05 | Dec
06:30PM
05 | Dec
06:30PM

film

Reckonings

Reception begins at 6:00 PM, screening at 6:30 PM.

They met in secret to negotiate the unthinkable – compensation for the survivors of the largest mass genocide in history. Survivors were in urgent need of help, but how could reparations be determined for the unprecedented destruction and suffering of a people? Reckonings explores this untold true story set in the aftermath of the Holocaust.

Directed by award-winning filmmaker Roberta Grossman, Reckonings recounts the tense negotiations between Jewish and German leaders. Under the constant threat of violence, they forged ahead, knowing it would never be enough but hoping it could at least be an acknowledgement and a step towards healing.

Watch the trailer here.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 LBI/CJH members, seniors, students at lbi.org/events/reckonings/


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film

06 | Dec
12:00PM
06 | Dec
12:00PM

book talk

Exclusive Authors Series with Alan Verskin: A Vision of Yemen – Live on Zoom

In 1869, Hayyim Habshush, a Yemeni Jew, accompanied the European orientalist Joseph Halévy on his archaeological tour of Yemen. Twenty years later, Habshush wrote A Vision of Yemen, a memoir of their travels, that provides a vivid account of daily life, religion, and politics. More than a simple travelogue, it is a work of trickster-tales, thick anthropological descriptions, and reflections on Jewish–Muslim relations. At its heart lies the fractious and intimate relationship between the Yemeni coppersmith and the “enlightened” European scholar and the collision between the cultures each represents. The book thus offers a powerful indigenous response to European Orientalism.

This edition is the first English translation of Habshush’s writings from the original Judeo-Arabic and Hebrew and includes an accessible historical introduction to the work. The translation maintains Habshush’s gripping style and rich portrayal of the diverse communities and cultures of Yemen, offering a potent mixture of artful storytelling and cultural criticism, suffused with humor and empathy. Habshush writes about the daily lives of men and women, rich and poor, Jewish and Muslim, during a turbulent period of war and both Ottoman and European imperialist encroachment. With this translation, Alan Verskin recovers the lost voice of a man passionately committed to his land and people.

About the Author
Alan Verskin is Associate Professor of History at the University of Rhode Island.

Click here for more about the book.

Ticket Info: Free; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

06 | Dec
01:00PM
06 | Dec
01:00PM

book talk

The Women of Rothschild: The Untold Story of the World's Most Famous Dynasty - Online Event

In The Women of RothschildNatalie Livingstone reveals the role of women in shaping the legacy of the Rothschild dynasty, following the extraordinary lives of the Rothschild women from the dawn of the nineteenth century to the early years of the twenty-first.

As Jews in a Christian society and women in a deeply patriarchal family, they were outsiders. Excluded from the family bank, they forged their own distinct dynasty, becoming influential hostesses and talented diplomats, choreographing electoral campaigns, advising prime ministers, advocating for social reform, and trading on the stock exchange. Rothschild women helped bring down ghetto walls in early nineteenth-century Frankfurt, inspired some of the most remarkable cultural movements of the Victorian period, and in the mid-twentieth century burst into America, where they patronized Thelonious Monk and drag-raced through Manhattan with Miles Davis.

Natalie Livingstone, author and journalist, will be in conversation with Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/women-of-rothschild-2022-12-06 for a Zoom link


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book talk

06 | Dec
02:00PM
06 | Dec
02:00PM

discussion

Continuing Evolution: Yiddish Folksong Today – Live on Zoom

Mark Kligman (Director of the Lowell Milken Center) interviews Alex Weiser (Director of Public Programs, YIVO) about the YIVO festival, which took place in May 2022. Called Continuing Evolution: Yiddish Folksong Today, this music festival celebrated Yiddish folksong and featured performances of contemporary classical works reimagining Yiddish folksongs; classic compositions which engage with Yiddish folksongs; contemporary artists engaged with traditional Yiddish folk singing, and more. YIVO presented four concerts with over twelve premieres. Musical highlights will be shared.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Klezmer2022-Evolution for a Zoom link


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discussion

07 | Dec
07:00PM
07 | Dec
07:00PM

book talk

Irena Klepfisz: Her Birth and Later Years: New and Collected Poems, 1971-2021 – Live Event

For fifty years, Irena Klepfisz has written powerful, searching poems about relatives murdered during the war, recent immigrants, a lost Yiddish writer, a Palestinian boy in Gaza, and various people in her life. A trailblazing lesbian poet, child Holocaust survivor, and political activist whose work is deeply informed by socialist values, Klepfisz is a vital and individual American voice. Klepfisz's new book, Her Birth and Later Years: New and Collected Poems, 1971-2021, is the first and only complete collection of her work.

Join YIVO in collaboration with The Workers Circle for a conversation with Klepfisz and Rabbi Ellen Lippmann celebrating this new book.

Buy the book.

About the Speakers
Irena Klepfisz (Brooklyn, NY) recently retired after 22 years of teaching Jewish Women's Studies at Barnard College. She is the author of four books of poetry including Periods of StressKeeper of AccountsDifferent EnclosuresA Few Words in the Mother Tongue, and Dreams of an Insomniac (prose). She is one of the foremost advocates of the Yiddish language. A co-editor of The Tribe of Dina: A Jewish Women's Anthology, her work has appeared in In GevebSinister WisdomJewish CurrentsConditionsThe Manhattan ReviewThe Village VoiceThe Georgia ReviewPrairie SchoonerChicago Review, and more.

Ellen Lippmann is founder and rabbi emerita of Kolot Chayeinu/Voices of Our Lives, an LGBTQ-inclusive, nondenominational congregation in Brooklyn. She was ordained by the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Lippmann served as East Coast director of MAZON: A Jewish Response to Hunger, director of the Jewish Women's Program at the New 14th Street Y in Manhattan, the first social justice chair for the Women’s Rabbinic Network, and co-chair of T’ruah: The Rabbinic Call for Human Rights. Lippmann also founded the Soup Kitchen at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion and co-founded the Children of Abraham Peace Walk: Jews, Christians and Muslims Walking Together in Brooklyn in Peace.

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at yivo.org/Irena-Klepfisz


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book talk

11 | Dec
02:00PM
11 | Dec
02:00PM

yiddish club

YIVO Yiddish Club: Yiddish in Rio With Sonia Kramer - Online Event

Nu, vilst redn a bisele yidish? An event for Yiddish enthusiasts the world over, the YIVO Yiddish club is an informal monthly gathering to celebrate mame-loshn. Hosted by Shane Baker, sessions take place in English, and are liberally peppered with Yiddish. Each month Baker is joined by a different guest who discusses their work and a related Yiddish cultural theme. In the spirit of a club, sessions are held as interactive zoom meetings in which participants can see and hear one another. Each session includes ample time for audience questions, group discussion, and, time permitting, knock-down, drag-out arguments. Attendees need not know any Yiddish to attend, though some familiarity with the language is highly recommended.

This session features Sonia Kramer, Professor of Pontific Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro/PUC-Rio, and coordinator of the “Núcleo Viver com Yiddish [Lebn far Yiddish Center]: research, courses and cultural projects.” Kramer has worked for many years as a teacher and researcher of language, literature, and pedagogy, publishing extensively on these subjects. Since 2015, her work has focused on Yiddish including developing a musical group, workshops on Yiddish music and literature for children in Jewish schools, Yiddish courses, and doing research on women that wrote in Yiddish.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/YiddishClub15 for a Zoom link


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yiddish club

12 | Dec
07:00PM
12 | Dec
07:00PM

discussion

Jewish Soldiers in the Civil War: Discoveries from the Shapell Roster – Live Event & Livestreamed on Zoom

In partnership with the Shapell Manuscript Foundation, please join the Center for Jewish History for the launch of two new and exciting projects on the Jewish American experience in the American Civil War.  This in-person event will begin with a virtual tour of the Shapell Roster of Jewish Service in the American Civil War, an ongoing reappraisal of the military service of Jews who served in the Union and Confederate Armies and Navies from 1861 – 1865.  This introduction will be guided by Adrienne DeArmas (Director, Shapell Roster) and Professor Jonathan Sarna(Lincoln and the Jews: A History, co-authored with Benjamin Shapell). Meticulously compiled since 2009, the Shapell Roster is a publicly accessible digital history resource granting access to thousands of men who served. 

To showcase the wealth of resources that the Roster makes available, the evening will also feature the launch of a new book, Jewish Soldiers in the Civil War: The Union Army, authored by Professor Adam D. Mendelsohn, who was given early access to the Roster for his research.  Dr. Mendelsohn will give a talk in conversation with Professor Deborah Dash Moore (University of Michigan), current Editor-in-Chief of the Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, and author of GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation.  

The event will conclude with a reception and book signing by Dr. Mendelsohn.

Purchase of advance tickets will include an option for a discounted copy of Jewish Soldiers in the Civil War: The Union Army.

Ticket Info:
Click here for in-person tickets
Click here for livestream tickets


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discussion

13 | Dec
02:00PM
13 | Dec
02:00PM

panel discussion

Yiddish Cultural and Music Festivals – Live on Zoom

This past summer, like many in the past, thousands of people attended festivals, workshops, and programs to hear, learn and listen to klezmer and Yiddish music. Such festivals and intensive learning programs occur at different parts of the year and in different places around the globe. This program shares information about and highlights from four such programs.

Chaired by Alex Weiser (YIVO, Director of Public Programs), the panel to will include:
Alan Bern (Yiddish Summer Weimar, Founding Artistic Director)
Lisa Newman (Yid-Stock, Director of Public Programs at the Yiddish Book Center)
Pete Rushefsky (Yiddish NY, Co-Founder)
Avia Moore (KlezKanada, Artistic Director)

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Klezmer2022-Festivals for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

14 | Dec
01:00PM
14 | Dec
01:00PM

lecture

Ukrainian-jewish Relations on the Eve and During the Holocaust – Live on Zoom

This lecture will focus on prewar Ukrainian-Jewish relations, a matter that ultimately determined the attitude of the Ukrainian population toward the Jews during the Holocaust. With an emphasis on the lives of Jews and Ukrainians in Soviet Ukraine in the 1930s, particular attention will be paid to the Jewish kolkhozes (collective farms) established by the Agro-Joint in Soviet Ukraine and the attitude of Ukrainians to those settlements.

Ukrainian-Jewish relations during the Holocaust will also be addressed and will concentrate on two aspects. First, the denunciation of Jews by Ukrainians, who delivered the victims to the German and Romanian authorities. The second is the rescue and safeguarding of Jews by Ukrainians, the circumstances and motivation for which will be examined. Research for this project has been based on a wide range of the YIVO archival collections, particularly Holocaust survival testimonies, the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee and its Agro-Joint branch documentation, as well as official German reports.

About the Speaker
Hanna Abakunova holds her PhD in Holocaust History from the University of Sheffield (UK). Currently, she is a researcher and lecturer at the Hugo Valentin Centre, Uppsala University (Sweden and is a former post-doctoral researcher at Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute and Yad Vashem. Dr. Abakunova was also Professor Bernard Choseed Memorial Fellow and Natalie and Mendel Racolin Memorial Postdoctoral Fellow in East European Jewish Studies at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research for 2020-2021. Her research interests encompass history and memory of persecution of Jews and Roma during the Holocaust in Ukraine in a comparative perspective, and considers matters such as rescue and self-rescue of Jews and Roma, motivation for the rescue of Jews by non-Jews, deportations of Jews and Roma to Transnistria, and inter-ethnic relations before, during and after the Holocaust in Ukraine, especially Ukrainian-Jewish-Roma relations. Dr. Abakunova is the author and co-author of academic works published in several languages in the field of Holocaust Studies, Romani Studies, Ukrainian Studies, and Memory Studies.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Ukrainian-Jewish-Relations for a Zoom link


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lecture

15 | Dec
12:30PM
15 | Dec
12:30PM

conversation

At Lunch with Jeremy Salamon - Online Event

Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal & NY Times) sits down with her nephew, Chef and Owner of NYC restaurant Agi’s Counter, Jeremy Salamon!

Jeremy Salamon knew at an early age he wanted to be a chef. He moved to New York in 2012 to attend the Culinary Institute of America and worked alongside great chefs in restaurants such as Locanda Verde, Prune, Buvette & Via Carota. In 2017, he created a Hungarian pop-up dinner series called Fond and shortly after, became the Executive Chef of Manhattan restaurants The Eddy and Wallflower.

He’s been graciously recognized by publications such as Food & Wine, Jarry Magazine, The Village Voice, Thrillist and more. Agi’s Counter is his first restaurant. His cookbook, Second Generation will be published in 2024.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs-org.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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conversation

15 | Dec
02:00PM
15 | Dec
02:00PM

panel discussion

The North American Premiere of the Opera 'bas Sheve' – Live on Zoom

Written by Henekh Kon in 1924, Bas Sheve is one of the only known pre-Holocaust Yiddish operas. Presumed lost, it was discovered in 2017 by Professor Diana Matut, though it was missing 16 pages of some of the essential dramatic elements of the plot. Composer Joshua Horowitz and librettist Michael Wex completed the score. In 2019, a fully orchestrated Bas Sheve was performed at Yiddish Summer Weimer. In the summer of 2022, it made its North American debut at Toronto's Ashkenaz Festival. This panel will discuss the performance with video examples provided.

Panel
Eric Stein (Producer, Artistic Director of Ashkenaz Festival)
Josh Horowitz (composer and arranger)
Michael Wex (supplementary librettist)
Neal Stulberg (conductor)

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Klezmer2022-Opera for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

15 | Dec
05:00PM
15 | Dec
05:00PM

lecture

Family History Today: Jewish Landsmanshaftn - Hometown Societies in the New World – Live on Zoom

Landsmanshaftn, mutual aid associations made up of immigrants from the same Eastern European town, were an important form of organization among turn-of-the-century Jewish immigrants to the United States. At one time, New York City alone was home to 3,000 landsmanshaftn that provided their half million members with health and death benefits, loans, and help in securing jobs and housing. They also served as arenas for social interaction and evolved their own colorful internal culture. Daniel Soyer, author and Fordham University professor specializing in American Jewish history, will discuss the development of these important organizations, and the crucial role they played in Eastern European Jewish communities in America.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/family-history-today-2022-12-15 for a Zoom link


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lecture

19 | Dec
04:00PM
19 | Dec
04:00PM

book talk

Arthur Miller: American Witness - Online Event

Join author John Lahr and MacArthur Prize-winning playwright Sarah Ruhl for a conversation about this new biography in Yale University Press’s Jewish Lives series. Organized around the fault lines of Miller’s life—his family, the Great Depression, the rise of fascism, Elia Kazan and the House Committee on Un-American Activities, Marilyn Monroe, Vietnam, and the rise and fall of Miller’s role as a public intellectual—this book demonstrates the synergy between Arthur Miller’s psychology and his award-winning plays, All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, and The Crucible.

Program registrants will receive a code for 25% off the price of the book.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/arthur-miller-2022-12-19 for a Zoom link


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book talk

22 | Dec
07:00PM
22 | Dec
07:00PM

lecture

A Very Jewish Christmas: Jesus and Shabbtai Zvi, From Heretic to Hero - Online Event

In Jewish memory, Jesus and Shabbtai Zvi were heretics, false messiahs who rebelled against the rabbis and against normative Judaism. But a funny thing happened in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: modern Jewish writers and artists reclaimed these heretics and gave them an honored place in Jewish history. In doing so, they transformed the historical figures, Jesus and Shabbtai Zvi, into heroes, projecting on to them these thinkers own modern dilemmas.

About the Speaker
David Biale is Emanuel Ringelblum Distinguished Professor of Jewish History at the University of California, Davis. He was educated at UC Berkeley, the Hebrew University and UCLA. His most recent books are Hasidism: A New History (with seven co-authors), Gershom Scholem: Master of the Kabbalah and Not in the Heavens: The Tradition of Jewish Secular Thought. Earlier books are Gershom Scholem: Kabbalah and Counter-HistoryPower and Powerlessness in Jewish HistoryEros and the Jews and Blood and Belief: The Circulation of a Symbol Between Jews and Christians. He is also the editor of Cultures of the Jews: A New History and the Norton Anthology of World Religions: Judaism. His books have been translated into eight languages and have won the National Jewish Book Award three times.

Professor Biale has served as chair of the Department of History at UC Davis and as Director of the Davis Humanities Institute. He also founded and directed the UC Davis Program in Jewish Studies. In 2011, he won the university’s highest award, the UC Davis Prize for Undergraduate Teaching and Scholarly Achievement. He also founded the Posen Society of Fellows, an international doctoral fellowship for students of modern Jewish history and culture.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/JewishChristmas2022 for a Zoom link


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lecture

24 | Jan
01:00PM
24 | Jan
01:00PM

lecture

Good Goy, Bad Goy: the Portrayal of Gentiles in Sketches From the London Yiddish Press – Live on Zoom

Gentiles often appeared in the news sections of the London Yiddish press, and sometimes they also appeared in the regular “feuilleton” section in character sketches and fiction, stories and scenes from immigrant East-End Jewish life. Many of these portrayals were humorous local scenarios and imagined tales. This talk will look at a broad section of how and where Gentile characters appear and their relationship to the Jewish immigrant.

Gentiles fix cars and do physical chores for the hapless immigrant. The wily immigrant hoodwinks the Gentile recruiting officers during the First World War. The stern Gentile gatekeeper of British government politics refuses access to the naïve immigrant wanting to help. The paternalistic English police officer gives directions to parts of London never before visited by an East-End immigrant. A proud fascist blackshirt is confused when he sees his respected Jewish neighbors in a strident communist counter-demonstration. Yet the word goy is also used by Jews describing each other: skipping the bus fare, not sharing their Yiddish newspaper, or being rude to their neighbor.

About the Speaker
Vivi Lachs is a historian of London’s Jewish East End, a Yiddishist, and a performer. She is a Research Fellow at Queen Mary University of London working on the project Making and Remaking the Jewish East End. Her book Whitechapel Noise draws new historical detail from London Yiddish poetry and song. In 2019, she was a Yiddish Book Centre translation fellow, which culminated in her latest book London Yiddishtown – a selection of stories translated from the Yiddish from the 1930s and 1940s and incorporating a new history of London’s Yiddish writers of that period. Lachs records London Yiddish songs with the bands Klezmer Klub and Katsha’nes, co-runs the Yiddish Open Mic Cafe and the Great Yiddish Parade – a marching band bringing Yiddish songs of protest back onto the streets. She also leads East End tours.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Good-Goy-Bad-Goy for a Zoom link


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lecture

25 | Jan
07:00PM
25 | Jan
07:00PM

panel discussion

700 Years of Vilnius, a City of Translation – Live Event & Livestreamed on Zoom

The history and geography of Vilnius are marked by linguistic pluralism, cultural variations, territorial rearrangements, and human losses that make temporal correspondence and spatial continuity hard to decipher. Since the first written records of the city in 1323, Vilnius was put on the path of translation. The existence of many languages and the sense of discontinuity point to diversity and conflict, but translation unravels the tensions, interactions, rivalries, or convergences among different points of views, knowledge and experiences of the place.

In the context of Vilnius, translation is often an outcome or response to erasure. Still, as Czeslaw Milosz pointed out, “everything would be fine if language did not deceive us finding / different names for the same thing in different times and places.” In one of his poems dedicated to his hometown, the poet construes Wilno as a city without name, underpinning its untranslatable – ‘unexpressed, untold’ – character. On the other hand, for Moyshe Kulbak, the Jewish city opens up as “the dream of a cabbalist” with a “thousand narrow doors into the universe.” Contrastingly, Avrom Sutzkver, in his threnody to Vilna, makes the town omnipresent with ‘all the cities [being transformed] into your image.’ As an act of creation, translation offers a possibility of entering Vilnius from an unknown territory; simultaneously, it frames the city within ‘unfamiliar tongues.’

In commemorating 700 years of the founding of Vilnius, Laimonas Briedis will give a presentation about the city as a form of translation, from poetic imagery and visual records to tangible geography and memory fragments. Briedis’s presentation will be followed by a discussion moderated by Jonathan Brent in which Briedis will be joined by Laima LauckaiteIrena Grudzinska Gross, and David Roskies.

About the Participants
Laimonas Briedis is a writer and scholar of the history, literature and geographical imagination of Vilnius, Lithuania. A native of Vilnius, he has lived for most of his adult life in Vancouver (Canada) where he completed a doctoral degree in cultural geography at the University of British Columbia. His creative output stretches from charting a GIS anchored digital map of the multilingual literature of Vilnius to examining the ramifications of being bi-local; placing questions related to belonging, migration, the diaspora, translation, poetic vision and memory at the core of his work. He is the author of Vilnius: City of Strangers, reviewed by The Economist as being a “subtle and evocative book,” where “vanished civilizations and lost empires leave a city stalked by horror and steeped in wonder.” The book has been translated into several languages, including German, Chinese, Russian and Portuguese (Brazil). Laimonas is the global ambassador for the 700-year anniversary of the founding of Vilnius.

Jonathan Brent is the Executive Director of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York City. From 1991 to 2009 he was Editorial Director and Associate Director of Yale Press. He is the founder of the world acclaimed Annals of Communism series, which he established at Yale Press in 1991. Brent is the co-author of Stalin’s Last Crime: The Plot Against the Jewish Doctors, 1948-1953 (Harper-Collins, 2003) and Inside the Stalin Archives (Atlas Books, 2008). He is now working on a biography of the Soviet-Jewish writer Isaac Babel. Brent teaches history and literature at Bard College.

Laima Lauckaite, art historian and curator of exhibitions, lives in Vilnius and is currently the leading researcher at the Lithuanian Culture Research Institute. Educated at Vilnius Art Institute (MA), University of Moscow (PhD), and Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich (Postdoc), her research focuses on the art history of Vilnius during the early 20th century. She initiated a study on the multicultural artistic scene of the city revealing activities of Polish, Jewish, Lithuanian, and Russian artists. Lauckaite is the author of the books: Art in Vilnius 1900-1915 (Biennial Book Prize of the Association for the Advancement of Baltic Studies in 2009), Art in Vilnius during the First World War (in Lithuanian), Rafael Chwoles: the Search for Jerusalem, and albums on iconography Vilnius. Topophilia (vol. I, II). She is the curator of the exhibition “Vilnius Forever. Dialog of Artworks and Guides to the City,” at the TARTLE Art Center in Vilnius in partnership with YIVO.

Irena Grudzinska Gross emigrated from her native Poland after student unrest of 1968. She studied in Poland, Italy and in the United States; she received her PhD from Columbia University in 1982. She taught East-Central European history and literature at Emory, New York, Boston and Princeton universities. Her books include Golden Harvest with Jan T. Gross, Oxford University Press, 2012, Czeslaw Milosz and Joseph Brodsky: Fellowship of Poets, Yale University Press, 2009, and The Scar of Revolution: Tocqueville, Custine and the Romantic Imagination, University of California Press, 1995. She edited books on literature and the transformation process in Central and Eastern Europe and published numerous book chapters and articles on these subjects in the international press and periodicals. Between 1998-2003, she was responsible for the East-Central European Program at the Ford Foundation.

David G. Roskies is the Sol and Evelyn Henkind Chair emeritus in Yiddish Literature and Culture and a professor emeritus of Jewish literature at The Jewish Theological Seminary. He also served as the Naomi Prawer Kadar Visiting Professor of Yiddish Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Dr. Roskies was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2012. Dr. Roskies is a cultural historian of Eastern European Jewry. A prolific author, editor, and scholar, he has published nine books and received numerous awards. In 1981, Dr. Roskies cofounded with Dr. Alan Mintz Prooftexts: A Journal of Jewish Literary History, and served for seventeen years as editor in chief of the New Yiddish Library series, published by Yale University Press. A native of Montreal, Canada, and a product of its Yiddish secular schools, Dr. Roskies was educated at Brandeis University, where he received his doctorate in 1975.

Ticket Info: Free in person and on Zoom; advance registration required at yivo.org/Vilnius700


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panel discussion