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Thu, Apr 22
12:00PM
Thu, Apr 22
12:00PM

panel discussion

Barbara Engelking and Jan Grabowski: New Scholarship on the History and Memory of the Holocaust in Poland

The new Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity at the Graduate Center—City University of New York launches its public programming with “In Honor of Barbara Engelking and Jan Grabowski: New Scholarship on the History and Memory of the Holocaust in Poland.” Chaired by Dr Joanna Sliwa (winner of the Fraenkel Prize, 2020), the program showcases a wave of outstanding young historians: Miranda Brethour, Alicja Podbielska, and Jonathan Zisook. Professors Engelking and Grabowski will offer remarks in response.

Panelists
Chair and moderator: Dr. Joanna Sliwa, author of Jewish Childhood in Kraków: A Microhistory of the Holocaust, awarded the 2020 Fraenkel Prize

Featuring a new wave of scholars:

, “Life and Death in the Shadow of Sobibór: Economic Dimensions of Jewish-Gentile Relations in the Town of Wlodawa, 1939-1944”
Alicja Podbielska, “The Righteous or Szmalcowniks?! Narrative of Rescue vs. Holocaust Scholarship”
Jonathan Zisook, “'Polityka Historyczna' and the Instrumentalization of the Holocaust in Contemporary Poland”
Responses by Profs Barbara Engelking and Jan Grabowski

Ticket Info: Free; register at gc-cuny.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Thu, Apr 22
01:00PM
Thu, Apr 22
01:00PM

lecture

Sephardi Thought and Modernity: In Praise of the Orient: Elia Benamozegh’s Sephardic Modernities

The intention of this series is to spark the interest in processes of Jewish modernization not exclusively mediated by Europeanization. The questions we will be dealing with are related to non-dichotomic identities, multiplicity and loss of language, colonization, social transformation, and intellectual responses to it. We will approach these questions by looking at Jewish-Arab influences, the Sephardi response to European modernization, the responses of the rabbinic leadership and the work of Sephardi intellectuals.

April 22nd: Clemence Boulouque (Columbia University): In praise of the Orient: Elia Benamozegh’s Sephardic Modernities

Ticket Info: Free; register at ucalgary.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Apr 22
01:00PM
Thu, Apr 22
01:00PM

book talk

Sutzkever Essential Prose

Sutzkever Essential Prose brings the largely unknown prose of seminal Yiddish poet Avrom Sutzkever to English readers in new translations by Zachary Sholem Berger. In these works, Sutzkever blurs the lines between fiction, memoir, and poetry; between real and imagined; between memory and metaphor. He offers haunting scenes drawn from a vast imagination and from the unique life he lived—his youth in Siberia and Vilna, his trauma as a partisan fighter and a survivor of the Holocaust, and his post-war life as a Yiddish poet in Israel. Join us for a conversation celebrating this new book with translator Zachary Sholem Berger and scholars Miriam Trinh and Karolina Szymaniak, moderated by Justin Cammy.

About the Participants
Zackary Sholem Berger is a poet and translator working in Yiddish, Hebrew, and English. His work has appeared in Poetry magazine, the Yiddish Forward, and Asymptote and elsewhere. Themes of his verse range from the philosophical and medical to the immediate problems of his adopted city Baltimore. In the Yiddish world he might be best known as a regular contributor to the Forverts and the translator of Dr. Seuss's Cat in the Hat (as well as other Seuss creations) into Yiddish.

Dr. Miriam Trinh is a professor of Yiddish and Yiddish literature at Hebrew University. Co-founder of “Yo”-Yidish-Ort, a center for Yiddish language and culture in Tel-Aviv and Jerusalem, Trinh is a noted Yiddish educator including at many international summer courses around the world.

Justin Cammy is chair and associate professor of Jewish Studies and World Literatures at Smith College, and senior fellow of the Goldreich Institute for Yiddish at Tel Aviv University. He is the author of the introduction to The Full Pomegranate, a recent volume of Sutzkever poetry translated by Richard Fein. Cammy's own translation of Sutzkever's memoir Vilna Ghetto will appear with McGill-Queens University Press in 2021.

Karolina Szymaniak is assistant professor at the Jewish Studies Department at the University of Wroclaw and Research Fellow at the Jewish Historical Institute. Her research interests range across modern Yiddish literature, Polish-Jewish cultural relations, and translation studies. In addition to having taught Yiddish language and culture throughout Poland and Europe, she has also served as a consultant for the POLIN Museum and the Museum of Modern Art in ?ódz. Her recent publications include Montages. Debora Vogel and the New Legend of the City and My wild goat. Anthology of women Yiddish poets (in Polish). She is also the editor of Rachel Auerbach's ghetto writings, which received the 2016 Polityka History Award.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Sutzkever-Essential-Prose for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Apr 22
07:00PM
Thu, Apr 22
07:00PM

book talk

The Soul of Judaism - Jews of African Descent in America

Author Dr. Bruce D. Haynes speaks of his recent work The Soul of Judaism in conversation with Dr. Michael Alexander. The Soul of Judaism offers the first exploration of the full diversity of Black Jews, including bi-racial Jews of both matrilineal and patrilineal descent; adoptees; black converts to Judaism; and Black Hebrews and Israelites, who trace their Jewish roots to Africa and challenge the dominant western paradigm of Jews as white and of European descent. 

 

Blending historical analysis and oral history, Haynes showcases the lives of Black Jews within the Orthodox, Conservative, Reconstruction and Reform movements, as well as the religious approaches that push the boundaries of the common forms of Judaism we know today. He illuminates how in the quest to claim whiteness, American Jews of European descent gained the freedom to express their identity fluidly while African Americans have continued to be seen as a fixed racial group. This book demonstrates that racial ascription has been shaping Jewish selfhood for centuries. Pushing us to reassess the boundaries between race and ethnicity, it offers insight into how Black Jewish individuals strive to assert their dual identities and find acceptance within their respective communities.


About the Speakers:

Bruce D. Haynes was born in Harlem, New York. After receiving his B.A. in Sociology from Manhattanville College, he conducted applied research, under sociologist and jury expert Jay Schulman, selecting juries for trials throughout New York State. From there he went on to earn his doctorate in sociology from the City University of New York (1995) and was appointed Assistant Professor of Sociology and African-American Studies at Yale University in 1995. In 2001, he joined the faculty at the University of California, Davis, where he now serves as Professor of Sociology. In addition, he is now a Senior Fellow in the Urban Ethnography Project at Yale University. In 2019 he was awarded the Albert J. Raboteau Book Prize for the Best Book in Africana Religions.

Michael Scott Alexander is the Maimonides Chair of Jewish Studies and Associate Professor of Religious Studies at U.C. Riverside. He is the author of Jazz Age Jews, which won the National Jewish Book Award, and Making Peace with the Universe: Personal Crisis and Spiritual Healing. Alexander earned a Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Yale University and a B.A. in Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations from the University of Pennsylvania. He has been faculty at the University of Oklahoma, as well as Temple University where he was director of the Feinstein Center for American Jewish History. He has served on the board and as associate editor of American Jewish History, where he guest edited several volumes, including co-editing “The Color Issue” with Prof. Bruce Haynes (U.C. Davis). Alexander writes about Jewish history, psychology of religion, and medical humanities.

Ticket Info: Free; register at forms.office.com for a Zoom link


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book talk

Sun, Apr 25
01:00PM
Sun, Apr 25
01:00PM

virtual tour

Global Nacao: Tour of the Venice Ghetto

Tour the Venice Ghetto with Moshe Bassali.

About the tour guide:
Moshe Bassali was born in Milan to Sephardic Jewish parents that came to Italy from Iran in the 1950's and married in Italy. His mother arrived at age 12 and went to school in Milan. Moshe has a degree in economics, works in diamonds, and is an official certified tour guide for Venice and Italy. He has been working in Venice since 1991 and after his marriage, Moshe and his wife, Tally, decided to move there. Currently they have three children. Moshe's father and brothers still live in Milan.

Ticket Info: $8; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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virtual tour

Mon, Apr 26
12:00PM
Mon, Apr 26
12:00PM

lecture

Global Nacao: Dayan Dilemmas

In the past, when Jewish communities were largely insulated and autonomous, the functions and jurisdiction of a Beth Din were more clearly defined. In today's global world, where Jewish communities are less clearly defined, and the Beth Din is largely a private endeavor operating within the general legal framework of the local government, many dilemmas regarding authority and jurisdiction arise. Dayan Ofer Livnat will try to address some of the dilemmas dayanim are faced with, and in particular how they relate to issues of Jewish identity, conversions and monetary disputes.


About the Speaker:

Dayan Ofer Livnat serves as a Dayan on the Sephardi Beth of London. A graduate of the Eretz Hemdah Institute for Advanced Jewish Studies in Jerusalem, Dayan Livnat teaches in a number of programs for training rabbis and Dayanim, including the Semicha and Dayanut Programs run jointly by the Montefiore Endowment of London and Eretz Hemdah. A lecturer on Tanach at the Jerusalem College as well, Dayan Livnat has previously served in an artillery unit in the IDF and is currently studying for a PhD in Jewish studies at University College London.

Ticket Info: $8; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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lecture

Mon, Apr 26
04:00PM
Mon, Apr 26
04:00PM

book talk

In a brief life that led to a violent end, Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel (1906–1947) rose from desperate poverty to ill-gotten riches, from an early-twentieth-century family of Ukrainian Jewish immigrants on the Lower East Side to a kingdom of his own making in Las Vegas. In this captivating portrait, author Michael Shnayerson sets out not to absolve Bugsy Siegel but rather to understand him in all his complexity.

Through the 1920s, 1930s, and most of the 1940s, Bugsy Siegel and his longtime partner in crime Meyer Lansky engaged in innumerable acts of violence. As World War II came to an end, Siegel saw the potential for a huge, elegant casino resort in the sands of Las Vegas. Jewish gangsters built nearly all of the Vegas casinos that followed. Then, one by one, they disappeared. Siegel’s story laces through a larger, generational story of eastern European Jewish immigrants in the early- to mid-twentieth century.

Program registrants will receive a code for 30% off and free shipping on the book.

This program is funded, in part, by a Humanities New York CARES Grant, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/bugsy-siegel-2021-04-26 to receive a Zoom link


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book talk

Tue, Apr 27
04:00PM
Tue, Apr 27
04:00PM

panel discussion

The Jewish Experience in Opera

The volume and richness of operatic repertoire drawn from specifically Jewish experience often comes as a revelation to seasoned opera buffs and otherwise knowledgeable devotees of Jewish high culture alike. Yet, dating to the 19th century and continuing on a steep upward incline during the 20th and 21st centuries thus far, very many composers have turned for their operas to themes and subjects of Jewish history, legends, and sacred as well as secular literature. These operas range across several languages, including modern Hebrew and Yiddish.

This panel discussion will include four prominent composers of such operas of Jewish experience: Ofer Ben-Amots, composer of one opera in Hebrew based on The Dybbuk and another in Yiddish on Isaac Bashevis Singer's story, "A Fool's Paradise"; David Schiff, whose opera, Gimpel the Fool is also to a Singer story; Bruce Adolphe, whose operas include Mikhoyels The Wise—about the legendary Soviet Yiddish actor—and Shabbtai Zvi, about the 17th-century so-called "false messiah" naively followed by many thousands of Jews; and Alex Weiser, who wrote an opera about Theodor Herzl, State of the Jews, with librettist Ben Kaplan who will also join the panel.

Introduced and moderated by YIVO's Anne E. Leibowitz Visiting Professor-in-Residence in Music Neil W. Levin, the discussion among the panelists will address questions and issues of topic selection; musical interpretations or reinterpretations of Jewish stories, events, or characters; Jewish aesthetics vis-a-vis the operatic medium; intertwining roles between composer and librettist and/or author; the variety of musical approaches to Jewish themes; and the universal resonance of otherwise specifically Jewish subjects, when viewed through an operatic prism; and what qualifies as a "Jewish opera."

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://www.yivo.org/Jewish-Opera for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Wed, Apr 28
12:00PM
Wed, Apr 28
12:00PM

book talk

New Works Wednesday and Global Nacao: Chocolate Around the World

Around the globe today, chocolate is embraced not only by enthusiastic consumers but also by truly passionate creators who pour their hearts into their confections.

Here in this convenient guidebook are nearly 300 of these chocolate masters. From Brussels to Boston, Paris to Tokyo, London to Los Angeles, these are some of the most dedicated artisans anywhere.

Special listings for gluten-free, vegan, organic, and other dietary needs are also included.


About the Speaker:

Joshua de Sola Mendes is the proprietor of www.sandpcentral.org and www.grahamesguides.com. He is a proud S&P community member and researcher who works to bring the international communities together through his website, and under a separate hat, make us all happy through insight into chocolate and chocolatiering. Joining his will be master chocolatiers who will share some of their background.

Ticket Info: $8; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, Apr 28
01:00PM
Wed, Apr 28
01:00PM

concert

Cry, My Heart, Cry: Songs from Testimonies in the Fortunoff Video Archive, Vol. 2

Many of the Holocaust testimonies of the Fortunoff Video Archive at Yale University include song. The placement of song within Holocaust testimonies speaks to music's power, even in the face of oppression, tyranny, and murder. The songs in Yiddish, Hebrew, Polish, Russian and other languages also give us insight into the wartime experiences of the survivors who sing them and offer a glimpse of the multilingual diversity of their experiences. In 2018 D. Zisl Slepovitch began production of an album of songs drawn from testimonies in the Archive titled Where is Our Homeland? After a successful release captivated audiences around the world, the Fortunoff Video Archive and Slepovitch are now releasing Cry, My Heart, Cry: Songs from Testimonies in the Fortunoff Video Archive, Vol. 2 featuring arrangements of 13 additional songs. Join us to celebrate this release with performances and a live digital discussion with the musicians behind this project.

Joshua Camp (accordion)
Dmitry Ishenko (contrabass)
Craig Judelman (violin)
Sasha Lurje (vocals)
D. Zisl Slepovitch (composer, arranger, producer, woodwinds)

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://www.yivo.org/Fortunoff-Vol2 for a Zoom link


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concert

Wed, Apr 28
02:00PM
Wed, Apr 28
02:00PM

book club

LBI Book Club, Vol. X: Nathan the Wise

One of the most frequently performed and widely read comedies of the eighteenth century, Gotthold Ephraim Lessing's Nathan the Wise (1779) combines rich characterization with an engaging plot. Set in Muslim-ruled Jerusalem at the time of the Crusades, it deals with universal themes -- including the nature of God, antisemitism, wealth and poverty, and the conflict between love and duty. Today the play is as timely as ever.  (Macmillan Learning).

Author
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing (1729 – 1781) was a German writer, philosopher, dramatistpublicist and art critic, and an outstanding representative of the Enlightenment era. His plays and theoretical writings substantially influenced the development of German literature. Lessing was not Jewish, but was famous for his friendship with Jewish-German philosopher Moses Mendelssohn. A biography of Mendelssohn's grandson, Felix, describes their friendship as one of the most "illuminating metaphors [for] the clarion call of the Enlightenment for religious tolerance". It was this relationship that sparked his interest in popular religious debates of the time. He began publishing heated pamphlets on his beliefs which were eventually banned. It was this banishment that inspired him to write Nathan the Wise.

Recommended Edition of the Play
Our guest for this book club recommends this particular version of the text, which comes with accompanying essays and historical notes.  Of course, any edition is fine, but this will be the edition "officially used" by the book club for the meeting.  The book can be purchased on Amazon here.

Our Guest
We are pleased to have Professor Peter Jelavich, who was with us twice last year to discuss Berlin Alexanderplatz, return for our discussion of Nathan the Wise.  

Peter Jelavich specializes in the cultural and intellectual history of Europe since the Enlightenment, with emphasis on Germany. His areas of interest include the interaction of elite and popular culture; the history of mass culture and the media; and the application of cultural and social theories to historical study.

He is the author of Munich and Theatrical Modernism: Politics, Playwriting, and Performance, 1890-1914 (1985), Berlin Cabaret (1993), and Berlin Alexanderplatz: Radio, Film, and the Death of Weimar Culture (2006). 

He currently is writing a book on censorship of the arts in Germany from 1890 to the present.

Ticket Info: Free; register at eventbrite.com for a Zoom link


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book club

Thu, Apr 29
02:00PM
Thu, Apr 29
02:00PM

panel discussion

Samson Schames and the Art of Exile

The German-Jewish painter Samson Schames represents a generation of artists who were forced to leave their homes due to Nazi persecution and yet demonstrated perseverance and resilience in their newly adopted lands. During his internment in an enemy aliens camp near Liverpool and later during the aerial bombardment of London by Nazi Germany, Schames continued to create art using improvised materials and the detritus of war. He created collages and mosaics of broken glass, nails, and wiring, held together by cement. For paintbrushes he used his own hair. Out of the rubble, Schames produced works of great power which captured the pain and suffering around him.

Using Schames’ life story and examples of his work, our panelists will provide a window into the history of exiled artists during the Nazi period and the impact of exile on their art. William Weitzer, Executive Director of the Leo Baeck Institute, will moderate a discussion about Schames with Annika Friedman from the Jewish Museum Frankfurt and Miriam Bistrovic, Leo Baeck Institute's Berlin Representative.

More about Samson Schames
The painter Samson Schames was born to an Orthodox Jewish family in Frankfurt Germany in 1898, and studied art at the Städelschule. He was an Expressionist and endowed his work with explosive spontaneity displayed through stark, spiky strokes, evoking a closer resemblance to applied arts than classical fine arts of his times. He also designed stage sets for the German theater and for the Jewish theater in Germany which in turn influenced his artworks that had an almost scenic quality.

After the Nazis came to power, life became far more difficult. His art was classified as Degenerate Art by the Nazis. In contrast to other artists, his artworks were not only confiscated, but often destroyed by the Nazi expropriators. He and his wife were forced to flee to London in 1939.

With the start of World War II, England interned German-born men as enemy aliens, ironically including German Jews who had escaped Nazi Germany. During his internment, he remained productive despite having access neither to paint nor brushes. He created collages and mosaics using the debris he found as a result of the Nazi bombings. After the war, Schames lived and continued his career as an artist in the U.S.

Ticket Info: Free; register at eventbrite.com for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Sun, May 02
06:00PM
Sun, May 02
06:00PM

lecture

Letters to Jozef Tiso, President of the Slovak State 1939-1945

“…From hour to hour, the most threatening news arrives from every corner of Slovakia about the most threatening measures and deportation of the destroyed, impoverished Jewish population to the former Poland and Russia. Please, I beg of you, Your Honor Mr. President, take steps and stop it… Dear Mr. President, they are sending us to a ready-made slaughter…” Jozef M. Bratislava, March 30, 1942

Between 1939 and 1944, thousands of ordinary people wrote to then President Jozef Tiso of the Slovak State about the so-called “Jewish question.” Some wanted mercy from anti-Jewish persecution, others coveted Jewish property. Why did these individuals write to Tiso? How did the President’s Office process the letters? What fates awaited the Jews who wrote to him? In her talk, Madeline Vadkerty will respond to these questions and describe her research at the Slovak National Archive. She will also read some letters to Tiso and discuss their outcomes, as well as discuss the fates of the letter writers. She will describe what the contents of the letters reveal about the scope and nature of anti-Jewish persecution in the Slovak wartime state.


About the Speaker:

Madeline Vadkerty is a Samuel P. Mandell Fellow in the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program at Gratz College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she is pursuing her PhD. She is the author of the book published in March 2020 entitled Slovutný pán president: Listy Jozefovi Tisovi (Your Honor Mr. President: Letters to Jozef Tiso). She is from the United States, but is currently living in Bratislava in order to carry out her research. Her work has appeared in several Slovak and US journals and her book is currently in its second printing.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/letters-to-jozef-tiso/ for a Zoom link


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lecture

Tue, May 04
01:00PM
Tue, May 04
01:00PM

panel discussion

Leftists on Left-Wing Antisemitism

There is a robust discussion inside the Left about antisemitism in its own ranks. This is not just related to Zionism, Israel, and Palestine, but also involves questions about conspiracy theories, notions of secret elites, and critiques of financial capital—as well as how to deal with openly antisemitic actors. This unique panel will bring together four scholars and activists on the Left, who have a range of different views to discuss this. What does antisemitism on the Left actually consist of? Where do different parts of the Left stand in relation to this issue? How is it addressed or ignored? And what are constructive ways the Left can better deal with antisemitism?

Moderated by Spencer Sunshine, this panel will feature Sina ArnoldShane BurleyKeith Kahn-Harris, and Joshua Leifer.

Ticket Info: Free; register at https://www.yivo.org/Leftists for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Wed, May 05
12:00PM
Wed, May 05
12:00PM

book talk

New Works Wednesdays with José Alberto R. Silva Tavim

In this edition of New Works Wednesday, José Alberto R. Silva Tavimwill discuss his new book "The Diasporas of Jews and New Christians of Iberian Origin between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean."

This book consists of a set of contributions, with different themes and chronologies, on the general theme of Jews of Iberian origin after the late 15th century conversions, that is, with an official Christian identity; and also about welcoming others, of remote Portuguese origin or not, in contemporary Portugal, but also in other longitudes, such as Egypt and Brazil, in different and sometimes even adverse circumstances.

In the light of the dispersion between the Mediterranean and the Atlantic, one can visit, as an example, the fortunes of some of these New Christians in Portugal, and their presence, assuming again a Jewish identity, in Diaspora lands, in Europe and in the New World. Modernity reveals the resistance in Portugal of an awareness of being Jewish; and also that, alongside this phenomenon, the arrival of other Jews, especially from the Maghreb, is more than just a return, it is actually another stage of permanence in completely different contexts with regard to people's origins, their activities, acceptance and respect for its identity.


About the Speaker:

Editor José Alberto R. Silva Tavim will share insights into the book along with some of the contributors: Hugo Martins, who is in Potsdam with a German research grant, published an article in English about the Jews of Hamburg in the 17th century; Angela Benoliel Coutinho (Portuguese-Cape Verdean) wrote about the migration of Jews from Morocco to Portugal and Cape Verde in the 19th and 20th centuries; and Luís Filipe Meneses, from the University of Belo Horizonte (Brazil), wrote an article about a Brazilian Jewish writer of Moroccan origin - Leão Pacífico Esaguy.

Ticket Info: $8; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, May 05
01:00PM
Wed, May 05
01:00PM

book talk

Information Hunters

Information Hunters examines the unprecedented American effort to acquire foreign publications and information in World War II Europe. An unlikely band of librarians, scholars, soldiers, and spies went to Europe to collect books and documents to aid the Allies’ cause. They traveled to neutral cities to find enemy publications for intelligence analysis and followed advancing armies to capture records in a massive program of confiscation. After the war, they seized Nazi works from bookstores and schools and gathered countless looted Jewish books. Improvising library techniques in wartime conditions, they contributed to Allied intelligence, preserved endangered books, engaged in restitution, and participated in the denazification of book collections. Information Hunters explores what collecting meant to the men and women who embarked on these missions and how the challenges of a total war led to an intense focus on books and documents. Book and document acquisition became part of the apparatus of national security, military planning, and postwar reconstruction. These efforts also spurred the development of information science and boosted research libraries’ ambitions to be great national repositories for research and the dissemination of knowledge that would support American global leadership, politically and intellectually.


About the Speaker:

Kathy Peiss is the Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History at the University of Pennsylvania. Her work explores modern American cultural history, gender and sexuality, consumer culture, and the history of books, libraries, and information. Other books include Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York (1986), Hope in a Jar: The Making of America's Beauty Culture (1998), and Zoot Suit: The Enigmatic Career of an Extreme Style (2011). She has also served as a consultant to museums, archives, and public history projects, and appeared in the documentary films New YorkMiss America, and The Powder and the Glory.

Ticket Info: Free; register at forms.office.com for a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, May 05
04:00PM
Wed, May 05
04:00PM

lecture

Due to their unique mediation between the score, the stage, and their audiences, singers are one of the most indispensable elements of opera’s performance and reception. Although opera singers have often inspired scholarship about their geographical, social, and ethnic backgrounds, few studies have designed methods for comparing the experiences of large numbers of singers at the same time. What is more, beyond biographies of individual performers, Jews are rarely understood as significant contributors to the American opera scene. Yet examination of their presence in the Center for Jewish History’s archives confirms that there is merit in undertaking devoted study of their vocal careers.

In this talk, Samantha M. Cooper (CJH Dr. Sophie Bookhalter Graduate Fellow in Jewish Culture 2020-2021, NYU Ph.D. Candidate in Historical Musicology) presents the first extended investigation into the patterns that shaped the trajectories of numerous men and women of Jewish descent who pursued careers as opera singers in New York between 1880 and 1940. Drawing on a wealth of archival resources, she unearths over 50 European- and American-born singers from Jewish families who sang in the citadel of America’s opera scene: New York City. Specifically, she attends to how the outsized frequency of name-changing, connections with the synagogue cantorate, performances for Jewish organizations, recordings in Jewish languages, networking with other Jewish musicians, impact of the Holocaust, and dedication to the State of Israel shaped these singers’ professional lives in particularly Jewish ways. Ultimately, Cooper finds that the statistically significant presence of extraordinarily talented Jewish performers in the American opera industry constituted a much more ordinary reality than scholars of American Jewish history have previously realized.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/tradition-of-talent-2021-05-05 to receive a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, May 06
07:00PM
Thu, May 06
07:00PM

workshop

Multigenerational Family Storytelling Workshop (Teens & Up)

Bring multiple generations of your family together, no matter the distance, for a lively evening of guided storytelling. Participants will learn the importance and how-to’s of family storytelling before breaking off into family groups to explore a list of fun, meaningful questions together. Be prepared to learn surprising new details about your relatives - you may have more in common than you think!

This program is presented by the Center for Jewish History, in collaboration with and with funding from Culture Pass. Culture Pass is a program for cardholding patrons of New York City’s public libraries, the Brooklyn Public Library, New York Public Library, and Queens Public Library. Support for Culture Pass is provided by The New York Community Trust, Charles H. Revson Foundation, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs. To learn more, visit www.culturepass.nyc.

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at eventbrite.com to receive a link to the Zoom program


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workshop

Mon, May 10
04:00PM
Mon, May 10
04:00PM

book talk

After two years at the Center for Jewish History, the Scholars Working Group “Hear Their Cry:” Understanding the Jewish Orphan Experience presents a talk with two group members about their new books.

Bernice Lerner is a senior scholar at Boston University’s Center for Character and Social Responsibility. She is the author of The Triumph of Wounded Souls: Seven Holocaust Survivors’ Lives and coeditor of Happiness and Virtue beyond East and West: Towards a New Global Responsibility. Dr. Lerner will present on her new book, All the Horrors of War: A Jewish Girl, a British Doctor, and the Liberation of Bergen-Belsen (2020), in which she focuses on the life of her mother, Rachel Genuth. Michael Berenbaum writes, “All the Horrors of War is a powerful and poignant tale that traces both the arc of the war and the history of the Holocaust. In this meticulously researched and detailed account, Lerner never lets the reader forget the humanity of the victims or their liberators.”

Marlene Trestman is an attorney and author of Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin. With exhaustive research and engaging prose, Trestman’s Fair Labor Lawyer recounts Margolin’s inspirational journey from New Orleans Jewish Orphans Home through the New Deal to the nation’s highest courts, where she shepherded the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 and the Equal Pay Act of 1963. Prompted by her research on Margolin’s early life and by her own childhood in New Orleans as a Jewish orphan, Trestman’s latest work is Most Fortunate Unfortunates: New Orleans Jewish Orphans’ Home, 1855-1946, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press.

Followed by a Q&A with both authors.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/contextualizing-2021-05-10 to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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book talk

Wed, May 12
01:00PM
Wed, May 12
01:00PM

cooking show

A Taste of Rome's Historic Jewish Cuisine

Rome is home to one of Europe's oldest and most delicious Jewish cuisines. Shaped by centuries of hardship and tightly-bound community, la cucina Ebraica Romana (the Roman Jewish kitchen) is defined by its elegant approach to vegetables, saucy braised meats, love of small and briny fishes, and masterclass level of skill for frying foods in olive oil. Join celebrated cookbook author Leah Koenig for an online cooking demonstration highlighting some of Rome's best dishes. The recipe for concia, a bright and silky marinated zucchini dish, will be made available before the event, so students may pick up ingredients and cook along.


About the Speaker:

Leah Koenig's writing and recipes have appeared in The New York TimesNew York MagazineThe Wall Street JournalThe Washington PostFood & WineEpicuriousFood52, and Tablet, among other publications. Leah is the author of six cookbooks including The Jewish Cookbook (Phaidon, 2019) and Modern Jewish Cooking (Chronicle Books). In addition to writing, Leah also leads cooking demonstrations and workshops around the country and world. She lives in Brooklyn, New York with her husband and two children.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Rome-Jewish-Cuisine for a Zoom link


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cooking show

Thu, May 13
04:00PM
Thu, May 13
04:00PM

conversation

Modern ideals of scholarly detachment and objectivity have always existed in tension with political and public engagement. In 1895, for example, Theodore Reinach, the President of the Société des études juives in France, wrote: "The Society of Jewish Studies need not concern itself with the present trials of Judaism, however poignant the interest may be. It dwells in the quieter sphere of history, and it is only by dispelling the accumulated errors about ancient Judaism that it can indirectly contribute to rehabilitating or consoling Judaism today.” Magda Teter (Fordham University, NEH Scholar-in-Residence 2020-21), in conversation with Deborah Dash Moore (University of Michigan), will explore the role political concerns and specific events have played not only in the lives of Jewish studies scholars but also in their scholarship.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/on-jewish-studies-2021-05-13 to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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conversation

Wed, May 19
01:00PM
Wed, May 19
01:00PM

lecture

Embodying Liberty: American Jewish Attorneys and the Case for Humanizing Public Charge

In 1891, the United States Congress codified a host of physical and mental conditions that would close America’s gates to hopeful immigrants. Since 1882, this policy—the public charge provision—had functioned as a primary means of restricting immigration. While its commodification of health and pathologization of poverty affected all immigrants, eastern European Jews particularly felt its impact, capturing the attention of American Jewish lawyers. Hannah Zaves-Greene examines the legal advocacy of Max Kohler, Abram Elkus, Simon Wolf, and Louis Marshall, American Jewish attorneys who marshalled their deep knowledge of American jurisprudence to defang the law. Focusing on Kohler’s work, we will examine his pro bono defenses of two young Jewish women, who each—about a decade apart—faced the state’s allegation that they had become medical public charges. As he dealt with local officials and argued before the courts, Kohler meticulously framed his opposition to public charge, articulating his philosophy of American citizenship at the nexus of disability and national belonging.


About the Speaker:

Hannah Zaves-Greene is a doctoral candidate in American Jewish history at New York University’s Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies. She is currently the Fellow in American Jewish Studies at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, and a recipient of the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute Research Award. Her dissertation, Able to Be American: American Jews and the Public Charge Provision in United States Immigration Policy, 1891-1934, explores how American Jewish women and men engaged with discrimination on the basis of health, disability, and gender in federal immigration law and its administration. She has taught at both the New School for Social Research and Cooper Union, and has published articles in both AJS Review and American Jewish History.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Embodying-Liberty for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, May 20
11:00AM
Thu, May 20
11:00AM

lecture

Sephardi Thought and Modernity: Rabbi Yosef Knafo’s Struggle for Democratization of Knowledge in Fin de Siècle Essaouira

The intention of this series is to spark the interest in processes of Jewish modernization not exclusively mediated by Europeanization. The questions we will be dealing with are related to non-dichotomic identities, multiplicity and loss of language, colonization, social transformation, and intellectual responses to it. We will approach these questions by looking at Jewish-Arab influences, the Sephardi response to European modernization, the responses of the rabbinic leadership and the work of Sephardi intellectuals.

May 20th: Gabriel Abensour (Hebrew University of Jerusalem): Rabbi Yosef Knafo’s Struggle for Democratization of Knowledge in Fin de Siècle Essaouira

Ticket Info: Free; register at ucalgary.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, May 20
12:30PM
Thu, May 20
12:30PM

conversation

At Lunch with Muzzy Rosenblatt

Author and journalist Julie Salamon (Wall Street Journal and NY Times) sits down with influential cultural leaders in the Jewish American Community; we'll hear their thoughts about working in this present moment, current projects, and what they have to say about their Jewish identity. Grab your lunch and tune in for our conversation with Muzzy Rosenblatt, CEO and President of the Bowery Residents’ Committee.

Our Guest This Month
Muzzy Rosenblatt is CEO and President of BRC (the Bowery Residents’ Committee, Inc.), one of the most successful and innovative nonprofits working in service to New Yorkers experiencing homelessness. BRC’s 30 programs with nearly 3,000 units of shelter and housing provide an integrated continuum of comprehensive services to 10,000 individuals it annually serves, offering a caring and effective path from homelessness to home.  In 2017, Muzzy was honored by the Nonprofit Times as one of the country’s Top 50 influential nonprofit leaders. Prior to BRC, Muzzy held several positions in NYC government, including First Deputy Commissioner and Acting Commissioner of the NYC Department of Homeless Services.  A native New Yorker he grew up in Manhattan, attending PS 158 and Hunter College High School, before earning and MPA from NYU Wagner and a BA from Wesleyan University. He now resides in “the hills of the forest” in the county of Queens.

Interviewed By
Julie Salamon is an American author, critic and storyteller. She worked at The Wall Street Journal for five years first as a commodities and banking reporter before spending eleven years as the paper's film critic. Later she became a staff journalist at The New York Times where she was a TV critic and arts reporter. Later she gained fellowships at the MacDowell Colony and became a Kaiser Media Fellow. She has written both fiction and non-fiction books for adults and children-- and produced articles for magazines that include The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Vogue, Bazaar, and The New Republic. Her books have received wide critical and popular attention, she has just completed "Unlikely Friends," a memoir for Audible Original, scheduled for release in 2021.

Ticket Info: Free; register at forms.office.com for a Zoom link


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conversation

Thu, May 20
07:00PM
Thu, May 20
07:00PM

book talk

A Fortress in Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate and the Making of Hasidic Williamsburg

Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper discuss their new book, which sheds light on the history of one of New York's Hasidic neighborhoods.

Hasidic Williamsburg is famous as one of the most separatist, intensely religious, and politically savvy communities in the entire United States. Less known is how the community survived in one of New York City’s toughest neighborhoods during an era of steep decline, only to later oppose and also participate in the unprecedented gentrification of Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

Nathaniel Deutsch and Michael Casper unravel the fascinating history of how a community of determined Holocaust survivors encountered, shaped, and sometimes fiercely resisted the urban processes that transformed their gritty neighborhood, from white flight and the construction of public housing to rising crime, divestment of city services, and, ultimately, extreme gentrification. By showing how Williamsburg’s Hasidim avoided assimilation, Deutsch and Casper present both a provocative counter-history of American Jewry and a novel look at how race, real estate, and religion intersected in the creation of a quintessential, and yet deeply misunderstood, New York neighborhood.


About the Speakers:

Nathaniel Deutsch is professor of history at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Michael Casper received his Ph.D. in history from UCLA and has contributed to American Jewish History and the New York Review of Books.

Ticket Info: Free; register at hforms.office.com for a Zoom link


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book talk

Tue, May 25
01:00PM
Tue, May 25
01:00PM

book talk

Salomea Perl & Women Yiddish Prose Writers

Warsaw based writer Salomea Perl was one of the rare women publishing literary Yiddish texts at the same time as the klasikers of Yiddish literature, Sholem Aleichem, Mendele Moykher Sforim and Y. L. Peretz. Ruth Murphy's new translation of Perl's work, The Canvas and other stories, is a cause for celebration and reflection. The last thirty years has seen many previously ignored or lost female authors, like Salomea Perl, finally brought into the Yiddish canon. Join us for a discussion of The Canvas, exploring the rediscovery and translation of her work and placing it into its literary context. Moderated by Rokhl Kafrissen (Tablet Magazine) the conversation will feature translator Ruth Murphy alongside Yiddish scholars Anna Fishman Gonshor and Justin Cammy.

Buy the book.


About the Speakers:

Rokhl Kafrissen is a journalist and playwright in New York City. Her ‘Rokhl’s Golden City’ column began appearing in Tablet in 2017, the only regular feature in the world dedicated to new Yiddish culture in all its iterations. Her op-eds on feminism, sociology and Jewish life appear in newspapers all over the world. She was a 2019-2020 14th Street Y LABA fellow, for which she wrote Shtumer Shabes (Silent Sabbath), a black comedy about the dangers of ethnography and human experimentation.

Ruth Murphy is a published and peer-reviewed professional translator specializing in the research and translation of Yiddish literature, historical documents and yizkor (memorial) books. Murphy’s translations have been featured in the Jewish Review of BooksMetamorphoses, and Pakn Treger. Murphy has also served as a translator for the Ellis Island Discography Project where she transcribed and translated multiple early 20th-century Yiddish songs relating to the Jewish Yiddish-speaking immigrant experience.

Justin Cammy is chair and associate professor of Jewish Studies and World Literatures at Smith College, and senior fellow of the Goldreich Institute for Yiddish at Tel Aviv University. He is the author of the introduction to The Full Pomegranate, a recent volume of Sutzkever poetry translated by Richard Fein. Cammy's own translation of Sutzkever's memoir Vilna Ghetto will appear with McGill-Queens University Press in 2021.

Anna Fishman Gonshor is Faculty Lecturer of Yiddish Studies in the Department of Jewish Studies at McGill University (retired). She has been guest lecturer for several university Yiddish programs and various institutions across North America. As a translator her work includes film, articles for academic publications and archival materials. In addition, she is a longstanding faculty member of the YIVO Uriel Weinreich Summer Program in Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Salomea-Perl for a Zoom link


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book talk

Tue, May 25
04:00PM
Tue, May 25
04:00PM

panel discussion

To conclude two years at the Center for Jewish History, the Scholars Working Group “Hear Their Cry:” Understanding the Jewish Orphan Experience presents scholarship from four members on the following topics:

Natalia Aleksiun: Survival Strategies and Jewish Orphans during the Holocaust in Eastern Europe
Joshua C. Andy: Remembrance and Resistance: The Testimony and Memoir of Rachel Pinchsowitz Litwak
Emily Bengels: Vichy France Orphan Rescue
Ms. Bengels will be presenting on the interagency efforts to rescue unaccompanied children from Vichy, France, and bring them to the US from 1939-1942.
Katharina Menschick: The Kindertransports from Austria — Findings from Ten Oral Histories in the Leo Baeck Institute’s Austrian Heritage Collection


About the Speakers:

Natalia Aleksiun, Ph.D., is a Professor of Modern Jewish History at Touro College, Graduate School of Jewish Studies, New York. She has published widely on Polish Jewish issues. She is the author of Where to? The Zionist Movement in Poland, 1944-1950, which appeared in 2002 in Polish, and the co-editor, with Antony Polonsky and Brian Horowitz, of Writing Jewish History in Eastern Europe( 2016). She is currently working on a book about the so-called cadaver affair at European Universities in the 1920s and 1930s and on a project dealing with daily lives of Jews in hiding in Galicia during the Holocaust.

Joshua C. Andy, Ph.D., is an Upper School History Teacher at Winchester Thurston School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he specializes in non-US history and teaches a class entitled “Genocide: A Global History on Crimes Against Humanity.” For the past eight years, he has traveled with and worked as a scholar and historian for Classrooms Without Borders; in that work he has guided students, teachers, and university educators in Holocaust education. Dr. Andy has been a partipant for the past two years in the Scholars Working Group ‘Hear their Cry: Understanding the Jewish Orphan Experience’ at the Center for Jewish History. His latest publication, ‘When Ghosts Roam the Streets: Historical Memory in Starachowice,’ appeared in February 2020 in In Context and describes how one Polish town grapples with its own history and the larger historical narratives of the Holocaust. He earned his BA with honours from Washington & Jefferson College and an MA and Ph.D. from the University of Birmingham (UK).

Emily Bengels is a doctoral candidate at Gratz College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was a JDC Fellow in 2020 and was selected to be part of the USC Shoah Foundation’s Past is Present commemoration of the liberation of Auschwitz and to attend the Yad Vashem Advanced Echoes and Reflections seminar. She leads music for the First Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Hunterdon County and for Congregation Kehilat Shalom, and teaches in Hunterdon County, NJ.

Katharina Menschick received an MA in history and literature from the CUNY Graduate Center in 2019. After working in the archives of the Leo Baeck Institute in New York, she is now is a research associate at the Arolsen Archives – International Center on Nazi Persecution.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/hear-their-cry-2021-05-25 to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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panel discussion

Thu, May 27
04:00PM
Thu, May 27
04:00PM

book talk

In June of 1942, amid Third Reich victories everywhere, Winston Churchill and his chief of staff form an unusual plan: a new commando unit made up of Jewish refugees who escaped to Britain. The resulting volunteers are a motley group of intellectuals, artists, and athletes, most from Germany and Austria. Many have been interned as enemy aliens, and have lost their families, their homes—their whole worlds. They will stop at nothing to defeat the Nazis. Trained in counterintelligence and advanced combat, this top-secret unit becomes known as X Troop.

Drawing on extensive original research, including interviews with the last surviving members, author and historian Leah Garrett, Professor and Director of Jewish Studies at Hunter College, follows this unique band of brothers from Germany to England and back again, with stops at British internment camps, the beaches of Normandy, the battlefields of Italy and Holland, and the hellscape of Terezin concentration camp—the scene of one of the most dramatic, untold rescues of the war. For the first time, X Troop: The Secret Jewish Commandos of World War IItells the astonishing story of these secret shock troops and their devastating blows against the Nazis.

This program is funded, in part, by a Humanities New York CARES Grant, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the federal CARES Act, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. 

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at /tickets/x-troop-2021-05-27 to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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book talk

Wed, Jun 02
04:00PM
Wed, Jun 02
04:00PM

book club

Go behind the stories and peer inside the archives at the CJH book discussion, led by Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History. This session will feature a discussion of Plunder by Menachem Kaiser, the story of the author’s quest to reclaim his family’s apartment building in Poland—and of the astonishing entanglement with Nazi treasure hunters that follows. This debut from Kaiser has received rave reviews and was described by the New York Times as “a twisting and reverberant and consistently enthralling story…a weird story that gets weirder.” We will be joined by the author for a Q&A after the discussion.

Participants will need to obtain their own copy to read before the discussion.

NOTE: This is a book discussion, not a lecture, so space is limited.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/people-book-club-2021-06-02 for a Zoom link


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book club

Tue, Jun 08
01:00PM
Tue, Jun 08
01:00PM

concert

Joel Engel: Jewish Folksongs Volume III - Premiere on Facebook and YouTube

Join us for a performance of Joel Engel's Jewish Folksongs Volume III (c. 1920): 10 Yiddish folksongs, dances, and Hasidic nigunim in virtuosic piano arrangements. Together with volumes I and II (featured by YIVO in November 2020), Engel's arrangements were the first classical compositions to feature Yiddish folksongs. His use of Yiddish folk music in his compositions proved to be influential and inspired the Society for Jewish Folk Music and the composers affiliated with it to create a vast oeuvre of similar work. Engel's work also provided a source for a variety of other composers who used Yiddish folksongs in their music including, famously, Prokofiev's Overture on Hebrew Themes, whose second theme is taken from the second song of Volume I from this collection.

This collection of 10 pieces will be performed by pianist Thomas Kotcheff.

About the Performer
Thomas Kotcheff
 (b. 1988) is a Los Angeles based composer and pianist. His music has been described as “truly beautiful and inspired” (icareifyoulisten.com) and “explosive” (Gramophone magazine). His compositions have been performed internationally by The Riot Ensemble, New York Youth Symphony, wild Up, Sandbox Percussion, Trio Appassionata, Argus Quartet, Lyris Quartet, Alinde Quartett, USC Thornton Edge, The Oberlin Contemporary Music Ensemble, HOCKET, Peabody Percussion Group, Latitude 49, and the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble amongst others.

As a new music pianist, Thomas has dedicated himself to commissioning and premiering new piano works. His playing has been described as “dazzling” by Mark Swed of the Los Angeles Times and “outstanding” by Steve Smith of Night after Night. In 2020, Thomas released the world premiere recording of Frederic Rzewski’s 75-minute solo piano work Songs of Insurrection in which Rzewski hailed his performance as “magnificent.” He is the pianist and founding member of the Los Angeles based piano duo HOCKET.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Engel-Volume-III for a Zoom link


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concert

Thu, Jun 10
01:00PM
Thu, Jun 10
01:00PM

lecture

Jewish Anarchist Women 1920-1950: the Politics of Sexuality

Anarchist theory includes the belief in freedom for all - that no one person, nor group of people, should have power over any others; that individuals can best decide how to live (and love). In this presentation Elaine Leeder will discuss eight Jewish women who identified as anarchists, active during the 1920s to 1950s. Through analysis of in-depth interviews Leeder explores the complete sexual freedom that these women sought at a time when conventionality and conformity was the norm. These women attempted to create equality in the public and private spheres, some living communally and raising their children in progressive schools. They also sought to maintain complete equality of the sexes through economic independence and maintaining non-conformist sexual relationships. This talk will place a particular focus on the way that ethnicity played a role in these women’s identities, emphasizing their atheism, while still maintaining Jewish values and traditions.


About the Speaker:

Elaine Leeder is a retired dean and professor at Sonoma State University; she is the author of six books, two of which are being used at universities around the country. Her first book The Gentle General: Rose Pesotta, Anarchist and Labor Organizer, was published by SUNY PRESS. She was the author of a number of articles on Anarchist-Feminism in the 1980s. Currently she works in prisons doing restorative justice facilitating dialogues between victims and those who committed the crimes in California prisons. She is the recipient of the Real Hero Award from the American Red Cross for her work in prisons, is listed in Who’s Who of American Teachers, and Who’s Who in America, and was a visiting scholar at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/Jewish-Anarchist-Women for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Jun 17
01:00PM
Thu, Jun 17
01:00PM

lecture

Sephardi Thought and Modernity: Foreign in a Familiar Land - Language and Belonging in the Work of Jacqueline Kahanoff, Albert Memmi and Jacques Derrida

The intention of this series is to spark the interest in processes of Jewish modernization not exclusively mediated by Europeanization. The questions we will be dealing with are related to non-dichotomic identities, multiplicity and loss of language, colonization, social transformation, and intellectual responses to it. We will approach these questions by looking at Jewish-Arab influences, the Sephardi response to European modernization, the responses of the rabbinic leadership and the work of Sephardi intellectuals.

June 17th: Yuval Evri (King’s College London) and Angy Cohen (University of Calgary): Foreign in a familiar land: language and belonging in the work of Jacqueline Kahanoff, Albert Memmi and Jacques Derrida

Ticket Info: Free; register at ucalgary.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Jun 24
02:00PM
Thu, Jun 24
02:00PM

conversation

Heinrich Heine: Revolution and Music

In Heinrich Heine, Writing the Revolution, a vividly imagined exploration of Heinrich Heine’s life and work for the Yale Jewish Live Series, author George Prochnik contextualizes Heine’s biography within the different revolutionary political, literary, and philosophical movements of his age. He also explores the insights Heine offers contemporary readers into issues of social justice, exile, and the role of art in nurturing a more equitable society.

Prochnik is also the author of a forthcoming essay on Heine and his relationship to Karl Marx for LBI's Shared History Project. In it, he explores the productive tension between Heine's political commitment to the cause of human freedom and his belief in the paramount importance of aesthetic self-expression.

Alex Ross, author of a recent essay on Heine for the New Yorker will engage Prochnik in a conversation about Heine's revolutionary aesthetics and politics with a special focus the musical settings of the poet's verse that became enduring landmarks of German-language culture.

About the Panelists
George Prochnik
 is the author of Stranger in a Strange Land: Searching for Gershom Scholem and Jerusalem. His previous book, The Impossible Exile: Stefan Zweig at the End of the World, received the 2014 National Jewish Book Award for Biography/Memoir.

Alex Ross has been the music critic of The New Yorker since 1996. He is the author of The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century (2007), Listen to This (2010), and Wagnerism: Art and Politics in the Shadow of Music (2020). In 2008 he was named a MacArthur Fellow.

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org/events/heinrich-heine-poetry-revolution-and-music/ for a Zoom link


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conversation