31 | Dec
31 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 3:00pm on Monday December 31 for New Year's Eve.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Dec
25 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Tuesday, December 25 for Christmas.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

24 | Dec
24 | Dec

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 3:00pm on Monday December 24 for Christmas Eve.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

18 | Dec
06:00PM
18 | Dec
06:00PM

panel discussion

Let’s Brisket!

It is the holiday season and that calls for some comfort food. The climate is perfect for brisket, so let’s discuss our city's favorite dish.

Mitchell Davis of the James Beard Foundation moderates a panel discussion with Julia Moskin of The New York Times, Stephanie Pierson – author of Brisket Book, Daniel Delaney of Brisket Town, Noah Bernamoff of Mile End and butcher Jake Dickson. These brisket experts discuss the dish’s history and origins, trends and cooking methods. They also try to explain why and how it became one of NYC’s most beloved dishes, making it a New York cult food. For many years this American-ethnic classic used to only be available in households. This is no longer the case and today it is being rediscovered by restaurant chefs around the city. Organized by culinary curator Naama Shefi.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

16 | Dec
11:00AM
16 | Dec
11:00AM

family stories at the center

Chanukah Lights

Join us in celebrating the last day of Chanukah and welcoming in the bright new year with renowned author Peninnah Schram. Through storytelling and song, families are invited to learn and participate in oral history traditions. Following her program, participants will illustrate and illuminate their own Chanukah memories, inspired by Peninnah Schram’s tales of light, miracles, menorahs and latkes.

“Chanukah Lights” is the part of Family Stories at the Center, a new multigenerational program series focusing on genealogy and oral history. For more information, please visit http://familystories.cjh.org.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family stories at the center

16 | Dec
06:30PM
16 | Dec
06:30PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

On the Eve: The Jews of Europe before the Second World War

How conscious were the Jews of Europe in 1939 that they stood on the edge of an abyss? Were they blithely insouciant of the catastrophe that threatened them or was there general awareness of the dangers that confronted them? Bernard Wasserstein argues that on the eve of the war, even if there was no consensus about how to confront the challenge, there was widespread understanding among Jews on the continent that they faced an existential crisis.

Benard Wasserstein is Ulrich and Harriet Meyer Professor of Modern European Jewish History at the University of Chicago. Previously he held appointments at Brandeis and Glasgow Universities and was President of the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies. His many books include Britain and the Jews of Europe 1939-1945, Vanishing Diaspora: The Jews of Europe since 1945, and The Secret Lives of Trebitsch Lincoln which won the Golden Dagger award for non-fiction from the Crime Writers' Association. His latest book On the Eve: The Jews of Europe before the Second World War (Simon & Schuster) has been praised as 'nothing less than a marvel' (London Sunday Times), 'enthralling, heartbreaking' (San Francisco Chronicle) and 'a masterpiece' (Yiddish Forward).

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

13 | Dec
03:00PM
13 | Dec
03:00PM

lecture

Di yidishe iberzetsung fun dem bris hadasha, 1540-1941

Prof. Naomi Seidman, Graduate Theological Union

Beginning very shortly after Martin Luther's Reformation Bible translation in German, the New Testament was translated into Yiddish numerous times, generally for missionary purposes. This lecture explores the radical changes that New Testament Yiddish translations underwent in the twentieth century, and their very different reception in the world of Yiddish letters. This lecture will take place in Yiddish.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

13 | Dec
07:30PM
13 | Dec
07:30PM

concert

Stories from the East

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble with the Grammy-nominated Enso String Quartet performing Puccini's Crisantemi and 3 Minuets, Boccherini's Piano Quintet and Shostakovich's Piano Quintet. Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky, piano.

This program is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

12 | Dec
03:00PM
12 | Dec
03:00PM

workmen's circle/dr. emanuel patt memorial lecture

Legitimizing the Revolution: Rhetorical and Intertextual Strategies in the Discourse of the Beis Yakov Movement

The founders of the Beis Yakov movement for Orthodox girls’ education were compelled to navigate between parents and rabbis concerned with halachic restrictions on girls' study and young girls more interested in socialism than Orthodoxy. This lecture illuminates the strategies by which Beis Yakov activists overcame these difficulties. Naomi Seidman, Graduate Theological Union.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

workmen's circle/dr. emanuel patt memorial lecture

12 | Dec
06:00PM
12 | Dec
06:00PM

curator's tour

Judaism - A Way of Seeing: The Art of David Gelernter

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

12 | Dec
06:30PM
12 | Dec
06:30PM

interview

Culture Brokers: Music | Producers and Labels

This program traces the history of small independent record labels that pioneered new forms of popular music from the 1960s to today, including rock & roll, Latin pop, and hip-hop. The talk will be in the form of an interview with Ben Sidran, a pianist, producer, singer, composer, author, and host of National Public Radio’s Jazz Alive! and VH1’s New Visions. Sidran’s new album of Bob Dylan songs is entitled Dylan Different and his new book is There Was a Fire: Jews, Music and the American Dream. The interview will be conducted by Jonathan Karp, executive director of the American Jewish Historical Society and associate professor of history, Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

interview

11 | Dec
07:00PM
11 | Dec
07:00PM

conference

The History of the YIVO Library

This event brings to light the magnificent treasures of the YIVO Library and the fascinating, often dramatic stories hidden behind them, discussed by outstanding scholars who have done profound research about the library’s collections.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

conference

09 | Dec
03:00PM
09 | Dec
03:00PM

concert

The Annual Hanukkah Concert

Hosted by Emmy Award winner Ellen Gould of "Bubbe Meises" fame, who will read a story for the holiday, this concert features Israeli jazz clarinet and saxophonist Anat Cohen and her quartet in a rollicking, fun-filled musical afternoon. The Jazz Journalists Association named Anat Cohen "Clarinetist of the Year" for five years running, the first time that any artist has achieved that honor.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

06 | Dec
06:30PM
06 | Dec
06:30PM

panel discussion

Culture Brokers: Publishing | The Book Trade

Three generations of leading publishers explore Jewish participation in the dramatic changes that transformed the book publishing industry in the post-War era from a sleepy "gentlemen's club" into a dynamic and tumultuous industry. Speakers include:
    Jonathan Karp, executive vice president and publisher, Simon & Schuster
    Jane Friedman, CEO and co-founder, Open Road Integrated Media; former president and CEO, HarperCollins Publishers; and executive at Random House, Inc.;
    Jason Epstein, former director, Random House; co-founder, The New York Review of Books; former editor, Doubleday; former editor for Norman Mailer, Vladimir Nabokov, E. L. Doctorow, Philip Roth and Gore Vidal
    Altie Karper, Schoken Books/Random House

Co-sponsored by The Jewish Book Council.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

panel discussion

03 | Dec
06:00PM
03 | Dec
06:00PM

film and discussion

Casablanca at 70: Play it Again, Sam...

Whether you’ve seen it a hundred times or never, join us as film scholar Noah Isenberg introduces an anniversary screening of America’s favorite wartime drama, refocusing our attention on the film’s rich production history, on the dozens of Central European Jewish émigrés involved in its making, and the picture’s enduring appeal. Isenberg’s recent article on the film’s enduring qualities was recently published in the Wall Street Journal’s Editor’s Picks section, Saturday, November 24, 2012.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

film and discussion

02 | Dec
01:00PM
02 | Dec
01:00PM

panel discussion

Culture Brokers: Film | Exhibitors, Distributors and Showmen

This program looks at the Jewish experience in film, including the great impresarios of both commercial and art film houses, the distributors, and the theater owners who brought movie entertainment to urban and small town America alike. Program includes a screening of the film Ivan and Abraham.

Speakers include:
    Phillip Lopate, American film critic; essayist; fiction writer; poet; and teacher;
    Ross Melnick, Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies at University of California, Santa Barbara; author American Showman and Cinema Treasures; former executive, Miramax, MGM, DreamWorks, and Sony Pictures;
    Toby Talbot, co-founder, New Yorker Films; co-owner Lincoln Plaza Cinemas; author. The New Yorker Theater; translator; teacher; and documentary film maker.

Co-sponsored by Columbia University Press.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

panel discussion

29 | Nov
03:00PM
29 | Nov
03:00PM

lecture

The Life of a Vilna Ghetto Rescuer: Reading, Writing, Remembering

Join Montreal writer Julija Šukys for a reading and discussion of her new book Epistolophilia: Writing the Life of Ona Šimaite, which beckons back to life this quiet and worldly heroine, a giant of Holocaust history (one of Yad Vashem's honored Righteous Among the Nations) and yet so little known.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

27 | Nov
07:00PM
27 | Nov
07:00PM

lecture

From the YIVO Archives: The Rothschild Talmud

A new program series highlighting the treasures of the YIVO Archives. The fall 2012 program features the Rothschild Baba Kama, an ornate and richly decorated manuscript written in 1721-22 by Anshel Moses Rothschild, the founder of the Rothschild dynasty.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

25 | Nov
11:00AM
25 | Nov
11:00AM

family stories at the center

Young Historians

As “Young Historians,” children will learn how to ask questions about their family past and discover connections to their present. Brought to life from the Center’s archives, a historical figure will engage children in conversation and guide them through the interview process. Expert videographers and digital storytellers will be present to capture adult-child conversations—empowering children to become family reporters.

*Note: Each family will receive their video recording in a private link.

“Young Historians” is the part of Family Stories at the Center, a new multigenerational program series focusing on genealogy and oral history. For more information, please visit http://familystories.cjh.org.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family stories at the center

23 | Nov
23 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Friday, November 23 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

22 | Nov
22 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Thursday, November 22 and Friday, November 23 for Thanksgiving.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

21 | Nov
21 | Nov

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 3:00pm on Wednesday, November 21 for Thanksgiving Eve.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

19 | Nov
06:30PM
19 | Nov
06:30PM

lecture

Jewish World in Action: Facing the Polish-Jewish Refugee Crisis, 1648-1683

Following the 1648 Chmielnicki uprising and subsequent wars in Eastern Europe, thousands of Jews became refugees, while others were captured and sold on the slave markets of Istanbul and the eastern Mediterranean, spawning international relief efforts. Adam Teller, Brown University and NEH Senior Scholar at CJH 2012-13, will explore these mechanisms and trace the fate of the refugees themselves from Amsterdam to Persia and from Hamburg to Cairo.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

lecture

18 | Nov
03:00PM
18 | Nov
03:00PM

concert

The Hugo Weisgall Centennial Concert

Celebrating the centennial of composer Hugo Weisgall's birth, this concert features opera star Lauren Flanigan performing the Weisgall one-act classic "The Stronger," based on a play by August Strindberg, and New York Philharmonic cellist Eric Bartlett playing "Arioso and Burlesca."

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

15 | Nov
03:00PM
15 | Nov
03:00PM

tell memorial lecture

In Search of Khaykl Lunski

Lara Lempert,Vilnius University. Khaykl Lunski’s presence was felt in nearly every field of Vilna Jewish culture, far beyond his library work. This talk addresses several aspects of Lunski’s work and share some thoughts or, rather, questions on his personality–evasive in its humility and represented almost entirely in the public sphere.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

tell memorial lecture

15 | Nov
06:30PM
15 | Nov
06:30PM

film and discussion

The Ritchie Boys (2004)

During World War II, an elite intelligence unit made up of mostly German-Jewish refugees helped break the morale of the SS; they are reunited decades later in this moving film. Followed by discussion with Ritchie Boys alumnus Victor Brombert.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

film and discussion

14 | Nov
06:00PM
14 | Nov
06:00PM

curator's tour

It's a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

14 | Nov
07:00PM
14 | Nov
07:00PM

16th street book club

To the End of the Land (David Grossman)

Just before his release from service in the Israeli army, Ora’s son Ofer is sent back to the front for a major offensive. In a fit of preemptive grief and magical thinking, so that no bad news can reach her, Ora sets out on an epic hike in the Galilee. She is joined by an unlikely companion—Avram, a former friend and lover with a troubled past—and as they sleep out in the hills, Ora begins to conjure her son. Ofer’s story, as told by Ora, becomes a surprising balm both for her and for Avram—and a mother’s powerful meditation on war and family.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

13 | Nov
06:00PM
13 | Nov
06:00PM

archival leaders advocate: annual seminar at the center
http://archivalleaders.cjh.org/

Digital Archives and Society

Speaker: Jackie Dooley

Our annual seminar, Archival Leaders Advocate, features prominent figures in the archives field addressing issues of broad relevance to all archivists. Speakers are afforded a stage to share their own creative strategies and specialties, as well as to reflect more generally on developments and trends in archives. The seminar highlights innovative thinkers and catalysts for change who have publicly advocated for archives and an archival professional identity, within and outside of the field, and across a variety of platforms.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

archival leaders advocate: annual seminar at the center
http://archivalleaders.cjh.org/

08 | Nov
02:00PM
08 | Nov
02:00PM

lecture

Assimilation as Rehabilitation: The Treatment of Child Holocaust Survivors by Relief Organizations in the Immediate Post-War Period

Mary Fraser Kirsh, Ph.D.
A recipient of the Fred and Ellen Lewis JDC Archives Fellowship for 2012, Kirsh’s researching and teaching interests includes Holocaust landscapes, children and the Holocaust, gender and Judaism, and Jewish life in Europe in the aftermath of World War II. Dr. Kirsh recently completed her doctoral studies at the University of Wisconsin.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and the Joint Distribution Committee Archives

lecture

07 | Nov
03:00PM
07 | Nov
03:00PM

tell memorial lecture

RESCHEDULED: NOVEMBER 15th
In Search of Khaykl Lunski

Lara Lempert,Vilnius University. Khaykl Lunski’s presence was felt in nearly every field of Vilna Jewish culture, far beyond his library work. This talk will address several aspects of Lunski’s work and share some thoughts or, rather, questions on his personality–evasive in its humility and represented almost entirely in the public sphere.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

tell memorial lecture

07 | Nov
06:00PM
07 | Nov
06:00PM

film and discussion

RESCHEDULED: DECEMBER 3, 2012
Casablanca at 70

Whether you’ve seen it a hundred times or never, join us as film scholar Noah Isenberg introduces an anniversary screening of America’s favorite wartime drama, refocusing our attention on the film’s rich production history, on the dozens of Central European Jewish émigrés involved in its making, and the picture’s enduring appeal.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

film and discussion

04 | Nov
03:00PM
04 | Nov
03:00PM

concert

CANCELED
Sidney Krum Young Artists Concert Series: Fall Concert 2012

This concert series is devoted to rarely heard masterworks from the Sidney Krum Jewish Music and Yiddish Theater Memorial Collections at YIVO, performed by gifted young artists from the Juilliard School, the Manhattan School of Music and other premier conservatories in the metropolitan New York area.

The Fall 2012 program, "Jewish Composers: A German Connection," will present masterpieces by Jewish composers who were influenced by German musical culture. Works by Mendelssohn, Mahler, Kurt Weill and Schoenberg will be explored as well as music by German Jewish synagogue composer Louis Lewandowski, Russian Jewish composers Anton Rubinstein and Joel Engel, and Israeli composers Paul Ben Haim and Tzvi Avni. Music from the YIVO and LBI collections will be included.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

31 | Oct
07:00PM
31 | Oct
07:00PM

symposium

The Circumcision Debates, Then and Now: Religious Ritual in Historical Perspective

(formerly titled “Converts from Judaism and Christianity”)

Circumcision, testimony to the divine covenant for Jewish males, drew the critical gaze of Christians from antiquity to the present as documented in the recent publication Judaism in Christian Eyes, which examines early modern Jewish practice from the outside. This symposium centers on circumcision’s central role in the formation of Jewish identity, for “new Jews” and in the eyes of non-Jews. Yaacov Deutsch, David Yellin College, author, Judaism in Christian Eyes; Lawrence Rosen, Princeton University and Columbia Law School; Hilit Surowitz-Israel, Rutgers University; Elisheva Carlebach, Columbia University, Moderator.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

symposium

28 | Oct
11:00AM
28 | Oct
11:00AM

symposium

The Mystery and History of the Eruv: A Symposium

Prominent scholars, writers and artists explore the surprising history, communal dynamics and mysterious character of the eruv in this symposium, which complements the YU Museum’s exhibition It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

symposium

25 | Oct
06:00PM
25 | Oct
06:00PM

lecture

Dr. Rafael Seligmann, publisher of “Jewish Voice from Germany”

At a time when Germany boasts the fastest growing Jewish community in the world, Jewish Voice from Germany focuses on the long, complex, and sensitive connection between the country and its Jewish citizens who were “Germans” until the Nuremberg Laws of 1935 turned them into “Jews.” Today, there is a vibrant revival of Jewish life, diversity of Jewish opinion, and revitalization of an indissoluble link between Germany and Jews around the world. Rafael Seligmann captures the excitement, the pride, and the concerns of a new generation in the pages of Jewish Voice from Germany, which he founded nearly one year ago.

Dr. Rafael Seligmann, Publisher Jewish Voice from Germany
Rafael Seligmann is a the author of numerous novels that deal with the Jewish experience in post-war Germany as well as non-fiction books about German history and Israeli security policy. Since 1978, he has contributed commentary to leading German magazines and newspapers including Spiegel, Bild, Die Welt, and taz. Born 1947 in Tel Aviv, he moved to Germany with his family at the age of 10. He founded Jewish Voice from Germany in 2012.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

lecture

23 | Oct
07:00PM
23 | Oct
07:00PM

book discussion

An Evening with Romanian Jewish Author Norman Manea

Romanian Jewish author Norman Manea will read and discuss his latest novel, The Lair.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book discussion

22 | Oct
11:00AM
22 | Oct
11:00AM

Second-Hand Book Sale

American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research are selling thousands of duplicate copies and “out-of- scope” books from their library collections. In addition, all the participating organizations will be selling discounted titles from their regular publications. All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund.

Authors include: Sholem Aleichem, Marc D. Angel, Paul Arnsberg, Martin Buber, Chaim Grade, Itzik Manger, Thomas Mann, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Stefan Zweig, and others.

Prices: Paperbacks: $1, Hardcover: $3, Music and Movies: $1 to $3, or as marked Cash Only

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

22 | Oct
06:30PM
22 | Oct
06:30PM

panel discussion

Jews as Art Dealers and Collectors

Jews' prominence as collectors and dealers supported their claim to membership in European high culture and made them the principal targets of Nazi dispossession. Art historian Emily Bilski, historian Charles Dellheim, and curator/art dealer Jane Kallir trace this fascinating history and its current repercussions. For related programs, see October 30, December 2 and December 12.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Yeshiva University Museum

panel discussion

21 | Oct
11:00AM
21 | Oct
11:00AM

family stories at the center

Be Your Tree

Working as young genealogists, children will discover the keys to tracing, and documenting their family history. Families will explore the Center for Jewish History’s rich genealogical archives, and gather inspiration for their own family trees—crafting each from roots to branches.

“Be Your Tree” is the first part of Family Stories at the Center, a new multigenerational program series focusing on genealogy and oral history. For more information, please visit http://familystories.cjh.org.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

family stories at the center

21 | Oct
11:00AM
21 | Oct
11:00AM

Second-Hand Book Sale

American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research are selling thousands of duplicate copies and “out-of- scope” books from their library collections. In addition, all the participating organizations will be selling discounted titles from their regular publications. All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund.

Authors include: Sholem Aleichem, Marc D. Angel, Paul Arnsberg, Martin Buber, Chaim Grade, Itzik Manger, Thomas Mann, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Stefan Zweig, and others.

Prices: Paperbacks: $1, Hardcover: $3, Music and Movies: $1 to $3, or as marked Cash Only

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

21 | Oct
02:00PM
21 | Oct
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

Getting the Most out of Jewishgen

Speaker: Phyllis Kramer, VP of Education, Jewishgen

Phyllis Kramer, the creator and VP of Jewishgen’s education program and the teacher of many of its online courses, will offer a presentation on the most successful approaches and techniques for Jewish family history research on the myriad databases of the Jewishgen website.

JewishGen, a non-profit organization affiliated with the Museum of Jewish Heritage - A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, was founded in 1987 as a bulletin board with only 150 users who were interested in Jewish genealogy. Currently, JewishGen hosts more than 20 million records, and provides a myriad of resources and search tools designed to assist those researching their Jewish ancestry.

The recipient of the 2011 IAJGS award for Outstanding Contribution to Jewish Genealogy for her creation of the Jewishgen Education program, Phyllis is a genealogist with primary interest in Eastern European Jewish research. She has served as Jewishgen’s VP of Education since 2005 and a member of its advisory board of governors since 2009.

Please note: There will be an informal question/answer session in the Kovno Room from 12:30 to 1:30.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open before the meeting at 11:00am for access to research materials and computers and networking with other researchers.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

18 | Oct
07:00PM
18 | Oct
07:00PM

film screening and discussion

Everything Is Illuminated

Liev Schreiber will discuss his debut as a director and screenwriter of the film Everything Is Illuminated, adapted for the screen from the 2002 novel by Jonathan Safran Foer. Prof. Eric Goldman will chair the discussion.

Everything Is Illuminated follows a young Jewish American as he endeavours to find the woman who saved his grandfather in a small Ukrainian town that was decimated by the Nazi invasion. What starts out as a journey to piece together one family's story under the most absurd circumstances turns into a surprisingly meaningful journey with a powerful series of revelations -- the importance of remembrance, the perilous nature of secrets, the legacy of the Holocaust, the meaning of friendship and, most importantly, love.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film screening and discussion

17 | Oct
07:00PM
17 | Oct
07:00PM

lecture

Golden Menorah of the Arch of Titus Revealed

After the destruction of the Jerusalem Temple in 70 CE, the golden Menorah and other holy objects were taken to Rome as booty of the First Jewish Revolt. Celebrated by Romans in the Arch of Titus, the menorah – a symbol of profound Jewish loss and hope for redemption – is today emblazoned on the seal of the State of Israel. This lecture will highlight recent discoveries made by the Arch of Titus Digital Restoration Project, led by Professor Steven Fine in Summer, 2013, of the original color of the menorah using the newest technological means. It will discuss what this pilot project harbingers for our understanding of the Arch of Titus, the Jewish Revolt and the significance of polychromy for understanding Roman Imperial art.

STEVEN FINE, professor of Jewish history at Yeshiva University and director of the YU Center for Israel Studies, is a cultural historian who specializes in Jewish history in the Greco-Roman period. His work focuses on the literature, art and archaeology of Judaism during the Talmudic period, and the ways that modern scholars have interpreted the Jewish past. To learn more about the Arch of Titus Digital Restoration Project, visit http://yu.edu/cis/activities/arch-of-titus.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

17 | Oct
07:00PM
17 | Oct
07:00PM

16th street book club

The Cosmopolitans (Nadia Kalman)

Equal parts Jane Austen and Gogol, The Cosmopolitans casts a sharp and sympathetic eye on the foibles and rewards of family and life in America. This warm and exuberantly comic debut tells the story of the Molochniks, Russian-Jewish immigrants in suburban Connecticut. Daughters wed, houses flood, cultures clash, and the past has a way of emerging at the most inconvenient moments (and in the strangest ways).

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

16 | Oct
09:30AM
16 | Oct
09:30AM

website launch

DigiBaeck - Access 500 Years of German-Jewish History

Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle delivers the keynote address as LBI unveils its digital archive, DigiBaeck, a treasury of artifacts that document the heritage of German-speaking Jewry in the modern era, from rare 16th-century books to memoirs reflecting the experience of émigrés in the 20th century.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

website launch

16 | Oct
07:00PM
16 | Oct
07:00PM

lecture

Reclaiming the Jewish Narrative in Lithuania Today

Markas Zingeris, Lithuanian Jewish author and Director of the Vilna Gaon State Jewish Museum, will discuss what it means to be Jewish in Lithuania today.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History, Consulate General of Lithuania in NY

lecture

14 | Oct
12:30PM
14 | Oct
12:30PM

symposium

A History of Giving: Symposium on Jews and Charity

Fourteen international scholars will discuss the fascinatingly complex personal, legal, economic and social reasons that led to charitable giving over time, looking with a comparative lens at its practice among Jews from the biblical period through the contemporary period. Symposium organized by Debra Kaplan, Yeshiva University and Judah Galinsky, Bar-Ilan University. For a complete program and list of scholars, please click here.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

symposium

11 | Oct
07:30PM
11 | Oct
07:30PM

concert

From Brahms to Klezmer

Clarinetist David Krakauer, praised internationally for his astounding ability to play in a myriad of music genres, will give his only New York City concert this fall, featured with the Phoenix Chamber Ensemble (Kathe Jarka, cello; Vassa Shevel, piano; and Inessa Zaretsky, piano). The concert features the world premiere of Inessa Zaretsky’s Six Poems for Tamar for clarinet and piano, as well as Brahms’ Trio for clarinet, cello and piano in A minor, Op. 114; Debussy’s Rhapsody, Steve Reich’s New York Counterpoint for clarinet and ten pre-recorded clarinets; excerpts from Messaien’s Quartet for the End of Time; and Krakauer’s selection of traditional Klezmer tunes and improvisations spotlighting his signature circular breathing.

This program is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

10 | Oct
05:00PM
10 | Oct
05:00PM

curator's tour

It's a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

10 | Oct
06:30PM
10 | Oct
06:30PM

film and discussion

Portrait of Wally (2012)

The 1997 rediscovery of Egon Schiele's famous painting rekindled the controversies surrounding issues of Nazi art theft and the claims of Jewish ownership, described in this riveting documentary. Followed by discussion with Director Andrew Shea.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Yeshiva University Museum

film and discussion

09 | Oct
09 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Tuesday, October 9 for Shemini Atzeret.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

08 | Oct
08 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Monday, October 8 for Shemini Atzeret.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

07 | Oct
07 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Sunday, October 7 for Erev Shemini Atzeret.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

04 | Oct
06:00PM
04 | Oct
06:00PM

workmen's circle/dr. emanuel patt memorial lecture

The Politics of Hate: The Image of "The Jews" in Russian and Polish Political Discourse at the Turn of the Century

Semion Goldin, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Scott Ury, Tel Aviv University. This symposium discusses the different images of "the Jews" that came to dominate the political discourse in turn-of-the-century Eastern Europe. What are the implications for the connection between democracy, nationalism, and the politics of hate?

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

workmen's circle/dr. emanuel patt memorial lecture

02 | Oct
02 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Tuesday, October 2 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

01 | Oct
01 | Oct

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Monday, October 1 for Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

30 | Sep
30 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Sunday, September 30 for Erev Sukkot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

26 | Sep
26 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Wednesday, September 26 for Yom Kippur.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Sep
25 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Tuesday, September 25 for Erev Yom Kippur.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

23 | Sep
01:00PM
23 | Sep
01:00PM

commemoration

Nusakh Vilne Memorial Lecture and Concert

A commemoration of the lost Jewish community of Vilna featuring musical performances and poetry. This program is in English and Yiddish.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

commemoration

20 | Sep
07:00PM
20 | Sep
07:00PM

16th street book club

No One is Here Except All of Us (Ramona Ausubel)

In 1939, the families in a remote Jewish village in Romania feel the war close in on them. Their tribe has moved and escaped for thousands of years- across oceans, deserts, and mountains-but now, it seems, there is nowhere else to go. Danger is imminent in every direction, yet the territory of imagination and belief is limitless. At the suggestion of an eleven-year-old girl and a mysterious stranger who has washed up on the riverbank, the villagers decide to reinvent the world: deny any relationship with the known and start over from scratch. Destiny is unwritten. Time and history are forgotten. Jobs, husbands, a child, are reassigned. And for years, there is boundless hope. But the real world continues to unfold alongside the imagined one, eventually overtaking it, and soon our narrator-the girl, grown into a young mother-must flee her village, move from one world to the next, to find her husband and save her children, and propel them toward a real and hopeful future. A beguiling, imaginative, inspiring story about the bigness of being alive as an individual, as a member of a tribe, and as a participant in history, No One Is Here Except All Of Us explores how we use storytelling to survive and shape our own truths. It marks the arrival of a major new literary talent.

Please consider supporting the Center for Jewish History by ordering these books (in print/e-book format) through the Center’s Amazon store at no extra cost.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

18 | Sep
18 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Tuesday, September 18 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

17 | Sep
17 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Monday, September 17 for Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

16 | Sep
16 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Sunday, September 16 for Erev Rosh Hashana.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

13 | Sep
07:00PM
13 | Sep
07:00PM

lecture

Antisemitism and Judaeophobia: A Critical Analysis of the Development in European Anti-Jewish Sentiment During the Interwar Period

Distinguished historian John Lukacs discusses the shifts in anti-Jewish sentiment in Europe during the first half of the 20th century.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

12 | Sep
06:00PM
12 | Sep
06:00PM

curator's tour

Microcosms: Ruth Abrams, Abstract Expressionist

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

10 | Sep
03:00PM
10 | Sep
03:00PM

dora and mayer tendler lecture

Zionism and Patriotism: The Jews of Italy in the Early 20th Century

Cristina Michal Bettin, Ben-Gurion University. Since the Emancipation, Italian Jews have in fundamental ways redefined their identities: Jewish as well as Italian. Like many Italians who reestablished their place of worship in their new countries, Italian Jews who immigrated to Israel and New York did the same, wanting to preserve their Italian national and cultural identity.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

dora and mayer tendler lecture

09 | Sep
02:00PM
09 | Sep
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

The Next Generation - Genealogical & Archival Databases: Retooling the Tools

Speakers: Miriam Weiner, President of the Routes to Roots Foundation (RTRF), and Michael Glickman, Chief Operating Officer of the Center for Jewish History

This joint presentation by Michael Glickman, Chief Operating Officer (CJH), and Miriam Weiner, President of the Routes to Roots Foundation (RTRF), will feature a demonstration of how people can use the Center’s resources to access some of the world's most comprehensive databases for researching Jewish genealogy. It will include the first public viewing of the Center’s Online Public Access Catalog after the integration of RTRF's Eastern European Archival Database and Image Database.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

09 | Sep
05:00PM
09 | Sep
05:00PM

discussion

Eternal Echoes: Violinist Itzhak Perlman and Cantor Yitzchak Meir Helfgot

Perlman and Helfgot talk about their new Sony Masterworks CD “Eternal Echoes: Songs and Dances for the Soul.” A unique chance to hear the inside story of the new recording, preview some of the pieces included on the disc, and ask questions of these wonderful artists, as well as arranger and producer Hankus Netsky, who will join them. A CD signing in the Great Hall follows the event.

Presented by: American Society for Jewish Music, American Jewish Historical Society and Center for Jewish History

discussion

06 | Sep
06:00PM
06 | Sep
06:00PM

panel discussion

Gefilte Talk

In honor of Rosh Hashanah, this program will stimulate your brain with conversation and tantalize your senses with a tasting. Mitchell Davis of the James Beard Foundation moderates a panel discussion between Elizabeth Alpern and Jeffrey Yoskowitz of the Gefilteria, Brooklyn; Zach Kutsher of Kutsher’s Tribeca; Jack Lebewohl of 2nd Ave Deli; and Israeli chef Omer Miller. They discuss taste, preserving culinary tradition and the adaptation of old recipes to current days. Organized by culinary curator Naama Shefi with morsels from artist Dover D.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

panel discussion

04 | Sep
06:00PM
04 | Sep
06:00PM

naomi prawer kadar memorial lecture

Watch the Throne: Spectacle and Specters in the Stories of Reb Nakhmen and Der Nister

Reb Nakhmen of Breslov (Bratslav) and Der Nister (Pinkhes Kahanovitsh) devote narratives to courtly intrigue. What are the sources for these stories, and what do they suggest about the authors' relation to modernity and literary modernism?

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

naomi prawer kadar memorial lecture

03 | Sep
03 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Monday, September 3 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

02 | Sep
02 | Sep

holidays and closures

The Center will be closed Sunday, September 2 and Monday, September 3rd, 2012 in honor of Labor Day.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

14 | Aug
07:00PM
14 | Aug
07:00PM

16th street book club

The Marriage Artist (Andrew Winer)

When the wife of renowned art critic Daniel Lichtmann plunges to her death, she is not alone. Lying next to her is Benjamin Wind, the very artist Daniel most championed. Dedicating himself to uncovering the secrets of their relationship, Daniel discovers a web of mysteries leading back to pre—World War II Vienna. Ambitious, haunting, and stunningly written, The Marriage Artist is an "elaborate psycho-political-sexual puzzle, with...hard truths, startling visions, and eerie insights into the mystical and memorializing powers of art, and that endless hunger we call love" (Booklist).

Please consider supporting the Center for Jewish History by ordering these books (in print/e-book format) through the Center’s Amazon store at no extra cost.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

12 | Aug
11:30AM
12 | Aug
11:30AM

theater

Jacob Stein and The Bakery Band Puppets

Join Jacob Stein and The Bakery Band Puppets for a hilarious journey through traditional and contemporary Jewish culture. Singing original and classic tunes, they are guaranteed to get you out of your seat and dancing along to a lively performance of puppetry, music and storytelling.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

theater

12 | Aug
03:00PM
12 | Aug
03:00PM

commemoration

Remembrance for the Murdered Soviet Yiddish Writers

The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research together with the Congress for Jewish Culture, CYCO Books, the Forward Association, the Jewish Labor Committee, and the Workmen's Circle present a commemoration of the sixtieth anniversary of the death of Soviet Yiddish writers and other members of the Jewish Anti-Fascist Committee at the hands of Stalin.

There were several short films based on the poetry of Perets Markish; Boris Sandler, editor of the Forward, read his own poems; well-known singers Hy Wolfe and Paula Teitelbaum sing and recite poetry; Shane Baker recites poetry; David Mandelbaum of New Yiddish Rep and Paul Glasser of YIVO read prose. The emcee was be Tom Bird of Queens College.

This program is in Yiddish.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

commemoration

01 | Aug
06:00PM
01 | Aug
06:00PM

only in new york summer film series

Crossing Delancey

Directed by Joan Micklin Silver. With Amy Irving, Peter Riegert, Reizl Bozyk, Sylvia Miles. A romantic comedy about an independent young woman who ultimately succumbs to the charms of nice Jewish man who sells pickles on the Lower East Side thanks to the machinations of a matchmaker. Amy Irving was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for best actress. 97 minutes, 1988.

The film will be introduced by Annie Polland, historian and vice president for education at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

only in new york summer film series

30 | Jul
06:30PM
30 | Jul
06:30PM

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

Shakespeare and Polish-Jewish Relations: The Reception of Shakespeare's Dramas in the Yiddish Theater in Poland

RSVP Required: email or call 212-294-6143

Presenter: Agatha Dabrowska, Adjunct Professor, Department of British and Commonwealth Studies, University of Lodz

Moderator: Edna Nahshon, Professor of Hebrew and Theater, Jewish Theological Seminary

Dr. Agatha Dabrowska received her doctorate in International Relations and Culture at the University of Lodz. She is currently Adjunct Professor at the University of Lodz in the Department of British and Commonwealth Studies and teaches Jewish theater and history. Dr. Dabrowska will trace the development of Shakespeare in the Yiddish theater in Poland from the 19th century to the post World War II period. Dr. Dabrowska will also discuss the reception of Shakespearean dramas in Yiddish against the context of Polish Jewish relations.

Dr. Edna Nahshon is Professor of Hebrew and Theater at the Jewish Theological Seminary. She is a senior associate of Oxford University's Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, and the recipient of various prestigious awards. Her books include Yiddish Proletarian Theatre: The Art and Politics of the Artef, 1925-1940; From the Ghetto to the Melting Pot: Israel Zangwill's Jewish Plays and the recently published Jews and Theater in an Intercultural Context. She is currently preparing for publication (with Professor Michael Shapiro) a book on Jewish responses to The Merchant of Venice, to be published by Cambridge University Press.

Inaugurated in 2008 thanks to a major gift from the family of Ruth Gay , the Ruth Gay Seminar in Jewish Studies takes place several times a year at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Established in honor of Ruth Gay (1922-2006), the noted American Jewish historian and writer, the seminar series is given by scholars who have used the resources of the YIVO Archives and who wish to share their research with the public.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

ruth gay seminar in jewish studies

25 | Jul
06:00PM
25 | Jul
06:00PM

only in new york summer film series

Next Stop, Greenwich Village

Directed by Paul Mazursky. With Lenny Baker, Shelley Winters, Christopher Walken, Jeff Goldblum, Ellen Greene. A semi-autobiographical account of Mazursky’s early life as an aspiring actor in New York who moves out of his parent’s Brooklyn apartment to seek his fortune in the bohemian life of Greenwich Village in 1953. 111 minutes, 1976.

The film will be introduced by Noah Isenberg, a film scholar and cultural critic based at The New School.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

only in new york summer film series

22 | Jul
11:00AM
22 | Jul
11:00AM

only in new york summer film series

Radio Days

Directed by Woody Allen. With Woody Allen, Mia Farrow, Dianne Wiest. A nostalgic look at radio's golden age focusing on one ordinary family and the various performers in the medium. 88 minutes, 1987.

The Woody Allen films will be introduced at 11 a.m. by David Schwartz, chief curator, Museum of the Moving Image, New York.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

only in new york summer film series

22 | Jul
02:00PM
22 | Jul
02:00PM

only in new york summer film series

Broadway Danny Rose

Directed by Woody Allen. With Woody Allen, Mia Farrow. In his attempts to reconcile a lounge singer with his mistress, a hapless talent agent is mistaken as her lover by a jealous gangster. 84 minutes, 1984.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

only in new york summer film series

22 | Jul
04:00PM
22 | Jul
04:00PM

only in new york summer film series

Annie Hall

Directed by Woody Allen. With Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts. Neurotic New York comedian Alvy Singer falls in love with the ditsy Annie Hall. 93 minutes, 1977.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

only in new york summer film series

20 | Jul
12:00PM
20 | Jul
12:00PM

max weinreich center: yiddish language seminar

Fun a khazerishn ek...

Speaker: Binyomen Feldman
This is a Yiddish language event.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich center: yiddish language seminar

18 | Jul
06:00PM
18 | Jul
06:00PM

only in new york summer film series

Hester Street and Sweatshop Cinderella

Hester Street, 1975. Directed by Joan Micklin Silver. With Steven Keats, Carol Kane, Mel Howard. A beautifully detailed reconstruction of first generation Jewish immigrant life in turn-of- the-century New York with the inherent challenges of assimilating or maintaining traditional ways. From Yekl, a novella by Abraham Cahan. In Yiddish and English. 90 minutes.

Sweatshop Cinderella, 2010. A short film by Suzanne Wasserman about Anzia Yezierska, a Polish immigrant who came to the Lower East Side in 1890 and rose from sweatshops and laundries to Hollywood and a return to New York as an award-winning writer of stories and novels in English. 27 minutes.

The films will be introduced by Suzanne Wasserman, historian, filmmaker and the director of Gotham Center for New York City History.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Jewish Historical Society

only in new york summer film series

17 | Jul
06:00PM
17 | Jul
06:00PM

book presentation

Anthony Heilbut - Fans Who Knew Too Much

In his new collection of essays, The Fan Who Knew Too Much (June 2012, Knopf), author Anthony Heilbut explores American cultural icons with a perspective as expansive and unique as his own career as a record producer, cultural critic, and teacher.

Born 1940 in New York, the son of German-Jewish refugees, Heilbut let his sense of cultural curiosity dictate his wandering path, from the familiar milieu of émigré intellectuals to Harlem’s Apollo Theater, where he discovered Gospel music as a teenager, to Harvard, where he wrote a dissertation on D.H. Lawrence. In 1997, he wrote the classic study of German-Jewish emigres in America Exiled in Paradise.

In his new book, with the erudition of a scholar and the manic enthusiasm of a superfan, Heilbut nimbly weaves a thread through freewheeling observations about Aretha Franklin, the experience of gay members of the black Pentacostal church, and the rise of the soap opera in American culture. In the essay, "Somebody Else's Paradise" Heilbut writes about the German exiles who fled Hitler - Einstein, Hannah Arendt, Marlene Dietrich, and others - and their long reach into the world of American science, art, politics, and literature.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

book presentation

16 | Jul
07:00PM
16 | Jul
07:00PM

16th street book club

By Blood (Ellen Ullman)

The award-winning writer returns with a major, absorbing, atmospheric novel that takes on the most dramatic and profoundly personal subject matter.

San Francisco in the 1970s. Free love has given way to radical feminism, psychedelic ecstasy to hard-edged gloom. The Zodiac Killer stalks the streets. A disgraced professor takes an office in a downtown tower to plot his return. But the walls are thin and he's distracted by voices from next door—his neighbor is a psychologist, and one of her patients dislikes the hum of the white-noise machine. And so he begins to hear about the patient's troubles with her female lover, her conflicts with her adoptive, avowedly WASP family, and her quest to track down her birth mother. The professor is not just absorbed but enraptured. And the further he is pulled into the patient's recounting of her dramas—and the most profound questions of her own identity—the more he needs the story to move forward. The patient’s questions about her birth family have led her to a Catholic charity that trafficked freshly baptized orphans out of Germany after World War II. But confronted with this new self-"I have no idea what it means to say 'I'm a Jew'"—the patient finds her search stalled. Armed with the few details he’s gleaned, the professor takes up the quest and quickly finds the patient’s mother in records from a German displaced-persons camp. But he can't let on that he’s been eavesdropping, so he mocks up a reply from an adoption agency the patient has contacted and drops it in the mail. Through the wall, he hears how his dear patient is energized by the news, and so is he. He unearths more clues and invests more and more in this secret, fraught, triangular relationship: himself, the patient, and her therapist, who is herself German. His research leads them deep into the history of displaced-persons camps, of postwar Zionism, and—most troubling of all—of the Nazi Lebensborn program.

With ferocious intelligence and an enthralling, magnetic prose, Ellen Ullman weaves a dark and brilliant, intensely personal novel that feels as big and timeless as it is sharp and timely. It is an ambitious work that establishes her as a major writer.

Please consider supporting the Center for Jewish History by ordering these books (in print/e-book format) through the Center’s Amazon store at no extra cost.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

16th street book club

15 | Jul
11:30AM
15 | Jul
11:30AM

theater

Jacob Stein and The Bakery Band Puppets

Join Jacob Stein and The Bakery Band Puppets for a hilarious journey through traditional and contemporary Jewish culture. Singing original and classic tunes, they are guaranteed to get you out of your seat and dancing along to a lively performance of puppetry, music and storytelling.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

theater

12 | Jul
06:00PM
12 | Jul
06:00PM

film

The Porzellangasse Boys (Die Porzellangassenbuben)

This documentary focuses on an encounter between Eric Pleskow and Ari Rath, who both had to flee from Austria and the Nazi regime. These two extraordinary men just recently found out that they grew up in the same Viennese street, the Porzellangasse. Eric Pleskow, a legendary Hollywood producer, Oscar winner and president of the Austrian Film Festival Viennale, met Ari Rath, the renowned activist and former editor of the Jerusalem Post, for the first time in 2009. Dir. Lukas Sturm, 52 min., Austria 2012, German with English Subtitles.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Austrian Cultural Forum New York

film

12 | Jul
06:30PM
12 | Jul
06:30PM

panel discussion

Soroka Medical Center: Defending Israel’s Health

Meet Dr. Michael Sherf, Medical Director and CEO of Soroka Medical Center, together with two of Soroka's medical experts. The Soroka Medical Center is one of Israel's most important and strategic medical institutions, and serves all of the residents of Israel's South, including soldiers stationed along the Gaza and Egypt borders. As Israel plans for intensified development of the Negev, Soroka meets the challenge as the sole major medical center for over one million.

Genetics 2012: From Research to Disease Prevention
Presented by Dr. Ohad Birk
Discover how groundbreaking genetics research in the 21st century is quickly translated into clinical genetics counseling, to save lives and prevent disease. Dr. Birk runs the only genetics services for the one million Israelis of the south of Israel. He unraveled the genes for 20 human diseases, including a severe disease in Jews of Moroccan and of Iraqi ancestry that is now routinely tested for in those communities.

Medicine on High Alert: Protecting Our Humanitarian Mission in a Complex Cultural, Political and Security Context
Presented by Dr. Agi Golan
Alongside the day-to-day challenge of providing cutting-edge medical care to the entire Negev region and beyond, Soroka's critical role in caring for Israeli civilians and soldiers alike becomes magnified in preparation for war and in the wake of terrorist missile attacks, when the doctors and staff of the medical center must shift into emergency preparation mode. Soroka is a hugely strategic hospital for the IDF, as the sole medical center on the southern front.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

panel discussion

04 | Jul
04 | Jul

holidays and closures

The Center is closed in observance of the 4th of July.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

25 | Jun
06:30PM
25 | Jun
06:30PM

lecture

Bratislava/Pressburg Returns to the Map of Jewish Europe

Bratislava, long known also as Pressburg, was for centuries an important center of Jewish life and learning which was virtually destroyed in the Holocaust and the post-war Communist period. Today it contains a vibrant Jewish community celebrating the rebirth of its cultural heritage. Dr. Maros Borsky, Director of the Slovak Jewish Heritage Center in Bratislava, will join us to discuss the significant events that are contributing to the community’s revitalization: the long-awaited opening of a new Jewish Community Museum in the city’s only extant synagogue, of which he serves as director and curator; the 250th anniversary of the birth of the prominent Bratislava rabbi and scholar Chatam Sofer whose burial site is an architectural landmark; and the Lost City project, the creation of a giant model of the Neolog synagogue which was demolished in 1969.

A native of Bratislava, Dr. Maroš Borský studied art history and Jewish studies in Bratislava, Regensburg, London, Jerusalem and Heidelberg. From 2001 to 2006, Dr. Borský was the curator at the Slovak National Museum-Museum of Jewish Culture, where he founded and oversaw Synagoga Slovaca, the documentation project of synagogue architecture in Slovakia. Since 2006, Dr. Borský has been the Director of the Slovak Jewish Heritage Center in Bratislava. Dr. Borský is the vice president of the Jewish Community of Bratislava and founder of the Jewish Community Museum in Bratislava.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Society for the History of the Czechoslovak Jews

lecture

24 | Jun
02:30PM
24 | Jun
02:30PM

memorial event

Mordkhe Schaechter Commemoration

The League for Yiddish and YIVO Institute present a program in memory of Dr. Mordkhe Schaechter Z"L. Dr. Kalman Weiser of York University, Toronto, spoke on "Max Weinreich's Attitude to American Jews and the Beginnings of Yiddish Studies at American Universities in the 1940s." This event is in Yiddish.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Yiddish League

memorial event

21 | Jun
07:00PM
21 | Jun
07:00PM

concert

East Meets West: Yidishe Meydlekh

California-based singer Heather Klein performs Yiddish songs from her new CD "Shifreles Portret." She sang duets with special guest artist Miryem-Khaye Seigel. The program also includes both known and lesser-known Yiddish theater songs.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and the Congress for Jewish Culture

concert

20 | Jun
07:30PM
20 | Jun
07:30PM

concert

Chelsea Music Festival: Debussy IV: Creation, Love and Life Everlasting

CMF returns to the Leo Baeck Institute this summer and takes us on a journey featuring works that capture essences of creation, love and life everlasting. Presented are Milhaud’s “Création du Monde” and a world premiere by CMF 2012 Composer-in-Residence Somei Satoh entitled SAGA, which will be led by Anne-Sophie Mutter Foundation violinist Fanny Clamagirand. The “bright, young” American baritone, Thomas Meglioranza, will sing art songs by Debussy and Ravel and the evening concludes with one of the greatest masterpieces in the chamber music repertoire, the exhilarating Octet for Strings by Felix Mendelssohn, led by star German violinist, Augustin Hadelich.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and Chelsea Music Festival

concert

19 | Jun
06:00PM
19 | Jun
06:00PM

exhibit opening

Destination Shanghai: The Jewish Community of Shanghai, 1936-1949

Shanghai was the last refuge for almost 20,000 German and Austrian Jews between 1936 and 1941, virtually the last place they could go where visas were not required. Most Central European refugees were ill-prepared for the conditions they found in this bustling metropolis of 6.5 million, but despite adverse circumstances, they were able to establish synagogues, a burial society, an educational system and numerous cultural institutions. Concerts, theater performances, art exhibitions, fashion shows and literary readings provided distraction from the daily deprivations. By 1949, when the People’s Republic of China was founded, the majority of Jewish refugees had left Shanghai, dispersing to all corners of the world. This exhibition brings together rare archival documents, photos, artwork, as well as books and periodicals printed in China. The materials that document the Shanghai experience are all taken from LBI collections.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

exhibit opening

13 | Jun
09:00AM
13 | Jun
09:00AM

conference

Beyond Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Studying American Jews (Day 3)

The AJHS Biennial Scholars Conference, chaired by Beth Wenger and Jeffrey Shandler, is a pioneering effort to broaden the scope of American Jewish History scholarship by incorporating perspectives from other fields and disciplines. Cutting-edge research presented by the leading scholars on American Jews. Visit www.ajhs.org for more information.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

conference

12 | Jun
09:00AM
12 | Jun
09:00AM

conference

Beyond Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Studying American Jews (Day 2)

The AJHS Biennial Scholars Conference, chaired by Beth Wenger and Jeffrey Shandler, is a pioneering effort to broaden the scope of American Jewish History scholarship by incorporating perspectives from other fields and disciplines. Cutting-edge research presented by the leading scholars on American Jews. Visit www.ajhs.org for more information.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

conference

12 | Jun
07:30PM
12 | Jun
07:30PM

panel discussion

The Uses of History in American Jewish Fiction: A Conversation with novelists Dara Horn and Anna Solomon

Novelists Dara Horn and Anna Solomon will discuss their works of historical fiction that focus on aspects of American Jewish life with moderator Josh Lambert. Both authors will read briefly from their work and discuss how they interrelate historical sources with the imaginative work of writing fiction.

Dara Horn is the author of three novels, including All Other Nights, published in 2009 by W.W. Norton, which was selected as an Editors' Choice in the New York Times Book Review.

Anna Solomon is the author of several short stories; her first novel, The Little Bride, published in 2011 by Riverhead Books, was selected as one of 2011's Best Adult Books for Teens by the School Library Journal.

Josh Lambert is the academic director of the National Yiddish Book Center and a Visiting Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

panel discussion

11 | Jun
10:30AM
11 | Jun
10:30AM

conference

Beyond Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Studying American Jews (Day 1)

The AJHS Biennial Scholars Conference, chaired by Beth Wenger and Jeffrey Shandler, is a pioneering effort to broaden the scope of American Jewish History scholarship by incorporating perspectives from other fields and disciplines. Cutting-edge research presented by the leading scholars on American Jews. Visit www.ajhs.org for more information.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

conference

11 | Jun
07:30PM
11 | Jun
07:30PM

conversation

Filming American Jewish History: A Conversation with Documentary Filmmaker Aviva Kempner

Documentary filmmaker Aviva Kempner will discuss her work making films about American Jews in a public conversation with University of Pennsylvania Professor Beth Wenger. Kempner will reflect on her choices of subjects and the ways that she uses historical sources in her films. She will also preview her current film-in-progress on the Rosenwald Schools. This film explores the life and work of Julius Rosenwald, the son of German-Jewish immigrants who became president and chairman of Sears, Roebuck & Co, focusing particularly on his effort to create more than 5000 schools for poor, rural African-American children in the South.

Aviva Kempner's films include The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg and Yoo-Hoo Mrs. Goldberg. Her films investigate non-stereotypical images of Jews in history, focusing on lesser-known stories of Jewish heroes. She founded the Washington Jewish Film Festival in 1989 and writes film criticism and feature articles for numerous publications, including The Boston Globe, The Forward, Washington Jewish Week and The Washington Post.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

conversation

10 | Jun
02:00PM
10 | Jun
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

What, Where and How to Search for Displaced Persons

Speaker: Valery Bazarov

This lecture by Valery Bazarov, Director of the HIAS Family History and Location Services, will describe the content and significance of the case records held by the International Tracing Service (ITS), Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS), and US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), and will consider the ways in which the Holocaust-era records of those agencies complement each other. The presentation will be illustrated with specific cases.

The formal program will be preceded, from 12:30 to 1:30, by an informal meeting for the sharing of genealogical research stories and questions.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

05 | Jun
03:00PM
05 | Jun
03:00PM

racolin memorial lecture

Destructive Creators: Jewish Immigrant Bankers, the Business of Mass Migration and the Failures that Reshaped American Finance, 1914

Rebecca Kobrin, Columbia University, explores how Jewish immigrant banks were central to the daily economic lives of thousands of Yiddish speaking Jews on the Lower East Side and in Brownsville. These 'banks' not only helped East European Jews book passage to the United States, but they helped them engage and negotiate American capitalism, by providing them with loans, savings accounts, and means to transfer money abroad.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

racolin memorial lecture

04 | Jun
06:00PM
04 | Jun
06:00PM

roundtable discussion

Annals of Communism: Soviet Archives from Secrecy to Openness? Recent Electronic Publications and Databases of Russia and the USA on Soviet History

A round table discussion on the topic of recent Russian and American electronic publications and databases on Soviet history, featuring A.K. Sorokin (Director of the Russian State Archive of Social and Political History), S.V. Mironenko (Director of the State Archive of Russian Federation), Yu. S. Pivovarov (Director of the Institute for Scientific Information on Social Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences), moderated by Jonathan Brent (Executive Director of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, founder of the “Annals of Communism” series, and former Editorial Director of Yale University Press). The evening will also feature a presentation of the "Documents of Soviet History" Internet Portal, a project of Yale University Press.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

roundtable discussion

04 | Jun
07:30PM
04 | Jun
07:30PM

exhibit opening and reception

The Jews of Tsarist Russia

The exhibition The Jews of Tsarist Russia presents for the first time in the United States scarcely known and unique pages of the photographic record of Jewish life in Tsarist Russia from the collections of the Russian Museum of Ethnography in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, Russian Museum of Ethnography, the Russian American Foundation, and the Russian Ministry of Culture, under the auspices of the Russian Heritage Festival

exhibit opening and reception

03 | Jun
11:30AM
03 | Jun
11:30AM

theater

Jewish Books Cooking

The Center for Jewish History launches its new Summer Sundays at the Center programming for families with the production of Jewish Books Cooking, a new children’s musical. The show is based on a dozen popular children’s books, with a group of young actors interpreting select scenes with original musical arrangements in vaudeville-style skits. Perfect for all ages.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History with the generous support of The Covenant Foundation

theater

03 | Jun
03:00PM
03 | Jun
03:00PM

concert

Music in Our Time: 2012

A felicitous blend of contemporary styles and a variety of vocal and instrumental combinations. With a rarely-heard piece by Leonard Bernstein (Piano Trio, for piano violin and cello); and works by Hugo Weisgall (selections from The Golden Peacock, a delicious set of Yiddish songs for soprano); Ben Yarmonlinsky (Menasche Songs, for baritone, set to texts by the late Samuel Menashe, who received the first “Neglected Master” award); Jody Rockmayer (Marsyas for harp and oboe, based on the Greek myth of Marsyas finding the aulos (oboe) created by Athena); and the award-winning composer Mark Zuckerman (Managerie for soprano, flute and piano, based on texts by the French poet Robert Desnos), this promises to be a stimulating and enjoyable program.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

01 | Jun
12:00PM
01 | Jun
12:00PM

max weinreich center: yiddish language seminar

Der krumer shpigl: kartuns vos vayzn di pitshevkes fun tvishn-milkhomedikn yidishn lebn

Speaker: Eddy Portnoy, Rutgers University

This is a Yiddish language event.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

max weinreich center: yiddish language seminar

30 | May
07:30PM
30 | May
07:30PM

concert

Piano Fest

Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky of the Phoenix Chamber Ensemble and a guest pianist, Ellen Braslavsky, will perform music for one and two pianos by J.S.Bach, Robert Schumann, Franz Schubert, Witold Lutoslavsky, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Astor Piazzola and Inessa Zaretsky.

This program is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

28 | May
28 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, May 28th for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

27 | May
27 | May

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, May 27th for Shavuot.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

22 | May
06:30PM
22 | May
06:30PM

book discussion

Walther Rathenau: The Life of Weimar’s Fallen Statesman

Shulamit Volkov will discuss her new book, Walther Rathenau: The Life of Weimar’s Fallen Statesman (Yale University Press, 2012). This deeply informed biography tells of a man who—both thoroughly German and unabashedly Jewish—rose to leadership in the German War-Ministry Department during the First World War, and later to the exalted position of foreign minister in the early days of the Weimar Republic. His achievement was unprecedented—no Jew in Germany had ever attained such high political rank. But Rathenau's success was marked by tragedy: within months he was assassinated by right-wing extremists seeking to destroy the newly formed Republic. Drawing on Rathenau's papers and on a depth of knowledge of both modern German and German-Jewish history, Shulamit Volkov creates a finely drawn portrait of this complex man who struggled with his Jewish identity and who treasured his "otherness." Volkov also places Rathenau in the dual context of Weimar Germany and of Berlin’s financial and intellectual elite. Above all, she illuminates the complex social and psychological milieu of German Jewry in the period before Hitler’s rise to power.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

book discussion

22 | May
07:00PM
22 | May
07:00PM

film screening and discussion

The Dybbuk (Poland, 1937)

Boundaries separating the natural from the supernatural dissolve as ill-fated pledges, unfulfilled passions, and untimely deaths ensnare two families in a tragic labyrinth of spiritual possession. The Dybbuk is based on the celebrated play of the same name by S. An-sky written during the turbulent years of 1912-1917 and inspired by An-sky’s ethnographic research of Jews living in the Polish-Russian countryside just before World War I. Yiddish, newly remastered with English subtitles by the National Center for Jewish Film.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

film screening and discussion

20 | May
02:00PM
20 | May
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

Jewish Chocolate Radar (Choco-Dar) Through the Generations

Speaker: Rabbi Deborah R. Prinz

The next time you pick up a piece of chocolate, consider that you are partaking in an aspect of Jewish history. There are some surprising Jewish connections with chocolate, including Jews in the early chocolate trade and early Jewish chocolate makers. Rabbi Prinz's forthcoming book, Jews on the Chocolate Trail, uniquely melds a popularity of chocolate with a fascination about Judaism.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

17 | May
06:00PM
17 | May
06:00PM

panel discussion

Trail of the Magic Bullet: Judaism and Bioethics

Is there just one Jewish approach to bioethics? A distinguished panel of leading Jewish clergy, scholars, and medical practitioners bring different perspectives and approaches to this question.

Exhibition Viewing 6pm
Program 6:30 pm

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

panel discussion

14 | May
03:00PM
14 | May
03:00PM

samuel and flora weiss research lecture

Creation of a Survivor Voice: Radio and Early Holocaust Narratives

Rachel Deblinger, University of California, Los Angeles. This paper, largely based on radio broadcasts accessed through the YIVO Sound Collection, will examine eyewitness accounts of Nazi persecution as they aired on radio programs in early postwar America. The paper seeks to explain how the voiced representations of Holocaust narratives constructed an identity of Holocaust survivors in postwar America.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

samuel and flora weiss research lecture

14 | May
04:00PM
14 | May
04:00PM

lecture

Genealogist Stephen P. Morse to Discuss 1940 Census

Internationally renowned genealogist Stephen P. Morse will present a two-part talk on genealogy at the Center for Jewish History on May 14 from 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. The program launches the Center's new Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute’s public programming series.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

lecture

14 | May
07:00PM
14 | May
07:00PM

panel discussion/performance

Bay mayn mames shtibele: The Women’s Art of Yiddish Folksong

An exploration of the Yiddish folksong tradition as preserved through the remarkable artistry of women singers in Eastern Europe and the United States. Itzik Gottesman of the Yiddish Forverts newspaper will lead a panel including renowned folksinger/researcher Michael Alpert, NEA National Heritage Fellow Beyle Schaechter-Gottesman and CTMD Artistic Director Ethel Raim as they present and discuss the work of leading folksingers such as Lifshe Schaechter-Widman, Bronya Sakina and other important exponents of the tradition. Made possible through support provided by the Keller-Shatanoff Foundation, the Atran Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. A reception will follow the event.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, Center for Traditional Music and Dance’s An-sky Institute for Jewish Culture, Brooklyn Arts Council’s Half the Sky Festival: Brooklyn Women in Traditional Performance

panel discussion/performance

11 | May
12:00PM
11 | May
12:00PM

yiddish language seminar

A kuk af Yosl Birshteyns "tvishn eylbertn" un zayn breytern politishn kontekst

Speaker: Adi Mahalel, Columbia University

This is a Yiddish language event.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

yiddish language seminar

10 | May
07:00PM
10 | May
07:00PM

concert

Sidney Krum Young Artists Concert Series: Spring Concert 2012

This performance of rarely heard masterworks from the Sidney Krum Jewish Music and Yiddish Theater Memorial Collections at YIVO is performed by gifted young artists from premier conservatories. The Spring Concert presented the great masterpiece of Jewish music, “Shlomo”, a Hebrew rhapsody for cello by Ernest Bloch. The program also included works for piano, cantorial music, and folk songs.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

concert

09 | May
06:00PM
09 | May
06:00PM

lecture

Autobiography and Biography: Herzl, Freud, and Stefan Zweig

How reliable are autobiographical works and biographical studies for historical work? Professor Mark Gelber (Ben-Gurion University) will discuss Stefan Zweig’s brilliant but problematic depictions of Herzl (and Zionism) and Freud (psychoanalysis, anti-Semitism, and Jewish survival) in his late autobiographical work written predominantly during the period of his American exile, The World of Yesterday (1942). Rescheduled from September 19, 2011.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

lecture

09 | May
06:00PM
09 | May
06:00PM

curator's tour

Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine 1860?1960

Join curator Josh Feinberg for an in-depth tour of this groundbreaking exhibition.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

07 | May
09:00AM
07 | May
09:00AM

conference

Jews and the Left (Day 2)

Since the 19th century, Jews have played prominent roles in a variety of leftist political movements. At the same time, associations between Jews and communism have been a frequent leitmotif of anti-Semitic thinking. While the political Left often spoke out against anti-Semitism and promised Jews tolerance and an end to distinctions between Jews and non-Jews, specific, prominent, leftists espoused anti-Semitic ideas. In addition, Jews cultivated their own, uniquely Jewish, socialist parties and ideologies. In recent years, the relationship between Jews and the Left has been further complicated by left-wing opposition to the State of Israel and debates about the extent to which this opposition bleeds into outright anti-Semitism. YIVO, in association with AJHS, will bring together historians, political scientists, philosophers, and journalists from Europe, Israel, and America to discuss some of the important topics pertaining to the relationship between Jews and the Left. Visit www.yivo.org for the full conference schedule.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

conference

06 | May
09:00AM
06 | May
09:00AM

conference

Jews and the Left (Day 1)

Since the 19th century, Jews have played prominent roles in a variety of leftist political movements. At the same time, associations between Jews and communism have been a frequent leitmotif of anti-Semitic thinking. While the political Left often spoke out against anti-Semitism and promised Jews tolerance and an end to distinctions between Jews and non-Jews, specific, prominent, leftists espoused anti-Semitic ideas. In addition, Jews cultivated their own, uniquely Jewish, socialist parties and ideologies. In recent years, the relationship between Jews and the Left has been further complicated by left-wing opposition to the State of Israel and debates about the extent to which this opposition bleeds into outright anti-Semitism. YIVO, in association with AJHS, will bring together historians, political scientists, philosophers, and journalists from Europe, Israel, and America to discuss some of the important topics pertaining to the relationship between Jews and the Left. Visit www.yivo.org for the full conference schedule.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

conference

02 | May
06:00PM
02 | May
06:00PM

artist's tour

Silk Stones - Works by Rochelle Rubinstein

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

02 | May
06:30PM
02 | May
06:30PM

discussion

Jews in Early Modern Europe: A Day-to-Day Perspective

Jewish expulsion from Spain and other parts of Western Europe in the late 1400s ironically initiated a “golden age” for Jewish economic life. Jewish merchants living under Ottoman Muslim rule sparked the creation of international networks of maritime and overland commerce, leading to the restoration of Jews to lands from which they had long been excluded, and eventually to the acquisition of citizenship rights, starting in the late 18th century. Join us for a fascinating conversation about the fabric of daily life in that early modern period, with glimpses of how Jews transacted business, negotiated lawsuits, and conducted their everyday activities. Participants: Jay Berkovitz (University of Massachusetts Amherst, CJH 2011-12 National Endowment for the Humanities Scholar), Francesca Trevillato (Yale University), Debra Kaplan (Yeshiva University), Jonathan Karp (SUNY Binghamton, Executive Director, American Jewish Historical Society), Moderator.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

discussion

02 | May
06:30PM
02 | May
06:30PM

lecture

From Dream to Reality: What is Life Really Like for Ethiopian Jews in 2012?

Award-winning Ethiopian-Israeli visionary and social entrepreneur Asher Elias presents an informed look at the challenges and opportunities currently facing the Ethiopian Israeli community today. Beginning with an overview of the "Dream" while in Ethiopia through the enchanting historical archives at the AJHS - and then fast-forwarding to the situation today, Asher Elias will take you from the "Dream of a Thousand Years" to an analysis of the disturbing disparities of life in Israel for Ethiopian Jews today. With introduction by Susan Pollack.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and Friends of Ethiopian Jews

lecture

01 | May
06:00PM
01 | May
06:00PM

dramatic reading

"Ghosts in Princeton", a Play by Daniel Kehlmann

Daniel Kehlmann introduced this special reading of his first play, “Ghosts in Princeton” in English translation. The play is about the Viennese mathematician Kurt Gödel (1906-1978), who by age 24 revolutionized the logic of mathematics. After the Nazis took over Austria in 1938, Gödel and his wife Adele emigrated to Princeton where he joined his good friend Albert Einstein at the Institute for Advanced Study. In “Ghosts of Princeton,” a play of facts, fiction and philosophy, Kehlmann follows the giant footsteps of Gödel and Adele on their journey from Vienna to Princeton. Breakthrough thinking, brilliant logic and a self-destructive rationalism characterized Gödel’s remarkable history.

Leo Baeck Institute and Goethe-Institut New York are extremely grateful to Deutsche Telekom for its support of this program. Special thanks also to Ambassador Peter Wittig and Huberta von Voss Wittig.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and the Goethe-Institut New York

dramatic reading

30 | Apr
03:00PM
30 | Apr
03:00PM

heifetz memorial lecture

Sholem Aleichem, Joseph Achron, and the Music of Stempenyu

Joshua Walden, Johns Hopkins University. Sholem Aleichem's 1888 novel Stempenyu tells the story of an itinerant klezmer violinist in the Eastern European shtetl. This paper explores the role of music in Stempenyu, and examines composer Joseph Achron’s score for Maurice Schwartz’s 1929 stage adaptation, showing how this tale was adapted for audiences across the diaspora.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

heifetz memorial lecture

29 | Apr
11:00AM
29 | Apr
11:00AM

symposium

New York City and the Jews

New York City has been home to more Jews than any other city in the United States. Over the years, countless observers—from poets to politicians—have considered New York a “Jewish City.” But what exactly does that idea mean? How have Jews shaped New York? And how has America’s largest city molded the Jews? Join us on Sunday, April 29, for a day of discussion on the remarkable synergy between this great people and this great city. Visit www.cjh.org/nyc for more information.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society, Scholars Working Group on Jews and New York City in collaboration with the Goldstein-Goren Institute at New York University

symposium

25 | Apr
04:00PM
25 | Apr
04:00PM

prins fellowship seminar

Modern and Zionist: The Meanings of Zionism for the New Jewish Woman in Interwar Poland

During the interwar period in Poland, many young Jewish women who were born before the outbreak of World War I started to embrace modern, feminist, and nationalistic ideologies, very much like their Polish analogues. Dr. Jolanta Mickute, Prins Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow, addresses the responses that this young, interwar generation of Jewish women had to Zionist ideology. In particular, Mickute explores Zionist women’s political structures and discourses on culture, ethnicity, and sexuality. While building a broader picture of Jewish women in interwar Poland, her analysis engages with points of intersection among this Zionist cohort, the Polish state, Polish-Jewish society at large, and ethnic Polish women.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

prins fellowship seminar

24 | Apr
07:00PM
24 | Apr
07:00PM

film and discussion

Yiddish Writers Monologues: Yosl Birshteyn 'A Kiss in Jerusalem'

YOSL BIRSHTEYN (1920-2003) may be the last Jewish writer to have inhabited a creative life in two Jewish national languages: Yiddish and Hebrew. Not only did he write and publish in each, but he also mastered the art of storytelling in both as well. He never simply spoke; he was a raconteur whose every anecdote was a performance. In 1994, towards the end of his career, Birshteyn gave an in-depth video interview about his life and work to the Editor in chief of the Forverts, Boris Sandler, from which this film is drawn.

Yosl Birshteyn’s daughter, Hanna Inbar, introduced the film.
Chava Lapin, former Educational Director of Workmen’s Circle, moderated the discussion.

A Kiss in Jerusalem is part of a series of video Yiddish Writers’ Monologues. Each DVD features contemporary footage shot on locations from Jerusalem and Rehovot to Vilna, incorporating archival footage and intimate photos from the writers’ personal archives. This series provides an opportunity to eavesdrop on spoken Yiddish as articulated by native Yiddish writers, with subtitles in English.

The DVD Series is funded by the Forward Association, the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, the Atran Foundation and Beth Shalom Aleichem (Israel).

Presented by: YIVO Institute for Jewish History and Yiddish Forward

film and discussion

23 | Apr
06:00PM
23 | Apr
06:00PM

lecture

Trail of the Magic Bullet: Jewish Women and the Encounter with Modern Medicine

Join Rakefet Zalashik (Temple University) for an enlightening presentation of and discussion around the experience of Jewish women who found, internationally, new careers, social roles and identities through their engagement with modern medicine.

Exhibition Viewing 6:00pm
Program 6:30pm

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

lecture

22 | Apr
03:00PM
22 | Apr
03:00PM

book launch

HIAS@130: 1+30, the Best of myStory

Celebrate HIAS' 130th Anniversary and join us for the festivities to launch HIAS' new book HIAS@130: 1+30, the Best of myStory. HIAS facilitated the immigration of thousands of Russian Jews from the Soviet Union, and showcases their moving stories on its famous myStory page. Featuring readings from the book, a musical interlude, and light refreshments.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and HIAS

book launch

19 | Apr
07:00PM
19 | Apr
07:00PM

lecture

From the YIVO Archives: The Unknown Memoir of Tuvia Bielski

This series highlights the treasures of the YIVO Archives, with Barbara Harshav and Robert Bielski.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

18 | Apr
04:00PM
18 | Apr
04:00PM

curator's tour

Trail of the Magic Bullet: The Jewish Encounter with Modern Medicine 1860?1960

Join curator Josh Feinberg for an in-depth tour of this groundbreaking exhibition.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

18 | Apr
06:00PM
18 | Apr
06:00PM

artist's tour

Silk Stones - Works by Rochelle Rubinstein

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

artist's tour

17 | Apr
06:30PM
17 | Apr
06:30PM

ajhs spring speaker series

Harry S. Truman and the Jews

The concluding lecture in our series on Presidents and the Jews focuses on our 33rd President. Truman’s role as a key supporter of Jewish Statehood is well known, but what of Truman’s private views on Jews? Renowned historian Ronald Radosh has uncovered new sources that shed light on Truman’s Jewish connections as well as his sometimes less than savory attitudes toward American Jews. This path-breaking lecture reveals a Truman different from the one you thought you knew.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

ajhs spring speaker series

15 | Apr
11:00AM
15 | Apr
11:00AM

book event

Second-hand Book Sale

The partners of the Center for Jewish History will host a second-hand book sale. The sale will include duplicate copies and “out-of-scope” work from the partners’ collections. Discover used books about Jewish and general history, literature, art, biographies, religion and other related topics. Authors include Sholem Aleichem, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Itzik Manger, Chaim Grade and many others. All proceeds will benefit each organization’s book acquisition fund. In addition, the participating partners—American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research—will be selling discounted and regular publications from their organizations.

Paperbacks will be on sale for $1, hardbacks for $3. 4 hardcover books for $10. Cash only.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

book event

13 | Apr
13 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Friday, April 13th for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

12 | Apr
12 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center will close at 2:00pm on Thursday April 12 for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

08 | Apr
08 | Apr

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, April 8th for Passover.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

holidays and closures

05 | Apr
03:00PM
05 | Apr
03:00PM

tell memorial lecture

The Transnational Vilna Troupe(s): A New Look at a Yiddish Theater Landmark

Debra Caplan, Harvard University, considers the role of international travel, correspondence, touring, and artistic exchange in the Vilna Troupe's extraordinary rise to success. It will shed light on the complex networks of artistic cross-fertilization that inspired the Vilna Troupe's theatrical innovations in landmark productions like The Dybbuk.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

tell memorial lecture

04 | Apr
06:00PM
04 | Apr
06:00PM

lecture/book presentation

Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power by Andrew Nagorski

In his latest book, author Andrew Nagorski chronicles Hitler’s rise to power and Germany’s march to the abyss as seen through the eyes of Americans, including diplomats, military, expats, visiting authors, and Olympic athletes. He taps a rich vein of personal testimonies to create a gripping narrative full of surprising twists and a startlingly fresh perspective on this heavily dissected era. Nagorski will speak about his book, from Simon and Schuster.

Presented by: Leo Baeck Institute and the American Council on Germany

lecture/book presentation

02 | Apr
07:00PM
02 | Apr
07:00PM

lecture

The Politics of Memory in Contemporary Eastern Europe

In Eastern Europe, the way history is remembered, forgotten, or ignored shapes modern-day political and social issues. Many in Eastern Europe today wish to ignore, forget, or erase from history both the Holocuast and the presence of Jews before World War II. Dr. Leonidas Donskis (Member of the European Parliament for Lithuania) will discuss the dangers of the willful forgetting of history, which he describes as the final blow dealt to the victims of the Holocaust.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

01 | Apr
03:00PM
01 | Apr
03:00PM

discussion/exhibition

Love, Loss & Legacy: Isidor and Ida Straus and the Titanic

The American Jewish Historical Society and the Straus Historical Society recount the dramatic story of the Strauses on the Titanic. Speakers include both descendants of Macy’s owner Isidor and Ida, as well as Steven Biel, Professor of History at Harvard University. A wine, cheese and dessert reception will follow the program, as well as a display of rare objects from the Straus Titanic collection. The newly republished 100th Anniversary Edition of the Autobiography of Isidor Straus, with inscription by the editor and Straus descendants, will be available for sale at the event for $40 (cash only).

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and The Straus Historical Society

discussion/exhibition

29 | Mar
06:30PM
29 | Mar
06:30PM

book discussion

Recovering Lost Voices of the Sephardic Past: A Discussion with Professors Aron Rodrigue and Sarah Abrevaya Stein, Moderated by Sara Ivry

In celebration of the release of A Jewish Voice from Ottoman Salonika: The Ladino Memoir of Sa'adi Besalel a-Levi, join a conversation with two leading scholars of Sephardic history about the quest for lost sources and perspectives on the Judeo-Spanish past. As they describe the experience of uncovering, translating, and interpreting the first Ladino memoir known to be written, Professors Stein (UCLA) and Rodrigue (Stanford) will reflect on the challenges and rewards of writing Sephardic history. Sara Ivry, host of Vox Tablet, the weekly podcast of Tablet Magazine, moderator.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and American Sephardi Federation

book discussion

28 | Mar
07:30PM
28 | Mar
07:30PM

concert

The Magic of French and Spanish Chamber Music

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing chamber music by Maurice Ravel, Cesar Franck, Joaquin Turina and Enrique Granados - all influenced by Moorish music and its heir - Spanish popular music.

This program is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

27 | Mar
06:30PM
27 | Mar
06:30PM

ajhs spring speaker series

Teddy Roosevelt and the Jews

Dr. Lance Sussman, Senior Rabbi of Reform Congregation Keneseth Israel in Elkins Park, PA, teacher of Jewish History at Temple University. Lectures on Harry S. Truman and Ronald Reagan to follow this Spring.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

ajhs spring speaker series

26 | Mar
03:00PM
26 | Mar
03:00PM

dina abramowicz emerging scholar lecture

YIVO's Aspirantur and the Training of Jewish Scholars in Eastern Europe on the Eve of the Holocaust

Natalia Aleksiun, Touro College. During the Second Polish Republic the history of East European Jews became a well-defined field. At the center of it was the Dr. Tsemakh Shabad Aspirantur (graduate school), which brought together Jewish academics and helped to train the next generation of scholars. In this lecture, Professor Aleksiun explores this unique program in the context of the Jewish community in Vilna and in comparison with other Jewish centers.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

dina abramowicz emerging scholar lecture

25 | Mar
02:00PM
25 | Mar
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust

Speaker: Ellen Cassedy

This program will be preceded by a brief presentation on "1940 Census Search Hints" given by Avrum Geller. The regular program will be presented by Ellen Cassedy who will discuss her recently published book about her journey to Lithuania to study Yiddish and connect with her Jewish forebears.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

22 | Mar
12:30PM
22 | Mar
12:30PM

roundtable discussion

Psychoanalysts on the Left and the Far Left

Jonathan Brent, Arnold Richards, and others discuss the cohort of psychoanalysts in the United States who belonged to the Communist Party in the 1930s and 1940s, and their impact on both clinical practice and theory.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

roundtable discussion

22 | Mar
07:00PM
22 | Mar
07:00PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Closing Night: IRAQ n' ROLL

Writer/Director: Gili Gaon, Israel 2011, 52 mins. Hebrew & Arabic w/English subtitles.
Israeli rock musician, Dudu Tassa, calls forth the voices of his family heritage when he takes on the original music of his grandfather, one of the leading musicians in early 20th century Iraq, creating a musical dialogue between the generations. Salah and Daud Al-kweiti (Dudu’s uncle and grandfather) were musicians in 1930s Iraq and were considered to be the creators of modern Iraqi music. After immigrating to Israel in 1951, they remained on the margins of Israeli culture, performing at weddings and Bar Mitzvahs, and operating a small kitchen utensils store to make a living. Crushed by circumstances, they forbade their children to become musicians or even learn to play an instrument. This is a story of the power of music and its ability to heal.

Performance with Yair Dalal and a reception follows. Ticket includes film, concert and reception.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

21 | Mar
03:30PM
21 | Mar
03:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

MABUL

Director: Guy Nattiv. Israel/Canada/France/Germany 2011, 101 mins. Hebrew w/English subtitles
A highly perceptive look at a family living under a deluge of pressure. Everything is complicated in Yoni Rosko's life. He is almost 13, extremely small and desperate to grow taller before his approaching Barmitzvah. Miri (Ronit Elkabetz) and Gidi, his dysfunctional parents, are on the brink of divorce when Yoni's older brother, Tomer, an autistic boy, returns home when the institution he has been living in shuts down. Yoni becomes the unwilling caregiver, using the rituals of the Barmitzvah ceremony, and an abandoned boat as a life raft.

Michael Moshonov (Tomer) will be present.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

21 | Mar
06:30PM
21 | Mar
06:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

400 MILES TO FREEDOM

Director/Producer: Avishai Yeganyahu Mekonen &anp; Shari Rothfarb Mekonen. USA & Israel 2012, 60 mins. English, Hebrew and Amharic w/English subtitles.
In 1984, the Beta Israel, a secluded 2,5000 year-old community of observant Jews in the northern Ethiopian mountains, fled a dictatorship and began a secret and dangerous journey of escape. Avishai Mekonen, then a 10-year old boy, was among them. Here he breaks the 20-year silence around the brutal kidnapping he endured as a child in Sudan during his community’s exodus. In so doing the film explores issues of immigration and racial diversity in Judaism.

Post-screening discussion with Avishai Yeganyahu Mekonen and Shari Rothfarb Mekonen.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

21 | Mar
08:30PM
21 | Mar
08:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

OBSESSION

Director: Nissim Notrika. Israel, 2011, 94 mins. Hebrew w/English subtitles.
1968 - A woman’s journey into self-destruction and humiliation as a result of her husband’s infidelity. The story takes place in an old Sephardic neighborhood in Jerusalem. Six-year-old Micha does not speak, but he sees everything. Malka, his mother, uses every available method to win back her husband – from consultations with rabbis to witchcraft.

Post-screening discussion with the producer.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

20 | Mar
03:30PM
20 | Mar
03:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

400 MILES TO FREEDOM

Director/Producer: Avishai Yeganyahu Mekonen & Shari Rothfarb Mekonen. USA & Israel 2012, 60 mins. English, Hebrew and Amharic w/English subtitles.
In 1984, the Beta Israel, a secluded 2,5000 year-old community of observant Jews in the northern Ethiopian mountains, fled a dictatorship and began a secret and dangerous journey of escape. Avishai Mekonen, then a 10-year old boy, was among them. Here he breaks the 20-year silence around the brutal kidnapping he endured as a child in Sudan during his community’s exodus. In so doing the film explores issues of immigration and racial diversity in Judaism.

Post-screening discussion with Avishai Yeganyahu Mekonen.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

20 | Mar
07:00PM
20 | Mar
07:00PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

TINGHIR-JERUSALEM shown with IFRANE 2011

TINGHIR-JERUSALEM: ECHOES FROM THE MELLAH
Director: Kamal Hachkar. France/Morocco/Israel 2011, 52mins. French, Berber w/English subtitles.

Kamal Hachkar grew up in France with the idea that all Berbers were Muslims. Speaking with his grandparents he learned that some Berbers were Jewish and that in many a village, Muslims and Jews had lived together for a long time. His search led him to Israel where he met families originally from Tinghir who spoke of their lives there, and answered many of his questions. On meeting Jews of his generation, with origins in Tinghir, Kamal realizes that he is not alone in his desire to restore this buried part of their identities. He hopes that his generation will be able to acknowledge the bonds broken by history.

followed by

IFRANE 2011: The First Holocaust Conference in the Arab World
Director: Haim Shiran. Morocco 2011, 20 mins. French, English w/English subtitles.

The Muslim students of the Mimouna Club of Al-Akhawayn University in Morocco have been moved to explore the Holocaust, a taboo topic in the contemporary Arab world. Inspired by the Royal Proclamation of King Mohammed VI (March 2009), they created this context (with visiting American students, a Holocaust survivor, and leaders of KIVUNIM) within which to fully appreciate the heroic actions of King Mohammed V during the Vichy period, and to deepen their understanding of their Jewish past.

Post-screening discussion with filmmakers Kamal Hachkar and Haim Shiran, Peter Geffen, others to be announced. A video message from the students of the Mimouna Club will be shown.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

19 | Mar
04:00PM
19 | Mar
04:00PM

graduate seminar

Christianity in Music and Bach into the Synagogue: Jewish Wagnerians Respond

Adam J. Sacks examines why two prominent German-Jewish cultural figures dedicated the bulk of the their life's work to the advocacy of explicitly Christian sacred choral music in fin-de-siecle Berlin. New research in the holdings of the Leo Baeck Institute have uncovered material that sheds light on the relationship of Berlin Philharmonic Chorus founder Siegfried Ochs and his protégé, Berlin Doctors Chorus founder, Dr. Kurt Singer. Deeply influenced by both Richard Wagner's transformation of music and the legacy of the German Jewish Enlightenment, this case study presents an overlooked area of Jewish engagement with Christian music and culture in Central Europe. This presentation offers a new approach for understanding the intersection of modern European, German, Jewish, religious and music history.

Adam J. Sacks, CJH Cahnmann Foundation Graduate Fellow, PhD candidate at Brown University. Dr. David Sorkin, CUNY Graduate Center, responding. Dr. Jonathan Karp, Binghamton University, presiding.

Intended for an academic audience; space is limited.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

graduate seminar

19 | Mar
06:30PM
19 | Mar
06:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

MABUL

Director: Guy Nattiv. Israel/Canada/France/Germany 2011, 101 mins. Hebrew w/English subtitles
A highly perceptive look at a family living under a deluge of pressure. Everything is complicated in Yoni Rosko's life. He is almost 13, extremely small and desperate to grow taller before his approaching Barmitzvah. Miri (Ronit Elkabetz) and Gidi, his dysfunctional parents, are on the brink of divorce when Yoni's older brother, Tomer, an autistic boy, returns home when the institution he has been living in shuts down. Yoni becomes the unwilling caregiver, using the rituals of the Barmitzvah ceremony, and an abandoned boat as a life raft.

Michael Moshonov (Tomer) will be present.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

19 | Mar
08:30PM
19 | Mar
08:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

LITTLE SIMICO'S BIG FANTASY

Director: Arik Lubetzky. Israel 2011, 91 mins. Hebrew w/English subtitles.
Simico is a friendly, romantic thirty year old, loved by all. He’s engaged to Mazy who is planning their wedding. When Simico completes a film class, he becomes obsessed with the idea of making a film on the subject of strippers. He recruits the entire neighborhood to help make this fantasy come true and finds himself carried away on the adventure of a lifetime.

Adult content, partial nudity.

Presented by: the American Sephardi Federation

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
12:30PM
18 | Mar
12:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

THE FARHUD

Producers: Yitzhak Halutzi and Dr. Zvi Yehudah. The Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center. Israel 2010, 20 minutes w/English subtitles.
The pro-Nazi uprising in Baghdad, Iraq took place on the Jewish festival of Shavout in 1941. At least 137 Jews were killed and thousands injured. The Farhud was the culmination of anti-Jewish propaganda by Hitler, and was the death knell of the 2,600 year old community of Jews dating back to the destruction of the first Temple in Jerusalem. In 1948 with the formation of Israel, there were about 165,000 Jews in Iraq. Today, only a few are left.

Sponsored by The Sue and Leonard Miller Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies, University of Miami.

Post-screening discussion with Prof. Haim Shaked, Director of the Sue and Leonard Miller Center.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
01:30PM
18 | Mar
01:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

THE LAST JEWS OF LIBYA and Panel Discussion

Director: Vivienne Roumani-Denn. USA 2007, 50 mins. Hebrew, Italian, Arabic & English w/English subtitles.
The final decades of a centuries-old North African Sephardic Jewish community is seen through the lives of the Roumani family. Thirty-six thousand Jews lived in Libya at the end of World War II, today none remain. Based on the memoirs of the family's matriarch, Elise Roumani, and interviews with several generations of the Roumani family, plus rare archival film and photographs.

Panel Discussion: Looking at Libya and the region through a contemporary lens
Panelists: Vivienne Roumani-Denn, Prof. Mustapha Tlili, founder and director, Center for Dialogues, NYU and Richard Chesnoff, veteran Mideast correspondent.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
03:30PM
18 | Mar
03:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

THREE PROMISES shown with EMPTY BOXCARS

THREE PROMISES: THE STORY OF THE KALEFS OF BELGRADE
Directors: Edward Serotta, Wolfgang Els, Stefan Sablic. Vienna 2011, 18 mins.

During the Holocaust more than 90% of Serbia’s Jewish families were destroyed. This is the story of one -- Dona Bat Kalef and her daughters, Breda and Matilda. We are taken back into the Sephardic world of Jewish Belgrade before the war. Father Andrej Tumpej, a Catholic priest, hid Dona, Breda and Matilda under false names and had the girls sing in his choir every day to chase away the fear and hunger. After the war, Breda Kalef became Yugoslavia’s most famous mezzo soprano, and she saw to it that Father Tumpej would receive his Righteous Gentile award from Israel’s Holocaust Museum, Yad Vashem.

followed by

EMPTY BOXCARS
Director: Ed Gaffney. USA 2011, 82 mins.

Gaffney’s powerful film explores the dark side of Bulgarian anti-Semitism, as well as the saving of Bulgaria’s 48,000 Jews. Former president, Petar Stoyanov, pays tribute to the role of certain Bulgarians in saving the Jews. Yet he also notes the 11,000 murders on the occupied territories (Thrace and Macedonia). Post-screening discussion with Ed Gaffney and others to be announced.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
06:30PM
18 | Mar
06:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

HISTORY'S ULTIMATE NOMADS

Director: Shaul Keslassi. Netherlands, 2010, 30 mins. each w/English subtitles
Spain: For 1500 years, Jews on the Iberian Peninsula played a significant role in the flourishing civilizations created by Muslims and Christians alike, becoming the largest and most distinguished Jewish community in Europe.
Portugal: In 1492, more than 100,000 Jewish refugees from Spain crossed the border to Portugal. But four years later, a political maneuver taken by King Manuel of Portugal, had a destructive impact on the Jewish community, and the majority of Jews were baptized by force. The present Jewish community is one of the smallest in the world, but in many Portuguese veins runs Jewish blood.
Brazil: For most people, the connection between swinging, sensual Brazil and Judaism is a highly unlikely one. The fact is that Jews played a significant role in Brazilian history.

Post-screening discussion with Prof. Ronnie Perelis, Alacalay Asst. Professor of Sephardic Studies at Yeshiva University.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

18 | Mar
08:30PM
18 | Mar
08:30PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

THREE MOTHERS

Director: Dina Zvi-Riklis. Israel 2006, 106 mins. Hebrew, French & Arabic w/English subtitles.
Rose, Flora and Yasmin were born as a triplet 60-something years ago in Alexandria, Egypt. Their well-to-do parents gave them names of flowers and King Farouk of Egypt gave them his blessing. They come to recount their memoirs in order to tell their life story to Rose’s only daughter, Rachel. They are also searching for the son that one of them gave away for adoption under mysterious circumstances.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

17 | Mar
08:15PM
17 | Mar
08:15PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

MY LOVELY SISTER

Director: Marco Carmel. Israel, 2011, 91 mins. Hebrew and Moroccan w/subtitles.
A beautiful film about the love and hate between two sisters, based on a Moroccan Jewish folk tale. Rahma (Evelin Hagoel) hasn't spoken to her younger sister Marie (Reymonde Amsellem) for many years, seemingly because Marie broke their parents' hearts by marrying an Arab. But lurking below the surface is an unspoken history involving Marie and Rahma's hubby, Robert (Moshe Ivgy). WON: The Ophir Award for Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

17 | Mar
10:00PM
17 | Mar
10:00PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

OBSESSION

Director: Nissim Notrika. Israel, 2011, 94 mins. Hebrew w/English subtitles.
1968 - A woman’s journey into self-destruction and humiliation as a result of her husband’s infidelity. The story takes place in an old Sephardic neighborhood in Jerusalem. Six-year-old Micha does not speak, but he sees everything. Malka, his mother, uses every available method to win back her husband – from consultations with rabbis to witchcraft.

Post-screening discussion with the producer.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

16 | Mar
12:30PM
16 | Mar
12:30PM

lecture

As German is to the Germans: The Yiddishism of Khayim Zhitlovski (1865-1943)

Joshua Price, Yale University. Based on a critical translation of six of Khayim Zhitlovski's essays, this talk will explore the evolution of Zhitlovski's program for secular Yiddish culture before and after Czernowitz, his radical plan for American Jewry, and his approach to translation in theory and practice.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

15 | Mar
07:00PM
15 | Mar
07:00PM

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

Opening Night: FREE MEN (Les Hommes Libres)

Join us and celebrate the 16th NY Sephardic Jewish Film Festival! ASF is proud to present this year’s Pomegranate Award to filmmaker, Izza Genini and musician and educator, Yair Dalal.

FREE MEN (Les Hommes Libres)
Director: Ismael Ferroukhi. France, 2011. 99 mins. French w/English subtitles.
Paris 1942:  Inspired by true events, Free Men tells the story of a group of Muslim agents who fought for the French Resistance, and who used the Mosque of Paris as the base for operations that included rescuing Jewish fugitives and assassinating Vichy informants. Younes, a young Algerian immigrant, is peddling goods on the black market. When German occupation forces arrest him, he agrees to spy on the activities of the Mosque of Paris, whose rector is suspected of providing Jews with false papers.  Younes’ friendship with a cabaret singer, mixed up in various underground affairs, eventually pushes him to join the fight against the Germans.  Best Director from the Arab World for his excellent telling of an unknown and important story/Abu Dhabi Film Festival 2011.

Presented by: American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in cooperation with the Yeshiva University Museum

16th annual ny sephardic jewish film festival

11 | Mar
03:00PM
11 | Mar
03:00PM

concert

The Leo Kraft 90th Birthday Concert

Featuring some of New York's finest chamber music players, including clarinetists Charles Neidich and Ayako Oshima, violinist Renee Jolles, violist Mark Holloway, cellist Marcy Rosen, flutist Patricia Spenser, and pianist Morey Ritt, who will premiere Testimonium a new work Kraft has written for her.

Among other works on the program are Leo Kraft's Seven Hebrew Songs, to poems by medieval Hebrew poets, sung by American baritone Thomas Meglioranza, with David Jolley, horn and Konstantza Chernov, piano. Hailed for his "vocal distinction and expressive warmth" (The Boston Globe), Meglioranza is one of this country’s most sought-after and unique young singers. The program will conclude with Omaggio, in memory of Primo Levi.

Presented by: American Jewish Historical Society and American Society for Jewish Music

concert

08 | Mar
07:00PM
08 | Mar
07:00PM

book event

The Tragedy of Leon Trotsky

Joshua Rubenstein, Northeast Regional Director of Amnesty International USA, discusses his new book, Leon Trotsky: A Revolutionary's Life (Harvard University Press, 2011).

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book event

05 | Mar
03:00PM
05 | Mar
03:00PM

hort memorial lecture

The Wise Men of Chelm: Eastern European Jewry’s Favorite Folk Tradition and Its Origins

Ruth von Bernuth, University of North Carolina. Yiddish stories describing the intellectual limitations of the Khelemer naronim, the fools, or, in the more common ironic formulation, the wise men of Chelm, made their debut in Eastern Europe in the 19th century. This talk explores the most significant editions of the tales, as well as the German Schildbürgerbuch as their precursor.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

hort memorial lecture

05 | Mar
06:00PM
05 | Mar
06:00PM

gallery tour and reading

Diane Noomin's Graphic Details: Glitz-2-Go Book Launch

Comix legend Diane Noomin (Wimmen’s Comix, Twisted Sisters) makes an extremely rare personal appearance at Yeshiva University Museum to celebrate publication of Glitz-2-Go (Fantagraphics Books), the first-ever collection of her hilarious cartoons. View original panels of “Baby Talk”, one of Noomin’s most controversial cartoons, as part of “Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women” currently on view at YU Museum. Join us for a night of (mostly) true confessions from one of the pioneers of underground comics.

6:00: Gallery viewing of Graphic Details with the curators
6:45: Diane Noomin reads from her new book and answers audience questions

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum and Fantagraphics

gallery tour and reading

02 | Mar
01:00PM
02 | Mar
01:00PM

lecture and book signing

A City Within a City

Emanuel Berman, Samuel Kassow, Aviva Blumberg, Leon Hoffman

YIVO and IPBooks are please to invite you to a book launch and reception for City Within a City, a Polish memoir written by Basia Berman and her husband Dr. Adolf-Abraham Berman, about their extraordinary efforts to lead a secret network that rescued thousands of Jews in Warsaw during World War II.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture and book signing

01 | Mar
07:00PM
01 | Mar
07:00PM

book event

Anti-Jewish Violence in Eastern Europe

Although overshadowed in historical memory by the Holocaust, the anti-Jewish pogroms of the late 19th and early 20th centuries were at the time unrivaled episodes of ethnic violence. Anti-Jewish Violence: Rethinking the Pogrom in East European History is a collection of groundbreaking essays by researchers from Europe, the United States, and Israel that investigates the phenomenon of anti-Jewish violence, the local and transnational responses to pogroms, and instances where violence was averted. Focusing on the period from World War I through Russia's early revolutionary years, the studies include Poland, Ukraine, Belorussia, Lithuania, Crimea, and Siberia.

The evening features a panel of three highly distinguished scholars of Eastern Europe (Jane Burbank from New York University, Sam Kassow from Trinity College and Benjamin Nathans from the University of Pennsylvania), who will offer their reflections on the book and its implications. This will be followed by comments from the book editors (Jonathan Dekel-Chen from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, David Gaunt from Södertörn University, Stockholm, Natan Meir from Portland State University and Israel Bartal from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem).

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book event

29 | Feb
04:00PM
29 | Feb
04:00PM

prins fellowship seminar

The International Community and the Jewish Minority Question in the 'New Europe' during the 1930s

During the 1930s the region between Germany and the Soviet Union was inhabited by more than five million Jews whose possible migration to the west caused concerns in the international community. Dr. Jan Lanicek, Prins Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow, will address the existence of the 'Jewish minority question' in this East-Central European region and its treatment by the international community in the framework of the minority treaties signed in 1919. Dealing with the prelude to the Holocaust, the lecture offers a novel perspective on bystanders' responses to the persecution of the Jews during the 1930s.

Presented by: the Center for Jewish History

prins fellowship seminar

28 | Feb
03:00PM
28 | Feb
03:00PM

choseed memorial lecture

S. An-sky: Writing the History of Jews in the First World War

Polly Zavadivker, University of California at Santa Cruz. Between 1914 and 1917, the ethnographer, playwright, and relief worker S. An-sky spent months at a time on a remarkable mission to assist and document the experiences of Jews throughout Galicia and the Russian pale of Settlement. An-sky's war writing was important not only in its own right, but also because so many of its features--the authority of the witness, the use of oral testimony, and the perspectives of individuals--anticipated ways that the Holocaust would be written about 30 years later.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

choseed memorial lecture

28 | Feb
06:30PM
28 | Feb
06:30PM

ajhs spring speaker series

Abraham Lincoln and the Jews

Dr. Gary P. Zola, Executive Director of The Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives (AJA) and Professor of the American Jewish Experience at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (HUC-JIR) in Cincinnati. Lectures on Teddy Roosevelt (March 27) and Harry S. Truman and Ronald Reagan (April) to follow this Spring.

Presented by: the American Jewish Historical Society

ajhs spring speaker series

26 | Feb
10:00AM
26 | Feb
10:00AM

symposium

Talking About Jewish Women and Comics

This international symposium for academics, artists and enthusiasts is being presented in conjunction with the current exhibition Graphic Details: Confessional Comics by Jewish Women and will be chaired by Sarah Lightman (University of Glasgow), Tahneer Oksman (CUNY) and Dr. Amy Feinstein (independent scholar). Speakers include: Miriam Katin, Corinne Pearlman, Ariel Schrag, and Lauren Weinstein (Graphic Details artists); Professor Joanne Leonard (University of Michigan); and Dr. Heike Bauer (Birkbeck College, University of London).

For more information visit Symposium Forward.

Presented by: Yeshiva University Museum, The Jewish Daily Forward, The Stirling Maxwell Centre University of Glasgow, PhD Program in English at the CUNY Graduate Center, Center for Jewish Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), and McFarland

symposium

24 | Feb
12:00PM
24 | Feb
12:00PM

yiddish language seminar

Di Broder-zinger: forgeyer funem yidishn teater

Miryem-Khaye Seigel, Librarian, Dorot Jewish Division, New York Public Library

This is a Yiddish language event.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

yiddish language seminar

23 | Feb
07:00PM
23 | Feb
07:00PM

book event

Children and War

Leading Holocaust historian Debórah Dwork (Clark University) and Cathy A. Frierson (University of New Hampshire) present their research on the devastating impact of the Holocaust and Soviet Terror on children. A discussion followed, moderated by Jonathan Brent (YIVO Executive Director).

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

book event

20 | Feb
20 | Feb

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, February 20th for President's Day.

Presented by: (none)

holidays and closures

19 | Feb
02:00PM
19 | Feb
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

What They Saved-Pieces of a Jewish Past

Speaker: Nancy K. Miller

As a third-generation descendant of Eastern European Jews, Nancy K. Miller, Distinguished Professor of English and comparative literature at the CUNY graduate center, learns that the hidden lives of her ancestors reveal as much about the present as they do about the past. Her story takes us back to the world of pogroms and mass emigrations at the turn of the twentieth century.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open before the meeting at 11:00 a.m. for networking with other researchers and access to research materials and computers.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

13 | Feb
03:00PM
13 | Feb
03:00PM

drench memorial lecture

The Scorched Melting Pot: Yiddish Culture and American Communism after World War II

Jennifer Young, New York University. In the late 1940s, the International Workers Order (IWO)--a multi-ethnic fraternal order established by Jews active in the American Communist movement that equated injustices against racial, cultural and economic groups--began to champion the rights of ethnic cultures. Jewish leaders of the IWO created a powerful counter-example to what the IWO’s Director of Jewish Education Itshe Goldberg called the “scorched melting pot.” They argued for the continuing growth of the Yiddish language and Jewish culture, integrally American and yet uniquely Jewish.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

drench memorial lecture

09 | Feb
12:00PM
09 | Feb
12:00PM

podbrodz memorial lecture

Belarus in Berlin/Berlin in Belarus: Moyshe Kulbak’s Raysn and Meshiekh ben-Efrayim

Marc Caplan, Johns Hopkins University. The two major works that Moyshe Kulbak completed while living in Berlin in the early 1920s count as significant achievements in Yiddish modernism, each poised between nostalgia and apocalypse. In each instance, the author’s location in Berlin obligated him to represent his Belorussian homeland through a variety of distorted, experimental, and innovative perspectives.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

podbrodz memorial lecture

09 | Feb
07:00PM
09 | Feb
07:00PM

jewish music forum lecture/concert

The St. Petersburg School: The Music of Leo Zeitlin (1884-1930)

Professor Paula Eisenstein Baker with YIVO’s Sidney Krum Young Artists. Leo Zeitlin belonged to a group of early 20th- century young Russian-Jewish composers--mostly students of the St. Petersburg Conservatory and members of the Society for Jewish Folk Music in St. Petersburg--who were united by the idea of creating a Jewish national music movement. Fascinated by Zeitlin’s masterpiece “Eli Zion,” cellist Paula Eisenstein Baker started to investigate the life and works of this remarkable, but almost unknown, composer. The result was an important volume of chamber music coinciding with growing international interest in Jewish art music from early 20th-century Russia.

Presented by: American Society for Jewish Music and YIVO Institute for Jewish History

jewish music forum lecture/concert

07 | Feb
07:00PM
07 | Feb
07:00PM

lecture

The Jewish Antifascist Committee and Its Foreign Delegation

Gennady Estraikh. During World War II, Stalin’s ideologists decided to form a new organization called the Jewish Antifascist Committee (JAC), which became a structural unit of the Soviet Information Bureau, or Sovinformburo. The JAC published the newspaper Eynikayt and had contacts with foreign Jewish organizations. In 1943, the leading members of the JAC, Solomon Mikhoels and Itsik Fefer, visited the USA, Canada, Mexico, and England. This lecture will concentrate on the events around Mikhoels and Fefer's American sojourn.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

05 | Feb
02:00PM
05 | Feb
02:00PM

recital

The Loewenberg Piano Trio

The members of the Loewenberg Trio (Hannah Loewenberg-Harnest, piano, Ilya Movchan, violin, and Jordan Gregoris, cello), met at the Royal College of Music in London and played their debut concert at the Philharmonic Hall (‘Gasteig’) in Munich in November 2010. In their New York debut, they will perform works by Beethoven, Schumann, Shostakovich, and the Swiss-Jewish-American composer Ernest Bloch.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

recital

02 | Feb
03:00PM
02 | Feb
03:00PM

joseph kremen memorial lecture

The Broder Singers: Forerunners of the Yiddish Theater

Miryem-Khaye Seigel, Librarian, Dorot Jewish Division, New York Public Library. Broder singers were the first Yiddish performers to present music and drama in a secular setting beginning in the mid-19th century. This lecture explores the Broder singers’ history, repertoire, and style, and their relationship to Yiddish theater.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

joseph kremen memorial lecture

25 | Jan
07:30PM
25 | Jan
07:30PM

concert

Talents Entwined: The Friendship of Brahms and Dvorak

Phoenix Chamber Ensemble performing Brahms and Dvorak Piano Quintets.

This program is made possible through the generous support of Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Blavatnik.

Presented by: Center for Jewish History and Leo Baeck Institute

concert

24 | Jan
12:30PM
24 | Jan
12:30PM

lecture

The Works of Chaim Grade

Curt Leviant, noted novelist and translator.

Chaim Grade (1910, Vilna - 1982, NYC) is considered one of the greatest Yiddish poets and novelists of the 20th century. A close reading of selected pages from his novels, The Agunah and The Yeshiva, and his memoir, The Seven Little Lanes, will demonstrate his mastery in creating characters, and his skill in making ideas spring to life – all in the context of Yiddishkeyt and the conflicts within Jewish Vilna and other sites in Eastern Europe.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

22 | Jan
02:00PM
22 | Jan
02:00PM

world film premiere, discussion, dvd release

When Our Bubbas and Zeydas Were Young

Follow Di Shekhter-tekhter, accompanied by their Musical Director and father, Binyumen Schaechter, in this film premiere of their one-of-a-kind musical revue. Through a potpourri of characters from the Yiddish songbook, the dynamic duo inspires with themes that are universal and contemporary, such as young love, family relationships and class struggle. Academy Award®-nominated director Josh Waletzky incorporates interviews that provide an insight into this family and their unique mission to share Yiddish with the world.

Yiddish with English subtitles.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

world film premiere, discussion, dvd release

20 | Jan
11:00AM
20 | Jan
11:00AM

lecture

Topography of Terror: A New Documentation Center on a Historic Site

Between 1933 and 1945, the central institutions of Nazi persecution and terror were located on Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, just steps away from Potsdamer Platz in the heart of Berlin. In this building were the Secret State Police Office with its own “house prison,” the leadership of the SS and, during the Second World War, the Reich Security Main Office. Today, this house of terror is gone, but a permanent exhibition within the old foundations documents the apparatus of Nazi persecution. Dr. Andreas Nachama, director of the “Topography of Terror” documentation center, will discuss the exhibition’s new permanent home as well as an exhibition coming to the United Nations in New York.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

lecture

16 | Jan
16 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, January 16th for President's Day.

Presented by: (none)

holidays and closures

15 | Jan
02:00PM
15 | Jan
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

Researching and Restitution in the Austrian State Archives

Speaker: Hubert Steiner, Ph.D.

Joining us from Vienna, Austria is Dr. Hubert Steiner, who will speak about the Austrian State Archives and some of its holdings. Shortly after the Nazi occupation and annexation of Austria, a regulation on the declaration of Jewish property was enacted on April 26, 1938. These property registrations were the first steps in the systematic robbery of Jewish properties. Most of their files still exist and may be used for studying questions of economic or administrative history and also for genealogical research.

After the end of Nazi rule in 1945, property restitution laws were implemented. Ten years later a process for compensation for victims of political persecution began, and in the 1950s and 1960s relief funds were established. These files, which contain many personal biographies, especially about how people escaped and started new lives in exile, can now be viewed in the Austrian State Archives.

Since 1990 Dr. Steiner has been responsible for the identification of the properties taken from Austrian Jews who lived in the Nazi era. He works closely with the National Fund for Victims of National Socialism and the drop-in centers of the Jewish community.

The Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at CJH will be open before the meeting at 11:00 am for access to research materials and computers and networking with other researchers.

Presented by: Jewish Genealogical Society and the Ackman & the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute at Center for Jewish History

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

12 | Jan
06:00PM
12 | Jan
06:00PM

literary reading

Poetics of Place - Readings with Drunken Boat, Tin House and Conjunctions

Presented in conjunction with the current exhibition Prophecy of Place: Quintan Ana Wikswo featuring readings by the artist and other prominent fiction and poetry authors from renowned New York literary magazines such as Drunken Boat, Tin House and Conjunctions.

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

literary reading

11 | Jan
05:00PM
11 | Jan
05:00PM

curator's tour

Old and the New: Mark Podwal's Textiles for the Altneuschul in Prague

Presented by: the Yeshiva University Museum

curator's tour

10 | Jan
06:30PM
10 | Jan
06:30PM

panel discussion

Joseph Roth, A Life in Letters

Newly recognized as one of the 20th century’s great writers, Joseph Roth wrote beautifully original prose that is still reaching new audiences as new translations of his works appear, even 73 years after the author’s death. In January 2012, W.W. Norton will offer a new window on Roth’s life when it publishes poet Michael Hoffman’s translations of Roth’s letters, many of which are preserved in LBI archives. W.W. Norton and LBI present a panel discussion of Roth’s literary legacy moderated by W.W. Norton executive editor Robert Weil and featuring New Yorker fiction editor Willing Davidson, the author and record producer Anthony Heilbut, and author Fran Lebowitz.

Presented by: the Leo Baeck Institute

panel discussion

09 | Jan
06:30PM
09 | Jan
06:30PM

lecture

The History of YIVO

Cecile Kuznitz, Bard College

When YIVO was established in 1925 its founders envisioned an institute consisting of two parts: an "academy" for research and a "college" for teaching. Yet as YIVO pursued its work in collecting, researching, and publishing material on East European Jewry, a teaching component was only realized in 1934 with the creation of the Aspirantur program. This talk will consider YIVO's educational initiatives such as the Aspirantur, Pro-aspirantur, and teacher training courses in Vilna, as well as efforts to transplant them to New York in the wake of the Holocaust.

Presented by: the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

lecture

02 | Jan
02 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Monday, January 2nd.

Presented by: (none)

holidays and closures

01 | Jan
01 | Jan

holidays and closures

The Center is closed Sunday, January 1st. Happy New Year!

Presented by: (none)

holidays and closures