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Wed, Sep 23
08:00PM
Wed, Sep 23
08:00PM

lecture

Preparing for the High Holidays – Yom Kippur

Understanding our Sephardic Laws and Traditions with Hakham Rabbi Elie Abadie, MD

Rabbi Elie Abadie, M.D., comes from a long and distinguished rabbinical lineage dating back to fifteenth century Spain and Provence. Born in Beirut, Lebanon, he grew-up in Mexico City before settling in the United States. Following in the footsteps of the great Jewish scholar and philosopher Moses Maimonides (the Rambam), he is both a rabbi and a physician. Rabbi Dr. Abadie maintains a practice in Gastroenterology and is fluent in English, Spanish, Hebrew, Arabic, French, as well as conversant in Italian and Portuguese. He serves on the Boards of the American Sephardi Federation and Beit Hatfutsot, as the Director of the Jacob E. Safra Institute of Sephardic Studies at Yeshiva University, Head of School of the Sephardic Academy of Manhattan, and Founder and Leader of the Manhattan East Synagogue – Congregation Shaare Mizrah.

Ticket Info: Free; register at zoom.us/meeting/register/tZckfuqrrD4tG9eWomnzGtZx-BhjLFCIXRTJ?mc_cid=af557d827d&mc_eid=a9a90f049b to receive a Zoom link


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lecture

Wed, Sep 30
10:00AM
Wed, Sep 30
10:00AM

cooking show

Sephardic Culinary History with Chef Hélène Jawhara-Piñer

Episode 2: Special Sukkot Edition "Beans and Chicken" and "Brown Nougat"

Sephardi Culinary History is a new show that combines chef and scholar Hélène Jawhara-Piñer’s fascination with food studies and flair for creating delicious cuisine. Join along as she cooks Sephardic history!

ASF Broome & Allen Fellow Hélène Jawhara-Piñer earned her Ph.D in History, Medieval History, and the History of Food from the University of Tours, France.

Ticket Info: $4.99; register at zoom.us/webinar/register/2815988907382/WN_mlRLQgiDT5KN4N64fIHnVA?mc_cid=af557d827d&mc_eid=a9a90f049b to receive a link to the Zoom program


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cooking show

Wed, Sep 30
02:00PM
Wed, Sep 30
02:00PM

book talk

LBI Book Club, Vol V, Part 1: Berlin Alexanderplatz by Alfred Döblin

The Jewish author Bruno Alfred Döblin is best-known as the author of Berlin Alexanderplatz (1929). The book became a best seller in the Weimar Republic, selling over 50,000 copies in just two years. The meandering story of Franz Biberkopf, ex-con, pimp, small-time criminal, and ordinary Joe trying to stay on the straight and narrow, captured life in 1920s Berlin like no other document. It was banned and burned under the Nazi regime, but recovered in the postwar era and canonized as a modernist masterpiece.

Bruno Alfred Döblin (1878 – 1957) was a German novelist, essayist, and doctor, best known for this novel. A prolific writer whose work spans more than half a century and a wide variety of literary movements and styles, Döblin is one of the most important figures of German literary modernism. His complete works comprise over a dozen novels ranging in genre from historical novels to science fiction to novels about the modern metropolis; several dramas, radio plays, and screenplays; a true crime story; a travel account; two book-length philosophical treatises; scores of essays on politics, religion, art, and society; and numerous letters—his complete works, republished by Deutscher Taschenbuch Verlag and Fischer Verlag, span more than thirty volumes. Döblin fled to Paris and then the United States in the Nazi period, but returned to Europe after the war, living in Paris and dying in West Germany.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations required at eventbrite.com/e/lbi-book-club-vol-v-part-1-berlin-alexanderplatz-by-alfred-doblin-tickets-117577472385


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About the Speaker:

Peter Jelavich, our guest expert for this month, is a Professor of History at the Johns Hopkins University. Previously, Jelavich was professor of history and chair of the Department of Germanic Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows (1979-1981) and he received his PhD from Princeton University in 1982. Jelavich specializes in the cultural and intellectual history of Europe since the Enlightenment, with emphasis on Germany. He is the author of Munich and Theatrical Modernism: Politics, Playwriting, and Performance, 1890-1914 (1985), Berlin Cabaret (1993), and Berlin Alexanderplatz: Radio, Film, and the Death of Weimar Culture (2006).


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book talk

Wed, Sep 30
08:00PM
Wed, Sep 30
08:00PM

lecture

Preparing for the High Holidays – Sukkot

Understanding our Sephardic Laws and Traditions with Hakham Rabbi Elie Abadie, MD

Rabbi Elie Abadie, M.D., comes from a long and distinguished rabbinical lineage dating back to fifteenth century Spain and Provence. Born in Beirut, Lebanon, he grew-up in Mexico City before settling in the United States. Following in the footsteps of the great Jewish scholar and philosopher Moses Maimonides (the Rambam), he is both a rabbi and a physician. Rabbi Dr. Abadie maintains a practice in Gastroenterology and is fluent in English, Spanish, Hebrew, Arabic, French, as well as conversant in Italian and Portuguese. He serves on the Boards of the American Sephardi Federation and Beit Hatfutsot, as the Director of the Jacob E. Safra Institute of Sephardic Studies at Yeshiva University, Head of School of the Sephardic Academy of Manhattan, and Founder and Leader of the Manhattan East Synagogue – Congregation Shaare Mizrah.

Ticket Info: Free; register at zoom.us/meeting/register/tZckfuqrrD4tG9eWomnzGtZx-BhjLFCIXRTJ?mc_cid=af557d827d&mc_eid=a9a90f049b to receive a Zoom link


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lecture

Tue, Oct 06
01:00PM
Tue, Oct 06
01:00PM

lecture

LIVE FROM THE ARCHIVES: Sukkah in the Sky – Live on Zoom

About the Series:
A new National Endowment for the Humanities CARES grant enables AJHS to bring curated objects and documents straight to you through new digital storytelling methods. In these live interactive Zoom sessions, you’ll see documents close up and pose questions to archivists and historians about what you are examining.

Ticket Info: Free; register at forms.office.com to receive a link to the Zoom program


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lecture

Wed, Oct 07
01:00PM
Wed, Oct 07
01:00PM

discussion

Yiddish Children’s Literature Today

The Jewish children’s literature field is booming and the call to provide representation of Jewish children, for Jewish children, has played a large part in that. The publication of Miriam Udel’s new book of translated Yiddish children’s literature, Honey on the Page, is the perfect opportunity to celebrate the history of Yiddish children’s literature, and to examine the roles it can play for children today.

What is the potential for Yiddish literature to educate not just Jewish readers, but non-Jewish readers? How is Yiddish literature different from other texts aimed at young Jewish readers? What can it bring to the field of Jewish children's literature that other texts might not? Join us for a conversation exploring these questions moderated by Rokhl Kafrissen (Tablet Magazine) with Miriam UdelNaomi Seidman, and Jennifer Young.

Ticket Info: Free; registration required at yivo.org/Yiddish-Childrens-Literature-Today


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discussion

Wed, Oct 07
04:00PM
Wed, Oct 07
04:00PM

lecture

Family History Today: Donating Your Family Papers – How, When, Where and Why?

Karen Franklin, Director of Family Research at the Leo Baeck Institute, is donating her voluminous family papers to LBI, providing her a unique dual perspective on the donation process as both a donor and a recipient. This session will address what you can do to organize and prepare your collection for donation to ensure that the material will be accessible and meaningful to future researchers. Karen will cover topics including the types of collections that are accepted, what to do with difficult and personal information, and requesting access restrictions. She will also share a few of the many family secrets she uncovered in the process of preparing her donation!.

This program is sponsored by the Ackman & Ziff Family Genealogy Institute and Leo Baeck Institute. It is supported, in part, by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor, as well as by funding from The New York Community Trust's NYC COVID-19 Response and Impact Fund, and public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/family-history-today-2020-10-07 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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lecture

Wed, Oct 07
08:00PM
Wed, Oct 07
08:00PM

lecture

Preparing for the High Holidays – Simhat Torah

Understanding our Sephardic Laws and Traditions with Hakham Rabbi Elie Abadie, MD

Rabbi Elie Abadie, M.D., comes from a long and distinguished rabbinical lineage dating back to fifteenth century Spain and Provence. Born in Beirut, Lebanon, he grew-up in Mexico City before settling in the United States. Following in the footsteps of the great Jewish scholar and philosopher Moses Maimonides (the Rambam), he is both a rabbi and a physician. Rabbi Dr. Abadie maintains a practice in Gastroenterology and is fluent in English, Spanish, Hebrew, Arabic, French, as well as conversant in Italian and Portuguese. He serves on the Boards of the American Sephardi Federation and Beit Hatfutsot, as the Director of the Jacob E. Safra Institute of Sephardic Studies at Yeshiva University, Head of School of the Sephardic Academy of Manhattan, and Founder and Leader of the Manhattan East Synagogue – Congregation Shaare Mizrah.

Ticket Info: Free; register at zoom.us/meeting/register/tZckfuqrrD4tG9eWomnzGtZx-BhjLFCIXRTJ?mc_cid=af557d827d&mc_eid=a9a90f049b to receive a Zoom link


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lecture

Wed, Oct 14
04:00PM
Wed, Oct 14
04:00PM

book talk

Derek Penslar will discuss his book Theodor Herzl: The Charismatic Leader with Jonathan Gribetz

About the book: The life of Theodor Herzl (1860–1904) was as puzzling as it was brief. How did this cosmopolitan and assimilated European Jew become the leader of the Zionist movement? How could he be both an artist and a statesman, a rationalist and an aesthete, a stern moralist yet possessed of deep, and at times dark, passions? And why did thousands of Jews, many of them from traditional, observant backgrounds, embrace Herzl as their leader?

Drawing on a vast body of Herzl's personal, literary, and political writings, historian Derek Penslar shows that Herzl's path to Zionism had as much to do with personal crises as it did with antisemitism. Once Herzl devoted himself to Zionism, Penslar shows, he distinguished himself as a consummate leader—possessed of indefatigable energy, organizational ability, and electrifying charisma. Herzl became a screen onto which Jews of his era could project their deepest needs and longings.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at herzl.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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book talk

Thu, Oct 22
07:30PM
Thu, Oct 22
07:30PM

lecture

Speaker: Sara Halpern

Facing an escalating demand for entry into the United States by German-speaking Jews in Shanghai in early 1941, the United States Consulate called the JDC for help. No one forewarned Laura Margolis, a translator for immigration interviews, about the Jewish refugees’ living conditions: over 16,000 Jewish refugees from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Poland desperate for food and housing. She set up a new JDC office. Under four directorships, four different regimes, and two wars, the JDC Shanghai office stood as a rock for Jewish refugees for a decade.

Drawing from the JDC Archives, testimonies, and memoirs, this lecture offers a tale of how the JDC Shanghai office, as both a transnational American and an international Jewish relief organization, and its ingenious directors navigated the regimes of the treaty port controlled by multiple powers, the Japanese puppet government, Chiang Kai-Shek, and Mao Zedong. Hailed by the senior administration in New York, the “Shanghai job” was one of the most difficult in the world. In contrast to Europe during the same period, the small, isolated JDC Shanghai office had to rely on the goodwill of the various consulates and local authorities to assist with the Jewish refugees’ survival and emigration to other destinations.

Closed captioning will be available during this program.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at halpern.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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lecture

Wed, Nov 11
04:00PM
Wed, Nov 11
04:00PM

discussion

In a series of discussions with leading scholars of modern Jewish history and the Holocaust, our new "Family Affairs" series explores researching and writing about Jewish experience from a distinctively personal perspective.

We will also discuss projects in the making, with scholars who are currently working on their books that either trace their family history or take this connection as a point of departure for their research. Despite their different disciplinary approaches and geographic scope, what these scholars share is the challenge of life-writing about close relatives. How does this experience change their thinking about Jewish history and their experience of writing it? What do these family affairs reveal to them in different ways?

Meri-Jane Rochelson and Devin E. Naar will discuss their projects and personal histories in Ashkenazi and Sephardi contexts, in conversation with Natalia Aleksiun.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; registration required at familyaffairs2.bpt.me to receive a link to the Zoom webinar


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discussion

Tue, Dec 01
04:00PM
Tue, Dec 01
04:00PM

book talk

The Great Kosher Meat War of 1902 with author/historian Scott D. Seligman – Live on Zoom

In response to a precipitous rise in the price of kosher meat, thousands of Jewish women took to the streets of Manhattan’s Lower East Side on May 15, 1902. Their stated intention was to shut down every kosher butcher shop until prices came down. What was conceived as a nonviolent effort did not remain so for long. In The Great Kosher Meat War of 1902: Immigrant Housewives and the Riots That Shook New York City (University of Nebraska Press, 2020), writer and historian Scott D. Seligman tells the twin stories of the Beef Trust, the midwestern cartel that conspired to keep meat prices high despite efforts by the U.S. government to curtail its nefarious practices, and the mostly uneducated female immigrants who discovered their collective consumer power. With few resources and little experience but a great deal of steely determination, this group of women organized themselves into a potent fighting force, and in their first foray into the political arena in their adopted country, successfully challenged powerful vested corporate interests and set a pattern for future generations to follow.

Ticket Info: Pay what you wish; register at /tickets/great-kosher-meat-war-2020-12-10 to receive a link to the Zoom program


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book talk