to Roman Jews, to the formative centuries of Western Judaism and the 22-centuries-long relationship between Rome and Jerusalem.

Through January 2018, the general public, students, and scholars are welcome to join and participate in the conversation. Additional info at www.primolevicenter.org.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

25 | Oct
06:00PM
25 | Oct
06:00PM

a library social hour

No Shushing Allowed

Please join us for our October library social hour. You will have the opportunity to speak with the librarians and archivists who make the materials housed at Center for Jewish History accessible, and to welcome our new group of incoming fellows. This is a wonderful opportunity to get to know fellow researchers as well as staff, learn about how others use the collections, and talk about books, archives, and research in general. Light refreshments will be served.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

a library social hour

25 | Oct
06:30PM
25 | Oct
06:30PM

panel discussion

The Frankfurt School Knew Trump Was Coming

In a post-election essay, the critic Alex Ross suggested that we may beexperiencing the American catastrophe anticipated by the Frankfurt School. Jack Jacobs (CUNY), Jonathon Catlin (Princeton), and Liliane Weissberg (Penn) discuss how the Frankfurt School’s analysis of antisemitism illuminates contemporary racism. Co-presented with Deutsches Haus at NYU.

Part of the series: German-Jewish History in the Now: The Contemporary Relevance of German-Jewish History

Made possible by Abraham Lowenthal, in memory of his parents, Rabbi Eric I. Lowenthal and Mrs. Suzanne S. Lowenthal. With additional support from Robert Rifkind and Elliot Sander.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

25 | Oct
06:30PM
25 | Oct
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

“Io so’ jodìo romano”: Notes on the Jewish-Roman Dialect

Daniel Leisawitz, Muhlenberg College. What language did the Jews of Rome speak before Judeo-Roman?

Together with Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back, Centro Primo Levi and the Jewish Museum of Rome present the Rome Lab, a learning space dedicated to Roman Jews, to the formative centuries of Western Judaism and the 22-centuries-long relationship between Rome and Jerusalem.

Through January 2018, the general public, students, and scholars are welcome to join and participate in the conversation. Additional info at www.primolevicenter.org.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

24 | Oct
06:30PM
24 | Oct
06:30PM

panel discussion

Counterfactual History—What if the Weimar Republic Had Survived?

Historian Michael Brenner (University of Munich/American University) joins Gavriel Rosenfeld (Fairfield University), to discuss what factors and what actors contributed to the collapse of a fragile pluralism in the 1930s, and what that means for our own democracy. Co-presented with the German Academy in New York.

Part of the series: German-Jewish History in the Now: The Contemporary Relevance of German-Jewish History

Made possible by Abraham Lowenthal, in memory of his parents, Rabbi Eric I. Lowenthal and Mrs. Suzanne S. Lowenthal. With additional support from Robert Rifkind and Elliot Sander.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

23 | Oct
06:00PM
23 | Oct
06:00PM

lecture & multi-media presentation

Jewish Heritage of Malta: An evening exploring a beautiful island's connection to Jewish history and culture

Evidence of Jewish history dates back to Roman times (4th-5th century) as seen at the St. Paul’s Catacomb site at Rabat, Malta, where several Jewish catacombs can be found alongside Christian burials.

The contemporary Maltese Jewish community is composed of immigrants from Gibraltar, England, North Africa, Portugal, and Turkey, arriving over the course of French and British rule starting in 1798.  During the early 20th century, the island’s Jews did not have a rabbi of their own and rabbis would often be flown in from Sicily to perform ceremonies.  During World War II, Malta was the only European country not requiring visas for Jews fleeing German rule. Numerous Maltese Jews, moreover, fought Germany in the British Army during the war. Today, a small but active community of under 200 Jews live on Malta with their own synagogue and rabbis.

Featuring guest speaker Dr. John Baldacchino (Director, University of Wisconsin-Madison Arts Institute), the program will present multimedia presentations showing Jewish heritage sites in Malta today.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation & New York Jewish Travel Guide

lecture & multi-media presentation

22 | Oct
01:00PM
22 | Oct
01:00PM

celebration

120th Anniversary of the Founding of the Jewish Labor Bund

A celebration of the 120th anniversary of the founding of the Jewish Labor Bund, the socialist movement which has figured so prominently in the history of Eastern European and World Jewry.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

celebration

22 | Oct
06:30PM
22 | Oct
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

Frivolous, Ironic and Erotic Like the Bible: The Poetry of Immanuel da Roma

Ann Brener, Library of Congress, Isabelle Levy, Columbia University. Did Yosef Caro really ban from Jewish life Immanuel Romano’s poetry?

Together with Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back, Centro Primo Levi and the Jewish Museum of Rome present the Rome Lab, a learning space dedicated to Roman Jews, to the formative centuries of Western Judaism and the 22-centuries-long relationship between Rome and Jerusalem.

Through January 2018, the general public, students, and scholars are welcome to join and participate in the conversation. Additional info at www.primolevicenter.org.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

19 | Oct
06:30PM
19 | Oct
06:30PM

panel discussion

Why Moses Mendelssohn Matters

How compatible are faith and reason, religious and civic loyalty, religiouscommitment and cosmopolitanism? Abraham Socher (Oberlin/Jewish Review of Books), David Sorkin (Yale), and Leora Batnitzky (Princeton) discuss how the great German-Jewish philosopher’s answers to these questions resonate today. Co-presented with the Jewish Review of Books.

Part of the series: German-Jewish History in the Now: The Contemporary Relevance of German-Jewish History

Made possible by Abraham Lowenthal, in memory of his parents, Rabbi Eric I. Lowenthal and Mrs. Suzanne S. Lowenthal. With additional support from Robert Rifkind and Elliot Sander.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

19 | Oct
06:30PM
19 | Oct
06:30PM

film

Luigi Magni, In the Name of the Pope King

1973 (103 minutes)

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

film

19 | Oct
07:15PM
19 | Oct
07:15PM

lecture

Rescuing Endangered Jews: The Unit for Aliyah, Absorption & Special Operations

Meet Arielle Di Porto, who grew-up in a Moroccan-Sephardi home, made Aliyah at age 17, and has dedicated her life to ensuring the safety of every Jew. For several decades she has worked tirelessly to facilitate the Aliyah of Jews who choose to make Israel their home -- whether by choice or circumstance. Di Porto’s strong sense of love for the Jewish people and State of Israel and drive to rescue endangered Jews characterizes a career in which she participated in some of most critical and sensitive emigration missions in Jewish history, including special operations to ex-filtrate Jewish refugees from Cuba, Iran, Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon, Syria, Yemen, and other hot spots.

Today, she serves as the Jewish Agency for Israel’s Director of the Aliyah Division of the Unit for Aliyah, Absorption & Special Operations, responsible for Aliyah from around the world, including the United States, as well as directly charged with Aliyah from France and clandestine Aliyah efforts from countries in the Middle East.

The American Sephardi Federation is proud to partner with the Jewish Agency for Israel to provide a rare look behind the headlines at the vital, life-saving work of Arielle Di Porto and her colleagues on behalf of the Jewish people and State of Israel.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation & Jewish Agency for Israel

lecture

18 | Oct
03:00PM
18 | Oct
03:00PM

lecture

Mystic, Teacher, Troublemaker: Shimon Engel and the Challenges of Hasidic Yeshiva Education in Interwar Poland

Max Weinreich Fellowship Lecture in Polish Jewish Studies

Prior to the interwar period, yeshivas were virtually unknown among Polish Hasidim, who preferred a less formal educational paradigm centered on a shtibl (a small house of study). Following the First World War and an increase in secularization, however, the shtiblekh emptied out and Hasidic yeshivas were designed as an emergency measure to retain the young people within the Hasidic fold. Paradoxically, this educational revolution depended to a great extent on people like Shimon Engel Horowic of ?elechów (1876-1943) – elite scholars educated in traditional shtiblekh, who often looked on modern yeshivas with suspicion, if not outright enmity.

This talk will explore Engel’s idea of Hasidic education as an alternative solution to the interwar crisis that befell the Hasidic communities. This controversial idea an idea that put his life on a collision trajectory with the modernizing endeavors of Hasidic leaders in Poland and eventually ended his career when his conflict with the administration of the famous Yeshivat khakhme lublin resulted in violent riots.

Speaker: Wojciech Tworek is a postdoctoral fellow at the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

18 | Oct
06:30PM
18 | Oct
06:30PM

panel discussion

Germans, Jews, and Sex

A century before landmark victories on same-sex marriage in the U.S. andGermany, Magnus Legendary author and sex-therapistRuth Westheimer joins historiansRobert Beachy (Yonsei International University) and Atina Grossmann (Cooper Union) to discuss the legacy of German-Jewish reformers in advancing the scientific study of sexuality and advancing gay rights. Co-presented with the Goethe-Institut New York.

Part of the series: German-Jewish History in the Now: The Contemporary Relevance of German-Jewish History

Made possible by Abraham Lowenthal, in memory of his parents, Rabbi Eric I. Lowenthal and Mrs. Suzanne S. Lowenthal. With additional support from Robert Rifkind and Elliot Sander.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

18 | Oct
06:30PM
18 | Oct
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

A Tale of Two Cities: Rome and Jerusalem

Paula Fredriksen, Boston University. Everyone knows that Rome destroyed Jerusalem in the year 70. But did you know how much Rome contributed to building it?

Together with Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back, Centro Primo Levi and the Jewish Museum of Rome present the Rome Lab, a learning space dedicated to Roman Jews, to the formative centuries of Western Judaism and the 22-centuries-long relationship between Rome and Jerusalem.

Through January 2018, the general public, students, and scholars are welcome to join and participate in the conversation. Additional info at www.primolevicenter.org.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

17 | Oct
06:30PM
17 | Oct
06:30PM

film and discussion

Germans & Jews—Jewish Life in Contemporary German and the Legacy of the Holocaust

The 2016 film Germans & Jews explores the country’s transformation from silence about the Holocaust to facing it head on. Post-film discussion with Steven Sokol (American Council on Germany), Rabbi Sonja Keren Pilz (Hebrew Union College), and attorney Steve Zehden (Noerr LLP). Co-presented with the American Council on Germany.

Part of the series: German-Jewish History in the Now: The Contemporary Relevance of German-Jewish History

Made possible by Abraham Lowenthal, in memory of his parents, Rabbi Eric I. Lowenthal and Mrs. Suzanne S. Lowenthal. With additional support from Robert Rifkind and Elliot Sander.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

film and discussion

17 | Oct
07:00PM
17 | Oct
07:00PM

book talk

Jewish New York, 1917

A panel discussion with Deborah Dash Moore andRonit Stahl in conjunction with 1917: How One Year Changed the World exploring New York Jewry’s myriad responses to WWI from the viewpoints of military and social urban history, launching two new landmark books in the field of American Jewish History: Deborah Dash Moore’s Jewish New York and Ronit Stahl’s Enlisting Faith.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

16 | Oct
06:30PM
16 | Oct
06:30PM

curator's tour

The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back

Join the curator on a walking tour through Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back, exploring the image and legacy of the Arch of Titus from Imperial Rome to modern-day Israel.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

16 | Oct
06:30PM
16 | Oct
06:30PM

film

Claudio Della Seta, Una Giornata Particolare

In memory of the victims of the deportation of the Jewish Community of Rome, October 16th, 1943 (2016).

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

film

15 | Oct
02:30PM
15 | Oct
02:30PM

lecture

German-Jewish History in the Twenty-First Century

New York Times columnist Roger Cohen synthesizes the themes of LBI’s fall series into a broader narrative about the disruptions and discontents of modernity, the fragility of democracy, and the twin crises of conflict and migration.

Part of the series: German-Jewish History in the Now: The Contemporary Relevance of German-Jewish History

Made possible by Abraham Lowenthal, in memory of his parents, Rabbi Eric I. Lowenthal and Mrs. Suzanne S. Lowenthal. With additional support from Robert Rifkind and Elliot Sander.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

lecture

13 | Oct
13 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, October 13 Simchat Torah.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

12 | Oct
12 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, October 12 Shemini Atzeret.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

11 | Oct
11 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm on Wednesday, October 11 Erev Shemini Atzeret.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

10 | Oct
07:00PM
10 | Oct
07:00PM

book launch

The Book Smugglers

The Book Smugglers tells the story of the courageous Jews of the “Paper Brigade,” who risked their lives to rescue thousands of rare books and manuscripts—first from the Nazis and then from the Soviets—by hiding them on their bodies, burying them in bunkers in the Vilna Ghetto, and smuggling them across borders. This new book by David Fishman has been dubbed “Monuments Men for book lovers.” It is the epic chronicle of a little-known chapter from the darkest days of Jewish history.

The event will feature remarks by David Fishman, a musical program featuring songs by Shmerke Kaczerginski, a leader of the "Paper Brigade," performed by Josh Waletzky, and commentary on the book by Aaron Lansky, Founder and President of the Yiddish Book Center, and YIVO’s Executive Director Jonathan Brent, who will also reveal how the work to rescue Jewish culture and heritage from oblivion continues to this very day with the Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Collections Project .

A free reception will follow the program. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing by the author.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Yiddish Book Center

book launch

06 | Oct
06 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, October 6 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

05 | Oct
05 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, October 5 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

04 | Oct
04 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2pm on Wednesday, October 4 for Erev Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

03 | Oct
07:00PM
03 | Oct
07:00PM

concert and lecture

Henech Kon: Beyond the Dybbuk

Featuring Diana Matut (scholar),Re'ut Ben-Ze'ev (soprano) and Zalmen Mlotek (piano) exploring the legacy of composer Henech Kon, best known as the composer of The Dybbuk’s film score and songs such as Shpil zhe mir a lidele in Yidish.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Jewish Music Forum

concert and lecture

30 | Sep
30 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Saturday, September 30 for Yom Kippur.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

29 | Sep
29 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Friday, September 29 for Erev Yom Kippur.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

27 | Sep
06:00PM
27 | Sep
06:00PM

a library social hour

CANCELLED: No Shushing Allowed

Please join us instead for our next library social hour in October.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

a library social hour

27 | Sep
07:30PM
27 | Sep
07:30PM

concert

Romantic Overtures: Music by Mozart, Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahms for Piano 4 Hands and Strings

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performs Mozart’s “Piano Trio K.520 in B-flat Major”; Mendelssohn’s "Hebriden" and "Ruy Blas" overtures arranged for 1 piano 4 hands, violin and cello; Schumann’s “G-minor Piano Trio,” Op.110 and Brahms’ “Hungarian Dances arranged for 1 piano 4 hands, violin and cello.”

This program is made possible by the generous support of the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

25 | Sep
06:30PM
25 | Sep
06:30PM

curator's tour

The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back

Join historian Steven Fine (Yeshiva University) on a walking tour through YUM’s exhibition The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back, as he explores the image and legacy of the Arch of Titus from Imperial Rome to modern-day Israel.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

24 | Sep
01:00PM
24 | Sep
01:00PM

commemoration

Nusakh Vilne

Join YIVO for their annual event commemorating the Jewish community of Vilna through poetry, music, and presentation. A reception will follow the presentations.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

commemoration

22 | Sep
22 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, September 22 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

21 | Sep
21 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, September 21 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

20 | Sep
20 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Wednesday, September 20 for Erev Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

19 | Sep
03:00PM
19 | Sep
03:00PM

lecture

Singing for the Bride and Groom in Early Modern Ashkenaz

Diana Matut will reveal the nature of singing during Jewish weddings in Ashkenaz and will answer questions such as: who was allowed to sing what to whom and when? And which repertoire did female singers perform and how?

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

19 | Sep
07:00PM
19 | Sep
07:00PM

film

Acts and Intermissions: Emma Goldman in America

A cinematic collage featuring rare archival footage of NYC from the 1910s, Abigail Child’s new documentary circles around the life of Emma Goldman and her relationship to the history of protest between then and now.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

film

17 | Sep
06:30PM
17 | Sep
06:30PM

panel discussion

“Our Crowd”—German-Jewish Banking Families in America

In 1967, Stephen Birmingham published his best-selling social history of New York’s elite German-Jewish banking families. Historians Susie Pak (St. John’s) and Rebecca Kobrin (Columbia) join journalist Daniel Schulman ( Mother Jones) to evaluate the legend and the reality of “Our Crowd.”

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and the American Jewish Historical Society

panel discussion

14 | Sep
06:30PM
14 | Sep
06:30PM

the arch of titus and the rome lab

Singing Sacred Text

Rav Alberto Funaro. Yes, these are the High Holidays’ melodies of the oldest Jewish community in the Western world. Would you like to sing them too?

Together with Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition The Arch of Titus – from Jerusalem to Rome, and Back, Centro Primo Levi and the Jewish Museum of Rome present the Rome Lab, a learning space dedicated to Roman Jews, to the formative centuries of Western Judaism and the 22-centuries-long relationship between Rome and Jerusalem.

Through January 2018, the general public, students, and scholars are welcome to join and participate in the conversation. Additional info at www.primolevicenter.org.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, NYU Casa Italiana Zerilli Marimò, Università di Roma La Sapienza, Italian Cultural Institute, ENIT Italian Tourism Board, Foundation for Jewish Cultural Heritage in Italy, American Sephardi Federation & Center for Jewish History.

the arch of titus and the rome lab

14 | Sep
07:00PM
14 | Sep
07:00PM

lecture

A Traveler Undisguised: “Mendele Moykher Sforim” as a Modern Jewish Intellectual

Professor Dan Miron presents a lecture on the essence of Abramovitsh’s historical achievement, one which enabled him to redefine the courses of both Hebrew and Yiddish Literature, and on the question of the continued relevance of his legacy in today’s world.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

13 | Sep
06:00PM
13 | Sep
06:00PM

lecture

Political Prophecy versus Liberation Theology: Ethical and Mystical Dimensions

Join us for a talk by Professor Susannah Heschel (Dartmouth College) examining the development of "prophecy" as a central category in Protestant and Jewish biblical scholarship over the past 200 years. Christian and Jewish theology have been at sharp odds in their understanding of prophetic speech and the prophets’ own religious experience. From the mid-19th century well into the 1920s, for example, most Protestant biblical scholars defined the prophets as "ecstatics," whereas Jewish theologians viewed the prophets as teachers of universal ethical behavior. How have these views changed as biblical scholars responded to the upheaval of the world wars and political challenges like the Civil Rights Movement? Professor Heschel will pay particular attention to the thought of Abraham Heschel and will ask what role prophets might play in religious and political circumstances in the present.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, The Berman Center for Jewish Studies at Lehigh University, Zentrum für Literatur- und Kulturforschun, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft,American Jewish Historical Society & Leo Baeck Institute

lecture

11 | Sep
04:00PM
11 | Sep
04:00PM

film

Rare Archival Footage from JDC’s Work with Refugees and Stateless Persons

A unique opportunity to view rare archival films from the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee (JDC) Archives, showcasing JDC’s assistance to refugees in Europe, North Africa and Yemen in the 20th century. A panel discussion will follow the film viewing.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee

film

11 | Sep
06:30PM
11 | Sep
06:30PM

course

Proust in Time: Swann’s Way

Mondays, September 11, 18, 25, October 2
In this course centered on Swann’s Way, the first installment of In Search of Lost Time, students will consider how Proust's novel illuminates concerns both intimate and vast in light of the historical, cultural, and personal context in which it was written.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research

course

11 | Sep
07:00PM
11 | Sep
07:00PM

celebration

Iraq’s Last Jews

Celebrating and honoring the founding supporters of the Iraqi Jewish Voices Project, Robert Shasha and Dennis Shasha. The project, led by the journalist and author Tamar Morad, tells the story of the last Jews of Iraq and their integration into Israel and throughout the world through dramatic current and historical photography, film, and personal narrative. The project is affiliated with Sephardi Voices USA, which means to collect interviews of Jews of Middle Eastern and North African origin to raise awareness around their destiny that is an important piece of Jewish and world history.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

celebration

10 | Sep
01:30PM
10 | Sep
01:30PM

workshop

Paper-Art Workshop for Rosh Hashanah

Explore unconventional ways to create two- and three-dimensional greeting cards for Rosh Hashanah and other occasions with returning guest artist Marna Chester. A selection of historic cards from YUM’s collection will be on display for inspiration. This multi-sensory activity is suitable for adults and children, including individuals who are blind or who have low vision.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

07 | Sep
06:30PM
07 | Sep
06:30PM

exhibit opening

For Her Own Good: An Interactive Art Installation by Ofri Cnaani

Artist Performance for Opening Night of “1917: How One Year Changed the World”. For Her Own Good is a mixed media installation exploring the multivalence of Emma Goldman’s performances, voices, and silences. A poetic commentary on the public speeches and closed hearings of “the most dangerous woman alive,” the installation weaves archival footage from various speeches and hearings. On view through November 1.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

exhibit opening

06 | Sep
06:00PM
06 | Sep
06:00PM

exhibit opening

Becoming “German-Jewish” in America

German-Jewish immigrants built some of the United States’ signature Jewish institutions based on their traditions, education, and cultural ideals. Historian Tobias Brinkmann (Penn State) comments on an exhibition that shows how diverse groups of German-speaking immigrants forged an identity in the New World.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

exhibit opening

04 | Sep
04 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, September 4 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

03 | Sep
03 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, September 3 and Monday, September 4 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

28 | Aug
07:00PM
28 | Aug
07:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Itamar Borochov – Jazz between Middle Eastern traditions

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

28 | Aug
09:00PM
28 | Aug
09:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

David Serero – A Sephardi on Opera!

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

27 | Aug
01:00PM
27 | Aug
01:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Sarah Aroeste - Ladino Music Transformed from Yesterday to Today

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

27 | Aug
03:00PM
27 | Aug
03:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Gerard Edery – Treasures of World Song

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

27 | Aug
05:00PM
27 | Aug
05:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Nashaz – Arabic Jazz Ensemble

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

27 | Aug
07:00PM
27 | Aug
07:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Adam Maalouf and the Future Tribe - Where the Ancient meets the Modern

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

27 | Aug
09:00PM
27 | Aug
09:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Steven Chera – A Sephardi on Jazz!

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

24 | Aug
07:00PM
24 | Aug
07:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Gerard Edery – Three Religions, Three Faiths

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

24 | Aug
09:00PM
24 | Aug
09:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

Francoise Atlan – An intimate evening of Andalusia and Sephardi music

Dynamic and diverse performances by world-class artists will be heard at the first edition of the American Sephardi Music Festival. Hosted by the American Sephardi Federation and directed by David Serero, the Festival will take place over three days.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

the american sephardi music festival

06 | Aug
08:00PM
06 | Aug
08:00PM

celebration

Sephardi Tu B’av

The American Sephardi Federation presents Tu B’Av, the Jewish Valentine’s Day! Come to celebrate this special holiday with music and dancing! Dress code: White is preferred (not mandatory). No shorts, t-shirts, or tank tops allowed.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

celebration

03 | Aug
06:30PM
03 | Aug
06:30PM

lecture

Hebrew: A Holy Language

Although the Bible itself says very little about it, Jewish and Christian traditions commonly regard Hebrew as the language of creation, the language of primitive humanity and, ultimately, the language of God. Is there any evidence to support such views? Scholars today understand Hebrew to be a North-West Semitic language closely related to Moabite and Phoenician. It entered the record of history late in the day. Nevertheless, the notion of Hebrew as a holy language cannot be completely rejected.

In this lecture, Jan Joosten, Regius Professor of Hebrew at the University of Oxford, will argue that, although Hebrew did not start out as a holy tongue, over time it really did become one. Join us to learn the story of this fascinating development from one of the world's leading authorities on the Hebrew language and the Bible. Professor Juoosten's talk will be followed by a discussion with Gary Rendsburg, Blanche and Irving Laurie Professor of Jewish History at Rutgers University.

This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition 500 Years of Treasures from Oxford. The exhibition gallery will be open for viewing before and after the program. For more information on the exhibition, please visit cjh.org/oxford.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History; Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford; University of Oxford North American Office; Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford; Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

02 | Aug
06:00PM
02 | Aug
06:00PM

concert

Summer Yiddish Song Celebration

A concert in celebration of the rich breadth of music with Yiddish lyrics including Yiddish Theater Songs, Yiddish Folk Songs, and Yiddish Art Songs. Singers include Eléonore Biezunski, Miryem-Khaye Seigel, and Eliza Bagg. Program details TBA.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

25 | Jul
06:30PM
25 | Jul
06:30PM

lecture

News and Journalism in the Age of Trump

Traditional news is facing disruption from all sides. Digital media are unraveling the advertising-based business model, an environment of political hyper-partisanship is undermining the idea of objectivity in reporting and the emergence of alternative sources of information, from so-called "fake news" to commercial and institutional propaganda, is challenging even the very notion of truth.

Join Wall Street Journal Editor in Chief Gerard Baker for a review and discussion of these far-reaching developments and their implications for political and civil discourse in a modern democratic society.

This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition 500 Years of Treasures from Oxford. The exhibition gallery will be open for viewing before and after the program. For more information on the exhibition, please visit cjh.org/oxford.

Presented by: Corpus Christi College, Oxford; the Center for Jewish History; & Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

13 | Jul
06:30PM
13 | Jul
06:30PM

course

Accusing Women

Dr. Yitzhak Lewis of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research will lead this four-week seminar that explores literary tropes of accusation, from Genesis to Borges, and considers their relation to representations of women in Western culture.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research

course

12 | Jul
06:30PM
12 | Jul
06:30PM

lecture

Oxford's Aleppo Connection: Edward Pococke (1604-1691) from Humanism to Enlightenment via Hebrew and Arabic Learning

Speaker: Lenn Goodman (Vanderbilt University).

Aleppo has figured much in the news of late, but the city is ancient. Long home to one of the finest manuscripts of the Hebrew Bible, in early modern times it became an important center of trade – and learning. Edward Pococke (1604-1691), traveled there as chaplain to a British trade mission, aiming to perfect his Arabic. There he collected Arabic and Hebrew manuscripts, laying foundations for Oxford’s Bodleian collection in these areas. The holdings at Corpus Christi, Pococke’s old college, now on display here in New York, attest to the tradition of seeking firsthand knowledge of such texts at Oxford going back to the 13th century.

It was such work, often aided by Jewish and Muslim texts and learned informants of non-Christian backgrounds, that made possible the King James Bible (1611), spearheaded by John Rainolds, the President of Corpus. On returning from Syria Pococke became the first tenant of the chair in Arabic founded by Archbishop Laud. Besides translating Arabic books of history and poetry and commenting on books of the Hebrew prophets, Pococke introduced in England the work of the great Jewish philosopher, physician and jurist Moses Maimonides, overseeing the forging of special fonts to make possible his Porta Mosis, the Gateway to Moses (Maimonides). And he translated into Latin Ibn Tufayl’s 12th century Arabic philosophical novel Hayy Ibn Yaqzan, the story of a man growing up without parents or language – a thought experiment designed to show what a human mind could achieve without the benefit (or interference) of tradition. Translated into many languages, the book influenced Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe and helped inspire the transition from Renaissance humanism, with its devotion to Greek, Latin, and Hebrew texts, to the Enlightenment ideal of independent thinking.

Lenn Goodman of Vanderbilt University is a widely known philosopher and a scholar of Jewish and Islamic philosophical classics. Like Pococke, he has translated both Maimonides and Ibn Tufayl.

This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition 500 Years of Treasures from Oxford. For more information on the exhibition, please visit cjh.org/oxford.

Presented by: Corpus Christi College, Oxford; the Center for Jewish History; & Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

11 | Jul
07:00PM
11 | Jul
07:00PM

film and discussion

The Muses of Bashevis Singer

Isaac Bashevis Singer, the famous Yiddish writer and Nobel Prize winner wrote with a 'harem' of dozens of translators behind him. Beyond simple translation, these women were a vital source of his creativity. The inspiration he drew from them came in many forms, often mixing romance with professional aspirations. Today nine remain to tell his story. Intimate, poignant interviews and exclusive archival footage combine to portray the unknown story of an author who charmed and enchanted his audiences, just like he charmed and enchanted his translators. A film about both the very art of translation and one of the great figures of twentieth century literature. Director Asaf Galay will join for a discussion and Q&A after the screening.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film and discussion

10 | Jul
06:30PM
10 | Jul
06:30PM

concert

A Musical Journey through Jerusalem

Join us for a musical journey through Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition City of Gold, Bronze and Light: Jerusalem between Word and Image. In the company of beautiful paintings, artifacts, models, prints and photographs of the Holy City from the 17th to 21st centuries, you’ll hear Jerusalem brought to life through a rich array of musical selections inspired by the city and its communities. Hosted by cellist Elad Kabilio of MusicTalks, and accompanied by clarinetist Avigail Malachi-Baev and vocalist Inbar Goldman, this intimate, interactive concert features music ranging from Ladino and Klezmer to Opera and Israeli song.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, MusicTalks, & the Center for Israel Studies of Yeshiva University

concert

09 | Jul
01:00PM
09 | Jul
01:00PM

concert/lecture

Annual Mordkhe Schaechter Memorial Program: Uriel Weinreich as a Bridge in Jewish Culture Between Eastern Europe and America

This Program is in Yiddish.

Dr. Rakhmiel Peltz (Professor of Sociolinguistics, Director of Judaic Studies, Drexel University)

Musical Program:
Inna Barmash (co-founder of the Klez Dispensers, Princeton's first klezmer band; solo album, "Yiddish Lullabies and Love Songs"; toured with Ljova and the Kontraband)
“The Echoes of My Grandparents”
Arele (Arun) Viswanath (Grandson of Mordkhe and Charne Schaechter; Yiddish activist)

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research and the League for Yiddish

concert/lecture

05 | Jul
06:30PM
05 | Jul
06:30PM

course

Tolerance, Culture, and Violence in Medieval Spain

Join Dr. Rachel Stein of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research for this four-week seminar about the culture and politics of Islamic Spain and the encounters among Jews, Christians, and Muslims that characterized this dynamic period.

Presented by: Brooklyn Institute for Social Research, Center for Jewish History & American Sephardi Federation

course

04 | Jul
04 | Jul

holidays and closures

Happy Independence Day! The Center is closed.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

29 | Jun
06:00PM
29 | Jun
06:00PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

The Writers, Artists, Singers and Musicians of the National Hungarian Jewish Cultural Association (OMIKE), 1939-1944

Presenter: Frederick Bondy, Editor
Moderator: Alex Weiser, YIVO Programs Manager
Historical Introduction: Professor Istvan Deak
Respondent: Professor Randolph Braham

In response to anti-Semitic laws passed in 1938 in Hungary, barring Jewish artists from practising their professions, Budapest's Jewish community leaders organized an artistic group under the aegis of OMIKE Országos Magyar Izraelita Közmueveloedési Egyesület (Hungarian Jewish Education Association) to provide employment opportunities for Jewish actors, musicians, singers, composers, writers and artists. Carrying out its activities primarily in Goldmark Hall in Budapest, OMIKE organized at least one thousand performances by Jewish performers which took place between 1939 and 1944. These included plays, concerts, cabaret, ballet, operas, and operettas. The cultured Budapest Jewish community deeply appreciated these performances especially in view of the oppressive conditions of which prevailed in Hungary the time. There were also art and sculpture exhibitions held throughout this period.

Frederick Bondy’s expanded English edition is based on the original 1943 Hungarian language book written by Jeno Lévai. This new book by Bondy includes the history of the OMIKE and provides an overview of the numerous contributions of musicans and artists to Jewish cultural life during the Holocaust period in Hungary. Amply illustrated with photographs, the new additional chapters added by Frederick Bondy to the original 1943 book includes recollections and interviews by inpidual artists who share the circumstances which led them to join the OMIKE.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

29 | Jun
07:30PM
29 | Jun
07:30PM

panel discussion

Freedom of Speech vs. Defending Israel

Join Floyd Abrams (First Amendment expert), Amanda Berman (Lawfare Project), Sam Norich (President, The Forward),  Thane Rosenbaum (Professor of Law) and Eric Yoffie (Ha’aretz columnist) for a compelling discussion of the American Jewish community’s commitment to free speech.

Presented by: Jewish Broadcasting Service and Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

28 | Jun
06:30PM
28 | Jun
06:30PM

concert

A Musical Journey through Jerusalem

Join us for a musical journey through Yeshiva University Museum’s exhibition City of Gold, Bronze and Light: Jerusalem between Word and Image. In the company of beautiful paintings, artifacts, models, prints and photographs of the Holy City from the 17th to 21st centuries, you’ll hear Jerusalem brought to life through a rich array of musical selections inspired by the city and its communities. Hosted by cellist Elad Kabilio of MusicTalks, and accompanied by clarinetist Avigail Malachi-Baev and vocalist Inbar Goldman, this intimate, interactive concert features music ranging from Ladino and Klezmer to Opera and Israeli song.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, MusicTalks, & the Center for Israel Studies of Yeshiva University

concert

22 | Jun
07:00PM
22 | Jun
07:00PM

lecture

Jews and the Left Reconsidered

Jack Jacobs, editor of Jews and Leftist Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2017) and Jacob Kronhill Visiting Professor at YIVO, will grapple with questions of Jewish participation in different left-wing movements, and will consider potential implications of recent political events on future relations between Jews and the left.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

21 | Jun
06:00PM
21 | Jun
06:00PM

exhibit opening

George Salter: A Legacy of Book Design

A presentation by Thomas Hansen, Professor Emeritus of German at Wellesley College

Curator's tour of the exhibit available after the program

"Salter's designs reveal a graphic artist par excellence who devised some of the best solutions ever posed by the genre of the book jacket. Salter had the fortunate ability to reduce the illustrated paper cover to its essential elements. He could visually evoke – either by typography, calligraphy, or pictorial imagery – the atmosphere of a volume's contents. In short, by placing the highest design standard at the service of the publishing trade, he achieved the marriage of commerce and art."
– Dr. Thomas Hansen

George Salter (1897-1967) was one of the most prolific and influential book designers of the 20th century whose distinguished career  included works for all the major publishing houses in both the United States and Germany. His legacy of design still reverberates in current design of both book jackets and contemporary advertising. Thomas Hansen, author of Classic Book Jackets: The Design Legacy of George Salter (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2005) will give a lecture on Salter’s work and subsequent influence on publishing and commercial art.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

exhibit opening

20 | Jun
06:30PM
20 | Jun
06:30PM

lecture

Liberty and Facts: Isaiah Berlin in the Age of Trump

Recognized as one of the greatest thinkers of the 20th century, Isaiah Berlin was a Russian-British social and political theorist, philosopher and historian of ideas. As a prominent Corpus Christi College alumnus, essayist, conversationalist, raconteur and lecturer, he is most known for his iconic lecture “Two Concepts of Liberty,” which was the inaugural lecture delivered by Berlin before the University of Oxford on October 31, 1958. It was subsequently published as a 57-page pamphlet by Oxford at the Clarendon Press. He is also remembered for his work on liberal theory and pluralism. Roger Cohen, noted journalist and The New York Times columnist, will speak on the importance of Berlin’s work and ideas, especially in a time of growing intolerance.

This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition 500 Years of Treasures from Oxford. For more information on the exhibition, please visit cjh.org/oxford.

Presented by: Corpus Christi College, Oxford; the Center for Jewish History; & Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

15 | Jun
06:30PM
15 | Jun
06:30PM

lecture

Oxford and the Printing of Judeo-Arabic

Speaker: Brad Sabin Hill, former Fellow in Hebrew Bibliography, Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies

Oxford is famed for the ancient books and manuscripts in its libraries, which also hold some of the greatest Hebrew collections in the world.  Less known is the role of Oxford in the study and dissemination of texts in other Jewish languages, such as Yiddish, Judeo-Spanish, Judeo-Persian, and Judeo-Provencal.  Most extraordinary is the case of the printing at Oxford, in the mid-17th century, of the first Judeo-Arabic book. 

This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition 500 Years of Treasures from Oxford. For more information on the exhibition, please visit cjh.org/oxford.

Presented by: Corpus Christi College, Oxford; the Center for Jewish History; & Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

11 | Jun
02:00PM
11 | Jun
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Galician Portraits: The Story of Jews, Gentiles, and Emperors

Speaker: Dr. Andrew Zalewski

The talk Galician Portraits brings to life the Jewish community of Galicia. The speaker's personal genealogical discoveries are intertwined within a larger historical context. The story of Galician Jews is the story of many contrasts: poverty mixes with opportunities, separateness with acculturation, where the sounds of Yiddish and Hebrew fill the heders, while German and Polish are spoken in the public schools. Based on research for Dr. Zalewski's recently published book, his talk is illustrated with many pictures, newly discovered historical documents and old maps of Galicia.

Andrew Zalewski was born in Poland and immigrated to the United States. Several generations of his Jewish and Christian ancestors traced their roots to this former province of the Austrian and Austro-Hungarian Empire. Dr. Zalewski is a physician and former Professor of Medicine at Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

Immediately before this program: "Gesher Galicia: Latest News, Projects, and Tips" from 1:00- 1:45. Meeting of Gesher Galicia members and friends from the New York area. Please join us for an overview of new genealogy-focused projects and online tools available through Gesher Galicia.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

07 | Jun
06:30PM
07 | Jun
06:30PM

gallery talk

Dara Horn, Jerusalem, Imagination and Historical Consciousness

In this gallery talk/walk through YUM’s exhibition City of Gold, Bronze and Light: Jerusalem between Word and Image, novelist Dara Horn explores Jerusalem's role in the work and imagination of modern Jewish writers.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & The Center for Israel Studies of Yeshiva University

gallery talk

07 | Jun
06:30PM
07 | Jun
06:30PM

course

Hannah Arendt: The Origins of Totalitarianism

Join Dr. Samantha Hill of the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research and the Bard Arendt Center for this four-week course which explores Hannah Arendt's groundbreaking study of totalitarian states alongside questions of anti-Semitism, imperialism, and social alienation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research

course

04 | Jun
03:00PM
04 | Jun
03:00PM

concert

Music in Our Time: 2017

Featuring a performance of his Fantasies for Piano, played by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, Yedhudi Wyner, this annual concert also showcases music of Benjie Ellen Schiller, Josh Fishbein, Ronn Yedidia, and Jonathan Leshnoff, performed by artists from Mannes College The New School of Music.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

01 | Jun
01 | Jun

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Thursday, June 1 for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

31 | May
31 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, May 31 for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

30 | May
30 | May

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Tuesday, May 30 for Erev Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

29 | May
29 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, May 29 in honor of Memorial Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | May
07:00PM
24 | May
07:00PM

the american sephardi music festival

The Yiddish Celluloid Closet and the Isle of Klezbos

Despite the taboo surrounding homosexuality, the topic was explored in the Yiddish picture. This program presents Yiddish cinema as you’ve never seen it before, plus the Isle of Klezbos all-gal sextet’s reinterpretations of movie music from vintage soundtracks, including classics and lesser-known gems.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society, American Society for Jewish Music and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

the american sephardi music festival

22 | May
06:30PM
22 | May
06:30PM

book talk

Kurt Tucholsky’s Germany? Germany!

Tucholsky was a brilliant satirist, poet, storyteller, lyricist, pacifist, and democrat; a fighter, ladies' man, reporter, and early opponent of the Nazis. Former New York Times reporter Ralph Blumenthal discusses a new edition of Tucholsky’s writings in English translation, for which he wrote the foreword.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

22 | May
06:30PM
22 | May
06:30PM

gallery talk

Barbara Mann, 1967, and Yehuda Amichai’s Vision of Jerusalem

In this gallery talk/walk through YUM’s exhibition City of Gold, Bronze and Light: Jerusalem between Word and Image, Barbara Mann (Jewish Theological Seminary) explores the city of Jerusalem as envisioned and represented in the poetry of Yehuda Amichai.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & The Center for Israel Studies of Yeshiva University

gallery talk

21 | May
01:30PM
21 | May
01:30PM

workshop

Paper Art Workshop for Shavuot

Drawing on the tradition of making paper decorations for Shavuot, this workshop will explore unconventional ways to think about paper in both 2D and 3D. Our guest paper artist, Marna Chester, will inspire us to curl, fold, pinch, crumple, roll, poke, tear and cut paper, to explore shapes and create dramatic effects.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

21 | May
02:00PM
21 | May
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Jews and the Rise of Immigration Restrictions in the 1920s

Speaker: Dr. Libby Garland

In 1921 and 1924, Congress passed legislation intended to reduce the influx of immigrants to the U.S. These new laws allocated only small quotas for southern and eastern Europe, and banned all immigration from Asia. Their purpose was to limit the number of foreigners considered inferior and a threat to the nation. Jews, heavily represented in early 20th century immigration, were among the prime targets of the laws. In this talk Dr. Garland discusses the response of Jews both in the U.S. and abroad to these new restrictions, including the attempts of many Jewish migrants to try to get to the U.S. in violation of the law.

Dr. Garland is Associate Professor of History at Kingsborough College of the City University of New York. She is the author of After They Closed the Gates: Jewish Illegal Immigration to the United States, 1921-1965 (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2014).

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

21 | May
07:00PM
21 | May
07:00PM

celebration

Mexico and Moral Courage: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Jerusalem's Reunification & Honoring Ambassador Andrés Roemer's Stand for Jerusalem at UNESCO

In honor of this year's Yom Yerushalayim, the 50th Anniversary of the liberation and reunification of the Jewish People’s eternal capital, the American Sephardi Federation is awarding the International Sephardic Leadership Award to former Mexican Ambassador Andrés Roemer. When confronted by the recent UNESCO resolution that sought to erase Jerusalem, Israel’s Jewish and Christian history, Ambassador Roemer knowingly risked his position to voice and vote his conscience, leaving the voting hall instead of following the instructions he had received. While the resolution still passed, Ambassador Roemer did not forget Jerusalem and his moral courage convinced several countries, including his own, to seek to reverse the resolution’s ill–considered position against historical truth and the possibility of peace.  Featuring remarks by Professor Ephraim Isaac and a special performance by David Serero!

Kosher hors d'oeuvres by Mexikosher NYC and refreshments to be served.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation & The Philos Project

celebration

17 | May
06:30PM
17 | May
06:30PM

book talk

Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court: From Brandeis to Kagan

David G. Dalin will introduce his new book Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court: From Brandeis to Kagan on the lives and careers of the eight Jewish Justices in U.S. history. Pamela Nadell  (American University; President, Association for Jewish Studies) will join him for a conversation about their legacies.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

book talk

17 | May
07:30PM
17 | May
07:30PM

concert

A Century Apart: Enso Quartet and Phoenix Chamber Ensemble Performing Schubert, Schumann and Shostakovich

The Enso Quartet and Phoenix Chamber Ensemble reunite to perform Schubert’s “String Trio in B-flat Major, D.471 ‘Allegro’,”  Schumann’s “Quintet Op. 44 in E flat major” and Shostakovich’s “Quintet Op. 57 in G minor.”  This program is made possible by the generous support of the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

15 | May
12:00PM
15 | May
12:00PM

lecture

Is There a Biblical “Law”? Law in the World of the Bible

The Pentateuch contains many passages that have long been thought of as “law” – from the time of the rabbis, who debated their intricate legal details, through modern-day America, where the Ten Commandments still stand on display outside some courthouses. However, the discovery of the Code of Hammurabi and other documents from the ancient Near Eastern world, in which the Bible emerged, has thrown into question whether or not one ought to consider these texts “law” at all. After all, the so-called law codes from the ancient Near East are never cited in legal cases, and are sometimes even contradicted by trial records. But if the law codes did not prescribe law, what was their purpose? And should the “law” of the Bible be understood similarly to the law codes of the ancient Near East? This talk will look at the reasons for questioning the legal nature of biblical “law”; the alternate approaches to interpreting relevant texts; and the ramifications of different understandings.  Yael Landman, a doctoral candidate at Yeshiva University and an AJS Dissertation Completion Fellow, will examine these questions and explore possible answers. This program is generously supported through a grant from Legacy Heritage Fund.

Presented by: AJS and Center for Jewish History

lecture

11 | May
06:00PM
11 | May
06:00PM

lecture

“Songs of the Nation”: Maskilic Readings of Psalms after Moses Mendelssohn

Dr. Yael Sela-Teichler discusses the 1791 edition of Moses Mendelssohn’s German translation of Psalms, The Book of the Songs of Israel, exploring maskilic renderings of the music of the Hebrews that reclaim biblical poetry as Jewish musical heritage and challenge traditional notions of exile.

Presented by: American Society for Jewish Music & the Leo Baeck Institute

lecture

10 | May
07:00PM
10 | May
07:00PM

conversation

Jenna Weissman Joselit and Samuel G. Freedman - In Dialogue on the Decalogue

Join New York Times columnist Samuel G. Freedman and historian Jenna Weissman Joselit, author of the brand new book, Set in Stone: America's Embrace of the Ten Commandments (Oxford University Press), as they explore the impact of the ancient biblical code on American culture.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Yeshiva University Museum

conversation

08 | May
06:30PM
08 | May
06:30PM

lecture

“My Unconscious Speaks Yiddish”: Psychoanalysis and Jewish Languages

Join us for a talk by NEH Senior Scholar Naomi Seidman exploring the role played by Yiddish and other Jewish languages in Freud’s writing, from the Yiddish of his parents "behind" his Viennese German to the translations and adaptations of his work in Eastern Europe. In the years since Jacques Lacan first called for "a return to Freud," a vast literature has arisen around the question of the translation of Freud's German into English and of the Nazi-era diaspora of psychoanalysts from Central Europe to England and the United States. But Freud's writing was in some sense already the product of translation and diaspora, from the Yiddish of his parents to his own Viennese German and from Eastern to Central Europe. This is not only a matter of the prehistory of psychoanalysis: Eastern Europe developed its own form of psychoanalysis, and psychoanalysts fled to Jerusalem as well as New York and London. In these contexts, Freud's work circulated in Hebrew and Yiddish among other languages. In this talk, we will explore the Eastern European dimension of psychoanalysis, discussing the Jewish languages "behind" Freud's German and in the translational "afterlife" of his writings.

 

Naomi Seidman is the Koret Professor of Jewish Culture at the Richard S. Dinner Center for Jewish Studies at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, and the 2016-2017 NEH Senior Fellow at the Center for Jewish History in New York. Her most recent book is titled The Marriage Plot, or, How Jews Fell in Love with Love, and with Literature, and another book on Bais Yaakov and Orthodox girls' education in interwar Poland is forthcoming from Littman Library. Her present research explores the question of the relationship between psychoanalysis and Jewish languages.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

08 | May
06:30PM
08 | May
06:30PM

gallery talk

Jeffrey Saks, “But always I regarded myself as one who was born in Jerusalem”

In this gallery talk/walk through YUM’s exhibition City of Gold, Bronze and Light: Jerusalem between Word and Image, Rabbi Jeffrey Saks (ATID) explores the special place the Holy City has held in the writing of Hebrew literature’s greatest author, S.Y. Agnon, and the vision of the city in modern Hebrew literature.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & The Center for Israel Studies of Yeshiva University

gallery talk

08 | May
07:00PM
08 | May
07:00PM

reading group

16th Street Book Club Meeting

Join us! All 16th Street book club sessions are free and open to the public. This month we'll meet to discuss Drunk from the Bitter Truth: The Poems of Anna Margolin, translated from the Yiddish by Shirley Kumove. Please try to bring your books or e-readers with you. RSVP recommended RSVP recommended via email. To learn more, visit cjh.org/bookclub.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading group

07 | May
02:00PM
07 | May
02:00PM

lecture

Eric Goldman, Lens on Israel: A Society through its Cinema

Movies provide an ideal “lens” through which to understand Israel’s birth, growth and development as a country. Join film historian Eric Goldman as he explores the changing nature of Israeli society as reflected through its cinema. The program will be preceded by a viewing of YUM’s exhibition City of Gold, Bronze and Light: Jerusalem between Word and Image.

Presented by: the Eli Kleinman Fund for Jewish Education of the Jewish Community Foundation of MetroWest, The Center for Israel Studies of Yeshiva University &Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

04 | May
07:00PM
04 | May
07:00PM

concert

Annie Gosfield Portrait Concert

This concert will explore music of composer Annie Gosfield that takes its inspiration from Jewish culture, history, and the New York immigrant experience. A longtime resident of NYC’s East Village, Gosfield has been hailed “a star of the downtown scene,” (New Yorker), and her music has been described as “imaginative” and “exuberant” (New York Times).

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research with support from the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs

concert

03 | May
06:30PM
03 | May
06:30PM

lecture

“Crackpot or Visionary”: Israel Zangwill, Isaac Steinberg, and the Jewish Territorialist Movement

After leaving the Zionist Movement in 1905 following the so-called Uganda Controversy, the Jewish Territorialists sought to create settlements for Jews outside both Europe and Palestine. They explored possibilities from Angola to Australia and Tasmania, and from Madagascar to French and British Guiana and Suriname. At the head of the movement stood several prominent Jewish figures. Their biographies shed light on the multi-faceted nature of Jewish politics both before and after the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948: for several decades, Zionism was not the only flavor on the menu for those looking to create a Jewish political future. Anglo-Jewish writer Israel Zangwill (1864-1926), author of classics such as Children of the Ghetto and The Melting Pot, was the first leader of the movement. He was followed as of the late 1930s by Russian émigré politician Isaac N. Steinberg (1888-1957), who had briefly served as Commissar of Justice under Lenin in 1917. There hardly could have been two more different men than the English gentleman Zangwill and the Russian socialist-revolutionary Steinberg, but both did share an almost literary-inspired idealism, infused with Jewish traditional and universalist elements.

In this talk, Dr. Laura Almagor, a Prins Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Jewish History, will touch upon the colorful life stories of the central Territorialist leaders, as a gateway to exploring the history of the Territorialist movement and its many—nowadays seemingly fantastical—pursuits.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

01 | May
10:00AM
01 | May
10:00AM

conference

Being a Jew in the Soviet Union: Findings from ‘A Comprehensive History of the Jews in the Soviet Union’

Join us for this unique opportunity to hear from renowned scholars working on "A Comprehensive History of the Jews in the Soviet Union" as they share their findings with the public in this day-long conference. With deep gratitude to Eugene Shvidler whose generosity is making possible the research and preparation of this NYU study.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at NYU

conference

01 | May
06:30PM
01 | May
06:30PM

lecture

A Tale of Three Cities: Jewish-Italian Writing and the Long 20th Century

Italy is home to the oldest Jewish community in the Diaspora, and the authors of many important works of Italian literature are Jewish. Yet, with the exception of Primo Levi, few of these writers are known to readers in the English-speaking world. This talk by Cornell University Professor K.E. von Wittelsbach will explore the work of Italian-Jewish writers and how it relates to modern Italian and world literature. What are some of the key themes of their work? How have these writers articulated the self against the background of the historical events that have shaped the past 120 years in the traditional centers of Jewish life in Italy—Rome, Turin and Trieste?

Presented by: Center for Jewish History & Jewish Studies Program in the College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell University

lecture

01 | May
06:30PM
01 | May
06:30PM

gallery talk

Ruby Namdar, 'The foxes walk upon it': The Destruction and Absence of the Temple in Modern Jerusalem and Jewish Life

In this gallery talk/walk through YUM’s exhibition City of Gold, Bronze and Light: Jerusalem between Word and Image, novelist Ruby Namdar the trauma of the destruction of ancient Jerusalem and its Holy Temple, and what it reveals about modern Jews and Jewish life.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum & The Center for Israel Studies of Yeshiva University

gallery talk

30 | Apr
11:00AM
30 | Apr
11:00AM

workshop

Children's Day

A morning of activity and cultural immersion for children of all ages; join us for sing-alongs, storytelling, and a Yiddish puppet show! Activities will take place from 11am until 1pm throughout the Center for Jewish History.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

workshop

30 | Apr
02:00PM
30 | Apr
02:00PM

panel discussion

Growing up Jewish

Scholars Sam Kassow, Miriam Udel, Naomi Seidman, and Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett will discuss the lives of Jewish children before WWII. Talks will include general overviews as well as discussions of Socialist Literature for Jewish Children in the US and USSR, and Max Weinreich’s work on psychology and Jewish adolescence.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

26 | Apr
07:30PM
26 | Apr
07:30PM

dramatic reading

Women and Resistance: Women, Theater and the Holocaust

The evening will launch the third edition of Remember the Women Institute’s Women, Theatre, and the Holocaust Resource Handbook, Rochelle G. Saidel and Karen Shulman, eds. Performances include:

  • We Will Not Be Silent, excerpt from a play about Sophie Scholl, by David Meyers, directed by Aliza Shane
  • At the Train Station in Munich by Cynthia L. Cooper, directed by Ludovica Villar-Hauser
  • In Her Words: Stories of Survival and Resistance by Virginia D’Albert-Lake, Geneviève de Gaulle Anthonioz, Gemma La Guardia Gluck, and Isabella Leitner; adapted and directed by Dr. Meghan Brodie; performed by Ursinus College students Mya Flood, Indira Joell, Maddie Kuklentz, and Allison Rohr
  • Terezin Caberet, Ilse Weber’s songs and letters, performed by Jenny Lee Mitchell, accompanied by Maria Dessena, Untitled Theater Company #61 and Mad Jenny Theatre

Panel discussion and reception to follow

Presented by: Remember the Women Institute in cooperation with American Jewish Historical Society

dramatic reading

24 | Apr
06:30PM
24 | Apr
06:30PM

concert

When We Remembered Zion: The New Budapest Orpheum Society Commemorates Yom HaShoah

Lecture 6:30 pm
Concert 7 pm
The Grammy-nominated New Budapest Orpheum Society bears witness to those murdered, those who resisted, and those who must not be forgotten. Under the direction of Philip V. Bohlman and Ilya Levinson, the ensemble consists of singers, violin, piano, accordion, bass, and percussion. This concert features repertories of Jewish song from the Holocaust, gathered from the cabarets, camps, ghettos, theater, and films. 

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

24 | Apr
06:30PM
24 | Apr
06:30PM

gallery talk

Liel Leibovitz, Inbound Exile: Jerusalem as Viewed from Tel Aviv

In this gallery talk/walk through YUM’s exhibition City of Gold, Bronze and Light: Jerusalem between Word and Image, Liel Leibovitz (Tablet Magazine) weaves his family's own eventful story in and out of Jerusalem with those of pilgrims, madmen and writers, from Herman Melville to S.Y. Agnon.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

gallery talk

24 | Apr
07:30PM
24 | Apr
07:30PM

reading and discussion

Walking Backwards: A Special Evening with Lee Sharkey

Lee Sharkey will read from her new poetry collection Walking Backwards, which Edward Hirsch has called a “deep book of remembrance—a collection of parables, an ongoing conversation with the dead, a tablet of fire.” Walking Backwards examines resistance to violence and repression. It evokes contemporary events and converses with poets and artists whose voices arise from the Holocaust. Lee will then be joined by multidisciplinary poet and artist Maya Pindyck for a conversation about engaging Jewish history and memory in creative work.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

reading and discussion

18 | Apr
18 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, April 18 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

17 | Apr
17 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, April 17 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

16 | Apr
16 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, April 16 for Erev Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

13 | Apr
02:00PM
13 | Apr
02:00PM

curator's tour

Uncommon Threads: Clothing & Textiles from the Yeshiva University Museum Collection

Join curator Bonni-Dara Michaels for a tour of YUM’s Uncommon Threads exhibition featuring garments, textiles and jewelry spanning three centuries. Highlights include a gold bracelet that belonged to the wife of the Hatam Sofer, a 19th-century Ottoman velvet bridal dress, an Adele Simpson evening dress trimmed with fox fur, a 1753 Ashkenazic wimpel, and an early 19th century Alsatian Passover Seder show towel.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

13 | Apr
07:00PM
13 | Apr
07:00PM

film and discussion

Streit's Matzo and the American Dream

Q&A featuring Director Neil A. Friedman
In the heart of New York’s rapidly gentrifying Lower East Side stand four tenement buildings that housed the Streit’s matzo factory since 1925. Streit’s Matzo and the American Dream is a story of tradition, of resistance and resilience, and a celebration of a family whose commitment to their heritage and to their employees is inspiring proof that the family that bakes together, stays together.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society & Eldridge Street Museum

film and discussion

12 | Apr
12 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Wednesday, April 12 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

11 | Apr
11 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Tuesday, April 11 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

10 | Apr
10 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Monday, April 10 for Erev Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

06 | Apr
06:30PM
06 | Apr
06:30PM

course

God or Nature: Spinoza’s Ethics

This four-week course explores Spinoza’s controversial and groundbreaking Ethics, closelyexaminingSpinoza’s thought in historical context, his influence on subsequent thinkers, and the significance of his Sephardic background.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History and the Brooklyn Institute for Social Research

course

05 | Apr
07:00PM
05 | Apr
07:00PM

reading group

16th Street Book Club Meeting

Join us! All 16th Street book club sessions are free and open to the public. This month we'll meet to discuss A Tale of Love and Darkness by Amos Oz, translated from the Hebrew by Nicholas de Lange. Please try to bring your books or e-readers with you. RSVP recommended RSVP recommended via email. To learn more, visit cjh.org/bookclub.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading group

02 | Apr
02:00PM
02 | Apr
02:00PM

workshop

Passover Workshop for All Ages

Inspired by the historical garments – in particular, the 19th-century “show” towel – on display in YUM’s Uncommon Threads exhibition, this family-friendly workshop invites people of all ages to create a personalized hand towel to beautify the experience of washing at the Passover seder. Using various design tools, participants will create objects for the holiday that are both functional and decorative.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

workshop

30 | Mar
06:30PM
30 | Mar
06:30PM

film

The 20th Annual New York Sephardic Jewish Film Festival

The history, traditions, and rich mosaic culture of Greater Sephardic communities are celebrated as an integral part of the Jewish experience throughout this week-long series of events. The NYSJFF features première screenings, intriguing stories, poignant documentaries, filmmaker Q&As, and the Pomegranate Awards ceremony. Join us for a very special anniversary year.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

film

29 | Mar
07:00PM
29 | Mar
07:00PM

symposium

Jewish Culture and the Legacy of the Classical World

Join Dan Bahat, Steven Fine and Lawrence Schiffman for presentations and a lively discussion about Jewish culture and the legacy of the classical world.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum together with American Friends of the Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem & Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at NYU

symposium

28 | Mar
06:30PM
28 | Mar
06:30PM

book talk

Max Liebermann: Modern Art and Modern Germany

Through a close reading of key paintings and by a discussion of his many cultural networks across Germany and throughout Europe, this new study by Marion Deshmukh illuminates the painter Max Liebermann’s importance as a pioneer of German modernism.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

28 | Mar
06:30PM
28 | Mar
06:30PM

family history today: genealogy programs at the center

Genealogy Basics for Reference Librarians

Speakers: Moriah Amit and J.D. Arden, Ackmann and Ziff Genealogy Institute, Center for Jewish History. Libraries and archives of all kinds are witnessing an unprecedented surge of patrons interested in conducting genealogy research, including those patrons working in inheritance law, journalism, documentary films, historical fiction and non-fiction, or personal family history research. It is imperative that reference librarians acquire some basic tools for serving the unique needs of this diverse user group. At CJH, we have a very robust genealogy program which has seen enormous growth in our patron numbers from year to year. In this session, you will learn how to conduct a genealogy reference interview (and how it is unlike most other reference interviews) and which are the key genealogy resources you should become acquainted with. This session is for librarians of all levels, from MLS students to experienced reference librarians.

Presented by: the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

family history today: genealogy programs at the center

27 | Mar
07:00PM
27 | Mar
07:00PM

lecture

Between Yosef Salamsa and Martin Luther King: The Ethiopian Jewish Struggle in Comparative Perspective

Join us for a talk by Efrat Yerday on the contemporary parallel struggles of Ethiopian Jews in Israel/Palestine and Black Lives Matter in the US and on the struggles of black people against racism from a transnational perspective.

In recent years, Ethiopian Jewish activists have begun to gradually perceive their struggle in universal terms, adopting global anti-racist strategies on the one hand, but often without giving up their precarious privilege as Jews. More specifically, they have drawn from the Black Lives Matter movement, invoking practices and language that transcend the local so as to garner universal legitimation. African American leaders such as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King are quoted frequently in demonstrations and on social media by Ethiopian activists; the clashes in Baltimore, Fergusson and Missouri are linked to the clashes in Rabin square in Tel Aviv.

Efrat Yerday is a writer, scholar, editor, and activist. In 2010–2011 she served as the spokesperson for the Israeli Association for Ethiopian Jews and published opinion pieces on racism in general and institutionalized racism in particular. Over the years she has also published reviews of nonfiction dealing with Ethiopian history and the absorption of Ethiopians in Israel. In 2010 she established the Young Ethiopian Students blog, inviting critical thinking and challenging the establishment and academic narrative of the immigration and absorption of Ethiopian Jews. Yerday teaches at Ben-Gurion University in the Negev and writes regularly for Hamakom hakhi kham begehinom (The Hottest Place in Hell) and for other media outlets.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

lecture

27 | Mar
07:30PM
27 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Re’ut Ben-Ze’ev, mezzo soprano, and the Diener Ensemble

Re’ut Ben-Ze’ev, mezzo soprano, and the Beatrice Diener Ensemble-in-Residence at Stern College for Women, Yeshiva University perform the work of Jewish composers with music by Martin Boykan, Edward Jacobs and the world premiere of Concertino No. 1 for Guitar and Chamber Ensemble by YU faculty composer David Glaser.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

concert

23 | Mar
06:30PM
23 | Mar
06:30PM

book talk

Stranger in a Strange Land—Searching for Gershom Scholem and Jerusalem

Acclaimed author George Prochnik presents his Bildungsroman on Gershom Scholem, one of the 20th century’s most important humanist thinkers. Prochnik traces the lifeline of Scholem, and weaves it with an intimate story of his own youth, marriage, and spiritual quest in Jerusalem.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book talk

23 | Mar
07:00PM
23 | Mar
07:00PM

lecture

Your New House: Wedding Songs, Gender, and Memory in an Indian Jewish Community

Bene Israel Indian Jewish weddings are enlivened through song. Women sing in Marathi to prepare for the wedding and men sing in Hebrew during the ceremony. This talk is about gender and emotion in the memories of Indian Jewish wedding songs.

Presented by: American Society for Jewish Music

lecture

20 | Mar
06:30PM
20 | Mar
06:30PM

lecture

The Evolution of the Joseph Traditions and the Emergence of Ancient Israel

Cornell Professor Lauren Monroe offers new perspective on the evolution of the seminal biblical narrative of Joseph by asking how the story of Joseph’s family relates to the emergence of Ancient Israel in Canaan in the wake of the Late Bronze Age.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History & Jewish Studies Program in the College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell University

lecture

16 | Mar
06:30PM
16 | Mar
06:30PM

book talk

How They Lived: The Everyday Lives of Hungarian Jews 1867 – 1940, with Andras Koerner and Victor Karady

Following the Holocaust, which saw approximately two-thirds of Hungary’s Jewish population killed, most survivors—if they could bring about to speak about their former lives—initially talked about the most memorable events: the horrors they had gone through. Compared to that, the details of their previous, by and large peaceful lives seemed insignificant. András Koerner has dedicated his research to reconstructing how the Hungarian Jews lived before that cataclysm, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. He tried in his work to bring this destroyed world to life again—even if only in our thoughts.

András Koerner is the author of several books about the lifestyles of Hungarian Jews, most of them available in both English and Hungarian. At this event at the Center for Jewish History he will discuss his new book with Victor Karady.

Victor Karady, a French-Hungarian historical sociologist of European Jewry, is a former research director with the French National Research Centre (CNRS). He is an external member of the Hungarian Academy of Science and emeritus professor at the Central European University in Budapest. His important works on Hungarian Jews focus on social and educational mobility, as well as on identity changes. Thus they are particularly relevant to the subject of Koerner’s work.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, YIVO institute for Jewish Research, and Balassi Institute

book talk

15 | Mar
06:30PM
15 | Mar
06:30PM

curator's tour

PLEASE NOTE: Artist's Talk and Curator's Tour with Fabric Artist Ita Aber will be rescheduled due to the inclement weather.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

14 | Mar
06:00PM
14 | Mar
06:00PM

a library social hour

PLEASE NOTE: No Shushing Allowed will be rescheduled due to the expected inclement weather.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

a library social hour

14 | Mar
06:30PM
14 | Mar
06:30PM

book talk

PLEASE NOTE: How They Lived: The Everyday Lives of Hungarian Jews 1867 – 1940 has been rescheduled for Thursday, March 16 due to the expected inclement weather.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, YIVO institute for Jewish Research, and Balassi Institute

book talk

12 | Mar
12:00PM
12 | Mar
12:00PM

symposium

Echoes and Reflections: Leaders in Holocaust Education

Program: 12pm-4pm
Primary Source Pop-Up Exhibit: 4pm-5pm

Echoes and Reflections is a comprehensive Holocaust education program that delivers professional development and a rich array of resources for middle and high school teachers. The program prepares educators to teach about the Holocaust in a way that stimulates engagement and critical thinking, providing opportunities for students to see the relevance of this complex history, and utilizes the rich primary sources here at Center for Jewish History. Of special interest to middle and high school teachers, but also to librarians, archivists, and scholars who teach with primary sources.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Anti-Defamation League, USC Shoah Foundation & Yad Vashem

symposium

06 | Mar
06:00PM
06 | Mar
06:00PM

book talk

Oedipus in Brooklyn and Other Stories by Blume Lempel

Blume Lempel (1907-1999) was a courageous storyteller whose narrative imagination moved fluidly between past and present, Old World and New, dream and reality. Ellen Cassedy and Yermiyahu Ahron Taub discuss Lempel’s life and work, her legacy, and their newly translated collection of her stories.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book talk

06 | Mar
06:30PM
06 | Mar
06:30PM

gallery talk

out of the whirlwind: Hugh Mesibov and the legacy of the Book of Job

In 1972, the American artist Hugh Mesibov painted an ambitious 45-foot-wide mural based on the biblical Book of Job for Temple Beth El in Spring Valley, New York. The painting was recently donated to Yeshiva University Museum, where it is installed in a special exhibition. In this gallery talk, Mordechai Cohen (Yeshiva University) explores the character of the Book of Job and its legacy within the Jewish imagination.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum with the Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies at Yeshiva University

gallery talk

05 | Mar
11:00AM
05 | Mar
11:00AM

conference

Festival of Contemporary Russian Jewish American Culture

This all-day festival to launch the special issue of the journal East European Jewish Affairs will feature opening remarks by guest editor Anna Katsnelson (Columbia University), and include panels on current issues in the field of Russian Jewish American cultural production, writers and visual arts.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

conference

05 | Mar
08:00PM
05 | Mar
08:00PM

concert

Svetlana and the Delancey Five in Concert

Svetlana is a vocalist, songwriter, and arranger based in NYC. With sold-out shows at legendary venues, she has earned accolades from jazz musicians, audiences and press alike with her poised and charming stage presence, enchanting vocals and strong musicianship.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

concert

01 | Mar
07:30PM
01 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

Mostly Schubert

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble and friends present Schubert Violin Sonata in A minor, Prokofiev Flute Sonata Op.94, and the beloved Schubert E-flat Piano Trio.

Cyrus Beroukhim - violin, Tanya Witek -flute, Arash Amini -cello, Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky – piano.

This program is made possible by the generous support of the Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

concert

28 | Feb
06:00PM
28 | Feb
06:00PM

a library social hour

No Shushing Allowed

Please join us for our February library social hour. You will have the opportunity to speak with the librarians and archivists who make the materials housed at CJH accessible. This is a wonderful opportunity to get to know fellow researchers as well as staff, learn about how others use the collections, and talk about books, archives, and research in general. Light refreshments will be served.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

a library social hour

28 | Feb
06:30PM
28 | Feb
06:30PM

film screening and book discussion

We'll always have Casablanca

In his new book, film historian Noah Isenberg (The New School) reveals the myths and realities behind Casablanca’s production, focusing in particular on the central role of refugees—nearly all the actors were immigrants from Hitler’s Europe. With a screening and post-film discussion.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute, Deutsches Haus NYU and NY Institute for the Humanities

film screening and book discussion

22 | Feb
02:00PM
22 | Feb
02:00PM

lecture

Town Fools, Beggars, and other Outcasts: Bringing the Margins to the Center in East European Jewish History

Natan Meir (the Lorry I. Lokey Chair in Judaic Studies at Portland State University, and the 2016 Ruth and David Musher/JDC Archives Fellow) will speak on Jewish social outcasts in prewar Eastern European history and offer insights into the changing mentalities of Jewish society.

Presented by: JDC Archives and Center for Jewish History

lecture

20 | Feb
20 | Feb

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, February 20th for President's Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

15 | Feb
06:30PM
15 | Feb
06:30PM

curator's tour

Uncommon Threads: Clothing & Textiles from the Yeshiva University Museum Collection

Join curator Bonni-Dara Michaels for a tour of Yeshiva University Museum’s newest exhibition featuring garments, textiles and jewelry spanning three centuries. Highlights include a gold bracelet that belonged to the wife of the Hatam Sofer, a 19th-century Ottoman velvet bridal dress and the groom’s tallit katan, an embroidered Italian Torah binder from 1602, and an early Ashkenazic wimpel dated 1643.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

15 | Feb
06:30PM
15 | Feb
06:30PM

panel discussion

Investing in Archivists

Please join us for a wonderful evening of discourse, where we will address the significant financial challenges and opportunities facing archivists today. The panelists will discuss the various ways in which they have been successful in securing funding for professional development, hiring, promotions, and advocating for salary increase for the professional staff at their respective repositories.

Panelists:
Bob Clark, Director of Archives, Rockefeller Archive Center
Julie I. May, Managing Director of Library & Archives, Brooklyn Historical Society
Kathleen Leary, Education Coordinator, Jerome Robbins Dance pision

Moderated by:
Steven G. Fullwood, Associate Curator, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books pision and Manager of the BNY Mellon Pre-Professional Development Program, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

The Center for Jewish History is proud to host the Archivist Round Table of Metropolitan New York’s discussion regarding the significant financial challenges facing archivists and archives today. Emphasizing a shared commitment to professionalism in the field, this forum will allow archivists from around the city to learn from each others’ experiences. Such conversations ensure the stability and continual improvement of the profession’s standards – a goal that is core the Center’s mission.

Presented by: Archivists Round Table of Metropolitan New York with the generous support of the Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

13 | Feb
07:00PM
13 | Feb
07:00PM

book talk

Singing God's Words: The Performance of Biblical Chant in Contemporary Judaism

Celebrates the publication of Singing God’s Words: The Performance of Biblical Chant in Contemporary Judaism, the first in-depth study of the meaning and experience of chanting Torah among contemporary American Jews (Oxford University Press, 2016). Rabbi Jeffrey A. Summit, Ph.D. describes how this ritual is shaped by such forces as digital technology, feminism and contemporary views of spirituality.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

book talk

12 | Feb
02:00PM
12 | Feb
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Jewish Families Yesterday, Today--and Tomorrow?

Speaker: Jonathan Boyarin, PhD

What do we mean when we talk about Jewish families? The family has been considered key to transmitting Jewish identity, But what we call "the Jewish family" has varied greatly through the times and places where Jews have found themselves. This talk will consider some big questions: How did Jewish family patterns compare to those of their non-Jewish neighbors? What is at stake for us in the present when we recall or reconstruct families from the past? How will changing forms of the family affect the very idea of Jewish identity--and what will our descendants think of us?

Jonathan Boyarin is Professor of Modern Jewish Studies in the Dept. of Anthropology at Cornell University. His work centers on Jewish communities and on the dynamics of Jewish culture, memory and identity. He is the author or coauthor of numerous books.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

09 | Feb
07:00PM
09 | Feb
07:00PM

photo series

Bubby: Kosher Love Advice in Unkosher Times

Bubby: Kosher Love Advice in Unkosher Times is a fashion photo series that features real bubbies imparting love and life advice. Shot by Los Angeles-based photographer Jackson Davis, the series celebrates the beauty and wisdom that these fashionable bubbies have gained throughout their Jewish life experience.  So come schmooze, get inspired and find out if old world love and romance still exists during these unkosher times. The photo series is a collaboration between fashion brand Unkosher Market and Bubby, a Jewish-inspired matchmaking app. 

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society In Partnership with Unkosher Market and Bubby

photo series

07 | Feb
06:30PM
07 | Feb
06:30PM

exhibit opening

Zionismus -- The Jewish Roots of Zionism

A refuge from antisemitism and the cruelty of the mob! Relief from grinding poverty. Freedom from the caprices of despots! A place for Jewish religion and culture to flourish!

The dream that Theodor Herzl gave voice to at the end of the 19th century was largely a response to discrimination against Jews and Jewish poverty in Eastern Europe. Yet Herzl himself, and many of his early confederates, emanated from assimilated milieus in cities like Vienna and Berlin, where Jews enjoyed unprecedented rights and prosperity in this period. Indeed, many of the men and women who laid the foundations of the Zionist movement shared an allegiance to Kaiser and fatherland, or Bildung and Kultur, that was often as strong as their attachment to Judaism. Until World War I, German was the lingua franca of the Zionist movement, and German-speaking Europe was the base of its substantial organizational capacity.

The exhibition Zionismus calls on books, periodicals, correspondence, and photographs from the collections of the Leo Baeck Institute (LBI) to trace the transformation of Zionism from a utopian dream to matter of survival for German-speaking Jews. After traveling around the US as a poster exhibition, Zionismus will return to the LBI, where the original objects will be placed on display for the first time.

Professor David Engel will be speaking at this exhibition opening. Engel is Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies; Maurice R. and Corinne P. Greenberg Professor of Holocaust Studies; Chair, Hebrew & Judaic Studies at New York University. His books include Between Liberation and Flight: Holocaust Survivors in Poland and the Struggle for Leadership, 1944-1946; Facing a Holocaust: The Polish Government-in-Exile and the Jews, 1943-1945; and In the Shadow of Auschwitz: The Polish Government-in-Exile and the Jews, 1939-1942. His research focuses on Modern Jewish political history, history of the Jews in Eastern Europe and the Holocaust.

This exhibit made possible by support from the German Information Center, USA.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

exhibit opening

06 | Feb
07:00PM
06 | Feb
07:00PM

staged reading

Money, Love, and Shame

Once a staple of the popular Yiddish stage, Isaac Zolotarevsky’s 1910 melodrama "Gelt, Libe, Un Shande" will be presented at YIVO in a new English translation by writer/director Allen Lewis Rickman in a ‘rehearsed reading’ format, for one performance only.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

staged reading

02 | Feb
06:30PM
02 | Feb
06:30PM

exhibition opening featuring video screening and live poetry performance

Black Panther Got Loose from the Bronx Zoo: An Exhibition by Ido Michaeli

Based on an article published in the New York Times in 1902, Ido Michaeli’s work Black Panther Got Loose from the Bronx Zoo,  a hand-woven tapestry and video piece, tell the true story of a panther, who escaped from the Bronx Zoo and, after struggling with the police, dove into the Bronx River and swam to his freedom.

Opening night will feature poetry performances in English, Hebrew, and Arabic. Poetry will comment on Michaeli’s work, commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Black Panther movement in the US and/or the 45th anniversary of the Mizrahi Black Panther movement, and celebrating the circulation of Black Panther imagery across movements globally. The exhibition will be up through April 2017.

Featuring:
Mariam Bazeed
Michael Brown Jr.
Miri Gabriel
Shlomi Hatuka
Boni Joi
Velina Manolova
Maryam Parhizkar
Jayson P. Smith
Sami Shalom Chetrit
Candace Williams

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

exhibition opening featuring video screening and live poetry performance

01 | Feb
06:30PM
01 | Feb
06:30PM

curator's tour

out of the whirlwind: Hugh Mesibov’s Book of Job

In 1972, the American artist Hugh Mesibov painted an ambitious 40-foot-wide mural based on the biblical Book of Job for Temple Beth El in Spring Valley, New York. Promoted by its recent relocation, the synagogue donated this monumental painting to Yeshiva University Museum. This curator’s tour focuses on the artist, his preparatory process for the commission, and the place of Job within modern culture.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

01 | Feb
07:00PM
01 | Feb
07:00PM

reading group

16th Street Book Club Meeting

Join us! All 16th Street book club sessions are free and open to the public. This month we'll meet to discuss The Liberated Bride by A. B. Yehoshua, translated from the Hebrew by Hillel Halkin. Please try to bring your books or e-readers with you. RSVP recommended RSVP recommended via email. To learn more, visit cjh.org/bookclub.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

reading group

29 | Jan
01:30PM
29 | Jan
01:30PM

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

Jewish Cemeteries - Preserving a Critical Genealogical Resource

Speakers: Lewis Polishook, Director of the NY State Division of Cemeteries, and Jamie Cotel, Executive Director of the Community Alliance for Jewish-Affiliated Cemeteries (CAJAC)

Cemeteries and gravestones are an important resource for genealogical research. Our speakers will discuss the sometimes complicated issues surrounding cemetery regulation, oversight and maintenance, from both a governmental and community perspective. The discussion will include preservation and management of gravestones and burial society plots.

The NY State Division of cemeteries works with cemetery officials on a wide range of issues including the sale of lots, service fees, and acquisition of lands. There are some 1800 cemeteries and crematories under its jurisdiction.

CAJAC strives to create permanent solutions for ensuring cemeteries' long-term sustainability, through a collaboration of volunteers, community leaders and local agencies.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society monthly meeting

24 | Jan
06:30PM
24 | Jan
06:30PM

music and discussion

The Viennese Café in New York Exile

Join us for an evening exploring the history of Jewish Austrian émigrés who transplanted the music of Viennese cafes to New York City. Esther Wratschko (Prins Foundation Fellow at the Center for Jewish History) will share her discoveries in the archives.

This presentation, including musical performance and historical background, will introduce you to the Viennese cabaret performers and musicians who fled the terrors of the Nazi regime to make a living in New York by opening cafés serving lavish pastry and Viennese melange (coffee with steamed milk). The cafés served as both a social platform for German-speaking immigrants and a stage for the former stars of the Viennese musical cabaret. Well-known performers like Hermann Leopoldi and Fritz Spielmann performed their typical Wienerlied there, charming the hearts of the nostalgic émigrés and Americans alike. If you´re wondering what a Viennese melange is made of and what a Wienerlied sounds like, you will learn it all during this entertaining evening, cream-filled and with a sour cherry on top!

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

music and discussion

22 | Jan
01:00PM
22 | Jan
01:00PM

panel discussion

The History and Future of the Strashun Library

Scholars Brad Hill, David Fishman, Zachary Baker and Jeffrey Veidlinger will discuss the historical importance and context of the Strashun library, its survival during WWII, and its transition to YIVO. Lyudmila Sholokhova and Roberta Newman from YIVO and Lara Lempert from the Martynas Mažvydas National Library of Lithuania will discuss YIVO’s landmark efforts to steward the Strashun library into the 21st century and beyond.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

panel discussion

19 | Jan
07:00PM
19 | Jan
07:00PM

storytelling and slam poetry

What Does Jewish Look Like To You? An Evening of Monologues Highlighting Jewish Racial & Ethnic Diversity Featuring Vanessa Hidary and Kaleidoscope

Through extensively crafted, deeply personal storytelling and Spoken Word, Kaleidoscope explores the ever-popular question "What does Jewish look like?" Boldly perse, distinctly Jewish, Kaleidoscope includes performers of Jamaican, Ethiopian, Moroccan, Yemenite, Libyan and African-American Jewish backgrounds. Directed by Vanessa Hidary. Followed by Q&A with the director and performers.

Featuring:
Ma Nishtana
Leemore Malka
Morr Mazal Barton
Kendell Pinkney
Yoshi Silverstein
Simi Toledano

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Downtown Jewish Life

storytelling and slam poetry

18 | Jan
06:00PM
18 | Jan
06:00PM

a library social hour

No Shushing Allowed

Please join us for our January library social hour. You will have the opportunity to speak with the librarians and archivists who make the materials housed at CJH accessible. This is a wonderful opportunity to get to know fellow researchers as well as staff, learn about how others use the collections, and talk about books, archives, and research in general. Light refreshments will be served.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

a library social hour

18 | Jan
06:30PM
18 | Jan
06:30PM

curator's tour

Uncommon Threads: Clothing & Textiles from the Yeshiva University Museum Collection

Join curator Bonni-Dara Michaels for a tour of YUM’s newest exhibition featuring garments, textiles and jewelry spanning three centuries. Highlights include a gold bracelet that belonged to the wife of the Hatam Sofer, a pearl and silver embroidered lectern cover of a Chief Rabbi of Izmir, a custom-made 1950 Hattie Carnegie wedding gown, and a 1969 Ark curtain made by Ina Golub for Temple Beth Ahm in New Jersey.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

16 | Jan
16 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, January 16th for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

12 | Jan
02:00PM
12 | Jan
02:00PM

lecture

No Man's Land: Jewish Refugees on the Borders of East-Central Europe in 1938

Michal Frankl (Researcher at the Masaryk Institute and Archives of the Czech Academy of Sciences, and the 2016 Sorrell and Lorraine Chesin/JDC Archives Fellow) will speak on expulsions of Jews in 1938 and offer perspectives on the implications of the East-Central European No Man's Land.

Presented by: JDC Archives and Center for Jewish History

lecture

12 | Jan
07:00PM
12 | Jan
07:00PM

film and discussion

There Are Jews Here: World Premiere Screening Featuring Filmmaker Brad Lichtenstein

There Are Jews Here tells the stories of once-thriving Jewish American towns that now can barely hold a minyan, focusing on the residents lamenting the gradual disappearance of their communities, and critically examining issues of class, family, and identity.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

film and discussion

09 | Jan
06:30PM
09 | Jan
06:30PM

curator's tour

Odessa: Babel, Ladyzhensky, and the Soul of a City

This exhibition explores the vital creative character and dramatic social context of pre- and post-revolutionary Odessa, Ukraine (formerly Russia) through the work of two of the city's most important artists - the writer Isaac Babel and the painter Yefim Ladyzhensky.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

02 | Jan
02 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, January 2 for New Year's Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

01 | Jan
01 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, January 1 for New Year's Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures