Tue, Mar 05
06:30PM
Tue, Mar 05
06:30PM

panel discussion

Jewish Labor in Early 20th Century NYC: Intersections and Tensions – In-person Event

Jewish Labor in Early 20th Century NYC: Intersections and Tensions – In-person Event

Join AJHS on March 5th for a discussion on organized and informal Jewish labor movements in early 20th century New York City.  This conversation hopes to interrogate how factors such as gender, class, race, religion, and religious observance both fostered these movements and also presented complex challenges to their goals, as well as expanding upon the intersections of the Jewish community in New York at this time with other ethnic and cultural populations. Panelists include Cameron Black, Alice Kessler-Harris, Tejasvi Nagaraja & Daniel Walkowitz with Mary Anne Trasciatti as moderator.

Cameron Black (Panelist)- Assistant Professor of Labor Studies at the CUNY School of Labor and Urban Studies.

Alice Kessler-Harris (Panelist) R. Gordon Hoxie Professor Emerita of American History in honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower, and Professor Emerita in the Institute for Research on Women and Gender both at Columbia University.

Tejasvi Nagaraja (Panelist) Assistant Professor of Labor History, Global Labor and Work at Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

Daniel Walkowitz (Panelist) Professor Emeritus of Social and Cultural Analysis and Professor Emeritus of History at New York University.

Mary Anne Trasciatti (Moderator) Director of Hofstra’s Labor Studies Program and Professor of Rhetoric and Public Advocacy.

Ticket Info: $10 General Admission, $5 Student Tickets


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panel discussion

Wed, Mar 06
07:00PM
Wed, Mar 06
07:00PM

book talk

Music, Gender, and Jewish Orthodoxy in North America - In-person Event & Live on Zoom

Join YIVO for a conversation with Jeremiah Lockwood and Jessica Roda, led by Jonathan Boyarin in celebration of Lockwood and Roda’s new books Golden Ages: Hasidic Singers and Cantorial Revival in the Digital Era (Lockwood, UCPress) and For Women and Girls Only: Reshaping Jewish Orthodoxy Through the Arts in the Digital Age (Roda, NYU Press). Through ethnography and media analysis, Lockwood and Roda offer unique insights into the vibrant masculine and feminine art worlds of Hasidic and Litvish-Yeshivish Jews today. They lead us to rethink the power of the arts to understand agency, privacy and publicity in religious settings.

The book launch will conclude with two performances featuring Cantor Yoel Kohn and actress Malky Goldman, artists who participated with the authors in their research projects.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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book talk

Sun, Mar 10
09:30AM
Sun, Mar 10
09:30AM

symposium

War and Memory in Jewish Material Culture - In-person Event

War and Memory in Jewish Material Culture - In-person Event

Professor Shalom Sabar
The Hebrew University
“Souvenirs of the Six-Day War as Conveyors of Socio-Historical Messages from the Past to Modern Israel”

Rabbi Joseph Topek
Stony Brook University
“Beyond the Civil War: Memory and Iconography in Early American Jewish Veteran Culture”

Co-sponsored by the Harry G. Friedman Society and Yeshiva University Museum

Ticket Info: $25 including brunch; register here


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symposium

Mon, Mar 11
01:00PM
Mon, Mar 11
01:00PM

book talk

Jewish Reading Habits in the Russian Empire - Live on Zoom

As significant economic, social, political, and cultural transformations swept the Jewish population of Tsarist Russia and Congress Poland between 1860 and 1914, the Yiddish language began to gain recognition as a central part of the Jewish cultural stage. Yiddish Transformed: Reading Habits in the Russian Empire, 1860-1914 examines the secular reading habits of East European Jews as the Jewish community began shifting to a modern society. Author Nathan Cohen explores Jewish reading practices alongside the rise of Yiddish by delving into publishing policies of Yiddish books and newspapers, popular literary genres of the time, the development of Jewish public libraries, as well as personal reflections of reading experiences.

Join YIVO for a discussion with Cohen about this book, led by YIVO’s Senior Academic Advisor and Director of Exhibitions Eddy Portnoy.

Buy the book.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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book talk

Wed, Mar 13
07:00PM
Wed, Mar 13
07:00PM

lecture

Hasidism in Poland on the Eve of the Holocaust - In-person Event & Live on Zoom

The Light of Learning tells the story of an unexpected Hasidic revival in Poland on the eve of the Holocaust. In the aftermath of World War I, as secularism spread, Hasidic leaders rapidly reinvented themselves as educators devoted to rescuing the youth by means of world-renowned yeshivas, Bais Yaakov schools for girls and women, and eventually underground yeshiva bunkers during the Holocaust. The Light of Learning belies notions of late Hasidic decadence and decline and transforms our understanding of Polish Jewry during its final hour.

Join YIVO for a presentation on this book with author Glenn Dynner along with performances of Hasidic nigunim by Lorin Sklamberg of the Klezmatics.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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lecture

Thu, Mar 14
07:00PM
Thu, Mar 14
07:00PM

lecture and concert

Wild Burning Rage and Song: Replies to Scottsboro - In-person Event

The Scottsboro Trials stand as one of the most renowned miscarriages of justice in the history of American jurisprudence. Beginning in 1931 with a false accusation of rape against nine Black teenagers, the case went on to invigorate a nascent Civil Rights movement, earn the international support of the Communist Party, and establish itself as a watchword among various strands of the American Left. It inspired reaction from the contemporary world of arts and letters as well, most famously by poets Langston Hughes and Richard Wright and novelist Harper Lee, who adapted its events in To Kill A Mockingbird.

The international, politically-oriented Yiddish intelligentsia of the thirties was no less galvanized, producing a body of creative response that passionately took up the themes of the trial, juxtaposing its American injustices with a diversity of images, tropes and language imbued with their own distinct histories of oppression.

Wild Burning Rage and Song: Replies to Scottsborobrings this world alive as a concert-lecture featuring Professor Amelia Glaser, author of Songs in Dark Times: Yiddish Poetry of Struggle from Scottsboro to Palestine (Harvard University Press), composer/vocalists Heather Klein and Anthony Russell, and composer/pianist Uri Schreter, performing their new settings of Yiddish and English poetry written in response to the pervasive climate of race prejudice that gave birth to the Scottsboro trials—and other injustices to come.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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lecture and concert

Sun, Mar 17
01:30PM
Sun, Mar 17
01:30PM

lecture

Stuck: Immigration, Naturalization and Repatriation in the WWI Era – In-person lecture & live on Zoom

Stuck: Immigration, Naturalization and Repatriation in the WWI Era – In-person lecture & live on Zoom

Stolen passports, pleading letters, and fake visas all appear in the US State Department's Records of Foreign Service Posts. These documents tell harrowing tales of families separated by WWI, and the incredible lengths people went to in order to leave war-torn Europe and reunite with relatives in America.

In the years before WWI, husbands immigrated to the USA, intending to send for their family after getting settled, but the outbreak of war turned temporary situations into lengthy separations. Other cases illustrate a short visit to see family in the Old Country morphing into a years-long ordeal.

Both during and particularly after the war, the emergence of new European countries meant new rules and regulations controlling movement and emigration. Simultaneously, panic over an assumed mass influx of war refugees spurred the US Congress to pass restrictive laws that imposed quotas on would-be immigrants.

This presentation highlights some of the incredible experiences families endured during this era and explains the records used to recount their stories.



About the Speaker
Renée Carl is a professional genealogist and advocate for historic preservation and records access. She previously worked in public policy, until realizing that researching dead people is easier than working with Congress. Her background in government and cultural anthropology brings a unique perspective to locating and interpreting records. Renée is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington, and the JewishGen Latvia Research Group. She also serves as a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists Advocacy Committee and as policy advisor to the RecordsNotRevenue.com campaign. She worked as a researcher for Season 2 of PBS’ Genealogy Roadshow and served as lead researcher for Season 3. She regularly researches at the National Archives, Library of Congress, and U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. You can find Renée online at EasternEuropeanMutt.com.

Co-sponsored with the Jewish Genealogical Society, Inc. (JGSNY) and Friends of Linda Cantor Z"L

Ticket Info:
In person: $5 general admission; free for JGSNY and CJH members; click here to register.
If you’re planning to attend this program in person, we strongly encourage you to register in advance. Space permitting, we will admit those who arrive without a ticket on a first-come, first-serve basis at our discretion.

Zoom: Pay what you wish; click here to register.


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lecture

Tue, Mar 19
01:00PM
Tue, Mar 19
01:00PM

discussion

Reimagining the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict - Live on Zoom

As the war in Gaza continues, a debate is unfolding over the future governance and status of Gaza. Join YIVO for a discussion with Marwan Muasher, Vice President for Studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and former Jordanian foreign minister and deputy prime minister, about Muasher's views on “the day after” in Gaza. In this conversation, led by former US Ambassador to Israel Daniel C. Kurtzer, Muasher will lay out his perspective on past failed peace processes, his own recently proposed framework for a peace process going forward, and his assessment of the likely alternatives to a durable peace.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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discussion

Thu, Mar 21
12:30PM
Thu, Mar 21
12:30PM

conversation

At Lunch with Sally Fischer – Live on Zoom

At Lunch with Sally Fischer – Live on Zoom

Julie Salamon (New York Times best-selling author) sits down with Sally Fischer, Founder and President of Sally Fischer Public Relations based in New York City. Sally was born and raised in New York City, and as a teenager Fischer moved to Florence, Italy where she completed High School and University studies, living in Italy for ten years. Upon moving back to the United States Fischer knew that staying connected to Italy was her life-long goal and has dedicated her career to promoting the Best of Italy: the finest films, the food and wine, the regions, and cities, even the Winter Olympics of 2006 based in Torino. Fischer’s goal has been to create a cultural bridge between Italy and the United States and to promote all that Italy has to offer. In 2018, Sally Fischer was awarded the distinguished Italian decoration: Cavaliere dell’Ordine della Stella d’Italia by the President of the Republic of Italy, the Honorable Sergio Mattarella. Fischer resides in Manhattan with her husband and son.

Ticket Info: Free; register at ajhs.org/events/at-lunch-with-sally-fischer/ for a Zoom link


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conversation

Thu, Mar 21
07:00PM
Thu, Mar 21
07:00PM

celebration

Is Anything Okay? The History of Jews and Comedy in America - In-person and Live on Zoom

Celebrate the launch of our newest online course about Jewish comedy, which delves into the history of Jewish comedy and its development in the United States.

Ticket Info: Free, registration is required.

Made possible by:

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 


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celebration

Mon, Mar 25
01:00PM
Mon, Mar 25
01:00PM

discussion

Colonialism, Racism, and the Arab Israeli War of 1948 - Live on Zoom

In 1947, a two-thirds majority of the members of the United Nations, an organization which took its name from the term for the Allies fighting against Nazi Germany, voted to establish an Arab, and a Jewish state on what had been British Mandate Palestine. Supporters of the Jewish state, and the Zionists themselves, viewed that project as an anti-colonial, anti-racist, and as a continuation of the anti-fascist passions of World War II. The Arab opponents, at the time and since, denounced the establishment of Israel as precisely the opposite, that is, an example of colonialism, racism, and in Soviet era propaganda even a form of Nazism. Historian Benny Morris has written extensively about the causes and nature of the war of 1948, and the controversies that have surrounded it ever since. Historian Jeffrey Herf has examined the international politics surrounding Israel’s establishment. In conversation, Morris and Herf will explore these issues and the way they influence contemporary discussions.

Buy the books from this series.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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discussion

Wed, Mar 27
01:00PM
Wed, Mar 27
01:00PM

lecture

Yiddish and Hebrew Little Magazines in the Weimar Republic - Live on Zoom

In this talk, Barbara Mann will discuss the "little magazine," a staple of modernist Jewish culture which flourished in the Weimar Republic. The little magazine is a distinctively portable and collaborative genre, an appropriate venue for the migrant, cosmopolitan mix of Berlin’s interwar Jewish population. Each issue blended poetry, manifestos and visual arts to create a unique form of cultural expression. Mann will explore the publishing history of Yiddish and Hebrew little magazines, their content, physical features, and readership.

About the Speaker
Barbara E. Mann is the inaugural holder of the Stephen H. Hoffman Professorship in Modern Hebrew Language and Literature at Case Western Reserve University. She is the author of A Place in History: Modernism, Tel Aviv and the Creation of Jewish Urban Space (Stanford, 2006) and Space and Place in Jewish Studies (Rutgers, 2012).

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.

Made possible by:

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.


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lecture

Thu, Apr 04
01:00PM
Thu, Apr 04
01:00PM

lecture

The Lodz Ghetto and the Kriminalpolizei: Jews, Neighbors, and Perpetrators in the Holocaust - Live on Zoom

The German criminal police (Kriminalpolizei, or Kripo) maintained a permanent station in the Lodz ghetto, which over the four years of its existence imprisoned some 200,000 Jews. Responsible for stopping smuggling networks and for gathering information about hidden possessions inside and outside the ghetto, the Kripo relied heavily on local ethnic Germans, the so-called Volksdeutsche. These policemen exploited their prewar social networks in their investigations and carried out violent acts against Jews familiar to them. They deployed their Polish and Yiddish language skills in interrogations of suspects, and they used their knowledge of Jewish religious practices and local customs to spy on the Jews and later to evaluate their confiscated property.

In this talk, Winson Chu focuses on how police records in Poland and survivor sources at YIVO enable a better understanding of such prewar connections with wartime perpetrators. By providing additional detail and context to existing accounts of ghetto experiences, this approach re-embeds Jews into interethnic relations in prewar Lodz and Nazi-occupied Poland and questions the common perception of the Lodz ghetto as “hermetically sealed.”

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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lecture

Thu, Apr 04
07:30PM
Thu, Apr 04
07:30PM

lecture

“Juden, Baptized and Unbaptized”: Jewishness and Ferdinand Hiller’s 'Israel’s Siegesgesang' - Live on Zoom

German composer Ferdinand Hiller (1811-85) lived and worked throughout a period of tumultuous change, marked by unprecedented movement (both geographic and socio-economic), active assimilation, and formalized emancipation for the Jews of German-speaking Europe. A piano prodigy and student of Hummel, he was a direct contemporary of Felix Mendelssohn, with whom he was personally and professionally close. Hiller, who was baptized at the age of 29, had a complex engagement with Jewishness and Judaism, which has thus been variously essentialized as a pervasive part of his identity to mere circumstance of birth, ignored and forgotten. Of several compositions explicitly engaging with Jewish texts, his 1840 oratorio, Die Zerstörung Jerusalems, was a widely acclaimed success throughout Germany and beyond, whereas Hiller’s eight-movement choral work, Israel’s Siegesgesang, op. 151 (1871) had a more modest initial reception.

This presentation shows how Hiller, by this point a well-established teacher and musical authority on the classical and early romantic traditions, used Psalm and other texts from the Hebrew Bible in Israel’s Siegesgesang to reflect current political sentiment following the Battle of Sedan, which ended the Franco-Prussian war of 1870. Amanda Ruppenthal-Stein will trace this work’s appearance from German-speaking Europe to English audiences in London, Cincinnati, Boston, and San Francisco, and finally in the 1897 edition of the Union Hymnal, showing how not only did Hiller clearly recognize his Jewish heritage and engage with it in varied ways throughout his life, but also the recognition of him as member of the broader Jewish community, regardless of his baptismal status.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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lecture

Sun, Apr 07
10:00AM
Sun, Apr 07
10:00AM

symposium

Reconsidering Jewish Migration to the United States: A Century of Controversy – In-person & live on Zoom

Reconsidering Jewish Migration to the United States: A Century of Controversy – In-person & live on Zoom

Reconsidering Jewish Migration to the United States: A Century of Controversy marks the 100th anniversary of the pivotal Johnson-Reed Immigration Act of 1924 by exploring a century of Jewish engagement with immigration at the national and international level. The symposium brings together nationally renowned scholars and experts to examine how the 1924 act restricted immigration from the interwar period to the 1960s, how Jews and other groups were affected, and how the liberalization of immigration law after the 1960s produced major demographic changes in the United States and set the stage for contemporary political controversies over the role of immigration in American life. 

Click here for a list of panels and speakers.

Speakers will be selling and signing books throughout the day. At the conclusion of the symposium, please join us for a wine and cheese reception to celebrate the opening of a related exhibition, Crossing the Ocean. Three Waves of German Jewish Immigration to the United States, presented by the Leo Baeck Institute.

The symposium is generously sponsored by the Selz Foundation, the David Berg Foundation, and supplemented by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

Photo Credit: Coming to America, 1952, Louis Stettner, © Louis Stettner Estate 2024

Ticket Info:
In-person tickets: $36 general; $28 members
Zoom: Pay what you wish
Click here to register

Tickets include lunch and a wine and cheese reception after the program.


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symposium

Wed, Apr 10
07:00PM
Wed, Apr 10
07:00PM

lecture

"The Protocols of the Elders of Zion" in Court: The Bern Trial (1933-1935) and the "Antisemitic International" - In-person Event & Live on Zoom

Between 1933 and 1935, a trial was held in Bern against members of the Swiss extreme right-wing National Front who had distributed “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion,” a widely disseminated antisemitic publication that spread lies about Jews. The real target of the Jewish organization’s fascist movements.

During the course of the trial, both sides received ample support in the form of material assistance and propaganda. The defendants and their supporters in Nazi Germany were able to rely on an extensive network that had been established in the early 1920s to combat “Judaeo-Bolshevism.” This conspiratorial “Antisemitic International” united German völkisch circles, Italian fascists, Russian monarchists, and French conspiracy theorists. On the other side, the plaintiffs, who actively sought to expose the “Protocols” as a forgery in the hope that this would counteract their impact.

In this lecture, Michael Hagemeister will use the Bern trial as a case study of Jewish legal self-defense in order to shed light on both the “Protocols of the Elders of Zion” and the concerted efforts against the “Antisemitic International” in the 1930s, which have received little attention from historians.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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lecture

Tue, Apr 16
01:00PM
Tue, Apr 16
01:00PM

panel discussion

Responses to October 7th - Live on Zoom

Historian Jeffrey Herf will lead a panel exploring responses to Hamas’ October 7th massacres and to the state of Israel’s subsequent military response. Meir Litvak will discuss his scholarship on the Islamization of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; Norman Goda will examine rules of war, civilian casualties, and accusations of genocide; Karin Stögner will discuss theories of race and intersectionality and anti-Zionism, and the gendered aspects of the violence of October 7; and David Hirsh will examine the nature of leftist anti-Zionism that achieved predominance for some years in the British Labor Party.

Buy the books from this series.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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panel discussion

Thu, May 30
01:00PM
Thu, May 30
01:00PM

book talk

Neo-Nazi Terrorism and Countercultural Fascism - Live on Zoom

A new wave of aspiring neo-Nazi terrorists has arisen—including the infamous Atomwaffen Division, and they have a bible: James Mason’s Siege, which praises terrorism, serial killers, and Charles Manson. Neo-Nazi Terrorism and Countercultural Fascism: The Origins and Afterlife of James Mason's Siege documents the origins of Siege and shows how Mason’s vision emerged during debates in the 1970s after the splintering of the American Nazi Party/NSWPP. The second part of the book unveils for the first time how four 1980s musicians and publishers—Boyd Rice, Michael Moynihan, Adam Parfrey, and Nikolas Schreck—discovered and promoted the terrorist ideologue.

Join YIVO for a discussion of this book with author Spencer Sunshine.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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book talk

Thu, Jun 06
01:00PM
Thu, Jun 06
01:00PM

book talk

Psychoanalysis and Jewish Languages - Live on Zoom

There is an academic interest in the "Jewish Freud," aiming to detect Jewish influences on Freud, his own feelings about being Jewish, and suppressed traces of Jewishness in his thought. This book takes a different approach, turning its gaze not on Freud but rather on those who seek out his concealed Jewishness. What is it that propels the scholarly aim to show Freud in a Jewish light? Naomi Seidmanexplores attempts to "touch" Freud (and other famous Jews) through Jewish languages, seeking out his Hebrew name or evidence that he knew some Yiddish. Tracing a history of this drive to bring Freud into Jewish range, Seidman also charts Freud's responses to (and jokes about) this desire. More specifically, she reads the reception and translation of Freud in Hebrew and Yiddish as instances of the desire to touch, feel, "rescue," and connect with the famous professor from Vienna.

Join YIVO for a discussion with Seidman about this newly published book, led by scholar Ken Frieden.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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book talk

Mon, Jun 24
01:00PM
Mon, Jun 24
01:00PM

book talk

Homes of the Past - Live on Zoom

In 1940s New York, immigrant Jewish scholars sought to build a museum to commemorate their lost worlds and people. Among the Jews who arrived in the United States in the early 1940s were a small number of Polish scholars who had devoted their professional lives to the study of Europe's Yiddish-speaking Jews at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. Faced with the devastating knowledge that returning to their former homes and resuming their scholarly work there was no longer viable, they sought to address their profound sense of loss by continuing their work, under radically different circumstances, to document the European Jewish lives, places, and ways of living that were being destroyed. In pursuing this daunting agenda, they decided to create a museum to memorialize East European Jewry and educate American Jews about this legacy. YIVO scholars determinedly pursued this undertaking for several years, publicizing the initiative and collecting materials to exhibit. However, the Museum of the Homes of the Past was abandoned shortly after the war ended.

Homes of the Past explores this largely unknown episode of modern Jewish history and museum history and demonstrates that the project, even though it was never realized, marked a critical inflection point in the dynamic interrelations between Jews in America and Eastern Europe.

Join YIVO for a discussion with author Jeffrey Shandler about this book, led by Deborah Dash Moore.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Free; registration is required.


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book talk