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Tue, Sep 03
07:00PM
Tue, Sep 03
07:00PM

lecture

The Greatest Yiddish Writer You’ve Never Heard of: Yankev Dinezon

The 19th-century author Jacob Dinezon, as well-known in his day as his close friends I. L. Peretz and Sholem Aleichem, wrote the first bestselling novel in Yiddish. His heartrending works vividly portrayed difficult issues confronting Jewish communities in the Russian Empire: arranged marriages, rigid gender roles, corporal punishment in childhood education, and assimilation. His poignant and realistic depictions of the effects of modernity on traditional Jewish life elicited copious tears from his devoted readers.

Yet, as popular as Dinezon was during his lifetime, by the turn of the 21st century, he had essentially been forgotten. Not one of his major works had been translated into English. That all changed in 2003, when Scott Hilton Davis, who was teaching teenagers in a religious-school classroom, rediscovered this once-beloved Yiddish author. Today, English versions of Dinezon’s three most popular novels, a collection of short stories, a literary biography, and an extensive website (www.jacobdinezon.com) provide readers and researchers with opportunities to encounter Dinezon’s significant contributions to Jewish literature.

In this image-filled presentation commemorating the 100th anniversary of Jacob Dinezon’s passing, Davis, an Emmy Award-winning filmmaker, author, and publisher, will share his 16-year journey to uncover the facts about Jacob Dinezon’s life and literary career and his ongoing efforts to restore this revered Jewish author to his rightful place in Yiddish literature.

Also participating in the commemoration of Jacob Dinezon’s 100th yortsayt will be Tina Lunson, the English translator of Dinezon’s Der shvartser yungermantshik and Zichroynes un bilder, and the noted Yiddishist and teacher Sheva Zucker.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 YIVO members, students at yivo.org/Dinezon or 917-606-8290


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lecture

Thu, Sep 05
07:00PM
Thu, Sep 05
07:00PM

panel discussion

The Challenges of Multiculturalism in Contemporary Lithuania

Under the auspices of Litvak Days NYC, a celebration of Lithuanian Jewish heritage, Professor Tomas Venclova (Yale University, Emeritus) will give a presentation titled, "Lithuanians and Jews: What’s Changed and What Hasn’t over the last Forty Years?” Professor Venclova will then be joined by Jonathan Brent (Executive Director of YIVO), Professor Saulius Sužiedelis (Millersville University, Emeritus) and Rabbi Andrew Baker (American Jewish Committee, Director of International Jewish Affairs) for a discussion about the challenges of rebuilding a multicultural society in Lithuania in the Post-Soviet era including the difficulties of confronting the complexities of Lithuanian Jewish history, and taking lessons from it for today.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations at yivo.org/LitvakDays2019 or 917-606-8290


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panel discussion

Sun, Sep 08
01:00PM
Sun, Sep 08
01:00PM

workshop

New Year’s Cards in the Style of Illuminated Hebrew Manuscripts

Join artist Deborah Ugoretz in a hands-on workshop incorporating techniques of medieval illuminated manuscripts to create 2019 Rosh Hashanah greeting cards (ages 12 to adult).

Ticket Info: $10 general; $8 YUM/CJH/Partner members, YU faculty/staff at illuminate.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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workshop

Sun, Sep 08
03:00PM
Sun, Sep 08
03:00PM

conversation

Growing up in Brooklyn, legendary journalist Pete Hamill was an altar boy in church and helped out a rabbi on Saturdays in a nearby synagogue. “He tried to teach me Yiddish,” Hamill remembers, “and I did my little part trying to explain to him that the Cincinnati Reds were not Socialists. They were a baseball team.”  The experience shaped a credo the renowned reporter and best-selling novelist lives and writes by. “New York City,” Hamill says, “is the capital of people who are not like you. Absorb as much as you can.”

In a career spanning six decades, Pete Hamill has absorbed his city, written its stories, and imagined still more in his eleven novels. On September 8th at 3 pm at the Center for Jewish History, the celebrated storyteller sits down with another notable New Yorker and his former New York Post colleague: Bronx native and acclaimed New York Times reporter Clyde Haberman.  Both sons of immigrants, Hamill and Haberman will talk about the Irish and Jewish neighborhoods they came from, the immigrant experience then and now, the tabloid that launched their careers, and the ever-changing city that continues to inspire.

Program will be followed by a reception.

Ticket Info: Auditorium tickets are sold out. Simulcast tickets are available here.


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About the Speakers:

A journalist, novelist, essayist, editor and educator, as well as a cartoonist and artist, Pete Hamill was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1935. The first of seven children of Catholic immigrants from Belfast, Hamill left school at 16 to work in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, and completed his high school education while serving in the Navy. He studied painting and writing in college on the GI Bill and joined the New York Post as a reporter in 1960. His newspaper career spanned decades and included positions at the Post, the New York Daily News, the Village Voice, and New York Newsday. He was also editor of the Post, and  editor-in-chief of the New York Daily News and wrote longer pieces for New York magazine, the New Yorker, Esquire, Playboy, Rolling Stone, and other periodicals. The author of both nonfiction and fiction, Hamill has written eleven novels, including the national bestseller Snow in August; a story about the unlikely friendship between a young Irish Catholic boy and an elderly Jewish rabbi in Brooklyn. He is the recipient of numerous awards, among them the Columbia Journalism Award for Lifetime Achievement, the George Polk Career Award, and the  Irish American Writers & Artists Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award.

Clyde Haberman first worked at The New York Times as a copy boy in 1964, then as a campus correspondent at City College of New York. In 1966, he began reporting for the New York Post, ultimately returning to the Times in 1977 as an editor in the Week in Review section. He went on to become a Metro reporter, City Hall Bureau chief and, from 1982 to 1995, a foreign correspondent based successively in Tokyo, Rome and Jerusalem. Returning home, he wrote NYC, his twice-a-week column on New York, from 1995 to 2011. In 2009, he was part of a Times team that won the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News, awarded for coverage of the prostitution scandal that led to Gov. Eliot Spitzer's resignation. Since 2014 he written a regular Times column accompanying Retro Report, a series of video documentaries exploring major news stories of the past and their continuing resonance. Haberman is the writer and editor of The Times of the Seventies: The Culture, Politics, and Personalities That Shape the Decade  published in 2013 by Black Dog & Leventhal. Among other journalistic honors, he was inducted into the New York Press Club's Hall of Fame in 2015.

 


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conversation

Mon, Sep 09
06:30PM
Mon, Sep 09
06:30PM

lecture

Desire, Envy & the Jewish-Christian Borderzone

Are the borders and boundaries between religions any more secure than those between nations? Working with major Jewish modernist writers such as Sholem Asch and Henry Roth, Maeera Shreiber (University of Utah) questions and examines our assumptions about religious differences and explores the high-voltage emotional consequences of trafficking in that volatile space of interfaith encounters she calls the Jewish-Christian Borderzone.

Ticket Info: $5 general; free for students at shreiber.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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lecture

Tue, Sep 10
06:30PM
Tue, Sep 10
06:30PM

book talk

The World of Aufbau: Hitler’s refugees in America

Aufbau—a German-language weekly published in New York and circulated worldwide—was an essential platform for the generation of refugees from Hitler and the displaced people and concentration camp survivors who arrived in the United States after the war. The publication served to link thousands of readers looking for friends and loved ones in every part of the world. In its pages Aufbau focused on concerns that strongly impacted this community in the aftermath of World War II: antisemitism in the United States and in Europe, the ever-changing immigration and naturalization procedures, debates about the designation of Hitler refugees as enemy aliens, questions about punishment for the Holocaust and other Nazi crimes, the struggle for compensation and restitution, and the fight for a Jewish homeland.

Author Peter Schrag is the first to present a definitive account of the influential publication that brought postwar refugees together and into the American mainstream. Schrag's new study, The World of Aufbau: Hitler's Refugees in America, examines the columns and advertisements that chronicled the social and cultural life of that generation and maintained a detailed account of German-speaking cultures in exile.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 LBI/CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at aufbau.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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About the Speakers:

Peter Schrag is a writer, educator, and former Guggenheim Fellow based in Davis, California. He is a refugee from Nazi Germany and has written extensively about the history and conflicts over American immigration.

Commentator Shira Kohn is a member of the Upper School History Faculty at The Dalton School. She received her doctorate in history and Hebrew & Judaic Studies from New York University and is currently working on a monograph focusing on Jewish college sororities and civil rights in postwar America. She, along with Hasia Diner and Rachel Kranson, co-edited A Jewish Feminine Mystique? Jewish Women in Postwar America (Rutgers University Press, 2010) and recently published an article on German-Jewish student refugees in 1930s America.


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book talk

Thu, Sep 12
06:30PM
Thu, Sep 12
06:30PM

exhibit opening

Russ & Daughters, An Appetizing Story

Join AJHS for an appetizing evening of stories and noshes as we celebrate the opening of our new exhibition Russ & Daughters: An Appetizing Story. Hannah Goldfield, food critic for The New Yorker,will interview two generations of the Russ family.

Ticket Info: $36 general at appetizingstory.bpt.me


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exhibit opening

Sun, Sep 15
10:30AM
Sun, Sep 15
10:30AM

workshop

Prose & Pose: Soapbox Yoga

Young families will work together to connect past and present through poses inspired by the stories of Emma Lazarus and the soapbox speakers of Union Square.

Ticket Info: $10 per family at bpt.me/4309884 or 800-838-3006


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workshop

Sun, Sep 15
02:00PM
Sun, Sep 15
02:00PM

lecture

Searching for Paterson Roots Remembered and Forgotten in Heritage Tourism Abroad

The extended Walkowitz family arrived in Paterson from Lodz, Poland as early as 1910. It was a Jewish World of Yiddishkeit in which Daniel Walkowitz was raised. As a radical student activist in the late 1950s and 1960s, he imagined himself walking in the footsteps of his Paterson grandparents who fought to improve the living and working conditions in the Lodz and Paterson mills. Professor Walkowitz will recount the genealogical and archival research that allowed him to uncover the stories of this past in the US and in Eastern and Central Europe where he seeks to see and hear what of these roots appear in walking tours, Jewish museums and memorial sites. Illustrated with slides, the lecture will illustrate the disappointments and surprises that frame the robust and changing terrain of Jewish heritage tourism today.

Daniel Walkowitz, Emeritus Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and Professor of History at NYU, has specialized in labor history, urban history and public history. In nearly a dozen books, many articles and four films for public television, he has worked to bring America's past to both academic and broad public audiences.In 2010 he published Rethinking U.S. Labor History, co-edited with Donna Haverty-Stacke, a collection of new work on work and labor published to mark the 25th anniversary of his 1984 collection (edited with Michael Frisch), Working-Class-America. His most recent work includes a monograph, The Remembered and Forgotten Jewish World: Jewish Heritage in Europe and the United States (Rutgers, 2018).

Ticket Info: $5 at the door; free for JGS members


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lecture

Mon, Sep 16
06:30PM
Mon, Sep 16
06:30PM

book talk

Harold Poor, Kurt Tucholsky, and the Ordeal of Germany

Harold L. Poor’s biography of Kurt Tucholsky is the most important and thorough work on the famed German-Jewish author in English: a still unmatched labor of love by the Rutgers history professor. For this book—originally published as Kurt Tucholsky and the Ordeal of Germany 1914–1935 in 1968, Poor spent years of research. He also visited Tucholsky’s widow Mary Gerold in her home in Rottach-Egern in Germany and unearthed letters, pictures, and other previously unknown materials. The result was an an entertaining and well-written gem that has finally been rediscovered—it is available in a new editionfrom the Berlin/New York-based Berlinica Publishing.

Harold Poor was born in 1935 in Missouri, grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and attended Harvard College. He held a Ph.D. in German and European history at Columbia University. In 1966, he became a professor at the Rutgers College History Department as one of the most gifted and charismatic teachers. He also was the co-author of a music drama Tickles by Tucholsky, which was first produced at Brandeis University and then Off Broadway at Theater Four in 1976. Poor died on January 24, 1992 in New York City.

Eva Schweitzer, the principal of Berlinica Publishing, will discuss Tucholsky's role in Weimar-era letters and politics. Atina Grossmann (Cooper Union) will comment on how Poor's work fits in the historiography of Germany in the late 1960's and early 1970s, when a fascination with the cultural and intellectual life of the Weimar Republic produced influential works like Peter Gay's Weimar Culture: The Outsider as Insider. Among those scholars, Poor was an outsider himself—neither Jewish, nor a refugee, but an American from the South.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 LBI/CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at tucholsky.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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book talk

Mon, Sep 16
07:00PM
Mon, Sep 16
07:00PM

panel discussion

Bundism’s Influence Today

Today we are witnessing a revival of the ideas of the Jewish Labor Bund, an organization which had been a powerful force in Russian and Polish Jewish communities during the first half of the 20th century. The Bund focused on doikayt (“hereness”), libertarian socialism, and support for secular Jewish culture and the Yiddish language. The activity of those with this new interest, sometimes called "neo-Bundism," alongside those with unbroken links to prewar Bundists, has led to a new visibility of interest in Bundist ideas in both political and cultural circles. And because Bundism offers an alternate historical vision of Jewish identity to Zionism, this development is sometimes a controversial one.

This panel, made up of activists and cultural workers ranging in age from their 20s to their 80s, will discuss what they see in Bundist ideas, and how it affects their current political and cultural practices. Jack Jacobs, a historian of the Bund, will introduce the evening with brief overview of the history of the Bund and its major political tenets and then will moderate a discussion with Molly Crabapple, Irena Klepfisz, Jenny Romaine, and Jacob Plitman, looking at how Bundist ideas are influencing the Jewish community today.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations at yivo.org/Dinezon or 917-606-8290


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panel discussion

Tue, Sep 17
06:30PM
Tue, Sep 17
06:30PM

book talk

Kugel and Frijoles: Latino Jews in the United States

Laura Limonic analyzes the changing construction of race and ethnicity in the United States through the lens of contemporary Jewish immigrants from Latin America in her new book. Since Latino Jews are not easily classified within the U.S. racial and ethnic schema, their ethnic identity and group affiliation challenge existing paradigms. Limonic introduces the stories of Latino Jewish immigrants and laying out the important questions surrounding ethnic identity: How do Latino Jews identify? Can they choose their identity or is it assigned to them? How is ethnicity strategic or instrumental?

As the Latino population continues to grow in the United States, so does the influence of millions of Latinos on U.S. culture, politics, economy, and social structure. Kugel and Frijoles offers new insight with which to understand the diversity of Latinos, the incorporation of contemporary Jewish immigrants, and the effect of U.S. ethno-racial structures for immigrant assimilation. Join us for a fascinating discussion about the book and Limonic’s biographical and scholarly findings.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $7 seniors; $5 CJH/Partner members; free for students at latinojews.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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book talk

Thu, Sep 19
07:00PM
Thu, Sep 19
07:00PM

talk

Known for her paintings of erotic female nudes, Lene Schneider-Kainer divorced her husband in 1926 and set off on an artistic odyssey across Asia. Retracing Marco Polo’s journey, the intrepid artist travelled from opium dens in Isfahan to Buddhist temples in the Himalayas and from brothels in Agra to the Peking Opera.

When she died, Schneider-Kainer left her travel diary, photographs, scrapbooks, and over 100 watercolors and sketches to the Leo Baeck Institute. Archivist Michael Simonson takes these rarely seen treasures Out of the Box and reveals the enchanting art and surprising story of a German-Jewish artist who defied the male art world and broke the boundaries set for women in her time.

Come early or stay late to see paintings by 11 other artists forced by the Nazi regime to leave Germany and Austria (as Schneider-Kainer would be, as well) on display in the Katherine and Clifford H. Goldsmith Gallery as part of LBI’s current exhibition, The Art of Exile: Paintings by German-Jewish Refugees.

About the Series
At the Center for Jewish History, there are tens of thousands of boxes in our partners’ archival collections. Boxes filled with photographs, journals, letters, and documents. Boxes filled with stories. We take these treasures Out of the Box in our new series. Join us!

Ticket Info: $10 general; $7 seniors; $5 CJH/Partner members, students at paintpraylove.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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About the Speaker:

Archivist and Director of Public Outreach at the Leo Baeck Institute, Michael Simonson discovered the story of Lene Schneider-Kainer when he was asked to translate her diary from German to English for greater research use. Drawn to her creativity and independence, Michael also began to explore a broader story of how Europeans, especially European Jews, viewed the Middle East and Asia in the 19th and early 20th century.  Originally from Minnesota, Michael studied German history and German language before attending Pratt Institute for archival studies.  A former President of the Archivist Roundtable of Metropolitan New York, Michael has worked at LBI for the last seventeen years.


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talk

Sun, Sep 22
10:30AM
Sun, Sep 22
10:30AM

walking tour

Soapbox Walks: Firebrand Women

Lara Vapnek features the powerful women speakers--Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, Harriet Stanton Blatch, Emma Goldman--who captured audiences atop the soapboxes of Union Square.

This series pairs a wonderful roster of scholars to co-lead tours with AJHS ED Annie Polland.

The Soapbox Walks Series has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.

Ticket Info: $20 general; $15 AJHS/CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at soapboxwalks.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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walking tour

Sun, Sep 22
11:00AM
Sun, Sep 22
11:00AM

walking tour

Jews on the Upper East Side Walking Tour

Jews have been a presence on the Upper East Side (UES) since the Gilded Age of the late 19th century, when the Guggenheims, Schiffs, and Warburgs built urban mansions along the “Gold Coast” of 5th Avenue. Set against the rich array of architecture, galleries, museums, and parks that distinguish the UES, this tour will explore the history of the neighborhood’s Jewry, discussing patterns of settlement, prominent Jewish residents, and Jewish contributions to commerce and art. Visits to active synagogues, including the Manhattan Sephardic Congregation and Temple Emanu-El, will offer insights into the historic and continued diversity of Jewish life in the neighborhood.

About the Tour Guide: Barry Feldman is a licensed New York City tour guide and a senior docent and educator in residence at the Museum on Eldridge Street. While Barry lives on the UES, his interest in urban history, architecture, and Jewish ethnography take him to all neighborhoods of the city

Location and other details: This tour will begin at the Manhattan Sephardic Congregation (325 East 75th Street). Please plan to arrive at 10:45 AM to check in. We will not wait more than a few minutes for late arrivals. This tour will take place rain or shine. Please dress modestly and bring water, hat/sunglasses, and sunscreen.  Note: Some tour stops are not wheelchair accessible.

Ticket Info: $20 general; $15 CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at ueswalkingtour.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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walking tour

Sun, Sep 22
01:00PM
Sun, Sep 22
01:00PM

commemoration

Nusakh Vilne Memorial

Join us for our annual event commemorating the Jewish community of Vilna through poetry, music, and presentation including readings and performances by Rivka Augenfeld, Michael Fox, Ellen Perecman, Ruth Baran-Gerold, and Mikhl Baran. Chaired by Elliot Palevsky, the program will include a presentation on YIVO’s forthcoming YIVO Bruce and Francesca Cernia Slovin Online Museum by YIVO’s Executive Director Jonathan Brent and the museum's Chief Curator, Karolina Ziulkoski. The presentation will showcase material from YIVO’s Edward Blank YIVO Vilna Online Collections project, including newly discovered material and the story of Bebe Epstein.

A reception will follow the presentations.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations at yivo.org/NusakhVilne2019 or 917-606-8290


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commemoration

Mon, Sep 23
07:00PM
Mon, Sep 23
07:00PM

book talk

Anneliese Landau’s Life in Music: Nazi Germany to Émigré California, with Dr. Lily E. Hirsch

The subject of her new book, Lily E. Hirsch introduces us to a woman who truly persisted. Anneliese Landau pushed past bias to earn a PhD in musicology in 1930. She then lectured on early German radio, breaking new ground in a developing medium. After the Nazis forced the firing of all Jews in broadcasting in early 1933, Landau worked in the Berlin Jewish Culture League (Jüdischer Kulturbund), a closed cultural organization created by and for Jews in negotiation with Hitler's regime. Although Rabbi Leo Baeck tried to help Landau’s parents leave Germany, in 1939, she would emigrate alone, the fate of her family members tied separately to the Kindertransport and to the Terezín concentration camp.

Landau settled in Los Angeles, assuming duties as music director of the Jewish Centers Association in 1944. In this role and those that came before, she knew and worked with many significant historical figures, among them Arnold Schoenberg, Bruno Walter, and Leo Baeck.

Anneliese Landau's Life in Music offers fresh perspective on the Nazi period in Germany as well as on music in southern California, impacted as it was by the many notable émigrés from German-speaking lands who settled in the area. Landau's story is ultimately one of stubborn survival: an account of one woman's confrontation with other people's expectations of her, as a woman and a Jew.

Ticket Info: Free; RSVP at jewishmusicforum.org or 800-838-3006


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book talk

Wed, Sep 25
07:00PM
Wed, Sep 25
07:00PM

concert

A Tribute to Oded Halahmy and the Music of Babylon

Elad Kabilio and MusicTalks offer a vibrant musical tribute to the work and spirit of artist Oded Halahmy, celebrating the launch of a catalogue of YUM’s Hey, Wow! exhibition.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 YUM/ASF members & YU students, faculty, staff at odedconcert.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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concert

Thu, Sep 26
07:30PM
Thu, Sep 26
07:30PM

concert

All in the Family: Songs and Trios by the Schumanns and the Mendelssohns

Robert Schumann: selection of songs from Dichterliebe (A Poet’s Love)
Clara Schumann: Piano Trio in G Minor, Op.17
Fanny Mendelssohn: selection of songs (TBD)
Felix Mendelssohn: Piano Trio in D Minor, Op.49 
Performed by the Phoenix Chamber Ensemble: Anna Elashvili-violin, Andrew Janns-cello, Pavel Sulyandziga-tenor, Vassa Shevel-piano, Inessa Zaretsky-piano

Made possible by Stravinsky Institute Foundation through the generous support of Blavatnik Family Foundation.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $12 seniors; $10 CJH/Partner members, students at allinthefamily.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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concert

Wed, Oct 02
06:30PM
Wed, Oct 02
06:30PM

exhibit opening

The Art of Exile: Paintings by German-Jewish Refugees

Opening celebration for this exhibition that tells the personal stories of artists uprooted from their homelands, whose work is linked by a sense of loss and displacement.

Ticket Info: Free; reservations at art-exile.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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exhibit opening

Sun, Oct 06
10:30AM
Sun, Oct 06
10:30AM

walking tour

Soapbox Walks: Overlooked Landmarks

This installment, featuring professor of historic preservation Andrew Dolkart, explores the architecture and development of the surrounding neighborhood.

This series pairs a wonderful roster of scholars to co-lead tours with AJHS ED Annie Polland.

The Soapbox Walks Series has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.

Ticket Info: $20 general; $15 AJHS/CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at soapboxwalks.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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walking tour

Thu, Oct 17
06:30PM
Thu, Oct 17
06:30PM

film and discussion

Joseph Pulitzer: Voice of the People

Join AJHS for a film screening followed by a conversation with Director Oren Rudavsky about the fascinating life, accomplishments, and legacy of Joseph Pulitzer.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $12 CJH/Partner members, seniors, students; $20 at the door at bpt.me/4309891 or 800-838-3006


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film and discussion

Sun, Oct 20
10:30AM
Sun, Oct 20
10:30AM

walking tour

Soapbox Walks: Jewish Radicals

Tony Michels traces how the Yiddish socialist movement influenced NY politics and culture. Co-sponsored by Jewish Currents.

This series pairs a wonderful roster of scholars to co-lead tours with AJHS ED Annie Polland.

The Soapbox Walks Series has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.

Ticket Info: $20 general; $15 AJHS/CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at soapboxwalks.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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walking tour

Sun, Oct 27
10:30AM
Sun, Oct 27
10:30AM

workshop

Prose & Pose: Soapbox Yoga

Young families will work together to connect past and present through poses inspired by the stories of Emma Lazarus and the soapbox speakers of Union Square.

Ticket Info: $10 per family at bpt.me/4309884 or 800-838-3006


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workshop

Sun, Oct 27
02:00PM
Sun, Oct 27
02:00PM

lecture

The Wedding Photo: Genealogy Comes Alive!

Contrary to dusty first impressions, genealogy can be an adventure. In Dan Oren's book, The Wedding Photo, a visit to an abandoned Polish Jewish cemetery in 1993 launches a 20-year search to solve the mystery of "Who is Buried in Sarah's Tomb?" A visit with a cousin unearths a breathtaking photo of a Berlin family wedding from 1926 and leads to discovering their unimaginable post-wedding history. An archivist in Prague discovers a secret uncle whose life takes the reader from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to the Vatican in Rome. A memoir by Philip Roth shocks a daughter into unlocking a father's concealed past. In this talk, Dr. Oren will share his genealogical research strategies.

Born and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Dan A. Oren, M.D. has worked for thirty years as a psychiatrist and faculty member at Yale Universtiy, the US National Institute of Mental Health, and the Univesity of Rzeszow, Poland. The author of Joining the Club: A History of Jews and Yale, he is the founder and president of the Friends of Jewish Heritage in Poland.

Ticket Info: $5 general at weddingphoto.bpt.me or 800-838-3006; free for CJH/JGS members (tickets not required)


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lecture

Sun, Oct 27
05:00PM
Sun, Oct 27
05:00PM

book talk

Tehran Children: A Holocaust Refugee Odyssey

Mikhal Dekel’s new booktracks the fates of those Polish Jews who during WWII were "saved by deportation.” It follows them alongside other Polish nationals from their Polish hometowns, into the Soviet interior, Central Asia, Iran, India and Mandatory Palestine, exploring the context in which they found themselves in each locale. Dekel travels these paths of escape, refuge, exile and new home, probing archives and people — from Polish nationalists to Russian oligarchs to Korean Uzbeks — and painting a dynamic, situational history of Jews and Catholics, refugees and evacuees, natives and newcomers, empires and nations, the millions and the one — her father — a former child refugee. Part memoir, part archival history, part travelogue, written over more than a decade from the perspective of a daughter-scholar-Israeli-New Yorker, Tehran Children is also a history of the present: of ways in which complex pasts have been obliterated from but nonetheless have bled into present day Poland, Russia, Uzbekistan, Iran and Israel, of the limited frameworks at our disposal for understanding these pasts and of the possibility of expansion. Dekel will discuss the book’s major themes with Dr. Natalia Aleksiun (Touro College).

Ticket Info: $10 general; $7 seniors; $5 CJH/Partner members; free for students at tehranchildren.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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book talk

Mon, Oct 28
07:00PM
Mon, Oct 28
07:00PM

film

Who Will Write Our History

With a wealth of archival footage and detailed re-enactments, this film recounts the incredible story of Emanuel Ringelblum, who secretly led a team of writers and intellectuals to preserve a vibrant Jewish culture in the Warsaw Ghetto shortly after the Nazis took over. What resulted was a startlingly deep and diverse portrait of European Jewish life, as the Oyneg Shabes Archive made an invaluable contribution to the historical record. Based on the book by Samuel Kassow. An Abramorama release.

96 minutes. In English, Yiddish, and Polish with English subtitles.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 YIVO members, students at yivo.org/WWWOH-Screening or 917-606-8290


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film

Tue, Oct 29
06:30PM
Tue, Oct 29
06:30PM

family history today

DNA and the Golden Rule – The Law and Ethics of Genetic Genealogy

Whose permission is needed to test a child or an adult unable to consent? Who owns our DNA? What can we disclose about a cousin who has tested? The rules of the road for the ethical challenges facing genealogists interested in using DNA evidence as part of their family history research. Learn how applying the Golden Rule can guide us through many if not most of the situations in which we as genetic genealogists find ourselves.

About the Speaker: The Legal Genealogist Judy G. Russell is a genealogist with a law degree who writes and lectures on topics ranging from using court records in family history to understanding DNA testing. On the faculty of numerous genealogy institutes, she is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Board for Certification of Genealogists, from which she holds credentials as a Certified Genealogist® and Certified Genealogical Lecturer?. Her award-winning blog is at http://www.legalgenealogist.com.

An ASL interpreter may be made available if requested in advance.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at geneticgenealogy.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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family history today

Wed, Oct 30
07:30PM
Wed, Oct 30
07:30PM

concert

The Places of Israel – in Song

Elad Kabilio and the MusicTalks ensemble embark on a musical journey across Israel’s diverse sites with a concert of music inspired by the landscapes of Israel.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $10 YUM members & YU students, faculty, staff at musictalksplaces.bpt.me or 800-838-3006


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Presented by:

concert