25 | Mar
06:30PM
25 | Mar
06:30PM

film screening and discussion

RBG

Born in 1933, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg developed a lengthy legal legacy while becoming an unexpected pop culture icon. But her unique, personal journey to a seat on the nation’s highest court was largely unknown, even to some of her biggest fans – until now. The Oscar nominated film, RBG explores Ginsberg’s fascinating life and brilliant career – from the young legal scholar who was shunned by law firms because of her gender, to the masterful appellate litigator who successfully argued before the Supreme Court for women’s rights, to the U.S. Supreme Court Justice.

Join MALA and the Center for Jewish History for a special screening and panel discussion of this critically acclaimed, award-winning documentary. Following the film, RBG Director/Producer Julie Cohen and Associate Producer Nadine Natour discuss their own fascinating journeys chronicling the life and career of Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $7 senior; $5 CJH/MALA member at Eventbrite


Purchase Tickets


About the Speakers:

Julie Cohen has directed and produced nine feature documentaries, including RBG (Magnolia, Participant, CNN Films), The Sturgeon Queens (7th Art Releasing/PBS); and American Veteran (Freestyle). She has won a duPont Columbia Award, two Gracie Awards, three New York Emmy Awards and the 2017 Panavision Showcase Award for best New York filmmaker. Before she started making documentaries, Julie was a staff producer for Dateline NBC and the creator and producer of Supreme Court Watch on Court TV. She holds a B.A. from Colgate and masters’ degrees from Columbia Journalism School and Yale Law School.


The associate producer of RBG, Nadine Natour has shot, field produced, and edited a feature-length doc, American Veteran (Freestyle Releasing; Winner of the G.I. Film Festival Founders Award and the Panavision Showcase Award),  and co-edited The Sturgeon Queens (PBS: 2015 Berlinale Official Selection). She is a 2009 graduate of the University of Virginia and a 2012 graduate of the Columbia Journalism School and a 2012 – 2013 News Associate at NBC.


Paul M. Barrett (program moderator) joined the NYU Center for Business and Human Rights as deputy director in September 2017 after spending more than three decades as a journalist and author focusing on the intersection of business, law, and society. Most recently, Paul worked for 12 years for Bloomberg Businessweek magazine, and from 1986 to 2005, he wrote for The Wall Street Journal, serving as the newspaper’s Supreme Court correspondent and later as the page one special projects editor. He is the author of four critically acclaimed nonfiction books, the most recent of which are GLOCK: The Rise of America’s Gun (2012), a New York Times Bestseller, and Law of the Jungle: The $19 Billion Legal Battle Over Oil in the Rain Forest and the Lawyer Who’d Stop at Nothing to Win (2014). Both of those books have been optioned for Hollywood movies. An adjunct professor at New York University School of Law since 2008, Paul is married to RBG director Julie Cohen.


Presented by:

film screening and discussion

04 | Apr
06:30PM
04 | Apr
06:30PM

film

The City without Jews

Jews are hounded by mobs and driven from Vienna in this 1924 expressionist film based on the satirical novel by Hugo Bettauer. The sensational film that anticipated the Holocaust and cost Bettauer his life was rediscovered in 2015. With commentary by film scholar Noah Isenberg (UT Austin) and a live score.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 LBI/CJH/Partner members at citywithoutjews.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


Presented by:

film

17 | Apr
07:00PM
17 | Apr
07:00PM

film and discussion

From Swastika to Jim Crow

The recent uptick in antisemitic, anti-immigrant, and racist rhetoric have created a burst of new interest in the acclaimed documentary, From Swastika to Jim Crow.  Based on the book by Gabrielle Simon Edgcomb, the film tells the little-known story of two very different cultures, sharing a common burden of oppression. In the 1930s, German universities were some of the first targets of Nazi activity.  Jewish professors and intellectuals who were able to immigrate to the United States faced an uncertain future.  Confronted with antisemitism at American universities and a public distrust of foreigners, a surprising number sought refuge in a most unlikely place – the traditionally black colleges in the then- segregated South.  Securing teaching positions, these scholars came to form lasting relationships with their students, and went on to significantly impact the communities in which they lived and worked.

Nineteen years after the film was originally released, the filmmakers, Steven Fischler and Joel Sucher, feel its message –that more binds us together than separates us - must be heard.  They passionately believe that as long as racism and inequality exist in our society, there will be a compelling need to bring From Swastika to Jim Crow to a wider audience. One-hour screening followed by Q&A with the filmmakers and historian Charles L. Chavis, Jr.

Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society and Leo Baeck Institute are grateful to the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture for its support as a promotional partner for this program..

Ticket Info: $10 general;$7 seniors; $5 LBI/CJH/AJHS members at bpt.me/4100610 or 800-838-3006


Purchase Tickets


About the Speakers:

Steven FischlerSteven Fischler and Joel Sucher founded Pacific Street Films in 1971, and they have produced and directed documentary films for venues as diverse as the United Nations, the BBC and commercial and public television in the United States.  These include portraits of Hollywood artists like Martin Scorsese, Oliver Stone and Jessica Lange, as well as investigations of police surveillance and misconduct.  They are the recipients of numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship in Film, Emmy Awards, Cine Golden Eagles, and the John Grierson Award for Social Documentaries.  Both the Museum of Modern Art and the Harvard Film Archives have honored Pacific Street Films with career retrospective programs.

Steven Fischler was the director of the 2007 PBS-broadcast documentary, “Beyond Wiseguys: Italian Americans & The Movies” and the producer of “Dressing America: Tales From The Garment Center,” broadcast in 2014. Fischler wrote and directed the documentary, “Five Finger Discount: A Crooked Family History,” which had its broadcast premiere on Thirteen/WNET in March of 2017.

Joe SucherIn addition to his work with Pacific Street Films, Joel Sucher has written and blogged for a number of platforms including American Banker, In These Times, Huffington Post, Observer. com and medium.com/@joelsucher




Charles L. Chavis, Jr. is Assistant Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution and History and Director of the Program for History, Justice and Racial Reconciliation, at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution at George Mason University. Before joining the S-CAR, he served as the Museum Coordinator for the Lillie Carroll Jackson Civil Rights Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Chavis’s work focuses on the history of racial violence and civil rights activism and Black and Jewish relations in the American South. His areas of specialization include Civil Rights oral history, historical consciousness, and racial violence and reconciliation. He has received numerous grants, awards and fellowships and is the author of the upcoming book, “‘Maryland, My Maryland’: The Lynching of Matthew Williams and the Politics of Racism in the Free State” and editor of For the Sake of Peace: Africana Perspectives on Racism, Justice, and Peace in America (Rowman & Littlefield, 2019).


Presented by:

film and discussion