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Wed, Oct 27
12:00PM ET
Wed, Oct 27
12:00PM ET

book talk

New Works Wednesdays: Jews and Muslims in Morocco: Their Intersecting Worlds

Join us for a discussion with three researchers featured in the book Jews and Muslims in Morocco: Their Intersecting Worlds.

About the Book
Multiple traditions of Jewish origins in Morocco emphasize the distinctiveness of Moroccan Jewry as indigenous to the area, rooted in its earliest settlements and possessing deep connections and associations with the historic peoples of the region. The creative interaction of Moroccan Jewry with the Arab and Berber cultures was noted in the Jews’ use of Morocco’s multiple languages and dialects, characteristic poetry, and musical works as well as their shared magical rites and popular texts and proverbs. In Jews and Muslims in Morocco: Their Intersecting Worlds historians, anthropologists, musicologists, Rabbinic scholars, Arabists, and linguists analyze this culture, in all its complexity and hybridity. The volume’s collection of essays span political and social interactions throughout history, cultural commonalities, traditions, and halakhic developments. As Jewish life in Morocco has dwindled, much of what is left are traditions maintained in Moroccan ex-pat communities, and memories of those who stayed and those who left. The volume concludes with shared memories from the perspective of a Jewish intellectual from Morocco, a Moroccan Muslim scholar, an analysis of a visual memoir painted by the nineteenth-century artist, Eugène Delacroix, and a photo essay of the vanished world of Jewish life in Morocco.

To purchase the book: Rowman.com/Lexington

About the Speakers
André Elbaz is a professor emeritus of French at Carleton University.

Edwin Seroussi is a professor of musicology and director of the Jewish Music Research Centre at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Michal Ben Ya'akov is an associate professor of history at Efrata College of Education.

Ticket Info: Free; register at us02web.zoom.usfor a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Oct 28
02:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 28
02:00PM ET

book club

LBI Book Club, Vol. XV: The Oppermanns

The three Oppermann brothers and their sister lead comfortable, upper-class lives in Berlin. For a long while, they choose to ignore the rising tide of antisemitism around them. The Oppermanns by Lion Feuchtwanger follows the members of the family from November 1932 until the late summer of 1933, as their bourgeoise existence as owners of a Berlin department store is increasingly threatened and begins to deteriorate. Feuchtwanger's contemporary novel was first printed by the Dutch Querido publishing house in 1933 — at a time when the author had already left Germany to live in exile in Sanary-sur-Mer, France. The Leo Baeck Institute Book Club is pleased to have Professor Peter Jelavich returning to lead us in a discussion of the novel.  

About the Author<
Lion Feuchtwanger (1884 – 1958), was born in Munich and raised Jewish. Growing up, his family reportedly placed equal emphasis on the religious rites and traditional aspects of his Jewish heritage as they did on German culture, which they considered themselves to be part of. Feuchtwanger suffered immensely under the Nazi reign of terror himself. After Hitler's seizure of power, copies of his novels were destroyed during the Nazi book burnings in Berlin and elsewhere across Germany on May 10, 1933, as they dealt with themes such as Jewish emancipation. His house and personal estate were also later confiscated.

Feuchtwanger went into exile in France, where he was eventually captured in 1940 after the Nazis invaded the country. He managed to then escape to the United States, where he spent the rest of his life. Feuchtwanger died in Los Angeles in 1958.

Getting the Book
The Oppermanns can be read for free in the Internet Archive here. It is also available on Amazon here.

About our Guest
Peter Jelavich is a Professor of History at the Johns Hopkins University. Previously, Jelavich was professor of history and chair of the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows (1979-1981) and he received his PhD from Princeton University in 1982. Jelavich specializes in the cultural and intellectual history of Europe since the Enlightenment, with emphasis on Germany. He is the author of Munich and Theatrical Modernism: Politics, Playwriting, and Performance, 1890-1914 (1985), Berlin Cabaret (1993), and Berlin Alexanderplatz: Radio, Film, and the Death of Weimar Culture (2006).

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org for a Zoom link


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book club

Thu, Oct 28
05:00PM ET
Thu, Oct 28
05:00PM ET

lecture

FamilyHistoryTodayGettingStartedwithAshkenaziJewishDNA

DNA has the potential to be an essential and exciting genealogical tool. But many Eastern European Jewish testers find their DNA results completely overwhelming and unnavigable. In this talk, Jennifer Mendelsohn, an internationally renowned journalist and professional genealogist, will help those with Ashkenazi heritage learn how to make sense of their DNA results. She’ll cover the basics of DNA testing, including why our match lists are so large, (hello, endogamy!) why all our matches seem to match each other (endogamy, again!), and how to spot the meaningful matches and separate them from the faux ones. Using real-life examples of DNA success, you’ll learn techniques that will help you work effectively with DNA to expand your tree.

This program is funded, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/family-history-today-2021-10-28 for a Zoom link


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lecture

Fri, Oct 29
01:00PM ET
Fri, Oct 29
01:00PM ET

book talk

The Yiddish Historians and the Struggle for a Jewish History of the Holocaust

Historians began writing the history of the Holocaust in Yiddish from a distinctly Jewish perspective in the years immediately after World War II. These Yiddish historians studied the Holocaust from the perspective of its Jewish victims, rather than that of the Nazi perpetrators, examining daily life in the ghettos and camps, and stressing the importance of survivor testimonies, eyewitness accounts, and memoirs. Above all, they redefined “resistance” to include the many ways Jews struggled to remain alive under Nazi occupation. Mark Smith chronicles and contextualizes this largely overlooked yet significant set of scholars in his recently published work, The Yiddish Historians and the Struggle for a Jewish History of the Holocaust.

Join Mark Smith and Samuel Kassow for this important, eye-opening conversation on Holocaust historiography.

About the Participants
Mark L. Smith is the author of The Yiddish Historians and the Struggle for a Jewish History of the Holocaust (Wayne State University Press, 2019), which was named a National Jewish Book Award finalist and is now in paperback. He has taught Jewish history at UCLA, where he received his PhD in Jewish history in 2016. He writes and lectures on East European Jewish history and culture, with a special interest in Holocaust historiography and Yiddish scholarly writing. His work has also been featured and reviewed in the Yiddish-language Forverts.  He is currently Resident Scholar at American Jewish University, Los Angeles.

Samuel D. Kassow is the Charles H. Northam Professor of History at Trinity College, and is recognized as one of the world’s leading scholars on the Holocaust and the Jews of Poland. He is widely known for his 2007 book, Who Will Write Our History? Emanuel Ringelblum, the Warsaw Ghetto, and the Oyneg Shabes Archive (Indiana University Press). He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy for Jewish Research, has won numerous awards, and has lectured widely.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/The-Yiddish-Historians for a Zoom link


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book talk

Mon, Nov 01
12:00PM ET
Mon, Nov 01
12:00PM ET

lecture

At the Crossroads: Provencal Jewish Culture in the Middle Ages

The medieval Jewish community of Provence sat at the crossroads of Ashkenaz and Sefarad, a meeting place of diverse ideas and a center of innovative thought. Provençal Jews were renowned for their masterpieces of Talmudic learning as well as groundbreaking works of philosophy and science. It was in Provence that the treasures of Judeo-Arabic learning were translated into Hebrew, from which they were handed down to us today. This distinct blend of traditional and worldly knowledge characterized Provence. Its denizens saw themselves as belonging to a unique regional culture and proudly recorded its customs in books of minhagim and its version of the liturgy. With the French expulsions of the fourteenth century, Provençal Jewish culture was dispersed, but it did not come to a halt. Everywhere that members of this community went, they carried with them their distinctive approach to Jewish life, and their influence is felt into modernity.

About the speaker:
Dr. Tamar Marvin is a scholar of medieval Jewish intellectual history and a semikha student at Yeshivat Mahrat. She holds a Ph.D. in Jewish Studies from the Jewish Theological Seminary and a B.A. in Literature and Journalism from New York University. Dr. Marvin has taught and developed curricula in a variety of academic and Jewish settings, including American Jewish University and Hebrew Union College-JIR, Los Angeles. She has published her work in academic journals as well as writing for broader media. Dr. Marvin’s research centers on questions of how medieval Jews reacted to and creatively adapted new forms of meaning-making in the world they encountered around them, including both philosophical reflection and Kabbalistic speculation.

Ticket Info: $10; register at us02web.zoom.usfor a Zoom link


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lecture

Wed, Nov 03
05:30PM ET
Wed, Nov 03
05:30PM ET

virtual tour

Tapestry Tour with Ted Comet: An Interactive Virtual Experience

Ted Comet is a New York Jewish community leader and husband of the late artist, psychotherapist, and Holocaust survivor, Shoshana Comet. With no prior art training, Shoshana brought a loom into their home and taught herself the art of weaving as a means of expressing and overcoming the trauma that she experienced during the war. Join Ted for an inspiring virtual tour of Shoshana’s tapestries, as he lovingly recounts the story of her survival and the redemptive power of art.

Ticket Info: Free; register at dorotusa-org.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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virtual tour

Wed, Nov 03
07:30PM ET
Wed, Nov 03
07:30PM ET

concert

SchumannandDvorakMasterpiecesPhoenixChamberEnsembleTeslaQuartetReturntotheCenterforJewishHistory

The Phoenix Chamber Ensemble cordially invites you to a performance of two great piano quintets -- Schumann's Piano Quintet Op. 44 and Dvorak's Piano Quintet, Op 81. Pianists Vassa Shevel and Inessa Zaretsky are joined by the Tesla Quartet in this happy comeback to the Center!

Auditorium seating is available for 100. This concert will also be live-streamed for those who cannot attend in person.

To ensure compliance with local health and safety guidelines, proof of full COVID-19 vaccination (at least 14 days after your final vaccine dose) with matching ID is required for all visitors 12 and older. You can provide proof of vaccination by displaying it on your smartphone, by presenting a physical copy, or by using the New York State Excelsior Pass or NYC COVID Safe App (Android | iOS). Other acceptable forms of COVID-19 vaccination proof are the CDC Vaccination Card or NYC Vaccination RecordMask wearing is mandatory throughout the building.

Ticket Info:
In person: $15 general; $10 members, seniors, students – ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY; NO SALES AT THE DOOR
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On YouTube: Pay what you wish
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concert

Thu, Nov 04
10:30AM ET
Thu, Nov 04
10:30AM ET

lecture

No hay boda sin tanyedera: Ladino Music Salon

Are there “right” instruments to accompany Sephardic songs? People often remark on the instruments in the background of Judith’s online lectures and concerts. Here, Judith will use the online format to invite you to this background, her living-room, and all the stringed, wind and hand percussion instruments in it. Rather than background, the instruments, most of them hand-crafted, will be protagonists. Each one has songs and stories associated with it, and your questions and comments will help shape the order in which they’re presented.

About the Speaker:
Dr. Judith Cohen is a Canadian ethnomusicologist, medievalist, singer and storyteller specialized in Sephardic music, music among the Portuguese Crypto-Jews, and related traditions. Her presentations are based on both academic research and many years of fieldwork in Spain, Portugal, Morocco, the Balkans, Turkey, French Canada and wherever else her work and curiosity take her. She teaches part-time at York University in Toronto and is the consultant for the Alan Lomax Spain 1952 recordings.

Ticket Info: $10; register at us02web.zoom.usfor a Zoom link


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lecture

Thu, Nov 04
04:00PM ET
Thu, Nov 04
04:00PM ET

conversation

AreThereNewWaysofReadingtheBibleinthe21stCentury

This program will focus on The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 1: Ancient Israel, from Its Beginnings through 332 BCE, edited by Jeffrey H. Tigay and Adele Berlin, and will feature Alison Joseph in conversation with Deborah Dash Moore.

For two thousand years, Jews and Christians have been reading the Hebrew Bible. Are there new ways to read it in the 21st century? To uncover what's new in this ancient document, join the discussion with The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization Editor and Biblical Scholar Alison Joseph in conversation with Professor Deborah Dash Moore, Editor in Chief of The Posen Library.

What do you learn about the Torah laws when you set them alongside non-biblical legal documents of the period? How does reading Miriam's song next to Deborah's song change how we understand these pieces of poetry? What can artifacts of this period show us about daily life in ancient Israel—its religious practices, household tasks, architecture, and art? Explore how we can read the Bible today in relation to the development of Judaism from ancient times to the present.


About the Speakers:

Alison L. Joseph is Senior Editor of The Posen Library of Jewish Civilization and CultureShe brings her academic expertise in Hebrew Bible and ancient Judaism to the management of the ancient volumes of The Posen Library. Dr. Joseph earned a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Studies from the University of California, Berkeley and a M.A. in Jewish Studies from Emory University. Her first book Portrait of the Kings: The Davidic Prototype in Deuteronomistic Poetics, received the 2016 Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise. She has previously taught at Swarthmore College, The Jewish Theological Seminary, Towson University, Villanova University, Haverford College, and Ursinus College.

Deborah Dash Moore is the Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professor of History and Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan. An American Jewish historian, her work focuses on urban Jews. She is the editor in chief of The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization. She also served as co-editor of The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 10: Late Twentieth Century, 1973–2005.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/new-in-the-bible-2021-11-04 for a Zoom link


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conversation

Mon, Nov 08
12:00PM ET
Mon, Nov 08
12:00PM ET

virtual tour

Museum Mondays: A Hanukkah Tour Through Ancient Greece – Greek Exhibits in Museums around the World

Join us for this Hanukkah special! Explore Greek memorabilia in museums around the world from the comfort of your own home with Nachliel Selavan, the Museum Guy.

About your tour guide
Nachliel Selavan created and delivered an integrated learning and museum tour program for both school and adult educational settings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and has hosted similar pilot visits to a dozen museums in North America, and a few museums in Europe and in Jerusalem. He also teaches and engages audiences through virtual tours and social media. He has recently completed a year long Tanach Study podcast called Parasha Study Plus, delivering a weekly episode of Archaeology on the Parasha, and is now on his second podcast and a new video series reviewing every book in Tanach, called Archaeology Snapshot.

Ticket Info: $10; register at us02web.zoom.us for a Zoom link


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virtual tour

Tue, Nov 09
01:00PM ET
Tue, Nov 09
01:00PM ET

concert

10 Yiddish Songs by Alexander Krein – Live on Facebook and YouTube

Join us for a performance of Alexander Krein's Ten Yiddish Songs Op. 49 (~1937). Performed by singer Lucy Fitz Gibbon with pianist Ryan MacEvoy McCullough, these 10 songs reimagine Yiddish folksong texts and melodies in rich and imaginative arrangements for piano and voice.

Born in 1883, Krein was raised in a family of musicians and performed cello with his father’s Klezmer band. After studying at the Moscow Conservatory where Krein enrolled at age 13, he became an active member of the Moscow branch of the Society for Jewish Folkmusic. Krein wrote music that was more harmonically adventurous than many of the other composers, taking influence from modernist composers such as Alexander Scriabin. While many of the composers affiliated with the Society for Jewish Folkmusic emigrated to Palestine or the United States, Krein remained in the Soviet Union for the rest of his life. Krein was awarded the title of Honored Artist of the Soviet Union, and was particularly active writing music for theatrical performances including for Moscow’s Hebrew-language Habimah Theater as well as for Yiddish state theaters in Moscow, Kiev, and Minsk.

About the Performers
Soprano Lucy Fitz Gibbon and pianist Ryan MacEvoy McCullough have been making music together since 2006, giving their first joint recital in Sacramento, California, in 2009. As both musical and life partners, Fitz Gibbon and McCullough bring an intimacy to their performances that speaks to their many years of collaboration. The husband-and-wife duo has performed throughout North America and Europe in such venues as New York's Merkin Hall, Park Avenue Armory, Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Di Menna Center; London's Wigmore Hall; and Toronto's Koerner Hall. Their growing joint discography includes forthcoming CDs with Albany Records (Descent/Return, featuring works by John Harbison and James Primosch, and another featuring the collected works of Sheila Silver alongside luminaries Dawn Upshaw, Stephanie Blythe, and Gilbert Kalish) and Acte Préalable (mid-century Polish art song).

Committed to the performance of contemporary works alongside the art song canon, Fitz Gibbon and McCullough have worked closely with emerging and established composers alike. Among the body of works dedicated to them are compositions by Niccolo Athens (Five Poems of Sara Teasdale), Dante De Silva (A Year of Strife), Andrew Hsu (Reticence), Anna Lindemann (The Colony), Pablo Ortiz (California Songs), and Alan Louis Smith (Surfing the Thin Places). They have also given premieres of works by John Harbison (Seven Poems of Lorraine Niedecker) and James Primosch (Descent/Return, The Pitcher, The Old Astronomer) and have worked closely with Sheila Silver on numerous projects. Through the guidance and research of musicologist Mackenzie Pierce, Fitz Gibbon and McCullough have given the US premieres of numerous works by mid-20th century Polish composers ranging from the early and late works of Roman Palester (Three Songs to Texts of Kazimiera IllakowiczównaMonogramy) and a modern setting of 16th century religious texts (Tadeusz Kassern's Tryptyk Zablobny), as well as songs by Grazyna Bacewicz and Alexander Tansman (Ponctuation Française). They have also brought new life to Milton Babbit's lyrical Du and Adela Maddison's lush Cinq mélodies, while championing long-form songs by Schubert (ViolaVergissmeinnicht) and Prokofiev (The Ugly Duckling).

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at https://www.yivo.org/Krein2021


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concert

Tue, Nov 09
07:30PM ET
Tue, Nov 09
07:30PM ET

concert

Kristallnacht and Its Aftermath: Remembering Terezín; A Tribute to the Artists who Perished in the Holocaust – LIVE!

The program features the world premiere of "Echoes from the Darkness: Messages from the Terezin Diaries of Petr and Eva Ginz," a chamber opera by John Califra. In addition, the concert will include Hans Krása’s “Dance for String Trio," selected songs by Viktor Ullman and Pavel Haas, Gideon Klein’s “Piano Sonata," and the "Sonata for Flute and Piano," by Erwin Schulhoff.

Ticket Info: $18 general; $12 members; $9 seniors/students; register at kristallnacht-and-its-aftermath.eventbrite.com


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concert

Wed, Nov 10
01:00PM ET
Wed, Nov 10
01:00PM ET

lecture

The Last Shtetl in Poland? The Jewish World, the Cold War and the Jewish Community of Dzierzoniow (1945-1950)

Using examples from archival, photographic other material from the YIVO and other archives, Kamil Kijek (Taube Department of Jewish Studies, University of Wroclaw) will show how a remarkable community of Polish Jews in formerly German Lower Silesia played an important role not only in Polish post-war history but also in Jewish global politics (on both sides of the so-called Iron Curtain) during the years 1945-1950.

What will become apparent is that, in the aftermath of the Holocaust, many Polish Jews, as well as their western, especially American counterparts, felt that Poland was to be considered more than cemetery of a destroyed Jewish civilization. During the years 1945-1950, the Polish Jewish Lower Silesian community in general, and that of the the town of Dzier?oniów in particular, were at the center of Jewish transnational discussion regarding the future of Polish Jewry after the Holocaust. Kijek will argue that it was, in fact, not the Kielce pogrom of 1946, but the intenstification of the Cold War and the installment of the so-called Stalinist political regime in Poland that was the main trigger leading to the end of faith in the possibility of an existence of Jewish national life in post-Holocaust Poland.

About the Speaker
Dr. Kamil Kijek is a Assistant Professor at the Jewish Studies Department, University of Wroclaw, Poland. He has been a Prins Foundation postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Jewish History in New York and Sosland Family Fellow at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC. Kijek’s publications include: “Dzieci modernizmu. Swiadomosc i socjalizacja polityczna mlodziezy zydowskiej w Polsce miedzywojennej” [Children of modernism. Socialization and Political Consciousness of the Jewish Youth in Interwar Poland], Wroclaw 2017; “Was It Possible to avoid ‘Hebrew Assimilation’? Hebraism, Polonization, and the Zionist “Tarbut” School System in the Last Decade of Interwar Poland”, “Jewish Social Studies”, vol. 21.2, 2016.; “Between love of Poland, symbolic violence and anti-Semitism. On the idiosyncratic effect of the state education system among the Jewish youth in Interwar Poland” [in:] “Polin. Studies in Polish Jewry”, vol. 30, 2018.

In 2018, he received an international prize for an outstanding publication in the topic of "Jews and Illiberal Regimes in Eastern Europe after 1917" granted by The Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East-European Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem for the book "Dzieci modernizmu."

His current research project is entitled Polish Shtetl after the Holocaust? Jews in Dzierzoniow, 1945-1950.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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lecture

Wed, Nov 10
06:00PM ET
Wed, Nov 10
06:00PM ET

book talk

MadamTheBiographyofPollyAdlerIconoftheJazzAge

Pearl “Polly” Adler (1900-1962) was a diminutive dynamo whose Manhattan brothels in the Roaring Twenties were key gathering places where high society mingled with violent underworld figures—and had a good time doing it. As a Jewish immigrant from eastern Europe, Polly Adler’s life is a classic American story of success and assimilation that starts like a novel by Henry Roth and then turns into a glittering tale straight out of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Debby Applegate tells the jaw-dropping story of a notorious madam who as much as any single figure helped make the twenties roar.

This program is funded, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/polly-adler-2021-11-10 for a Zoom link


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book talk

Thu, Nov 11
01:00PM ET
Thu, Nov 11
01:00PM ET

book talk

Man of the Futures: the Story of Leo Melamed

YIVO Board Member Leo Melamed, author of Man of the Futures, recounts his journey from Holocaust survivor to prominent leader in the world of finance, sharing behind-the-scenes reminiscences on the financial markets and his philanthropic work in the Jewish community.

About the Author
Leo Melamed (born March 20th, 1932), a Holocaust survivor, found safety in the US during World War II. He is the founder of financial futures. In 1972, as chairman of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME Group), he revolutionized markets with the creation of the International Monetary Market — the first futures exchange for financial instruments — and the launch of currency futures. Twenty years after their inception, Nobel Laureate Merton Miller named financial futures “the most significant innovation of the past two decades.” In 1987, Melamed revolutionized futures trading again with the founding of Globex®, the world’s first futures electronic-trading system.

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at https://www.yivo.org/Man-of-the-Futures


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book talk

Sun, Nov 14
11:00AM ET
Sun, Nov 14
11:00AM ET

conference

Jewish Soldiers & Fighters in World War II

Sunday, November 14, 11am - 4:30pm & Monday, November 15, 9:30am - 6pm

Amidst the bloodshed and destruction of World War II, nearly 1.5 million Jewish men and women made vital contributions to the Allied war effort against Adolf Hitler and the Axis powers. However, despite the large volume of World War II research, books, movies, and other works, the very fact of these 1.5 million “Jewish soldiers” remains virtually unknown.

In November 2021, leading experts from universities, archives, libraries, and museums will gather on an international (virtual) stage, alongside members of the public, veterans and their families, and Holocaust survivors and their descendants to explore the experience of the Jewish soldier in WWII. Click here for more information.

The Center for Jewish History is a Cultural Partner of this program.

Ticket Info: Free; register at accelevents.com/e/jewishsoldiersinwwii


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conference

Mon, Nov 15
09:30AM ET
Mon, Nov 15
09:30AM ET

conference

Jewish Soldiers & Fighters in World War II

Sunday, November 14, 11am - 4:30pm & Monday, November 15, 9:30am - 6pm

Amidst the bloodshed and destruction of World War II, nearly 1.5 million Jewish men and women made vital contributions to the Allied war effort against Adolf Hitler and the Axis powers. However, despite the large volume of World War II research, books, movies, and other works, the very fact of these 1.5 million “Jewish soldiers” remains virtually unknown.

In November 2021, leading experts from universities, archives, libraries, and museums will gather on an international (virtual) stage, alongside members of the public, veterans and their families, and Holocaust survivors and their descendants to explore the experience of the Jewish soldier in WWII. Click here for more information.

The Center for Jewish History is a Cultural Partner of this program.

Ticket Info: Free; register at accelevents.com/e/jewishsoldiersinwwii


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conference

Mon, Nov 15
04:00PM ET
Mon, Nov 15
04:00PM ET

book club

PeopleoftheBookClubemTheVixenemwithauthorFrancineProse

Go behind the stories and peer into the archives at the CJH book discussion, led by Lauren Gilbert, Senior Manager for Public Services at the Center for Jewish History. Join a discussion of The Vixen by Francine Prose, a novel about Simon Putnam, a recent Harvard graduate hired by a distinguished Manhattan publishing firm, which feels a world away from his middle-class Jewish home in Coney Island. Simon’s first assignment, editing a lurid bodice-ripper improbably based on the recent trial and execution of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, tests his loyalties, because he has a secret that he cannot reveal at the height of the Red Scare: his beloved mother was a childhood friend of Ethel Rosenberg’s. We will look at some documents in the Center’s collections that are connected to the Rosenberg case, and we will be joined by author Francine Prose for a Q&A after the discussion.

Participants will need to obtain their own copy of the book to read in advance.

NOTE: This is an interactive book discussion for all participants, not a lecture, so space is limited.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/people-book-club-2021-11-15 for a Zoom link


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book club

Tue, Nov 16
02:00PM ET
Tue, Nov 16
02:00PM ET

panel discussion

Holocaust History in the 21st Century

From the earliest efforts by survivors themselves to document the destruction of European Jews to the enormous international and interdisciplinary literature being produced today, the historiography of the Holocaust has both followed the course of history as a discipline through numerous turns – cultural, narrative, forensic, spatial, etc... – and opened up new methodological paths of its own. As LBI's Shared History Project concludes its examination of the darkest chapter in the 1,700-year history of Jewish life in German-speaking lands, panelists Elizabeth Anthony (USHMM), Anna Hájková (University of Warwick), and Joanna Sliwa (Claims Conference) reflect on the past, present, and future of Holocaust historiography. Aubrey Pomerance (Jewish Museum Berlin) moderates.

About the Panelists
Elizabeth Anthony is the Director of Visiting Scholar Programs at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, which supports significant research and writing about the Holocaust and related topics with a particular goal of ensuring the development of a new generation of scholars. Her own research focuses on the postwar Jewish community of Vienna and the records of the International Tracing Service (ITS) archive. Her book, The Compromise of Return: Viennese Jews after the Holocaust (2021) is a co-publication of Wayne State University Press and the USHMM. From 2005–2007, she was a case worker and case work manager for HIAS in Vienna, Austria.

Anna Hájková is Associate Professor of Modern European Continental History at the University of Warwick, UK. She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. She is the author of The Last Ghetto: An Everyday History of Theresienstadt (Oxford University Press, 2020), the first in-depth analytical history of prison society during the Holocaust, based on archival sources from dozens of archives from ten countries and in nine languages. She has been working on history of Theresienstadt since 2000, and between 2006 and 2008 was the co-editor of Theresienstädter Studien und Dokumente. She has also co-edited the anthology Alltag im Holocaust: Jüdisches Leben im Großdeutschen Reich 1941–1945, and co-authored The Last Veit Simons from Berlin: Holocaust, Gender, and the End of the German-Jewish Bourgeoisie. She regularly contributes to mass media in English, German, and Czech in the publications HaaretzSüddeutsche ZeitungTablet, and Tagespiegel.

Joanna Sliwa is Historian at the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (Claims Conference). Her own research focuses on the Holocaust in Poland and on Polish-Jewish history. Joanna has taught at Kean University and Rutgers University, and she served as an educator in teacher training programs on the Holocaust. Joanna’s book, Jewish Childhood in Kraków: A Microhistory of the Holocaust will be published in fall 2021 (Rutgers University press; recipient of the 2020 Ernst Fraenkel Prize from the Wiener Holocaust Library).

Ticket Info: Free; register at lbi.org for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Wed, Nov 17
01:00PM ET
Wed, Nov 17
01:00PM ET

panel discussion

Nazism, Neo-nazism and Music

All political movements use music, and National Socialism is no exception. Both Hitler’s Nazis and postwar neo-Nazis have used different kinds of music in various ways. This panel will explore how German Nazis used music to help facilitate mass murder during the Holocaust, as well as how neo-Nazism became entangled with various music-based subcultural scenes and their connections with political organizations. From the NSDAP to the American Nazi Party’s record label, to the Nazi skinhead movement, to NSBM (National Socialist Black Metal) and even fascist reggae, this panel will document and reflect on how, why, and in what ways National Socialism has come to be tied to various musical forms.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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panel discussion

Sun, Nov 21
02:00PM ET
Sun, Nov 21
02:00PM ET

yiddish club

YIVO Yiddish Club: Yiddish Puppetry With Jenny Romaine

Nu, vilst redn a bisele yidish? An event for Yiddish enthusiasts the world over, the YIVO Yiddish club is an informal monthly gathering to celebrate mame-loshn. Hosted by Shane Baker, sessions take place in English, and are liberally peppered with Yiddish. Each month Baker is joined by a different guest who discusses their work and a related Yiddish cultural theme. In the spirit of a club, sessions are held as interactive zoom meetings in which participants can see and hear one another. Each session includes ample time for audience questions, group discussion, and, time permitting, knock-down, drag-out arguments. Attendees need not know any Yiddish to attend, though some familiarity with the language is highly recommended.

This session features director, designer and puppeteer Jenny Romaine. Romaine is the co-founder and artistic director of the OBIE winning Great Small Works visual theater collective, the music director of Jennifer Miller’s CIRCUS AMOK and artist in residence at Milk Not Jails and Inside Change. This conversation will focus on her work with Yiddish puppetry, and will also include special guest Eddy Portnoy, whose scholarly work on Zuni Maud and Yosl Cutler was one of the inspirations for Great Small Works’ Muntergang and Other Cheerful Downfalls.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org/YiddishClub8 for a Zoom link


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yiddish club

Tue, Nov 23
03:00PM ET
Tue, Nov 23
03:00PM ET

book talk

"When I Grow Up" - a Graphic Novel Exploring Interwar Teenage Jewish Life

When I Grow Up is a new graphic nonfiction book, based on six of the hundreds of autobiographies of Eastern European Jewish teens collected by YIVO on the brink of WWII, including those discovered in 2017 which had been hidden in a Lithuanian church cellar. Created by New Yorker cartoonist Ken KrimsteinWhen I Grow Up shows readers the stories of six young men and women in illustrated narratives showcasing the humor, yearning, ambition, and angst of their teenage years. Join YIVO for a discussion with Krimstein led by scholar Jeffrey Shandler celebrating this new book.

About the Participants
Ken Krimstein’s cartoons have been published in the New YorkerBarron'sThe Harvard Business ReviewProspect MagazinePunchThe National Lampoon, the Wall Street JournalNarrative Magazine, and three of S. Gross’s cartoon anthologies. His humor writing has been in The New York Observer’s “New Yorker’s Diary” and humor websites, including McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, Yankee Pot Roast, and Mr. Beller’s Neighborhood. Ken is also an advertising creative director who has taught writing at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is currently a professor at De Paul University.

Jeffrey Shandler is Distinguished Professor of Jewish Studies at Rutgers University. His publications include Adventures in Yiddishland: Postvernacular Language and Culture (2005) and Shtetl: A Vernacular Intellectual History (2014); among other titles, he is editor of Awakening Lives: Autobiographies of Jewish Youth in Poland before the Holocaust (2002) and translator of Emil and Karl, a Holocaust novel for young readers by Yankev Glatshteyn (2006). Shandler has served as president of the Association for Jewish Studies and is a fellow of the American Academy for Jewish Research.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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book talk

Mon, Nov 29
06:00PM ET
Mon, Nov 29
06:00PM ET

conversation

RememberingWilliamHelmreich

Please join us for a program in tribute to William Helmreich, z”l, sociologist, author, scholar of Judaism, and distinguished professor. He walked every street of New York City – more than 6,000 miles – and wrote about his adventures, conversations, and insights in a series of excellent and uncommon guidebooks that introduce readers anew to the city and its neighborhoods.

The author of many books including The New York Nobody Knows (and individual volumes on Queens, Brooklyn, and Manhattan) along with Against All Odds and The World of the Yeshiva, William Helmreich was a Distinguished Professor of Sociology at City College and at CUNY’s Graduate Center. A man with deep curiosity, wide-ranging brilliance, and a generous spirit, he died of COVID in March 2020. 

Featuring:
Jeffrey S. Gurock, the Libby M. Klaperman Professor of Jewish History at Yeshiva University, the author or editor of more than twenty books, many about the Jewish history of New York.

Matt Green, who is walking every block of New York City, as documented in the film The World Before Your Feet (which also features a cameo by William Helmreich).

In conversation with:
Sandee Brawarsky, award-winning journalist, author, and editor.

When you register for this event, you’ll also join the New York Jewish Week community of readers. Look for the latest news about Jewish New York in your inbox soon.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/remembering-william-helmreich-2021-11-29 for a Zoom link


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conversation

Tue, Nov 30
01:00PM ET
Tue, Nov 30
01:00PM ET

book talk

In the Midst of Civilized Europe: the Pogroms of 1918-1921 and the Onset of the Holocaust

Between 1918 and 1921, over a hundred thousand Jews were murdered in Ukraine by peasants, townsmen, and soldiers who blamed the Jews for the turmoil of the Russian Revolution. In hundreds of separate incidents, ordinary people robbed their Jewish neighbors with impunity, burned down their houses, ripped apart their Torah scrolls, sexually assaulted them, and killed them. Largely forgotten today, these pogroms—ethnic riots—dominated headlines and international affairs in their time. Aid workers warned that six million Jews were in danger of complete extermination. Twenty years later, these dire predictions would come true.

Jeffrey Veidlinger’s new book In the Midst of Civilized Europe: The Pogroms of 1918-1921 and the Onset of the Holocaust draws upon long-neglected archival materials, including thousands of newly discovered witness testimonies, trial records, and official orders, showing for the first time how this wave of genocidal violence created the conditions for the Holocaust. Join us for a discussion on this important new book featuring Jeffrey Veidlinger in conversation with Steven Zipperstein.

Purchase the book here.

About the Speakers
Jeffrey Veidlinger is a professor of history and Judaic studies at the University of Michigan. His books, which include The Moscow State Yiddish Theater and In the Shadow of the Shtetl, have won a National Jewish Book Award, the Barnard Hewitt Award for Theatre Scholarship, two Canadian Jewish Book Awards, and the J. I. Segal Award. He lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Steven J. Zipperstein is the Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish Culture and History at Stanford University. He is the author and editor of nine books; his most recent is Pogrom: Kishinev and the Tilt of History (Liveright/WW Norton) named a book of the year by The Economist and shortlisted for the National Jewish Book Award and the Mark Lytton Prize as the best non-fiction book of 2018. He is now writing a biography of Philip Roth for Yale's Jewish Lives series.

Ticket Info: Free; register at yivo.org for a Zoom link


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book talk

Wed, Dec 08
06:30PM ET
Wed, Dec 08
06:30PM ET

book talk

UNDERJERUSALEMTheBuriedHistoryoftheWorldrsquosMostContestedCity

In UNDER JERUSALEM: The Buried History of the World’s Most Contested City, acclaimed journalist and author Andrew Lawler delves into the tombs, tunnels, and trenches of the Holy City—a saga of biblical treasures, intrepid explorers, and political upheaval—and brings to life the indelible characters who have investigated this subterranean landscape. Sharing previously unpublished images by National Geographic photographers, Lawler will discuss how the 150-year quest to unearth the city’s biblical history has not only led to remarkable discoveries, but also contributed to riots and bloodshed. And yet while the colorful array of excavators has helped spawn Zionism, create the state of Israel, and ultimately define the conflict over modern Jerusalem, their struggles to control this contested place may also provide a map for two peoples and three faiths to peacefully coexist.

This program is funded, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at programs.cjh.org/tickets/under-jerusalem-2021-12-08 for a Zoom link


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book talk